American Catskills: Blog https://www.americancatskills.com/blog en-us Copyright (C). All Rights Reserved. 2009-2024. Matthew Jarnich. [email protected] (American Catskills) Tue, 18 Jun 2024 12:31:00 GMT Tue, 18 Jun 2024 12:31:00 GMT https://www.americancatskills.com/img/s/v-12/u126062438-o922362058-50.jpg American Catskills: Blog https://www.americancatskills.com/blog 120 80 Hankins Stone Arch Bridge: A Photographic Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/6/hankins-stone-arch-bridge-a-photographic-study The historic Hankins Stone Arch Bridge is located along Route 94 in the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Upper Delaware River region. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. The hamlet of Hankins is located approximately 45 miles northwest from Port Jervis, New York, 19 miles southeast of Hancock, New York and 24 miles west from Liberty, New York.

 

Photograph of the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, located at the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Sullivan County region of the Catskills.Hankins Stone Arch BridgeThe charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, located at the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Sullivan County region of the Catskills.Over the Hankins Creek Stone Arch BridgeThe charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Settlement at Hankins

 

The Hankins area was first settled in 1780 by Isaac Simmons, who “soon after sold his right of possession to Joseph Brown. Brown sold to Aaron Pierce, who, in 1792, built a saw-mill and small grist-mill . . . About the year 1800, Jonas Lakin came to the place, and subsequently became the owner of a considerable tract of land. In 1821, Lakin sold his tract of land to Elizabeth Pierce, who, with her family, lived on it until about 1833, when she died. In 1834, John Hankins and Luther Appley bought the property, for which they paid $1,451. In 1835, Hankins bought an additional tract of Lucas Elmendorf, and in May, 1839, moved to Fremont with his family.” (Quinlan, James Eldridge. History of Sullivan County. p. 292.)

 

The Hankins area was considered a good location for farming, with soil well adapted to the production of grass and grain, and for lumbering, with “a great store of valuable timber in its forests.” The location allowed hardy raftsman to run their timber rafts down the Delaware River. It offered good mill sites on its streams and was home to plentiful bluestone quarries.

 

Hankins Stone Arch Bridge

 

By the early part of 1900s there was a need for a stretch of river road to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. Previously this connecting road had not been built due to the topography of the Hankins region and the presence of the Erie Railroad. The contract to construct a three-mile road with stone arch bridges over the Hankins Creek and the Basket Creek was given to John Inman. The road, the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, and the Basket Creek Stone Arch Bridge were constructed in 1905 at a cost of $150.

 

“Everyone thought Mr. Inman would go broke on that job, but he was an old quarry man and had sized up the rocky point he had to cut through and knew what he was doing. The greater part of the three miles, down past the McDowell farm, was easy grading as roads went in those days. Cutting through the rocks just above Hankins was the main problem, blasting between train times and keeping the track clear. Mr. Inman, it will be recalled, was an expert at blasting and had at the Basket some years previously shot a big rock out of a quarry on this hillside and knocked the end off a house down near McDuffie’s.

 

On the road job he picked out a block of stone the right distance above the railroad and shot it into the river, and they said they couldn’t find a stone the size of a hen’s egg on the railroad track when he had finished. He left the overhang above the block he shot out, and until Route 97 came along forty years later and widened the road, this place was always called “Hanging Rock.” When Mr. Inman made the cut there he hit a colony of wild bees in a crevice and took out a lot of honey. When the road was finished, the bees came back and stayed there in the deep crevice until Route 97 wrecked them permanently.” (LaValley, Leslie D. “John Inman. Basket Letters – A History of the Basket Brook.” The Hancock Herald. April 25, 1957.)

 

The Hankins Stone Arch Bridge is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. “The bridge consists of a single round arch springing from the banks of the rock creek. The arch is built of mortared and partially dressed voussoirs approximately two feet in depth. The spandrels and parapets rest directly upon the arch and are built of fieldstone. Cut, bluestone coping stones dress the top of the two parapet walls guarding the roadway. The roadway above the bridge is closed to traffic and largely unpaved. Although maintained for pedestrian use across the bridge, the former East Ridge Road remains only a trace south of the bridge. Wingwalls lining the creek banks downstream of the bridge were rebuilt in 1999 in order to stabilize the bridge and its erosion prone banks. The bridge and its immediate surroundings are currently maintained for passive recreation by Sullivan County and the Town of Fremont.” (National Register of Historic Places.)

 

With the completion of Route 97 connecting Port Jervis and Hancock in 1939, the Basket Creek Stone Arch Bridge was bypassed, and the Hankins to Long Eddy road began to see less traffic. The Hankins bridge remained in use, connecting Hankins with East Ridge Road (TR 26). The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973, when East Ridge Road was rerouted and the bridge was abandoned.

 

Through the efforts of local citizens, the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The bridge is now open to pedestrian traffic only. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “a rare and intact example of traditional stone arch bridge construction within the context of Upper Delaware River transportation resources.”

 

Photograph of the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, located at the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Sullivan County region of the Catskills.Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, Hankins, New YorkThe charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, located at the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Sullivan County region of the Catskills.The Work of John InmanThe charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, located at the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Sullivan County region of the Catskills.The Skills of a MasonThe charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Hankins Stone Arch Bridge, located at the hamlet of Hankins, New York in the Sullivan County region of the Catskills.Still StandingThe charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

John B. Inman

 

The Hankins Stone Arch Bridge was constructed by John B. Inman (1845-1907), a local mason, quarryman and carpenter. According to federal and state census records Inman was listed with a range of occupations over the years, including carpenter (1870), farmer (1875, 1880), mill proprietor (1900) and lumberman (1905).

 

In the 1870s Inman and his family lived in Rock Valley and in 1877 Inman served as the trustee for the local district school. At this time Inman was employed as a wood worker. In the 1880s Inman was “running the old McDuffie sawmill,” and later went into the quarry business, leasing the “Shooting Rock” quarry from Horace McKoon on the hill west of the lower Basket. By the late 1890s Inman “lived in the Lathrop house and opened a quarry near the falls, and around 1900, he moved back to Rock Valley in what was always known as the John Inman house after the Lobdell estate sold it.”

 

Inman constructed a second stone arch bridge along the road from Hankins to Long Eddy, this one over the Basket Creek. The Basket Creek Stone Arch Bridge was also constructed in 1905. The Basket bridge was put to good use for several decades, “battered by floods, rammed by skidding cars and trucks . . . through the years, all the wood, stone and chemical products of the Basket valleys and hills were hauled over this bridge to the stone dock, or McKoon’s dock, as it was sometimes called.” The Basket Creek Stone Arch Bridge was destroyed around 1942 after a big flood, with most of the stones being washed down into the river.

 

Inman also constructed the classic, one-story, wood frame Rock Valley School, located in an area known as the Upper Basket in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, Delaware County. The school was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. In 1953 the school building was deeded to the Rock Valley Cemetery Association, which has maintained the school ever since. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

John Inman died suddenly at Rock Valley, New York at 61 years of age on February 2, 1907. Funeral services were held at the Rock Valley Church, with Reverend Regnal officiating. He was survived by his widow Margaret (Garrison) Inman; four sons, Clarence, James, John and Frank; and one daughter, Mrs. Bloom.

 

John Hankins

 

The historic Hankins Stone Arch Bridge and the creek it spans are named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. As part of his business, he rafted large amounts of lumber down the Delaware River. Hankins later served as a Justice of Peace and then Supervisor of the town of Callicoon from 1844 to 1847. In 1851 the Erie Railroad named the local stop as Hankins Station. Hankins was a descendant of a soldier who served under General George Washington in the American Revolution, and was notably with the Continental Army when they crossed the Delaware.

 

John Hankins constructed the Hankins District No. 1 Schoolhouse in 1845. The school is located on County Highway 132, which continues downhill toward the commercial center of the hamlet, Route 97, the railroad tracks and the river. “He [Hankins] built the schoolhouse for the community and later donated the land and building to be used as a church for all denominations. After the local religious groups built their own churches, it continued to be used as a school. A new school was later built and this schoolhouse became the Hankins Fire House. The Fire Department has recently sold the building to a private owner with the stipulation that the bell shall remain with the building.” The school building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

John Hankins was born on September 2, 1803, the son of Ralph Hankins (1776-1863) and Mary (Dougherty) Hankins. He was born and raised in Pike County, Pennsylvania. James Eldridge Quinlan in his History of Sullivan County wrote in detail of John Hankins and the hamlet named for him. “Previous to 1839, Mr. Hankins had resided in the town of Damascus, in the State of Pennsylvania, where he married Susan, a daughter of Moses Thomas, 3d. Then he removed to Fremont, he passed over the “State-road,” on the west side of the river. The New York and Erie Railroad Company had accomplished considerable in grading their road; but had suspended work in 1837. Mr. Hankins attempted to make a highway of their track, but after rendering about three miles passable, gave up the job.

 

For several years ingress and egress were difficult. To attend town-meeting and vote at the fall-elections, he was obliged to follow a line of marked trees to Liberty, or travel over the State-road to the bridge at Cochecton, and from thence to Liberty by the way of Bethel. Sometimes, however, when the water was low, he followed the beach of the river on horseback as far as Cochecton. As the ford near his residence was occasionally impracticable, he built a scow, and crossed the river in it; but when there was a flood, it was not safe to cross in any manner, and he was practically cut off from the outside world.

 

It was been represented that John Hankins was the pioneer setter at Hankins Depot;* [See French’s Gazetteer] yet, when he came, he found on his place an old frame-house, a saw-mill, and land which had been occupied and tilled many years. He also found a sycamore tree which was nine feet in diameter. The latter was hollow, and the cavity was larger than some bed-rooms. It is said that a man could ride into it astride of a horse. Until about 1865, this tree was used as a substitute for a smoke-house.

 

Mr. Hankins was a man of action. Exclusive of those who lived in Pennsylvania, his only neighbors were at Long Eddy and Long pond; yet during the first year of his residence, he started a store and built a blacksmith-shop. He also built a handsome residence for his family, and in 1847, the second saw-mill erected on his land. He also became prominent as a local politician, and, notwithstanding his isolated position, was one of the first Justices of the Peace, and the second Supervisor of the town of Callicoon. He was elected to the latter office repeatedly, and at one time, in conjunction with Matthew Brown, controlled the Board of Supervisors.

 

Mr. Hankins did not live until the railroad was completed as far as Hankins creek. He was a man of forcible and energetic character – a warm friend and an ardent enemy – exalted in prosperity and depressed when his surroundings were unfavorable. In the summer of 1847, he suffered from a variety of small annoyances, and on the 17th of September was found dead on the road to Callicoon, about a quarter mile from his house, under circumstances which led to the belief that his life was cut short by his own hand.” (Quinlan, James Eldridge. History of Sullivan County. pp. 292-293.)

 

After Hankins’ death on September 17, 1847, rumors started that he had been shot and murdered by a contractor and engineer from the railroad. However, this proved false, as a coroner’s jury was organized, and they “spent all the afternoon and evening in a thorough and careful examination of the facts in relation to his death.” After the investigation, the jury offered their own findings. “The jury unanimously rendered a verdict that he [Hankins] killed himself by cutting his throat on the right side, having severed a jugular vein and an artery, it is supposed with a razor. There does not appear to have been any particular cause for his committing the rash deed, but a variety of small causes which had a tendency to render him unhappy, and which prompted him to suddenly commit the rash act. It is thought the resolution to do it had not long been taken before it was put in execution. He was found about one-fourth of a mile up the road leading from his house to the Callicoon Settlement. He committed the act in the afternoon of Friday. The finding of the jury was perfectly satisfactory to the family.” (“Suicide of John Hankins.” Republican Watchman. September 21, 1847.)

 

Although it is unclear if it is related to his passing, beginning in February 1847 Hankins advertised weekly in the local newspaper that much of his property was for sale. There does not seem to have been much interest in the property as the advertisements continued throughout the year. Even if the sale of his home and property was unrelated to his suicide, the advertisements still provide great insight to his land and possessions.

 

“Highly interesting to lumbermen, tanners, farmers, & c. A RARE OPPORTUNITY! 1173 Acres of Valuable Land For Sale! Situated in the Hardenbergh patent, great lot 2, in division 23, 24 and 25, containing about 1173 acres of land, with a good farm house well finished from cellar to garret, three small frame houses which are comfortable dwellings for small families, 2 saw mills, a grist mill, store house, a blacksmith shop with tools, a large frame barn, with a shed or cow house 64 b 24 ft., 16 ft. posts, all well finished, a good cider mill with screws, and three first rate orchards. On the lot, there is an abundance of timber – hemlock, maple, white ash, beech, birch, chestnut and some cherry. As a lumbering establishment it is one of the best of the kind in Sullivan County. The N. Y. & Erie Railroad will run through it, and 2 public roads lead to it, one from the town of Rockland and the other from Callicoon settlement. A railroad depot will probably be established on it, as it is 13 miles from Cochecton. It is well calculated for the tanning business, and has an abundance of water power. Any person wishing to purchase such a property will do well to call and examine for themselves. A liberal time for payment will be given. John Hankins, Callicoon, Feb. 18, 1847.” (Republican Watchman. March 16, 1847.)

 

John Hankins married Susan Thomas (1811-1885) on March 4, 1830 at her parents’ homestead, two miles south of Damascus, Pennsylvania. Susan was the daughter of Moses Thomas III (1777-1857) and Rebecca Thomas (1782-1841), and a granddaughter of Moses Thomas II, who was killed in 1779 during the American Revolution at the Battle of Minisink Ford. John and Susan had eight children together, including Lucas Wurtz (1831-1910), Mary (1833-1907), Rebecca Thomas (1835-1918), Angeline Elizabeth (1838-1903), Susan Abigail (1841-1917), John Ralph (1843-1905), William Thomas (1845-1847) and Samuel Howard (1848-1917).

 

After the death of her husband in 1947, Susan continued to raise her children at the village of Hankins. The Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania, published in 1900, offered many details about the children of John and Susan Hankins.

 

(1) Lucas W. . . . Owner and proprietor of a beautiful summer resort in Manchester township, Wayne County.

 

(2) Mary, born in Sullivan County, N.Y., in October, 1833, married Col. Zalman Main, of Sullivan County, N.Y., who during the Civil war raised a company in Indiana, and for bravery and valor on the field was promoted to the rank of colonel, having command of an Indiana regiment. He died in 1866, leaving a wife and one child, Florence E., who now resides in Binghamton, N.Y.

 

(3) Rebecca T., born in Sullivan County, N.Y., is a well-educated woman, was for a number of years a successfully teacher in the public schools, and is now a resident of Binghamton.

 

(4) Angie E., born in Damascus township, Wayne County, married Capt. C. A. Johnson, of the regular army, who died in 1894, at Washington, D. C., and she now makes her home at Binghamton.

 

(5) Susan A., born in Hankins, N. Y., in 1841, married David Bush, of California, born in Sullivan County, and they located in Susquehanna, Penn., where he was connected with the Adams Express Company for a number of years, or until his health failed. He died at his home in that place in 1889, leaving a wife, now a resident of Binghamton; one son, Edward, a civil engineer residing in Rome, N. Y., and one daughter, Jessie, who died at the age of sixteen years.

 

(6) John R., born in Hankins, was educated in the New York schools, and when a young man engaged in mercantile business at Little Equinunk, Wayne County. Subsequently he carried on business near Owego, N. Y., for a number of years, but now has charge of his brother’s wholesale tobacco trade, in Binghamton, where he makes his home. He married Emma Buckley, of Fremont Center, Sullivan County, N. Y., and had two daughters – Susan, now the wife of Dr. W. Leonard, of Tully, N. Y.; and Bertha, who died in childhood.

 

(7) Willie died when a child.

 

(8) Samuel H., born in Hankins, has a large wholesale tobacco establishment in Binghamton, and is one of the leading business men of that place. He married Lillian Wait, of Hollisterville, Wayne Co., Penn., and has two children, Walter and Winifred.” (Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Chicago: J.H. Beers & Co., 1900. pp. 466-467.)

 

Hankins and his wife Susan, along with two of their sons, John and William, are all buried at Overlook Cemetery at Damascus, Pennsylvania.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) arch architecture Basket Creek Stone Arch Bridge bridge Catskill Mountains Catskills creek Delaware River hamlet Hankins Hankins Creek Hankins Creek Stone Arch Bridge Hankins District No. 1 Schoolhouse Hankins Stone Arch Bridge John Hankins John Inman Long Eddy New York river road Rock Valley School Route 97 settlement stone arch Sullivan County village https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/6/hankins-stone-arch-bridge-a-photographic-study Sat, 15 Jun 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Ten Mile River Baptist Church at Tusten, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/6/ten-mile-river-baptist-church-at-tusten-new-york The historic Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, is located just off Route 97 in the Upper Delaware River Valley town of Tusten, New York. It is approximately five miles south of the village of Narrowsburg, New York. The church prominently stands on a wooded hill, east of the Ten Mile River, which flows approximately one-half mile south to its junction with the Delaware River. Downriver from the church, near the mouth of the Ten Mile River at its junction with the Delaware River, the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge also pays testament to the former village of Tusten, which was known as Ten Mile River Village on some historic maps. The church property encompasses approximately six acres of land, including the church building, the adjacent cemetery and several stone walls.

 

Photograph of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Ten Mile River Baptist ChurchThe Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, was organized in 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, first meeting in the homes of its congregants. The current church building was constructed in 1856. “The layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishing and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

 

Enoch Owen – Preaching the Word at Ten Mile River

 

As the village of Ten Mile River grew in the 1800s the Baptist faith reached the people of the village through the works of Elder Enoch Owen (1767-1836). Owen came to the village of Damascus, Pennsylvania about the year 1790, and settled above Cochecton. He married Lois Tyler (1772-1814), the daughter of Silas Tyler. By trade Owen worked as a local lumberman, farmer and mason. He “built the old-fashioned stone chimneys of the valley before brick and lime were seen there” and also constructed several miles of the Newburgh and Cochecton Turnpike.

 

In June of 1806 Enoch Owen was ordained as an Evangelist. Being of the Free Will Baptist faith, he preached every Sunday at a small Baptist meeting-house in Damascus, Pennsylvania, but also “held religious meetings in the Delaware river towns wherever there was a settlement.” He was the first missionary at Callicoon and “among the pioneer preachers of Cochecton,” and he occasionally visited the village of Ten Mile River. Owen was sometimes accompanied on his trips up and down the Delaware River valley by Deacon William Dunn, a member of Owen’s church. Where a church was not available, Owen would preach in people’s homes, in barns and sometimes at popular establishments such as the Raftman’s Hotel in the town of Tusten.

 

At Callicoon, “hearing that a few families were living here far from Christian privileges, he found his way to them through the woods in 1820, and preached to them. The three households received him gladly, and as a token of their satisfaction, presented him with a half-bushel of rye, which he carried home on his shoulders. It is said that he continued to preach at [Edward] Wood’s once a month; that to reach the settlement he followed blazed trees when the snow was deep and the thermometer below zero; and that he was paid fifteen dollars per annum for his services!” (Quinlan, James Eldridge. History of Sullivan County. p. 159.)

 

Elder Owen “was a man of but little education; but his mind and body and zeal were robust. It cannot be said that he was mercenary; for he received little or no compensation for his labors in his Master’s vineyard . . . He was always ready to visit the sick and afflicted, and to discourse at funerals on mortality and immortality – the ineffable and everlasting bliss of the redeemed, and the fearful fate of the doomed. His unpretending and homely discourses impressed Christian morality upon many souls of this neglected region . . . In his old age he joined the Close Communion Baptists. He was an honest old soul, whose good deeds and good name survived his mortal body, and are yet held in grateful remembrance.” (Quinlan, James Eldridge. History of Sullivan County. pp. 217-218.) Enoch Owen passed away on November 14, 1836 and is buried at Overlook Cemetery in Damascus, Pennsylvania.

 

Founding of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church

 

The official congregation of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church was organized in the spring of 1840 by local citizens, including E. Tyler, A. F. Bush and Thompson Parsons. The group commenced holding prayer meetings, with the first meetings taking place in the homes of its congregants. Soon after founding of the congregation, Reverend Henry Curtis, of the Damascus society, was invited to preach and to aid in conducting the church meetings.

 

In the early days of the church, “the Word preached was attended with convincing and converting power, leading Christians to pray and labor, and sinners to cry “men and brethren what shall we do to be saved?” Soon a number of the anxious were indulging hope in an all-sufficient Savior. The meetings were continued with increasing interest and power. The subject of believers’ baptism and church membership now began to claim attention and elicit discussion. As usual, candid inquiry resulted in a sense of obligation to make a public profession of Christ by baptism, and become identified with his people. A number of persons manifested a desire to unite with a Baptist church.

 

This desire being made known to the Damascus Church, situated some fourteen miles above, on the Delaware River, a special meeting was appointed by that church and held at Ten Mile River, to hear experiences and receive candidates for baptism and membership. A number of the converts presenting themselves at this meeting, were cordially received and baptized on a profession of faith, by Mr. Curtis, and became a branch of Damascus Church.” (Bailey, Edward L. History of the Abington Baptist Association, From 1807 to 1857. pp. 185-188.)  

 

Given its lengthy distance from the Damascus church, the Ten Mile River congregation soon requested “letters of dismission” in order to organize themselves as an independent body. The Ten Mile River Church was officially established through a council of recognition on August 18, 1840. At the time of its organization the congregation consisted of 29 people, including 16 males and 13 females. The first dedicated pastor of the church was Rev. Daniel F. Leach (1840-1845), who was then followed by Rev. James P. Stalbird (1845-1848), Rev. M. M. Everet (1848-1852) and Rev. J. R. Ross (1852-1854). In October 1840 William Hawks and Tobias Fox were chosen Deacons of the church and were ordained into that office the following year. Services continued at the church for circa 80 years until around 1920.

 

Photograph of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Ten Mile River Baptist Church, 1856The Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, was organized in 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, first meeting in the homes of its congregants. The current church building was constructed in 1856. “The layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishing and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

 

The Church Building and Cemetery

 

Sixteen years after the congregation’s founding, the church building was constructed in 1856 at a cost of $1,500. Although there is little evidence, several newspaper articles from around the time the church was being restored in 1969 have noted that “according to tradition, this church replaced a still older one.” (“Resort Tusten Church – Service Sunday.” The Evening News. August 21, 1969.) The church had seating available for 200 people. The “layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishings and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” (National Register of Historic Places.)

 

The Ten Mile River Baptist Church has also been known as the Tusten Baptist Church. However, not all local residents appreciated the alternative name. In 1894, a local newspaper noted that “some are mistaken by calling this church the Tusten church. It always has been the Ten Mile River Baptist church and it is hoped it always will be.” (Tri-States Union. October 11, 1894.)

 

The cemetery adjacent to the church was opened in 1840 or earlier. The cemetery, enclosed by stone walls on the east and south sides, contains approximately 100 burials. William H. Hankins (1846-1922), builder of the nearby Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, is buried here. William Hawks (1813-1906), reported to be “the last constituent member of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church,” passed away “on the old homestead” in September 1906 and is buried at the church “beside those of his family, who have passed on before.” Hawks had been chosen to be a Deacon at the church in the year of its founding in 1840.

 

The church was largely unused for over 50 years from 1920 to 1969, but continued to receive basic maintenance. In 1969, the Tusten Settlement Association was established in order to restore and maintain the church and the adjacent cemetery, and over 50 years later they continue with that notable historic mission. After the church’s restoration was completed in August 1969, a community service was held for the first time in nearly five decades. The services were attended by nearly 150 people, with the sermon being given by Reverend Robert L. Kohler, Jr., the senior chaplain at the nearby Ten Mile River Boy Scout Camp.

 

Today, the church continues to serve the Tusten area, and is made available for special services, including Memorial Day and Veterans Day observances. In 1995 the church belfry and spire were reconstructed through the analysis of historic photographs. The church building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997 “for its historical significance in representing the lost nineteenth century river community of Tusten.”

 

Photograph of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Ten Mile River Baptist Church, Tusten, New YorkThe Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, was organized in 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, first meeting in the homes of its congregants. The current church building was constructed in 1856. “The layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishing and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Photograph of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Ten Mile River Baptist Church, Tusten, NYThe Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, was organized in 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, first meeting in the homes of its congregants. The current church building was constructed in 1856. “The layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishing and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Photograph of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Point to GodThe Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, was organized in 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, first meeting in the homes of its congregants. The current church building was constructed in 1856. “The layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishing and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Photograph of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.FatherThe Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, was organized in 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, first meeting in the homes of its congregants. The current church building was constructed in 1856. “The layout and construction of this building was typical of smaller Protestant meetinghouses of the period and illustrated simple, but finely crafted furnishing and joinery. The rectangular lines of the building, and use of period moldings and trim profiles imbue the vernacular church with some of the characteristics of the Greek Revival style, popular in the Delaware Valley between 1840 and 1860.” The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

 

Reverend Daniel Fowler Leach

 

Reverend Daniel Fowler Leach (1817-1889), the first pastor at the church, was born at Corbettsville, New York on June 27, 1817. He was a direct descendent of Lawrence Leach who arrived at Salem, Massachusetts in 1629. Daniel’s father, Major Daniel Leach (1777-1831) was a lumberman and farmer, served as a Justice of the Peace, and served as a Major in the New York State Militia. Daniel’s grandfather, Captain Hezekiah Leach (d. 1823) served during the American Revolution as a private in the Connecticut Line of the Revolutionary Army.

 

Daniel felt the call of the ministry early in life, and was baptized at the age of 15. In 1838 he was attending the Hamilton Literary and Theological Institution, and in 1840 he began preaching in Pennsylvania at Bethany, Damascus and Jackson Summit. At Pennsylvania, “revivals soon broke out under his labors, and he became, without any preconceived purpose, by force of circumstances, an itinerant evangelist along the Lackawaxen and Delaware Rivers. Long walks, often on mere footpaths, and sometimes with no path, became necessary. He was ordained at Ten Mile River, N.Y., September 10, 1840.” (Brooks, Charles Wesley. A Century of Missions in the Empire State. pp. 174-175)

 

Reverend Leach remained as pastor of the Ten Mile River Baptist Church for four years until 1845, during which time “he performed missionary labors. . . preaching six times a week; only one other Baptist minister within forty miles.” Reverend Leach divided his time between Ten Mile River and the Paupack Eddy Church (now Hawley, Pennsylvania). The Ten Mile River Baptist church grew to a membership of 43 in 1841 and t0 46 in 1842. Reverend Leach was married to Levantia Guy on May 11, 1841 at Middlefield, New York. Daniel and Levontia had six children together.

 

After his time at Ten Mile River, Reverend Leach went on to serve in a number of locations, including Port Jervis, New York for five years from 1845 to 1850; followed by time at Colesville, New York; Unadilla, New York; Newark Valley, New York; and the state of Virginia. Reverend Daniel Fowler Leach passed away at Virginia on September 10, 1889. Upon his passing it was written that “few men in the State ever gave a half-century of more self-sacrificing, disinterested service to the cause of Christ than did the dear brother whose life-work is here so briefly and imperfectly sketched. The half has not been told of his efficiency and consecration, even in outline. A multitude of souls won to Christ was waiting to welcome him on the other shore, and throngs will be welcomed by him, whom he had led to the Savior’s feet.” (Brooks, Charles Wesley. A Century of Missions in the Empire State. pp. 176-177.)

 

Reverend James Perkins Stalbird

 

Reverend James P. Stalbird (1813-1900), the second pastor at the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, was born in Canada in 1813. That same year he moved with his family to New Hampshire, where he spent most of his time until 1837, when he then came to Pennsylvania.

 

Reverend Stalbird was licensed to preach the gospel at the Blakely Baptist Church in 1843, and in 1845 he was ordained at the Ten Mile River Baptist Church. He remained at Ten Mile River for three years until 1848. During his time at Ten Mile River church membership including 40 people in 1846, and “congregations had been comparatively large and covenant meetings quite interesting. Three weekly prayer meetings had been sustained by a few as in former years. The Sabbath School, however, had been somewhat neglected. In 1847, the church was measurably revived and the cause strengthened. They report to the Association of that year, 11 received by baptism and 51 as their total membership.” (Bailey, Edward L. History of the Abington Baptist Association, From 1807 to 1857. p. 187.)

 

In 1854 Reverend Stalbird returned to the Ten Mile River Baptist Church. During his second tenancy, “little has occurred during his ministry worthy of particular notice. The church report in 1856, two received by baptism, and 53 as their total membership, but complain of their scattered condition and want of activity and earnestness in the cause of the Master. In 1857, they report 50 communicants, and say that they cannot tell of prosperity and progress in the service of Christ. They, however, still cling to the Word and promise of God, and hope for brighter and better days.” (Bailey, Edward L. History of the Abington Baptist Association, From 1807 to 1857. p. 188.)

 

After leaving Ten Mile River, Reverend Stalbird served a number of churches, including those at Ashland, Berlin, Hawley, Purdytown, Lebanon, Lackawaxen and Barryville, as well as many mission churches. He often traveled 20 miles a day, and preached three times on Sunday.

 

In the fall of 1868 Reverend Stalbird sold his house at Beaver Brook, New York and settled on a farm at Freytown, Pennsylvania. He remained there on the farm for nearly thirty years until the fall of 1897, when he moved to Moosic, Pennsylvania to live with his son.

 

Reverend James Perkins Stalbird passed away at 87 years of age on November 6, 1900 at the home of his son Howell G. Stalbird in Moosic, Pennsylvania. His passing was caused by a fall a few days prior, from which he received a broken hip and suffered internal injuries. Funeral services were conducted by Reverend H. F. Hardell, of Daleville, Pennsylvania. Reverend Stalbird is buried at Freytown Cemetery in Pennsylvania. Upon his passing it was written that “he was a kind husband and father, and much respected wherever he lived.”

 

Reverend M. M. Everet

 

Reverend M. M. Everet, the third pastor at the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, took charge of the church in 1848 and remained for four years until 1852. During this period, Reverend Everet divided his time between Ten Mile River and Paupack Eddy, Pennsylvania (now Hawley, Pennsylvania). In 1852 he resigned from the church and the Baptist association.

 

During his time at Ten Mile River, “under his faithful labors, the church enjoyed a degree of prosperity and received some accessions by baptism. Two were baptized in 1848, the same number in the following year, and one in 1850. In 1852, the church report four received by baptism and 64 as their total membership – the culminating point in their numerical prosperity – and say in their letter to the Association, which met with them that year, that they are grateful for the mercies of the past year; had tokens of a deep and solemn work of grace, but the enemy of all righteousness, by weakening the faith of the brethren, disappointed their hopes. A few, however, were hopefully converted.” (Bailey, Edward L. History of the Abington Baptist Association, From 1807 to 1857. pp. 187-188.)

 

Reverend J. R. Ross

 

Reverend J. R. Ross, the fourth pastor at the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, accepted the invitation of the church to be the pastor while teaching at an academy in Narrowsburg. Reverend Ross took charge of the church in the autumn of 1852 and remained until May of 1854, when he resigned from the church and the Baptist association. During his time at Ten Mile River “his labors were faithful, but without any marked results.” Reverend Ross was followed as pastor by the return of Reverend James P. Stalbird.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) 1856 architecture building Catskill Mountains Catskills church D. F. Leach Daniel Fowler Leach Delaware River Henry Curtis J. R. Ross James P. Stalbird M. M. Everet New York pastor reverend Route 97 Sullivan County Ten Mile River Ten Mile River Baptist Church Tusten Tusten Baptist Church Tusten Settlement Association village William H. Hankins William Hawks https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/6/ten-mile-river-baptist-church-at-tusten-new-york Sat, 08 Jun 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Tusten Stone Arch Bridge: A Photographic Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/6/tusten-stone-arch-bridge-a-photographic-study The Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was designed and constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. The two-arch bridge, constructed of native bluestone, is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide.

 

The stone arch bridge was located at the heart of the former village of Tusten, adjacent to a mill located on the west bank of the Ten Mile River. It is believed that the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge replaced an earlier, less permanent timber structure. Tusten was sometimes referred to as Ten Mile River Village on historic maps.

 

Photograph of the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Tusten Stone Arch BridgeThe Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide and continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic.

The bridge is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten, “an American militia volunteer and physician, who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779 less than ten mile to the south of this settlement.”

The bridge and the surrounding land has been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, NYThe Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide and continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic.

The bridge is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten, “an American militia volunteer and physician, who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779 less than ten mile to the south of this settlement.”

The bridge and the surrounding land has been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Standing the Test of Time: The Tusten Ston Arch BridgeThe Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide and continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic.

The bridge is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten, “an American militia volunteer and physician, who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779 less than ten mile to the south of this settlement.”

The bridge and the surrounding land has been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The first settlement on the Delaware River at the mouth of the Ten Mile River originated in the 1750s, about the year 1757, under the authority of the Connecticut-based Delaware Company. A sawmill was established at the site by Elijah Reeves before 1762. In October 1763, the settlement was wiped out during an Indian raid led by Captain Bull, the son of an elderly sachem named Teedyuscung. All 22 settlers were killed in the raid known as the Ten Mile River Massacre. “Not a person escaped. The houses, barns, etc. were burned, and everything valuable was destroyed, except the bare fields.” (Quinlan, 106.) Following the American Revolution, the community was re-established at the same location.

 

As the village of Tusten grew, a post office was established there in 1838, and operated intermittently until 1913. From 1838 to 1842, the post office operated under the name Ten Mile River, and was staffed by Samuel Hankins, the father of William H. Hankins. From 1849 to 1863, the post office operated under the name Delaware Bridge, and was operated at various times by Paul A. Tyler, Sylvester Mapes and William Hawks. From 1884 to 1913, the post office operated with the name Tusten. When the Tusten post office was not in service, residents would cross the Delaware River to pick up their mail at Mast Hope, Pennsylvania.

 

In addition to the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, the Ten Mile River Baptist Church, also known as the Tusten Baptist Church, also still stands in remembrance of the former village of Tusten. The church is prominently located on a wooded hill north of the bridge and east of the Ten Mile River, and just off Route 97. The congregation was organized in the spring of 1840 by Reverend Henry Curtis, of the Damascus society, with the first meetings taking place in the homes of its congregants. The church was officially organized through the council of recognition on August 18, 1840. Sixteen years after the church’s founding, the church building was constructed in 1856 at a cost of $1,500. The first dedicated pastor of the church was Rev. Daniel F. Leach (1840-1845), who was then followed by Rev. James P. Stalbird (1845-1848), Rev. M. M. Everet (1848-1852) and Rev. J. R. Ross (1852-1854). Services continued at the church until around 1920. The church building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997 “for its historical significance in representing the lost nineteenth century river community of Tusten.”

 

During the 1870s the village of Tusten was home to a sawmill, a gristmill, a blacksmith shop, a store, a church with an adjacent parsonage, a schoolhouse, a cable ferry across the Delaware River to Mast Hope, Pennsylvania, a “flag stop” railroad station on the Erie Railroad and a number of homes. In addition to Hankins, the names of other families that lived in the area in 1875 included W. Davis, J. Crawford, W. Robinson, H. Bross, W. D. Bross, W. Hawks and J. H. Barlow.

 

Tusten’s fortunes began to fade with the decline of the area’s leading industries such as rafting, lumbering and bluestone quarrying. In 1911, in an effort to revive the town, the Minisink Company, of New York City, sought to create “a nicely laid out community” at Tusten, and then sell the lots to city people who wanted to have a summer home along the Delaware River. The 4,000-acre community, set along two miles of river frontage on the Delaware River, would be complete with new roads, water works, electric lights and over 325 building lots for new homes. The lands around Davis Lake were to be sold as a single parcel for a club or hotel. However, these well-intentioned plans never materialized, and by the 1920s the company had dissolved. Most of Tusten’s remaining buildings were abandoned and left to deteriorate. All that now remains of the once thriving village of Tusten is the stone arch bridge and the Ten Mile River Baptist Church.

 

The bridge and the surrounding land have been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic. The Tusten Stone Arch Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places “as a rare and intact example of traditional stone arch bridge construction within the context of Upper Delaware River transportation resources.”

 

Photograph of the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, Tusten, New YorkThe Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide and continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic.

The bridge is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten, “an American militia volunteer and physician, who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779 less than ten mile to the south of this settlement.”

The bridge and the surrounding land has been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, Tusten, NYThe Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide and continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic.

The bridge is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten, “an American militia volunteer and physician, who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779 less than ten mile to the south of this settlement.”

The bridge and the surrounding land has been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photograph of the Tusten Stone Arch Bridge, located at Tusten, New York in the southern Catskills.Ten Mile River at the Tusten Stone Arch BridgeThe Tusten Stone Arch Bridge was constructed in 1896 by William H. Hankins, a local timber raftsman, stone mason and occasional postmaster. The bridge crosses the Ten Mile River just northeast of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 52 feet long and 15 feet wide and continues to operate as a single lane vehicle bridge for local traffic.

The bridge is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten, “an American militia volunteer and physician, who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779 less than ten mile to the south of this settlement.”

The bridge and the surrounding land has been owned by the Boy Scouts of America since 1927 for their use an educational camp. Fortunately, through an agreement with the National Park Service, the bridge is publicly accessible along the beginning section of the 3-mile Tusten Mountain Trail, an interesting hike with outstanding Upper Delaware Valley scenery. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

William H. Hankins, the bridge builder, was born at Tusten, New York on March 12, 1846, the son of Samuel Hankins (1798-1877) and Catherine (Reeves) Hankins (1803-1882). Samuel Hankins was a farmer and a merchant, and served as postmaster from 1838 to 1842. The Hankins family were prominent members of the Tusten community, being associated with virtually every public office and business. William Hankins was “one of the last of the old Delaware River raftsmen who ran through the tidewater.” In 1883 it was reported that “many more rafts are offered to him every year than he can take under his charge.” In 1902, perhaps for old times’ sake, and for the first time in 15 years, Hankins started down the Delaware River from Narrowsburg, but noted that “he did not find many changes in the river.” In 1905, Hankins purchased a scow in order to accommodate those who wished to cross the Delaware River.

 

The William H. Hankins & Company worked three or four quarries in the region, employing approximately 30 men as quarrymen, stone cutters, teamsters and laborers. For a time, he was associated with Charles W. Martin and C. R. Underwood in the stone business. In the early 1900s, as the tourism business began to grow in the region, Hankins operated a boarding house.

 

Upon his passing, it was written that William H. Hankins “was devoted to his home and family and was held in high esteem in the community where he had always resided.” Hankins passed away at 76 years of age after a long illness on October 24, 1922 at Tusten. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend R. D. Minch, were held at Ten Mile River Baptist Church. Hankins is buried at Tusten Cemetery in Narrowsburg, New York.

 

The bridge, and the town of Tusten, New York, is named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Tusten (1743-1779), an American militia volunteer and physician who was killed as he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Minisink on July 22, 1779.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) arch Benjamin Tusten Boy Scouts of America bridge Catskill Mountains Catskills Delaware River Delaware Valley hamlet National Park Service National Register of Historic Places New York river road settlement stone stone arch Sullivan County Ten Mile River Ten Mile River Baptist Church Tusten Tusten Baptist Church Tusten Mountain Trail Tusten Stone Arch Bridge village William H. Hankins https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/6/tusten-stone-arch-bridge-a-photographic-study Sat, 01 Jun 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct: A Photographic Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/roebling-s-delaware-aqueduct-a-photographic-study Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1849 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

 

The Delaware Aqueduct operated for nearly 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

 

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

 

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.Roebling’s Delaware AqueductRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

 

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.Overlooking Roebling's Delaware AqueductRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.Across the RiverRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

 

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The Wayne County Herald issue of May 9, 1849 announced the opening of the aqueduct in an article titled “Del. & Hud. Canal Company.”

 

“The water was let into the Delaware and Hudson Canal on the 25th ult., and the navigation resumed for the season. The wire Suspension Aqueducts over the Delaware and Lackawaxen rivers, which were commenced in 1846, are now completed and opened for the passage of boats. These works have been erected for the purpose of avoiding the delay formerly experienced in crossing the Delaware river, and will materially improved the navigation. They are constructed on the plan of the Pittsburg Suspension Aqueduct; a structure designed and executed by Mr. John A. Roebling, civil Engineer of the city of Pittsburg, and which has proved eminently successful, and was the first of the kind in the world. After an examination of this work by Mr. R. F. Lord, Chief Engineer of the Del. & Hud. Canal Co., a contract was entered into with Mr. Roebling for the erection of the superstructure of the Delaware and Lackawaxen Aqueducts. The following description will convey a tolerably accurate idea of the extent and magnificence of this work.

 

The trunks are composed of timber and plank well joined and caulked, and suspended to two wire cables, one on each side. The Cables rest in heavy cast iron saddles, which are placed on top of small towers of 4 by 6 feet base, rising 4 feet above the towpath. There is a towpath on each side of the trunk, which is wide enough for two boats of the present capacity to pass. The towers are each composed of 3 blocks of a white quartz pudding-stone, of great hardness and durability, obtained from the quarries in Ulster Co., N.Y. The masonry of the piers and abutments, which support the little towers has been executed in the most substantial manner of a durable and compact gray-wacke, which constitutes the principal foundation of the valley of the upper Delaware. The beds of the face-stone are all cut, the backing is large and well bonded, and the whole laid in hydraulic cement. Nothing has been spared to ensure the safety of the foundations, and by the construction of good ice-breakers to guard the piers against the heavy ice floods, which in this river prove sometimes very violent and destructive.

 

The Cables are made in one length across the river from abutment to abutment, and connected at their ends with anchor chains, manufactured of solid wrought iron, in bars of from 5 ft. to 10 feet long, and 5 to 6 inches wide by 1 1/4 inch thick. The lower end of each chain is secured to a heavy cast iron anchor-plate of 6 feet square, which supports the foundation of a large body of masonry, whose weight resists the strain of the chain and cable. As the cables are protected against oxidation by a copious varnish and paint and closely encased by a tight wire wrapping, which gives them the appearance of solid cylinders, they may be considered indestructible.

 

The wood-work is subject to decay, however it will last longer in these works than in common timber structures, and can be renewed at any time.

 

The following table exhibits the principal dimensions and quantities of the Delaware Aqueduct:

 

  • Hydraulic cement masonry in abutments, piers and anchorage, 7,688 cubic yards.

 

  • Length of Aqueduct with extensions, 600 feet.

 

  • Number of Spans, 4.

 

  • Length of Span varies from 131 to 142 feet.

 

  • Width of Trunk at water line, 19 ft.

 

  • Depth of water, 6 ft. 6 inches.

 

  • Weight of water between abutments, 1,950 tons.

 

  • Weight of water in one span, 487 1/2 tons.

 

  • Diameter of wire cables, 8 1/2 inches.

 

  • Length of wire weighing 1 lb., 17 1/2 feet.

 

  • Number of wires in each cable, 2,150.

 

  • Total weight of Cables and anchor chains, 190,000 lbs.

 

  • Ultimate strength of each cable, 1,900 tons.

 

The new Aqueducts over the Neversink at Cuddebackville and the Rondout at High Falls, will be constructed on the same plan in the course of this season. There will then be on the line of the Del. And Hudson Canal, four Wire Suspension Aqueducts, most perfect and complete, as far as durability and economy is concerned.

 

The general enlargement of the Canal has been prosecuted vigorously during the last winter. Fifty-seven of the enlarged Locks, being 100 feet long between quoins, and 15 feet width of chamber, are brought into use this spring, and the whole are to be completed by the opening of the Canal in the spring of 1850, making the canal then competent for the passage of Boats loaded with 130 to 140 tons of Coal.”

 

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.The Bridge at Minisink FordRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.Roebling BridgeRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.John A. Roebling's Bridge at Minisink FordRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

Photograph of Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford in Sullivan County, New York.Roebling's Engineering MarvelRoebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, located at Minisink Ford, New York, is the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. The 535-foot aqueduct bridge, spanning the Delaware River, opened in 1847 as a vital transportation link between the coal mines of Pennsylvania and the thriving marketplace in New York. It was one of four suspension aqueducts on the former Delaware & Hudson Canal. John A. Roebling (1806-1869), future engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, designed each of the four bridges.

The aqueduct operated for over 50 years, closing in 1898 with the end of the canal. The aqueduct was then drained and the bridge converted to accommodate vehicle traffic, often operating as a private toll road. The bridge continued to operate until 1979 when, after substantial deterioration through years of neglect, it was threatened with closure. Fortunately, however, in 1980 the National Park Service purchased the bridge and began its restoration using Roebling’s original plans and specifications.

Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, the bridge accommodates single lane vehicle traffic where barges once flowed, and accommodates foot traffic on each side of the road where the path was once trod by canal workers and their mules. Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct is a wonderful example of the historic and modern blended together in the Upper Delaware River area.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) aqueduct architecture bridge cable canal Catskill Mountains Catskills Delaware & Hudson Canal Delaware River John A. Roebling Lackawaxen Minisink Ford National Historic Landmark National Park Service New York NPS road Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct Sullivan County suspension https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/roebling-s-delaware-aqueduct-a-photographic-study Sat, 25 May 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York: A Photographic Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/kadampa-world-peace-temple-glen-spey-new-york-a-photographic-study The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

 

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

 

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

 

Photograph of the Kadampa World Peace Temple, located at Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills.Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York (1)The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

Photograph of the Kadampa World Peace Temple, located at Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills.Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York (6)The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

Photograph of the Kadampa World Peace Temple, located at Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills.Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York (7)The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

Photograph of the Kadampa World Peace Temple, located at Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills.Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York (9)The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

Photograph of the Kadampa World Peace Temple, located at Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills.Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York (11)The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

Photograph of the Kadampa World Peace Temple, located at Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills.Kadampa World Peace Temple, Glen Spey, New York (13)The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey in the Sullivan County region of the southern Catskills. It is one of six Kadampa World Peace temples in the world. The temple, which opened in 2006, is set on 82 landscaped and woodland acres, which includes gardens, nature trails, a lake and streams.

The Temple was designed by Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as part of the International Temples Project. According to the website for the Temple, its “unique design is based on the celestial palace of Heruka, the Buddha of Compassion. The design also represents all the stages of the spiritual path.” The Temple is also home to a bookstore, a gift shop and the World Peace Cafe.

The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at 47 Sweeney Rd, Glen Spey, New York. Visit their website at www.kadampanewyork.org for more information.

 

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Buddha Buddhism café Catskill Mountains Catskills Geshe Kelsang Gyatso Glen Spey Kadampa Meditation Center Kadampa World Peace Temple meditation New York photographer photographs photography pictures retreat Sullivan County temple https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/kadampa-world-peace-temple-glen-spey-new-york-a-photographic-study Sat, 18 May 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Glen Spey, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/saints-peter-and-paul-ukrainian-orthodox-church-glen-spey-new-york The beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

 

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church (1)The beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church (2)The beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church (3)The beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

 

The ground for the church was consecrated on July 11, 1971. The dedication service was performed by Very Reverend Vitaly Kowalenko, Very Reverend Philimon Kulchinsky and the Very Reverend Serhij Nepril. Construction on the church was completed in 1972. The property for the church was donated by the Ukrainian Fraternal Association, which at the time owned and operated the nearby Verkhovyna resort.

 

The church was built in the Kozak-Baroque architectural style, which emerged in the 17th and 18th centuries in Ukraine as the country struggled for national independence. This style of architecture was a combination of European baroque styles and local architectural styles, and was noted for its moderate ornamentation, a local style that was simpler in form from its western European counterparts and a style softened by traditional naturalistic images. It was also noted for gilded or azure domes.

 

The church was designed by Ivan Zhukovsky (1901-1980), who was born on March 4, 1901 in Kitsman, Bukovyna. He studied in Prague in 1926 and graduated from Moscow Polytechnic, while at the same time studying conducting and composition at the Moscow Conservatory. He operated his own architectural firm at Chernivtsi, Ukraine from 1930 to 1941 and was the head of the Society of Ukrainian Engineers from 1931 to 1941. He emigrated to Germany and then to the United States in 1949, where he was active in Ukrainian community life. He was a professor and dean of the architectural department at the Ukrainian Technical Institute in New York from 1957 to 1961. He served as president of the Ukrainian Engineers’ Society of America from 1954 to 1980 and served as chairman at the Center for the Association of Bukovinian Ukrainians in the United States from 1954 to 1973. Zhukovsky published a number of books, including several versions of Ukrainian-German dictionaries. He also designed the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in Hunter, New York.

 

The hamlet of Glen Spey, where the church is located, takes its name from the Scottish word “glen” for valley, and “spey” for the clear water springs found throughout the area. In the 1940s the area became a popular destination for second home owners of Ukrainian descent, eventually becoming known as “Little Ukraine.” The area is said to have reminded the homeowners of their native homeland, and allowed them to celebrate their faith and heritage without the fear of persecution. The popular Ukrainian Youth Festival for many years attracted thousands of visitors to the small Glen Spey hamlet in Sullivan County. The equally beautiful St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Catholic Church, founded in 1967, can also be found at Glen Spey.

 

Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located at 329 High Road (County Route 41) in Glen Spey, New York.

 

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church, B&WThe beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.988-1988, 1000 Years of Christianity in UkraineThe beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.988-1988, 1,000 Years of Christianity in UkraineThe beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

Photograph of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Erected 1972The beautiful Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located only a few miles from the Delaware River at the hamlet of Glen Spey in Sullivan County, New York. The church was built in order to meet the religious needs of the growing population of Ukrainians living in the area. The church is part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the United States of America.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) architecture building Catskill Mountains Catskills Christian church Glen Spey Ivan Zhukovsky Kozak-Baroque New York photographer photographs photography pictures Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Catholic Church Sullivan County Ukraine Ukrainian https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/saints-peter-and-paul-ukrainian-orthodox-church-glen-spey-new-york Sat, 11 May 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/saint-john-the-baptist-ukrainian-catholic-church Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located in Hunter/Jewett Center, New York in the northern Catskills of Greene County. The beautiful church was built in 1962 using the traditional construction methods of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain highlanders. The church, constructed on lands donated by Dr. Ivan Makarewycz, was designed by sculptor Jaroslaw Paladij and architect Ivan Zhukovsky, and was built by master carpenter Jurij Kostiw. The interior of the church was decorated by two prominent Ukrainian artists, iconographer Petro Cholodny, Jr., and wood-carver/sculptor Mykhailo Chereshnovsky.

 

The tri-partite (three-frame) church, which measures 61 feet in height, was constructed using building techniques involving solid timber or logs. The logs were laid horizontally one on top of the other and secured with wooden pegs and various other systems of corner-joinings. There were no nails used in the church’s construction. The redwood cedar logs, measuring 7 1/2 feet by 12 inches, were imported from British Columbia. The roof shingles were hand split from the imported red cedar and were expected to last for 60 years before repairs were needed.

 

Photograph of the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in the hamlet of Jewett in the northern Catskills.St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church (1)Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located in Jewett, New York in the northern Catskills. The beautiful church was built in 1962 using the traditional construction methods of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain highlanders. The church, constructed on lands donated by Dr. Ivan Makarevych, was designed by sculptor Jaroslaw Paladij and architect Ivan Zhukowsky and was built by master carpenter Jurij Kostiw. The interior of the church was decorated by two prominent Ukrainian artists, iconographer Petro Cholodny, Jr., and wood-carver/sculptor Mykhailo Chereshniowsky.

The church is located along Route 23A, six miles west from the village of Hunter and two miles east from the hamlet of Lexington. For more information about the church, its history and current events, visit their website at www.ukrainianmountaintop.org.

Photograph of the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in the hamlet of Jewett in the northern Catskills.St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church (2)Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located in Jewett, New York in the northern Catskills. The beautiful church was built in 1962 using the traditional construction methods of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain highlanders. The church, constructed on lands donated by Dr. Ivan Makarevych, was designed by sculptor Jaroslaw Paladij and architect Ivan Zhukowsky and was built by master carpenter Jurij Kostiw. The interior of the church was decorated by two prominent Ukrainian artists, iconographer Petro Cholodny, Jr., and wood-carver/sculptor Mykhailo Chereshniowsky.

The church is located along Route 23A, six miles west from the village of Hunter and two miles east from the hamlet of Lexington. For more information about the church, its history and current events, visit their website at www.ukrainianmountaintop.org.

Photograph of the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in the hamlet of Jewett in the northern Catskills.St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church (3)Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located in Jewett, New York in the northern Catskills. The beautiful church was built in 1962 using the traditional construction methods of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain highlanders. The church, constructed on lands donated by Dr. Ivan Makarevych, was designed by sculptor Jaroslaw Paladij and architect Ivan Zhukowsky and was built by master carpenter Jurij Kostiw. The interior of the church was decorated by two prominent Ukrainian artists, iconographer Petro Cholodny, Jr., and wood-carver/sculptor Mykhailo Chereshniowsky.

The church is located along Route 23A, six miles west from the village of Hunter and two miles east from the hamlet of Lexington. For more information about the church, its history and current events, visit their website at www.ukrainianmountaintop.org.

 

The interior of the church is adorned with hand-carved wood items including the altar, pulpit, tabernacle and processional cross, as well as a variety of artistic religious icons including the four Evangelists (symbolizing the Catholic church’s roots in the Gospel), the Virgin Mary with Jesus, the scene of the Last Supper and St. John the Baptist, patron saint of the church. The crosses inside the church were designed after those used in Ukraine 300-400 years ago. Carvings on the various tables in the church show sun rays, wheat, grapes, even dishes and utensils used in every day life by the Ukrainian ancestors of the church’s founders. The wooden chandelier, at 65 feet high, is suspended from the ceiling, and signifies the earth wherein the crops are grown. According to old traditions it is customary to stand during the service and while praying or meditating; and therefore there are no pews in the church, and only a few benches along the walls which can be used by the elderly, the sick and pregnant or nursing mothers.

 

As per the church website, construction of the church “was financed by Ukrainian post-World War II refugees and immigrants who realized the need for a tangible expression of their heritage and in the context of Soviet control of their country were constantly vigilant in the preservation and propagation of Ukrainian culture.” With this historic goal for the landmark church, it has certainly met its objective for over 60 years, remaining a distinctive example of Ukrainian culture and heritage.

 

The idea for the church began to form on August 14, 1960 at a meeting held at the home John Kobziar which was well attended by local Ukrainian-American residents. The group called themselves the “Temporary Committee for the construction of the Ukrainian Catholic Chapel in the Vicinity of Hunter, N.Y.” The church design was approved at the group’s May 21, 1961 meeting, and the group raised the money required. Construction of the church began in 1961 and was completed the following year in 1962.

 

The consecration service at St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church was officiated by Right Reverend Joseph Schmondiuk (1912-1978), who would later become the head of the Ukrainian Catholic Church in America. Twenty-four priests assisted in the service that was attended by over 2,000 people from across the country. Following the service, John Kobziar hosted a dinner for 270 people at his nearby Xenia motel. The dinner included a number of speeches by prominent Ukrainian officials, followed by a presentation of Ukrainian folk songs and entertainment by Ukrainian folk dancers.  

 

Photograph of the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in the hamlet of Jewett in the northern Catskills.St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church (4)Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located in Jewett, New York in the northern Catskills. The beautiful church was built in 1962 using the traditional construction methods of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain highlanders. The church, constructed on lands donated by Dr. Ivan Makarevych, was designed by sculptor Jaroslaw Paladij and architect Ivan Zhukowsky and was built by master carpenter Jurij Kostiw. The interior of the church was decorated by two prominent Ukrainian artists, iconographer Petro Cholodny, Jr., and wood-carver/sculptor Mykhailo Chereshniowsky.

The church is located along Route 23A, six miles west from the village of Hunter and two miles east from the hamlet of Lexington. For more information about the church, its history and current events, visit their website at www.ukrainianmountaintop.org.

Photograph of the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in the hamlet of Jewett in the northern Catskills.St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church (5)Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located in Jewett, New York in the northern Catskills. The beautiful church was built in 1962 using the traditional construction methods of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountain highlanders. The church, constructed on lands donated by Dr. Ivan Makarevych, was designed by sculptor Jaroslaw Paladij and architect Ivan Zhukowsky and was built by master carpenter Jurij Kostiw. The interior of the church was decorated by two prominent Ukrainian artists, iconographer Petro Cholodny, Jr., and wood-carver/sculptor Mykhailo Chereshniowsky.

The church is located along Route 23A, six miles west from the village of Hunter and two miles east from the hamlet of Lexington. For more information about the church, its history and current events, visit their website at www.ukrainianmountaintop.org.

 

John (Ivan Volodymyr) Kobziar (1909-1977), organizer of the original group responsible for building the church, was born in the city of Lviv, Ukraine on January 19, 1909. He would begin playing professional soccer at the young age of 14 for the Lviv “Ukraina”, and became widely known for his “uncanny skills as a soccer player, including a booming shot that eventually became the nemesis of some of the best goalkeepers in Eastern Europe.” He played professionally through 1949, including from circa 1923 to 1931 for Lviv “Ukraina”, then the Ukrainian “Rus” team from Uzhhorod, Carpatho-Ukraine, followed by a second stint at Lviv “Ukraina”, and then for several years at the Regensburg “Sich” team in west Germany. He is regarded as one of the best soccer players in Ukrainian history, and was elected to the Ukrainian Sport Hall of Fame in 2017. With the arrival of communism, he was eventually forced to move to West Germany, and then moved to the United States in 1949. Soon after his arrival, in 1950, he became one of the first Ukrainian settlers in the mountaintop area of Hunter, New York. John and his wife Olga operated the Xenia tourist house at the intersection of Route 23A and Route 17 in Jewett Center for many years. John Kobziar was tragically killed in a car collision along Route 23A on August 15, 1977. He is buried at Saint Francis de Sales Cemetery in Elka Park, New York.

 

Dr. Ivan Makarewycz (1914-1999), who donated the land for the church, worked as a physician and surgeon for over 30 years in New York City. He owned a summer home not far from the church. Makarewycz, who also helped supervise the construction of the church, noted in 1969 what the church meant to him. “We constructed the church as a memorial to all the Ukrainians killed by the Communists in Russia and to preserve this special style of church architecture. We welcome visitors to stop so they can see what an old mountainside church looked like years ago in the western part of Ukraine.” (Times-Union. August 3, 1969.) Dr. Makarewycz passed away at 85 years of age on July 10, 1999 and is buried at Saint Andrew Cemetery in South Bound Brook, New Jersey.

 

Jaroslaw Paladij (1910-1977), who made the preliminary scale model of the church, was born on April 21, 1910 at Bukovyna, Ukraine, the son of Jurig and Maria (Smereshanska) Paladij. He graduated from the Academy of Art in Bucharest, Romania and taught sculpture for several years. He immigrated to the United States in 1949, where he worked as draftsman for the New York City Water District until his retirement in 1959. He had a summer weekend summer home in the Jewett area, and after his retirement he made his permanent residence there. Several of his works are featured at the Bukovina Museum of Diaspora in the Ukraine and three of his pyrographs are housed in the Vatican Museum in Rome. He illustrated the book “Abetka,” first published in 1973 by the Ukrainian Academy of Art and Science, which featured 33 illustrated letters of the Ukrainian alphabet, with each letter highlighting famous patriots and historic events from his Ukrainian homeland. Several of his paintings were used for Ukrainian Christmas and Easter greeting cards. One review of his works noted that “his perfect techniques of accomplishment are evident in his works “Zadumany” (“Meditating), “Portret druzhyny” (Wife’s Portrait”), “Avtoportret” (Selfportrait”), and his memorial project honoring Hetman I. Mazepa.” Jaroslaw Paladij passed away in 1977 and is buried at Saint Andrew Cemetery in South Bound Brook, New Jersey.

 

Ivan Zhukovsky (1901-1980), the church architect, was born on March 4, 1901 in Kitsman, Bukovyna. He studied in Prague in 1926 and graduated from Moscow Polytechnic, while at the same time studying conducting and composition at the Moscow Conservatory. He operated his own architectural firm at Chernivtsi, Ukraine from 1930 to 1941 and was the head of the Society of Ukrainian Engineers from 1931 to 1941. He emigrated to Germany and then to the United States in 1949, where he was active in Ukrainian community life. He was a professor and dean of the architectural department at the Ukrainian Technical Institute in New York from 1957 to 1961. He served as president of the Ukrainian Engineers’ Society of America from 1954 to 1980 and served as chairman at the Center for the Association of Bukovinian Ukrainians in the United States from 1954 to 1973. Zhukovsky published a number of books, including several versions of Ukrainian-German dictionaries. He also designed the Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Glen Spey, New York.

 

George (Jurij) Kostiw, the church master builder, was born at the city of Skole in the Ukraine on May 3, 1912, the son of Mykola and Maria (Palko) Kostiw. He was trained by experienced carpenters, including Komar, Koval and Mykhailiv, in his native Bojko mountain region of Ukraine. He served as an apprentice to church master builders and architects in Tseneva, Ukraine from 1927 to 1936. Kostiw came to the United States in 1950 and became a naturalized citizen in 1960. He married Daria Szczur on August 15, 1950. Kostiw also constructed the St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Catholic Church (1967) at Glen Spey, New York and the Sacred Heart Ukrainian Catholic Church (1977) at Johnson City, New York. Jurij passed away in 2005 and is buried at Saint Andrew Cemetery in South Bound Brook, New Jersey. An illustration of the Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is pictured on his gravestone.

 

Petro Cholodny, Jr. (1902-1990), the church artist, was born in Kyiv, Ukraine and would become a well-known Ukrainian icon painter and graphic artist. He received his art education from the Ukrainian Studio of Plastic Art in Prague and the Academy of Fine Art in Warsaw, Poland from 1928 to 1934, and upon graduation worked at the Academy as an instructor. Before World War II Cholodny exhibited his work across Europe, including at Warsaw, Lviv, Berlin and Brussels. After the war, he immigrated to the United States and settled in New York. His artistic work can be found in numerous churches, including St. George Ukrainian Catholic Church (New York City), Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Volodimir (New York City), St. Andrew's Ukrainian Orthodox Memorial Church (South Bound Brook, New Jersey), St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church (Newark, New Jersey), and the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Lourdes, France). In 2001, The Ukrainian Museum in New York City featured an exhibition titled "Three Generations of Cholodny Artists," which featured the paintings and icons of Petro Cholodny the Elder (1876–1930), those of his son, Petro Cholodny the Younger (1902–1990), and of Andrew Charyna (b. 1951), grandson of Petro Cholodny the Younger.

 

Mykhailo Chereshnovsky (1911-1994), the church wood-carver and sculptor, was born on March 5, 1911 in the village of Stezhyntsia in the Lemko region. He studied at the School of Applied Arts in Kolomyia and graduated from the School of Plastic Arts in Krakow in 1939. After the end of World War II, as a member of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army, Mykhailo emigrated in 1947 to West Germany, and later to the United States, settling in New York City. He was described in 1958 as “one of the best sculptors of the younger generation.” In addition to his decorative wood carving, as seen at St. John the Baptist, he sculpted busts of a number of prominent Ukrainians and produced several monuments in bronze. He served from 1973 to 1994 as the president of the Ukrainian Artists Association, an organization founded in 1952 at New York.

 

Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church is located on a small hillside along Route 23A, six miles west from the village of Hunter and two miles east from the hamlet of Lexington.  Other buildings on the church complex include a bell tower, the parish hall (grazdha) and the parsonage. The Grazdha serves as the venue for the classical music concert series that is held each summer by the Music and Art Center of Greene County. The complex is also home to a Ukrainian gift shop, which offers a wide variety of Ukrainian artistic works and handcrafted items. For more information about the church, its history and current events, visit their website at www.ukrainianmountaintop.org.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) architecture building catholic Catskill Mountains Catskills Christian church Greene County Hunter Ivan Makarewycz Ivan Zhukovsky Jaroslaw Paladij Jurij Kostiw Lexington Mykhailo Chereshnovsky New York Petro Cholodny Route 23A Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church St. John the Baptist Ukraine Ukrainian Catholic Church https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/5/saint-john-the-baptist-ukrainian-catholic-church Sat, 04 May 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Heller’s Fabulous Furniture, Boiceville https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/heller-s-fabulous-furniture-boiceville Heller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

 

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

 

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.To the FutureHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.AliensHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Alien LeaderHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Strange AlienHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.To the MoonHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Take Me to Your LeaderHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Alien GirlHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

This 25 foot rocket ship can be found at Steve Heller’s Fabulous Furniture in Boiceville, New York.Roswell or BustHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, Boiceville, Ulster County

One of the largest installations, seen prominently along Route 28, at Steve Heller’s Fabulous Furniture store in Boiceville is this 25 foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving the spaceship and waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts.

The creator of this interesting work of art is Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store, which includes various other artistic installations on the front lawn, is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.I Come in PeaceHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Take Me to Your LeaderHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.RuthieHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.StarshipHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Metal GuitarHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Compressor ManHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Rock OnHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.PeacockHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

Photograph of metallic sculptures at Heller’s Fabulous Furniture along Route 28, Boiceville in the central Catskills.Pink PigHeller’s Fabulous Furniture, located along Route 28 in Boiceville, is home to a wide variety of interesting and eclectic metallic sculptures. One of the largest installations is a 25-foot rocket ship, detailed with Martians driving a spaceship while waving out the window, with a humorous motto of Roswell or Bust. The rocket ship weighs 11,000 pounds and interestingly utilizes a cement truck barrel mixer, bulldozer treads and old car parts. Other sculptures include all sorts of aliens and robots, as well as a metallic pig and a guitar.

Heller’s Fabulous Furniture is operated Steve Heller, a local artist, woodworker and sculptor. Heller, a man of many skills, makes one-of-a-kind wood furniture, creates metal art out of all sorts of odds and ends and even customizes old cars. Heller’s works have been featured in a variety of newspaper and magazine articles including Architectural Digest, Car & Travel, Hudson Valley Magazine and the New York Times. Heller’s store is certainly worth a stop on your way along Route 28. Visit the store website at www.fabulousfurnitureon28.com for more information.

 

 

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Architectural Digest art artist automobile Boiceville business car Car & Travel Catskill Mountains Catskills furniture Heller's Fabulous Furniture Hudson Valley Magazine magazine Martians metal New York New York Times rocket ship Roswell or Bust Route 28 sculptor shop spaceship Steve Heller store Ulster County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/heller-s-fabulous-furniture-boiceville Sat, 27 Apr 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Fill ‘Er Up https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/fill-er-up This abandoned Gulf gas station can be found alongside a busy county highway in the central Catskills. I have driven past the station many times, but only recently decided to stop and photograph. It is not exactly clear when the station was abandoned, but it nonetheless has a few interesting elements that have stood still with time, such as the stacks of tires and hubcaps, an old 7UP soda machine, a pair of analog gas pumps, overgrown vegetation and a decaying building.

 

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Fill 'Er Up

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Open

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Closed

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.24-Hour Towing

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Used Tires

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Out of Order

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Long Time Gone

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Full Serve

Photograph of an abandoned gas station at Big Indian, New York in the central Catskills.Full Serve at Your Local Gulf Station

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) abandon abandoned Big Indian Catskill Mountains Catskills fuel gas gas pumps gas station New York photographer photographs photography photos Route 28 tow truck truck Ulster County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/fill-er-up Sat, 20 Apr 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Early Morning on the Esopus https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/early-morning-on-the-esopus The Esopus Creek is one of the great waterways of the Catskills. Rising from its source at Winnisook Lake on the northwest slopes of Slide Mountain, the creek scenically flows through Ulster County as it makes its way to the Hudson River at Saugerties. The creek is impounded at Olive Bridge to create the Ashokan Reservoir, an important water source for residents of New York City. The creek above the Reservoir is commonly known as the Upper Esopus Creek, and the section below the Reservoir is commonly known as the Lower Esopus Creek. The Esopus Creek offers some of the best fly fishing in the Catskills and, with high water flow, is also popular with kayakers and tubers.

 

These pictures of the lower section of the Esopus Creek were taken on an early September morning. One of the amazing things about photographing along the Esopus Creek is to observe how the river changes so much from section to section, from narrow to wide, from shallow to deep, from slow-moving to swift currents, and so on.

 

Photograph of an early morning on the Esopus Creek in the Catskills.Early Morning on the Esopus Creek

Photograph of an early morning on the Esopus Creek in the Catskills.Morning Light on the Esopus Creek

Photograph of an early morning on the Esopus Creek in the Catskills.First Light on the Esopus Creek

Photograph of an early morning on the Esopus Creek in the Catskills.Esopus Creek, Ashokan Center

Photograph of an early morning on the Esopus Creek in the Catskills.Early Morning on the Esopus Creek, Ashokan Center

Ray of Light on the Esopus CreekRay of Light on the Esopus Creek

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Ashokan Reservoir Catskill Mountains Catskills creek Esopus Creek fishing fly fishing Hudson River kayaking New York river Saugerties Slide Mountain tubing Ulster County water Winnisook Lake https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/early-morning-on-the-esopus Sat, 13 Apr 2024 12:00:00 GMT
1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan Center https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/1817-schoolhouse-ashokan-center The 1817 Stone Schoolhouse, a one-story, two-bay by two-bay stone building with a gable roof, is located on the property of the Ashokan Center. It was constructed in 1817 and operated as a school for the Shokan district from 1817 to 1842, after which it functioned as a cooper shop and a dwelling. It had been abandoned for most of the 20th century when it was given to the Ashokan Camp and staff dismantled it and reconstructed it on its present site in 1985.

 

The 1817 Schoolhouse is located on the grounds of the Ashokan Center, a non-profit organization dedicated to outdoor and environmental education. The center hosts school groups and hobby and community events such as concerts, blacksmithing, square dancing, guitar camp and the fall festival. The beautiful 374-acre property, being home to Winchell Falls, the 1885 Ashokan/Turnwood Covered Bridge, Cathedral Gorge, a large lake, a barnyard and a horse pasture, is like taking a step back in time. Although the Ashokan Center is private property, you can take advantage of one of its numerous public events to tour the scenic grounds. Visit their website at www.ashokancenter.org for more information.

 

1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan Center1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan CenterThe 1817 Stone Schoolhouse, a one-story, two-bay by two-bay stone building with a gable roof, is located on the property of the Ashokan Center. It was constructed in 1817 and operated as a school for the Shokan district from 1817 to 1842, after which it functioned as a cooper shop and a dwelling. It had been abandoned for most of the 20th century when it was given to the Ashokan Camp and staff dismantled it and reconstructed it on its present site in 1985.

Going to School in 1817Going to School in 1817The 1817 Stone Schoolhouse, a one-story, two-bay by two-bay stone building with a gable roof, is located on the property of the Ashokan Center. It was constructed in 1817 and operated as a school for the Shokan district from 1817 to 1842, after which it functioned as a cooper shop and a dwelling. It had been abandoned for most of the 20th century when it was given to the Ashokan Camp and staff dismantled it and reconstructed it on its present site in 1985.

Shokan School i 1817Shokan School i 1817The 1817 Stone Schoolhouse, a one-story, two-bay by two-bay stone building with a gable roof, is located on the property of the Ashokan Center. It was constructed in 1817 and operated as a school for the Shokan district from 1817 to 1842, after which it functioned as a cooper shop and a dwelling. It had been abandoned for most of the 20th century when it was given to the Ashokan Camp and staff dismantled it and reconstructed it on its present site in 1985.

 

Door to the Future, 1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan CenterDoor to the Future, 1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan CenterThe 1817 Stone Schoolhouse, a one-story, two-bay by two-bay stone building with a gable roof, is located on the property of the Ashokan Center. It was constructed in 1817 and operated as a school for the Shokan district from 1817 to 1842, after which it functioned as a cooper shop and a dwelling. It had been abandoned for most of the 20th century when it was given to the Ashokan Camp and staff dismantled it and reconstructed it on its present site in 1985.

 

Here to Learn, 1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan CenterHere to Learn, 1817 Schoolhouse, Ashokan CenterThe 1817 Stone Schoolhouse, a one-story, two-bay by two-bay stone building with a gable roof, is located on the property of the Ashokan Center. It was constructed in 1817 and operated as a school for the Shokan district from 1817 to 1842, after which it functioned as a cooper shop and a dwelling. It had been abandoned for most of the 20th century when it was given to the Ashokan Camp and staff dismantled it and reconstructed it on its present site in 1985.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) 1817 Schoolhouse architecture Ashokan Center Ashokan Field Campus Historic District building Catskill Mountains Catskills Esopus Creek Jacobus Bush Lemuel Winchell National Register of Historic Places New York Olivebridge Ulster County Winchell – Moehring House Winchell's Falls Winchell's Inn https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/4/1817-schoolhouse-ashokan-center Sat, 06 Apr 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Winchell’s Inn, Ashokan Center https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/winchell-s-inn-ashokan-center Winchell’s Inn, also known as the Winchell – Moehring House, was constructed in 1785, and reputedly includes the stone foundation of the early 18th-century dwelling of Jacobus Bush, the first landowner. The inn takes its name from Lemuel Winchell and the Winchell family who managed the lands along the Esopus Creek from 1785 to 1857. Lemuel Winchell also developed an industrial site on the waterfall named for him which, at its fullest extent in the early-19th century, had grist, saw and fulling mills, a forge and a store.

 

Photograph of Winchell’s Inn, located at the Ashokan Center in the central Catskills.Winchell’s Inn, Ashokan Center

 

The early history of the property, located on the Esopus Creek at what had been known as Winchell’s Falls, has been traced back to a 1731 deed by which Jacobus Bush purchased the property from the Town of Marbletown. Portions of the stone basement of Bush’s homestead, or that of his son and namesake who inherited the property in 1754, are believed to survive in the extant house, which Lemuel Winchell erected after acquiring the farm in 1785. Whereas the Bush family was well-established in the region, Winchell was a newcomer arriving from Dutchess County, where his family had migrated from New England. He selected the site for the industrial potential of the falls, which is believed to have supported a mill as early as 1772, as well as its location at a fording place on the creek. In addition to constructing a dam on the falls and operating grist, saw and carding mills, as well as a forge, blacksmith shop and store, Lemuel Winchell accommodated travelers in his house and tavern.

 

The house was extensively restored and “improved” in the 1930s for use as a country retreat for an automobile industry executive with local ties. Following plans provided by Teller & Halverson, a Kingston architectural firm specializing in the restoration of historic houses for second homes, the house was renovated in the Colonial Revival sensibility of the period, featuring a regional “Dutch” taste emphasizing ceiling beams, wide-board floors in natural finish, and modest white-painted interiors and exteriors. A service wing was added to one end and a bluestone terrace, embellished with grind stones from an abandoned pulp mill on the property, distinguished a new front façade created on the uphill side. When the college created the camp in 1957, the house was used as a retreat for the president and a conference center; later it became a dormitory for camp staff. Few changes have been made to the 1937 plan and design.

 

Winchell’s Inn is located on the grounds of the Ashokan Center, a non-profit organization dedicated to outdoor and environmental education. The center hosts school groups and hobby and community events such as concerts, blacksmithing, square dancing, guitar camp and the fall festival. The beautiful 374-acre property, being home to Winchell Falls, the 1885 Ashokan/Turnwood Covered Bridge, Cathedral Gorge, an 1817 schoolhouse, a large lake, a barnyard and a horse pasture, is like taking a step back in time. Although the Ashokan Center is private property, you can take advantage of one of its numerous public events to tour the scenic grounds. Visit their website at www.ashokancenter.org for more information.

 

The house is the oldest building on the property and has been in continuous use since the 18th century. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Ashokan Field Campus Historic District.


 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) architecture Ashokan Center Ashokan Field Campus Historic District building Catskill Mountains Catskills Esopus Creek Jacobus Bush Lemuel Winchell National Register of Historic Places New York Olivebridge Ulster County Winchell – Moehring House Winchell's Falls Winchell's Inn https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/winchell-s-inn-ashokan-center Sat, 30 Mar 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Father John Nelson, Memento Mori https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/father-john-nelson-memento-mori “I didn’t plan on any of this. In fact, I had a lot of other plans. But then I heard the word of God, and after that . . . your other plans become your other plans.” – Father John Nelson

 

 

In the fall of 2014, I found myself in the village of Woodstock to photograph the Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount, a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located near the summit of Meads Mountain Road high above the village of Woodstock. The church, originally known as the Episcopalian Chapel of Ease, was constructed circa the mid-1890s to serve seasonal visitors at the neighboring Mead’s Mountain House and the nearby Overlook Mountain House.

 

George Mead (1834-1905), who built Mead’s Mountain House, was born at Ridgefield, Connecticut, the son of Sherwood Mead. At the young age of 15, Mead went to Newburgh to learn the silversmith business as an apprentice. After six years of learning the trade, he went to New York, then New Haven, before settling at Kingston for eight years between circa 1856 to 1864. On the recommendation of his doctor, who told him that he only had a few years to live, Mead moved to the country, buying a farm from a man named Henry Fuller on the side of Overlook Mountain.

 

Fuller had established himself at what was then known as Wide Clove around 1855, and “cleared a few acres and built a small and rough dwelling.” (Evers, 276). He would “take care of climbers’ horses and occasionally give climbers sleeping space on his floor. He did not act as a guide, however. When climbers asked him to help them keep to the rough trail up Overlook, Fuller would point in the general direction of the trail’s beginning and say, ‘Follow the plainest path.’” (Evers, 276.)

 

After purchasing Fuller’s farm, Mead would establish his popular boarding house in 1865, which was originally called the “Overlook Mountain House” (not to be confused with the Overlook Mountain House that was later constructed further up the mountain) on account of its location. In its early days it was also sometimes called the “Red House” on account of its color, or the “The Halfway House” on account of its location on the road to Overlook Mountain.

 

South View, Mead's Mountain House. Louis E. Jones. Author's collection

South View, Meads Mountain House. No number, Beautiful Woodstock SheriesSouth View, Meads Mountain House. No number, Beautiful Woodstock SeriesLouis E. Jones. Author’s collection.

Louis E. Jones was a well-regarded photographer and painter closely associated with the Catskills and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

 

Upon opening the “Overlook Mountain House” on August 8, 1865, Mead advertised that the “house is new and commodious, fronting a view of more than seventy miles. Ample stable room for horses and vehicles. Persons wishing pure mountain air and mountain scenery in matchless grandeur, will find the location of this summer resort unsurpassed. Fine trout fishing and hunting in the immediate vicinity of the house. No pains will be spared to render the visits of guests both agreeable and pleasant.” (Rondout Freeman. September 6, 1865.) The first visitor names on the hotel register were Christopher Agar and H. B. Schoonmaker.

 

The location of Mead’s Mountain House in Wide Clove was considered one of the finest in Catskills. “It is located in one of the finest notches in the south end of the Catskills, two thousand feet above the Hudson River and fifteen hundred feet above the beautiful village of Woodstock. From the broad piazzas tine views of the mountains and valleys can be had in every direction and the whole range of the Shawangunk Mountains and the Esopus and Woodstock valleys in the south, while at the north the domes of the Catskills are seen as far as they eye can reach; the house is surrounded with all the attractions of the southern Catskills; is only two miles from Cooper and Echo lakes, two miles from Woodstock village and the immediate vicinity is replete with beautiful mountain walks, fine trout streams, etc.” (Kingston Daily Freeman. April 28, 1880.)

 

In those early days, visitors came to Rondout by day boats, then transferred to stages for the rest of the journey, sometimes not reaching the house till ten or eleven o’clock at night. Mead’s Mountain House grew in popularity over the next several decades, eventually reaching a capacity for 75 people by 1897. By that time, George Mead had noticed a change in his clientele. “In those [old] days . . . people were glad to get away from railroads and were content with mail three times a week; not they want a railroad station right in front of the house, mail every hour and a telegraph within reach of the bed. He deplores the “pace” at which the present generation lives, and loves to talk of the ‘old times.’” (Ferris, R. The Catskills: An Illustrated Handbook. P. 37.)

 

Mead’s Mountain House, in addition to being a destination itself, was often used as a way stop for refreshments for travelers making their way to the summit of Overlook Mountain and as a base for fishing at Shue’s Pond (what would become known as Echo Lake). The Mountain House entertained many prominent people over the years, including General Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th President of the United States, as well as Jervis McEntee, Sanford R. Gifford and Frederick Church, all notable painters of the Hudson River School.

 

Three generations of the Mead family would manage Mead’s Mountain House. Upon George Mead’s death in 1905, his son William and daughter-in-law Annie continued to operate the boarding house. When William passed away in 1913, Annie worked with her daughter Genevieve and son-in law Joseph Hutty to manage the place. The Mead family sold the boarding house to 1948 to Captain Sava J. Milo (1905-1982) and his wife Danka (1913-2002), who operated the place until 1978. It was then purchased by the Karma Triyana Dharmachakra monastery, who demolished the historic structure in 2011.

 

The Mead family were devout Episcopalians, and in response to the growing popularity of their boarding house, they built the Chapel of Ease circa 1894 so that their customers, and those of the Overlook Mountain House, did not have to travel all the way down the mountain to the village of Woodstock to attend religious services. Episcopal services were held every Sunday, with rotating ministers from the village of Woodstock or a minister who was staying at the adjacent boarding house. George Mead’s granddaughter Genevieve was married to Joseph Hutty at the chapel.

 

The church is beautifully situated at an elevation of 1,700 feet above sea level, between Mount Guardian to the west and the southwestern shoulder of Overlook Mountain to the east. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005 “for its association with the seasonal tourist industry in Woodstock and the larger Catskill Mountain region during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.”

 

Chauncey Snyder, who lived in a nearby farmhouse, donated one acre of land to the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Albany to build the church. Despite this act of goodwill, several years later in 1902 Snyder would be evicted from his farm, with “tears running down his old bronzed cheeks,” by Bolton Brown as he acquired lands for the Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony. (Bolton Brown. Early Days at Woodstock.) An article published in 1952 in the Kingston Daily Freeman attributed the construction of the church to William Mead (1862-1913), son of George Mead.

 

The chapel was “modestly built, constructed with a wood balloon frame above a well-laid fieldstone foundation with detailing reminiscent of the rustic aesthetic . . . the form of the chapel and the honesty of its construction and lines relate it to the parish-type model.” Furthermore, “the chapel was modestly scaled, built, and detailed, reflecting its original use as a seasonal place of worship. The choice of shingle sheathing and rustic detailing, particularly as seen on the original entrance canopy and rustic walkway, mark it as a seasonal building and effectively relate it to its immediate mountain surroundings. These elements likewise lend the building a considerable charm and romantic appeal.”

 

The chapel design was based on architectural designs of Richard Upjohn (1802-1878), who authored Upjohn’s Rural Architecture in 1852. The designs included in the book were aimed at small Episcopal congregations of modest means, and included “plans and elevations for a conveniently scaled and priced wood church and chapel.” Although the Christ-on-the-Mount Church was constructed 39 years after the book’s publication, some of Upjohn’s design elements found in the church include “its steeply pitched roof simple and unpretentious lines, self-contained form and open truss ceiling;” with “the form of the chapel and the honesty of its construction and lines [relating] it to the parish-type model.”

 

Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount
The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located high above the village of Woodstock.Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-MountWoodstock, Ulster County

The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located near the summit of Meads Mountain Road high above the village of Woodstock. The church, originally known as the Episcopalian Chapel of Ease, was constructed in 1891 to serve seasonal visitors at the neighboring Mead’s Mountain House and the nearby Overlook Mountain House.

Since 1948, with the arrival of Father William Francis (1885-1979), the church has been affiliated with the Orthodox Church of the Western Rite. During the 1960s Father Francis would gain a small degree of fame as the “hippie priest” for his kindness, understanding and service to the young people of the era. According to various sources, Father Francis also spent time with Bob Dylan (a local resident of Woodstock) in the mid 1960s, with the humble priest serving as the inspiration behind Dylan’s song Father of Night. Today the church is led by the equally charismatic Father John Nelson, who first attended Easter Sunday service with Father Francis in 1970, and now serves as a local community leader and founder of the Woodstock Council for World Peace.

The Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as an “architecturally significant . . . relatively intact example of seasonal ecclesiastical architecture” and “for its association with the seasonal tourist industry in Woodstock and the larger Catskill Mountain region during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.” (1) The church interior is adorned with “ornate lattice and woodcarvings” (2) created by Father Francis and artwork depicting a wide range of scriptural and religious figures.

References:
(1) Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount. National Park Service, nomination form for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, Washington D.C. 2004.
(2) Ibid.

 

Most sources, including the National Register of Historic Places, put the construction of the church as 1891. However, two different sources place the construction as circa 1893 or 1894. In November 1893, the Stamford Mirror wrote that “Christ Chapel, in the town of Woodstock, is to be the most elevated church in Ulster County. It is 2,000 feet above tide water, being near Mead’s Mountain House.” The use of the term “to be” implies, as of November 1893, that the church had not been constructed yet, and that its construction was therefore likely in 1894. A second source, The Churchman issue of August 4, 1894, notes that the cornerstone for the church was laid “two summers ago.” This places the beginning of construction as circa the summer of 1893.

 

This same article from The Churchman seemingly described the opening of the church in the summer of 1894. “Woodstock, At Christ Church, in the Catskill Mountains, services were held on the Eighth Sunday after Trinity, July 15, and 5 children were baptized. The Rev. George W. Douglas, D. D., who was spending Sunday at Mead’s Mountain House, while on his way to the Adirondacks, conducted the services. The little church has been built mainly through the efforts of Mrs. Augusta Crabbe, of Rochester, N.Y., and the Misses Bolton, of Pelham, N.Y., who spent some time in this place three summers ago. Mr. Snyder presented an acre of ground, and since then $600 have been collected, and a simple shingled building, with rustic finish have been completed. Two summers ago, the Rev. Mr. Wattson, of Kingston, and the Rev. Charles Adams, of Rondout, directed by Archdeacon Thomas, laid the cornerstone. Among the gifts presented to the church, $50 was received from the Church Building Association, also Prayer Books and Hymnals, and an altar Prayer Book and a Bible from Miss Stewart Brown, of New York. A friend from Rochester presented a lectern and chancel chair, and Christ Church, Rochester, sent altar vases. About eighty guests are at Mead’s Mountain House from May to October, and, with the farmers and their children, they all make quite a Sunday-school and goodly congregation. Miss Elizabeth Crabbe, by her faithful visiting among the neighbors, built up a Sunday-school before the church was finished, and thus her summer holidays have laid a precious cornerstone of faith and love.”

 

No matter the specific date of construction, over the next 130 years after its founding, the church has been associated with some of the village’s most prominent residents. In 1902, Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead purchased 1,200 acres of land in the village of Woodstock, including the property on which the chapel was located, in order to found the Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony, now the oldest-operating arts colony in the country. In the mid-1930s, Jane Whitehead, then Ralph’s widow, invited Father William Henry Francis, Archbishop of the Old Catholic Church in America, to Woodstock to help mentor her son Peter Whitehead (1901-1975).

 

William Henry Francis was born at Nottingham, England, and immigrated to the United States with his family as a young boy. The family settled at Waukegan, Illinois, on Lake Michigan, where his father established a mechanized lace-making factory. From an early age Francis had decided that he wanted to become a monk and in 1908 he joined a monastic community in Waukegan founded by Dom Augustine de Angelis Harding. Francis was ordained as a priest in 1910 by Joseph Rene Vilatte, was appointed prior of St. Dunstan’s Abbey at Waukegan in 1913, was consecrated as a bishop in the Old Catholic Church in America by Prince de Landas Berghes in 1916 and was ultimately elected Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Old Catholic Church in America in 1917. He would later in life also be known as William Henry Francis Brothers, after adding the name Brothers, his mother’s maiden name.

 

The Old Catholic Church in America, sometimes called the Western Orthodox Catholic Church, “believes in the ancient faith, as held by the undivided Catholic Church prior to the great schism of 1054 A. D.” The doctrine is essentially Catholic, but “the authority of the pope is rejected, as is also clerical celibacy. Communion is offered to the laity in both kinds and the liturgy is mainly in the vernacular. The great creeds are accepted, but the ‘filioque’ clause of the Nicene Creed is rejected. Apostolic succession as constituting the only valid ministry is insisted upon, but the typical Roman Catholic intolerance of other religious bodies is largely absent. In most other points of doctrine and practice there is agreement with the Roman position.” (Elmer T. Clark. The Small Sects in America. p. 205.) The church does not advocate compulsory confession and participation of the congregation in worship is emphasized.

 

With his new position of Archbishop of the Old Catholic Church in America, Father Francis moved around 1917 to Chicago, where he worked with the poor and disadvantaged, who were often “the uncared for, exploited immigrants working in the steel mills of the Middle-West. There in the midst of the despised “foreigners” his sympathetic understanding of their problems and his practical attempts to solve them made his mission bountiful in good works.” (Catskill Mountain Star. 1941.) In the early 1920s, Francis moved to New York City, and worked from St. Dunstan’s House on Stuyvesant Square, where he continued with his branch of the Old Catholic Church. From 1926 to 1936 Francis grew the Old Catholic Church in America from 9 to 24 parishes and from 1,888 members to 5,470 members.

 

In the early 1930s Father Francis moved to Cos Cob, Connecticut, located half-way between Greenwich and Stamford, in the hopes of establishing Saint Dunstan’s Abbey as “one of the truly great cloisters of the twentieth century.” However, the community was not successful, and Father Francis was ultimately forced to give up the 100-acre property. Around 1934 he moved to a small farmhouse at Bedford Village in New York, in the hopes that this new version of Saint Dunstan’s Abbey would become “The Mother Community of the Old Catholic Benedictines in North America.” Despite the lofty name and ambitions, this community “seldom mustered more than half a dozen monks, few of whom ever reached profession.” Francis remained at Bedford for only a couple of years.

 

With the invitation of Jane Whitehead, Father Francis moved to Woodstock in the mid-1930s, where he would remain for the rest of his life. Father Francis was often quoted as saying “I came here to convert Woodstock, but Woodstock has converted me.”

 

When Father Francis first arrived in the late 1930s at the Chapel of Ease, later renamed to the Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount, it had been abandoned for 13 years, or since around 1926. As per Alf Evers, “The Overlook Mountain House, which was destroyed by fire in 1924 [should be 1923], never reached a point at which it could house fashionable church-going guests. Mead’s became somewhat less popular among churchgoers and the chapel languished. By 1931 the Board of Missions of the Episcopal Diocese of New York took it over, but did little to check the growing deterioration of the charming rustic building and its grounds or the dwindling of its congregation.

 

The Old Catholic Movement was usually on good terms with the Anglican Church and the American Protestant Episcopal Church. Yet problems developed when the chapel became the center of the Old Catholic Church in America. William Manning, bishop of New York and some said a man with a medieval mind, objected to the presence of the Old Catholics on his church’s property. Jane Whitehead bought the chapel from the board of the diocese and allowed Father Francis to remain in possession throughout the rest of his life.” (Evers, Woodstock: History of an American Town, pp. 582-583.)

 

Father Francis arrived in the summer of 1939 at the church, “which up until a few months ago seemed to be claimed only by the wilderness about it. (Kingston Daily Freeman. December 7, 1939.) Father Francis, with the help of three assistants, quickly went to work, clearing away the brush and making necessary repairs to the interior. The group, including Father Francis, Father Victor Boniface, Father Edwin and Brother Frank, lived in a house about a quarter mile down the road from the church. That house was owned by Mrs. C. Hinton, and “was known originally as the Snyder house, part of which still stands and which was one of the first two homes built in Woodstock.” (Kingston Daily Freeman. December 7, 1939.) The original intention of the group was to use the church as “nothing more than a monastic chapel,” but they quickly attracted an ever-growing attendance at Sunday services. The first service attracted 13 people, then 26 people a week later, and services soon had enough congregants that they were standing in the back of the church and even outside.

 

Since the arrival of Father Francis, the church has been affiliated with the Orthodox Church of the Western Rite. During the 1960s and 1970s Father Francis would gain a small degree of fame as the “hippie priest” for his kindness, understanding and service to the young people of the era. According to various sources, Father Francis spent time with Bob Dylan, a local resident of Woodstock in the mid-1960s, with the humble priest serving as the inspiration for Dylan’s song Father of Night. Folk singer Ramblin’ Jack Elliot was a frequent visitor at the chapel. Father Francis married famed sculptor Harvey Fite, creator of Opus 40, to Barbara Richards in 1944.

 

Father Francis lived a simple life during his time at Woodstock, once noting that “this may seem absurd but we are trying to be like the primitive Christians.” There was a small wood addition, now removed, that was added to the back of the Christ-on-the-Mount church to serve as a humble residence for Father Francis. In a 1941 profile, it was written that Father Francis did not receive a salary, but largely depended on donations of food from his flock. He did not own any property, and at the time was living in an abandoned corn crib which was given to him for free by the owner. There was no passing of a collection plate at church services, but a simple offertory box on the rear wall where donations could be made as one felt inclined. Donations at that time did not exceed $10 per week.

 

As it was then inconvenient in winter and impossible to hold year-round services at the Christ-on-the-Mount Church high up on the mountain, around 1940, Father Francis moved his church to the village of Woodstock along the Saugerties-Woodstock Road (what is now Route 212), where he converted a barn into what he would call St. Dunstan’s Church. The barn was originally constructed in the 1890s through a communal “raising bee,” where the men of the community came together to erect the structure. Under Father Francis, St. Dunstan’s Church quickly gained a small amount of popularity with both locals and tourists for its beautiful altar, wood carvings and decorative pieces, much of it handcrafted by Father Francis and his associates. When St. Dunstan’s Church was destroyed by fire in December 1945, Father Francis lost much of his worldly possessions, including the church organ, vestments, books, carvings and pictures, as well as all of his personal and household effects. Soon thereafter, Father Francis retreated to the Christ-on-the-Mount Church, where he would live and preach for the remainder of his life. Father Francis passed away on July 21, 1979.

 

On the morning of October 10, 2014, 35 years after the passing of Father Francis, I went to the Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount only expecting to take some exterior shots of the building. Although churches have historically kept their doors open around the clock in order to serve the community at any time of day or night, the world has changed, and likely due to theft, vandalism, etc., most churches are now locked while not in active use. After getting my exterior shots, I walked to the front door in the secret hope that it would be open. And surprise, it was.

 

“As you step through the door,” one newspaper article noted in the 1950s, “you find you have gone back to the 15th century, for it is truly a reproduction of early times.” (Saugerties Daily Post. September 30, 1954.) The interior design of the church, including the ornate lattice and woodcarvings found at and near the altar, were constructed by Father Francis. A decorative, medieval-like rood screen with carved Gothic and floral motifs separates the worship space from the liturgical center, and was once described as being “a work of art which would be a credit to the masters of the Renaissance.” (Kingston Daily Freeman. December 7, 1939) The rood screen and the surrounding walls are decorated with paintings of historic religious figures. The floor is laid with medium-width pine plank, seemingly original, running in an east-west direction.

 

Interior, Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount
The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located high above the village of Woodstock.Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-MountWoodstock, Ulster County

The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located near the summit of Meads Mountain Road high above the village of Woodstock. The church, originally known as the Episcopalian Chapel of Ease, was constructed in 1891 to serve seasonal visitors at the neighboring Mead’s Mountain House and the nearby Overlook Mountain House.

Since 1948, with the arrival of Father William Francis (1885-1979), the church has been affiliated with the Orthodox Church of the Western Rite. During the 1960s Father Francis would gain a small degree of fame as the “hippie priest” for his kindness, understanding and service to the young people of the era. According to various sources, Father Francis also spent time with Bob Dylan (a local resident of Woodstock) in the mid 1960s, with the humble priest serving as the inspiration behind Dylan’s song Father of Night. Today the church is led by the equally charismatic Father John Nelson, who first attended Easter Sunday service with Father Francis in 1970, and now serves as a local community leader and founder of the Woodstock Council for World Peace.

The Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as an “architecturally significant . . . relatively intact example of seasonal ecclesiastical architecture” and “for its association with the seasonal tourist industry in Woodstock and the larger Catskill Mountain region during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.” (1) The church interior is adorned with “ornate lattice and woodcarvings” (2) created by Father Francis and artwork depicting a wide range of scriptural and religious figures.

References:
(1) Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount. National Park Service, nomination form for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, Washington D.C. 2004.
(2) Ibid.

The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located high above the village of Woodstock.Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-MountWoodstock, Ulster County

The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located near the summit of Meads Mountain Road high above the village of Woodstock. The church, originally known as the Episcopalian Chapel of Ease, was constructed in 1891 to serve seasonal visitors at the neighboring Mead’s Mountain House and the nearby Overlook Mountain House.

Since 1948, with the arrival of Father William Francis (1885-1979), the church has been affiliated with the Orthodox Church of the Western Rite. During the 1960s Father Francis would gain a small degree of fame as the “hippie priest” for his kindness, understanding and service to the young people of the era. According to various sources, Father Francis also spent time with Bob Dylan (a local resident of Woodstock) in the mid 1960s, with the humble priest serving as the inspiration behind Dylan’s song Father of Night. Today the church is led by the equally charismatic Father John Nelson, who first attended Easter Sunday service with Father Francis in 1970, and now serves as a local community leader and founder of the Woodstock Council for World Peace.

The Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as an “architecturally significant . . . relatively intact example of seasonal ecclesiastical architecture” and “for its association with the seasonal tourist industry in Woodstock and the larger Catskill Mountain region during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.” (1) The church interior is adorned with “ornate lattice and woodcarvings” (2) created by Father Francis and artwork depicting a wide range of scriptural and religious figures.

References:
(1) Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount. National Park Service, nomination form for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, Washington D.C. 2004.
(2) Ibid.

The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located high above the village of Woodstock.Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-MountWoodstock, Ulster County

The Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount is a simple, but picturesque, one-room church located near the summit of Meads Mountain Road high above the village of Woodstock. The church, originally known as the Episcopalian Chapel of Ease, was constructed in 1891 to serve seasonal visitors at the neighboring Mead’s Mountain House and the nearby Overlook Mountain House.

Since 1948, with the arrival of Father William Francis (1885-1979), the church has been affiliated with the Orthodox Church of the Western Rite. During the 1960s Father Francis would gain a small degree of fame as the “hippie priest” for his kindness, understanding and service to the young people of the era. According to various sources, Father Francis also spent time with Bob Dylan (a local resident of Woodstock) in the mid 1960s, with the humble priest serving as the inspiration behind Dylan’s song Father of Night. Today the church is led by the equally charismatic Father John Nelson, who first attended Easter Sunday service with Father Francis in 1970, and now serves as a local community leader and founder of the Woodstock Council for World Peace.

The Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as an “architecturally significant . . . relatively intact example of seasonal ecclesiastical architecture” and “for its association with the seasonal tourist industry in Woodstock and the larger Catskill Mountain region during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.” (1) The church interior is adorned with “ornate lattice and woodcarvings” (2) created by Father Francis and artwork depicting a wide range of scriptural and religious figures.

References:
(1) Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount. National Park Service, nomination form for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, Washington D.C. 2004.
(2) Ibid.

 

With the surprise of the church being open, and my additional wonder at the interior being so religiously striking and beautiful, I quickly began to photograph, focusing on the woodwork, close-ups of the religious artifacts, etc. I was inside taking photographs for about 15 minutes when I was startled by someone behind me walking through the front door. It was Father John Nelson.

 

Father Nelson and I would wind up talking for several hours. He told me a little bit about the church, and himself and asked about my photography. After some time, he then told me he wanted to show me a religious relic that was very important to him, which was located in his basic, monk-like dwelling not too far from the church building.

 

Although I do not remember some of the particulars, Father Nelson told me about the history of the relic, and how he had traveled years before to northwest US in search of the abandoned dwelling of an esteemed pastor of his church denomination who had died years before. This pastor had lived the life of solitude in a secluded monk-like environment, but had still managed to be known to others in the church. With only the most basic of information, Father Nelson searched the woods for this home for several days, but to no avail. As he was about to give up, Father Nelson found the home, perhaps with some divine intervention, and much to his happiness.

 

Although the dwelling was in relative ruins after years of abandonment, Father Nelson did find this historic religious artifact with the charcoal inscription “memento mori” arched over a skull and crossbones. The powerful Latin phrase “memento mori” can be translated to “remember death,” “remember that you have to die” or “remember that you are mortal.” Closely associated with Christianity, “memento mori” serves as a moral lesson, reminding believers to lead a meaningful and virtuous life as your time on earth is fleeting. As death is inevitable it was not something to fear, and by contemplating your own mortality it would lead you to reflect on your life and the emptiness of earthly possessions, pleasures and achievements; and lead you to focus on the afterlife and the eternal gift of God.

 

Father John Nelson, Memento Mori

Father John Nelson, pastor at the Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount, is holding an historic religious artifact with the charcoal inscription “memento mori” arched over a skullFather John NelsonChurch of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount, Woodstock, Ulster County

Father John Nelson (seen here), pastor at the Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount, is holding an historic religious artifact with the charcoal inscription “memento mori” arched over a skull and crossbones. The powerful Latin phrase ‘memento mori’ can be translated to “remember death”, “remember that you have to die” or “remember that you are mortal”. Closely associated with Christianity, “memento mori” serves as a moral lesson, reminding believers to lead a meaningful and virtuous life as your time on earth is fleeting. As death is inevitable it was not something to fear, and by contemplating your own mortality it would lead you to reflect on your life and the emptiness of earthly possessions, pleasures and achievements; and lead you to focus on the afterlife and the eternal gift of God.

 

Father John Nelson asked me to take a picture of him with the religious artifact, and also asked if I could send him some of the photographs of the church that I had taken. After getting home several days after taking the photographs, I processed the photos and sent him the best ones in an email. He responded to the email with much thanks. The photos were later used as part of a fundraising campaign for the church to help fund needed repairs.

 

In my photography of the Catskills, I do not take many photographs with people, and if there are people, they are usually small, often non-descript, and used only to offer a point of interest or offer a contrast in size to the surrounding landscape. That being said, this photograph of Father John Nelson continues to be one of my favorite photographs that I have ever taken in the Catskills. I fondly remember the brief time spent with the charismatic Father Nelson and the beauty of the small mountaintop church.

 

The combination of the portrait element of Father John Nelson, wearing a winter coat and hat in the chilly autumn weather, standing outside the most rustic of living quarters, while he holds an incredibly interesting religious artifact with a powerful and timeless meaning, and knowing the very personal story of how the religious artifact was obtained, provide multiple points of interest, which, when seamlessly united, seem to perfectly capture that moment in time.

 

After meeting Father Nelson that day I tried to learn a little bit more about him, who, as I found out, had led quite an interesting and varied life. John Nelson was born in 1950 in Maryland and was raised by his grandparents. He had found his way to the village of Woodstock by the late 1960s, and first attended Easter Sunday service with Father Francis in 1970. On his first visit to the mountain church, Nelson recalled, “I was immediately struck by the reverence being shown toward God, something that did not exist in typical American churches. It was something very old, and you could feel it.” (Woodstock Times. March 12, 2015.)

 

Intervening years found Nelson living in an intentional community in Stony Hollow, marrying several times, working as a woodworker and carpenter, studying the Celtic church in Ireland for several years, and ultimately studying in the early 1990s at the Western Rite Orthodox Monastery in New Jersey under the mentorship of Father Theodore, a Russian priest who had escaped the revolution. He would also lead a cover band called the Beagles, which was dedicated to the music of the Beatles and the Eagles.

 

By around 1995, Nelson would follow in the footsteps of Father Francis and personally lead the Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount. While serving the church, “he built a beautiful baptistry by closing in the old pavilion, creating a sleeping area, and lived there as a monk, under simple, primitive conditions. He also worked on the church structure, rebuilding the rood screen and shoring up areas that were decaying.” (Woodstock Times. August 10, 2017.)

 

For the next 22 years until his passing, Nelson served as a prominent local community leader. He helped found the Woodstock Council for World Peace, led the Woodstock March for Peace and was instrumental in getting the church listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. Father John Nelson died from liver cancer at Northern Dutchess Hospital on August 1, 2017. He is buried on the grounds of his beloved mountaintop church.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) architecture building Catskill Mountains Catskills Chapel of Ease Christ Church church Church of the Holy Transfiguration of Christ-on-the-Mount Father Francis Father John Nelson George Mead Jack Nelson John Nelson Meads Mountain House memento mori National Register of Historic Places New York Overlook Mountain Overlook Mountain House pastor photograph photography priest Richard Upjohn St. Dunstan's Church Ulster County William Henry Francis Woodstock https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/father-john-nelson-memento-mori Sat, 23 Mar 2024 12:00:00 GMT
Woodstock Artists Cemetery: A Photographic Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/woodstock-artists-cemetery-a-photographic-study Encircled by the everlasting hills

They rest here who added to the beauty of the world

By art, creative thought and by life itself.

                       - Dr. James T. Shotwell

 

Woodstock Artists CemeteryWoodstock Artists CemeteryArtists Cemetery, Woodstock, New York

They Rest HereThey Rest Here

RIP Ralph Radcliffe WhiteheadRIP Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead

 

Woodstock’s reverence for artists and their craft is not limited to the living, as the Woodstock Artists Cemetery pays eternal homage to local residents who have made their mark on the arts. Buried here are many great artists, musicians, writers, painters, sculptors and poets.

 

Among the well-known buried here are Milton Avery and Philip Guston, noted painters; Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead, Bolton Brown and Hervey White, co-founders of the Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony, now the oldest-operating arts colony in the country; Milton Glaser, graphic designer and creator of the I ♥ NY logo; and Howard Koch, who won an Academy Award as one of the screenwriters of the movie “Casablanca.”

 

The idea of the Woodstock Artists Cemetery was initiated in 1934 by John Kingsbury following the tragic death of his 18-year-old son, who died in a car accident while attending school in Andover, Massachusetts. Kingsbury, who had originally purchased an 80 ft. by 100 ft. plot of land on which to bury his son, was soon joined by his close friends Carl Lindin, James Shotwell, Bruno Zimm and James Stagg, who together purchased additional land to expand the cemetery. The Woodstock Memorial Society was officially established on November 4, 1934 to manage the cemetery.

 

In the hopes of preserving the natural environment and the beauty of the landscape, the cemetery established bylaws which prohibited many of the traditional symbols of grief. With the exception of the memorial to Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead, the cemetery requires that all gravestones are level to the earth. Cemetery bylaws also prohibit signs and grave mounds and containers for flowers were not permitted to rise more than two inches above the ground.

 

In line with their artistic backgrounds, many of the gravestones of the deceased include beautiful visual images such as a piano, a violin, a sailboat, a peace symbol, doves, musical notes, a sword, an acorn, a colorful sunburst, among many others. Some of the gravestones carry messages that attempt to sum up life in a few words such as “From Rain to Sunshine,” “He Has Loved the Stars Too Fondly to Be Fearful of the Night,” “Many Blessings on Your Sacred Journey,” “May All Beings Be Happy and Free from Suffering,” or “He Was a Man, Take Him for All in All I Shall Not Look Upon His Like Again.”  

 

At the top of the hill overlooking the cemetery, there is an imposing 10-ton bluestone monument set on a circular terrace that was created by sculptor Tomas Penning (1905-1982). The bluestone sculpture includes the inscription of Dr. James Shotwell’s words seen at the beginning of this blog post. Penning had settled in the hamlet of High Woods in Saugerties in the early 1930s and would become one of the leading sculptors in the village of Woodstock. He was an instructor for several years at the National Youth Administration Work Center in Woodstock. Penning honorably served during World War II from 1942 to 1946, including service in an army anti-aircraft unit in Tunis, North Africa.

 

The Woodstock Artists Cemetery is located at 12 Mountain View Avenue, just off Rock City Road, and only a short walk from the Village Green at the center of Woodstock. Visit the cemetery website at www.woodstockartistscemetery.org for more information.

 

RIP Clinton Woodbridge ParkerRIP Clinton Woodbridge Parker

Poet + Painter + PhilosopherPoet + Painter + Philosopher

RIP Albert GraeserRIP Albert Graeser

RIP AlekRIP Alek

RIP Richard E. TeeRIP Richard E. Tee

RIP Leonardo CiminoRIP Leonardo Cimino

ViolinistViolinist

At the EndAt the End

On the HorseOn the Horse

Many Blessings on Your Sacred JourneyMany Blessings on Your Sacred Journey

May All Beings Be Happy and Free From SufferingMay All Beings Be Happy and Free From SufferingRIP Carol Anderson, Woodstock Artists Cemetery.

PeacePeace

He was a manHe was a man

Seeds of LifeSeeds of Life

Cross of GodCross of God

Art at Woodstock Artists CemeteryArt at Woodstock Artists Cemetery

Our HomeOur Home

Crusader for PeaceCrusader for Peace

RIP Jenne Magafan ChavezRIP Jenne Magafan Chavez

The Song of LifeThe Song of Life

Two AcornsTwo Acorns

Reaching OutReaching Out

BugBug

Manhattanville College 1841Manhattanville College 1841

All I WantAll I Want

The Scenes of LifeThe Scenes of Life

LifeLife

RIP Hans J. CohnRIP Hans J. Cohn

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) artists Catskill Mountains Catskills cemetery graves musicians New York painters poets Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead sculptors Tomas Penning Ulster County Woodstock Woodstock Artists Cemetery Woodstock Memorial Society writers https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/woodstock-artists-cemetery-a-photographic-study Sat, 16 Mar 2024 12:00:00 GMT
John Kenneth Corbin: The First Aerial Photographs of Stamford, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/john-kenneth-corbin-the-first-aerial-photographs-of-stamford-new-york John Kenneth Corbin was born on September 5, 1902, the son of William and Mary Cowley Corbin. He was born in Stamford and graduated from the local high school. After high school he worked at the local railroad station for two years, before joining the National Bank of Stamford in 1923. He worked at the bank for over 40 years, from 1923 to his retirement in 1965. He was a veteran of the US Army during World War II, serving from December 1943 until his discharge in May 1945. He was an active member of the community, serving as a member of the Stamford Fire Department and the Methodist Church. He was a motorcycle enthusiast and an avid bowler, holding several local record high scores for many years.

 

Corbin was married to Eva Dederick on December 25, 1943 at Saugerties, New York. Eva worked as a teacher in the Stamford and South Kortright school systems for 23 years.

 

Mt. Utsayantha, Elev. 3365 Ft.Mt. Utsayantha, Elev. 3365 Ft.

 

In the late 1920s and early 1930s Corbin took to the air, earning his pilots license. Combining his love of flight and photography, Corbin took the first aerial pictures of the Stamford area in 1931. The first pictures were taken unassisted from his Allison monoplane with an ordinary No. 3 Brownie camera. The simple Brownie camera, first manufactured by the Eastman Kodak company in 1900, was inexpensive and easy to use, making it accessible to the general public and the growing population of amateur photographers. The No. 3 Brownie camera used by Corbin was manufactured from 1908 to 1934.

 

The Stamford Mirror-Recorder, the local newspaper, reported on these first aerial pictures in an article titled "First Airplane Views of Town." “One of the pictures, taken from a height of 1300 feet, shows how conspicuous as an identification mark the new pool in Indian Trail Park really is to visiting aviators. It also reveals that the South Street garage building of Cook & Son and the Stamford Opera House are two conspicuous landmarks, having as they do, two of the largest roof-spreads in town. The Cook & Son building especially stands out clearly and from its location it would make an ideal direction indicator for visiting pilots. The Hoagland garage block which already carries a direction arrow and the name of the airport, is clearly discernible at 1300 feet and should be instantly located by a pilot new to these parts. Stamford Arms stands out clearly as do the Belvedere and the Maselyn.

 

Another picture, taken at considerably greater height, looks directly down upon the Tower on Mt. Utsayantha – a white dot against a dark background. This picture shows what an unusually dense forest growth covers this mountain top. The automobile road which leads through the woods to the mountain top is completely hidden.” (Stamford Mirror-Recorder. September 17, 1931.)

 

In 1934 Corbin took a series of aerial photographs of Stamford, Mount Utsayantha, the village hotels and the surrounding region, pictures that were then made available for sale as postcards. Local resident Dayton Griffin piloted the plane while Corbin took the pictures.

 

“Stamford people who haven’t the courage to view their village from the air will soon have an opportunity to see what it looks like from above, through post cards which will shortly go on sale here . . .

 

Stamford people had forgotten that the village has a huge airport direction arrow painted on the roof of one of its larger buildings until they saw a picture taken by Mr. Corbin showing in sharp detail the West End area of Stamford village of which the Hoagland garage block was the center. There were many other pictures of various sections of the village, all unusually sharp and clear and giving a new and very favorable impression of the beautiful village in which we live.

 

Two of the pictures of the village were especially interesting. One shows the buildings which comprise The Maselyn Hotel group and Stamford Arms, together with Main Street and other buildings in that immediate section. The other picture shows the municipal pool in Indian Trail Park to splendid advantage.

 

Two unusually fine pictures of the New Rexmere Club Hotel have been obtained from the air by Mr. Corbin. In one picture the hotel and its immediate surroundings are beautifully reproduced. In the other picture the acres of lawns which spread out in all directions from the hotel are interestingly caught from a higher elevation.

 

Another view of the village is taken from the air from Hobart way and is quite inclusive. One of the prettiest pictures is that of The Chateau in Granthurst Park. Here a natural setting aids the camera and with close-cropped lawns and encircling trees the effect is pleasing indeed.

 

The Stamford Country Club, located on a sharply sloping hillside, has heretofore been difficult to photograph to advantage and as a result pictures for booklets have for years been taken showing the rear of the building. Part of Stamford’s picture problem this year was solved when Mr. Corbin took a picture of the club house from his plane. The picture is used in this year’s Stamford booklet issued by the Chamber of Commerce. Since that picture was taken, Mr. Corbin, flying at a much lower altitude, has secured an unusually fine picture.

 

The tower on Mt. Utsayantha and the automobile parking space on the top of this 3,365-foot peak were beautifully caught in a hazardous flight in which the plane must have barely skimmed the flag staff. The gnarled trees surrounding the tower which always attract the interest of the visitor are faithfully reproduced in the picture which incidentally is the first to be taken of the tower from the air.

 

There are other fine pictures of various sections of the village showing The Terrace, The Madison, the Watson Greenhouses, etc.

 

There were two other pictures of unusual interest. One a “still,” taken on Main Street during the flood of last March when West End residents in Stamford worked desperately nearly all day Sunday, March 4th, to truck away or break up the ice jams that formed constantly at the rear of Main Street business places on the upstream side. When the trucks proved too slow to handle the ice a double line of men extending across the street was formed and the cakes were broken up into small pieces and shoved through a manhole on the opposite side of the street, below the plugged culvert. The picture shows the string of men in action, with cakes of ice which they couldn’t for the moment handle spreading out upon the street.

 

The other picture, taken from the air, gives an impressive close-up of the mighty torrent that pours over Gilboa dam when the Old Schoharie Creek goes on a rampage. The camera caught it – mist and all.

 

The pictures, particularly those of Stamford, should provide something of interest for those who are ever seeking “something different” for their booklets.” (Stamford Mirror-Recorder. July 12, 1934.)

 

Upon his retirement from the National Bank of Stamford in 1965, Corbin and his wife moved to Bradenton, Florida. Corbin passed away a few years later after an extended illness on December 21, 1971 at the Manatee Memorial Hospital in Bradenton, Florida. Funeral services were held at Hall Funeral Home in Stamford, with Reverend William R. Phinney, pastor of the Jefferson United Methodist Church, officiating. John Kenneth Corbin and his wife Eva are both buried at Stamford Cemetery in Stamford, New York.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Catskills aerial airplane Catskill Mountains County" Delaware Eva Dederick J. K. Corbin John Kenneth Corbin Ken Corbin Kenneth Corbin National Bank of Stamford New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures pilot plane postcards Stamford https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/john-kenneth-corbin-the-first-aerial-photographs-of-stamford-new-york Sat, 09 Mar 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying Ground https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/crispell-memorial-french-church-and-burying-ground The Crispell Memorial French Church, to the surprise of many, is actually a 1972 reconstructed interpretation of the first 1717 stone church in New Paltz. The original church, which was also used as a school, served the early settlement for 56 years when a larger church was built to accommodate the growing congregation. The church is named for Antoine Crispell, one of the twelve founders of New Paltz. The adjacent Burying Ground contains many graves of the original 12 founding families of New Paltz. The last burial took place here in 1864.

 

New Paltz was founded in 1678 by French Huguenots, Protestant followers of John Calvin who had escaped religious persecution in France and emigrated to religiously tolerant countries around the world, including the United States. With the purchase of nearly 40,000 acres of land from the Esopus Indians, the 12 founding families, referred to as the Patentees (as they held the legal patent to the land), quickly left their young Kingston and Hurley homes and established a permanent settlement and farming community along the Wallkill River.

 

Peaceful Huguenot Street in downtown New Paltz offers a step back in time to these early days of the village. Charming, Dutch-inspired stone houses, many now active museums, provide a glimpse of what life was like in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Visitors can admire the quality architecture at the Freer House, Abraham Hasbrouck House, Bevier-Elting House, DuBois Fort, Jean Hasbrouck House and the LeFevre House, as well as a reconstructed 1717 church. There is also an 18th century burial ground, a visitor center, educational exhibits and many of the homes are open for tours. Huguenot Street, marketing itself as “the oldest street in America with its original houses”, is listed on the register of National Historic Landmark Districts.

 

Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying Ground is located along historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz, New York.Morning Light at the Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying GroundThe Crispell Memorial French Church, to the surprise of many, is actually a 1972 reconstructed interpretation of the first 1717 stone church in New Paltz. The original church, which was also used as a school, served the early settlement for 56 years when a larger church was built to accommodate the growing congregation. The church is named for Antoine Crispell, one of the twelve founders of New Paltz. The adjacent Burying Ground contains many graves of the original 12 founding families of New Paltz. The last burial took place here in 1864.

New Paltz was founded in 1678 by French Huguenots, Protestant followers of John Calvin who had escaped religious persecution in France and emigrated to religiously tolerant countries around the world, including the United States. With the purchase of nearly 40,000 acres of land from the Esopus Indians, the 12 founding families, referred to as the Patentees (as they held the legal patent to the land), quickly left their young Kingston and Hurley homes and established a permanent settlement and farming community along the Wallkill River.

Peaceful Huguenot Street in downtown New Paltz offers a step back in time to these early days of the village. Charming, Dutch-inspired stone houses, many now active museums, provide a glimpse of what life was like in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Visitors can admire the quality architecture at the Freer House, Abraham Hasbrouck House, Bevier-Elting House, DuBois Fort, Jean Hasbrouck House and the LeFevre House, as well as a reconstructed 1717 church. There is also an 18th century burial ground, a visitor center, educational exhibits and many of the homes are open for tours. Huguenot Street, marketing itself as “the oldest street in America with its original houses”, is listed on the register of National Historic Landmark Districts.

Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying Ground is located along historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz, New York.Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying GroundThe Crispell Memorial French Church, to the surprise of many, is actually a 1972 reconstructed interpretation of the first 1717 stone church in New Paltz. The original church, which was also used as a school, served the early settlement for 56 years when a larger church was built to accommodate the growing congregation. The church is named for Antoine Crispell, one of the twelve founders of New Paltz. The adjacent Burying Ground contains many graves of the original 12 founding families of New Paltz. The last burial took place here in 1864.

New Paltz was founded in 1678 by French Huguenots, Protestant followers of John Calvin who had escaped religious persecution in France and emigrated to religiously tolerant countries around the world, including the United States. With the purchase of nearly 40,000 acres of land from the Esopus Indians, the 12 founding families, referred to as the Patentees (as they held the legal patent to the land), quickly left their young Kingston and Hurley homes and established a permanent settlement and farming community along the Wallkill River.

Peaceful Huguenot Street in downtown New Paltz offers a step back in time to these early days of the village. Charming, Dutch-inspired stone houses, many now active museums, provide a glimpse of what life was like in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Visitors can admire the quality architecture at the Freer House, Abraham Hasbrouck House, Bevier-Elting House, DuBois Fort, Jean Hasbrouck House and the LeFevre House, as well as a reconstructed 1717 church. There is also an 18th century burial ground, a visitor center, educational exhibits and many of the homes are open for tours. Huguenot Street, marketing itself as “the oldest street in America with its original houses”, is listed on the register of National Historic Landmark Districts.

Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying Ground is located along historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz, New York.The Light of GodThe Crispell Memorial French Church, to the surprise of many, is actually a 1972 reconstructed interpretation of the first 1717 stone church in New Paltz. The original church, which was also used as a school, served the early settlement for 56 years when a larger church was built to accommodate the growing congregation. The church is named for Antoine Crispell, one of the twelve founders of New Paltz. The adjacent Burying Ground contains many graves of the original 12 founding families of New Paltz. The last burial took place here in 1864.

New Paltz was founded in 1678 by French Huguenots, Protestant followers of John Calvin who had escaped religious persecution in France and emigrated to religiously tolerant countries around the world, including the United States. With the purchase of nearly 40,000 acres of land from the Esopus Indians, the 12 founding families, referred to as the Patentees (as they held the legal patent to the land), quickly left their young Kingston and Hurley homes and established a permanent settlement and farming community along the Wallkill River.

Peaceful Huguenot Street in downtown New Paltz offers a step back in time to these early days of the village. Charming, Dutch-inspired stone houses, many now active museums, provide a glimpse of what life was like in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Visitors can admire the quality architecture at the Freer House, Abraham Hasbrouck House, Bevier-Elting House, DuBois Fort, Jean Hasbrouck House and the LeFevre House, as well as a reconstructed 1717 church. There is also an 18th century burial ground, a visitor center, educational exhibits and many of the homes are open for tours. Huguenot Street, marketing itself as “the oldest street in America with its original houses”, is listed on the register of National Historic Landmark Districts.

Crispell Memorial French Church and Burying Ground is located along historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz, New York.Autumn at the Crispell Memorial French ChurchThe Crispell Memorial French Church, to the surprise of many, is actually a 1972 reconstructed interpretation of the first 1717 stone church in New Paltz. The original church, which was also used as a school, served the early settlement for 56 years when a larger church was built to accommodate the growing congregation. The church is named for Antoine Crispell, one of the twelve founders of New Paltz. The adjacent Burying Ground contains many graves of the original 12 founding families of New Paltz. The last burial took place here in 1864.

New Paltz was founded in 1678 by French Huguenots, Protestant followers of John Calvin who had escaped religious persecution in France and emigrated to religiously tolerant countries around the world, including the United States. With the purchase of nearly 40,000 acres of land from the Esopus Indians, the 12 founding families, referred to as the Patentees (as they held the legal patent to the land), quickly left their young Kingston and Hurley homes and established a permanent settlement and farming community along the Wallkill River.

Peaceful Huguenot Street in downtown New Paltz offers a step back in time to these early days of the village. Charming, Dutch-inspired stone houses, many now active museums, provide a glimpse of what life was like in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Visitors can admire the quality architecture at the Freer House, Abraham Hasbrouck House, Bevier-Elting House, DuBois Fort, Jean Hasbrouck House and the LeFevre House, as well as a reconstructed 1717 church. There is also an 18th century burial ground, a visitor center, educational exhibits and many of the homes are open for tours. Huguenot Street, marketing itself as “the oldest street in America with its original houses”, is listed on the register of National Historic Landmark Districts.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Abraham Hasbrouck House architecture Bevier-Elting House building burial burial ground burying ground church congregation Crispell Memorial French Church DuBois Fort educational Esopus Indians exhibit family field stone founder France Freer House grave headstone Historic Huguenot Street home house Huguenot Huguenot Street Jean Hasbrouck House John Calvin LeFevre House museum National Historic Landmark District New Paltz Patentee persecution Protestant religion school settlement stone tours United States village visitor center Wallkill River https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/3/crispell-memorial-french-church-and-burying-ground Sat, 02 Mar 2024 13:00:00 GMT
The Rondout Effect https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/the-rondout-effect The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

 

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

 

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

 

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

Mural by Matthew Pleva at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in the Rondout District of Kingston, New York depicting the Rondout Lighthouse, buildings of the Strand, a Viking ship, small boat fishermenThe Rondout EffectKingston, Ulster County

The Rondout Effect, located at the Riverport Wooden Boat School in Kingston, New York, is an impressive mural depicting scenes typical of the Rondout District including boating, the Rondout Lighthouse, and the buildings of the Strand. The mural was created in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. It is the first O+ mural in the downtown section of Kingston.

The Rondout Effect is the creation of local artist Matthew Pleva, a Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate. This is Pleva’s second work for the O+ festival. His first, titled Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, prominently overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The Hobgoblin mural features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well as the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) art artist dance festival Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church Kingston Matthew Pleva medicine mural music O positive festival O+ Festival paint Peace Park performance art Riverport Wooden Boat School Rondout District sculpture Stockade District The Rondout Effect Ulster County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/the-rondout-effect Sat, 24 Feb 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Heading to Kingston Point https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/heading-to-kingston-point The non-profit Trolley Museum of New York, located in the Rondout waterfront section of Kingston, has on display trolley cars from around the world. Visitors can also hop on to take a 1 ½ mile trolley ride with stops at T. R. Gallo Park and out to Kingston Point, all while taking in great views of the Hudson River and the Rondout Lighthouse.

 

Trolley #358, seen here, is making its way towards Kingston Point. This trolley originally operated in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. It was manufactured in 1925 by the St. Louis Car Co. for the Johnstown Traction Company. After Johnstown abandoned its street railway in June 1960 the car was sent to Stone Mountain, Georgia, where it operated as part of a tourist ride around the mountain. The Trolley Museum of New York then acquired trolley #358 in 1991 and undertook an extensive restoration. In 2000 trolley #358 began to carry its first Kingston passengers and continues this service today. The trolley weighs 38,380 pounds and originally had seating capacity for 44.

 

For more information about the Trolley Museum and the trolley rides, check out their website at www.tmny.com.

 

Visitors to the Trolley Museum of New York, located in the Rondout waterfront section of Kingston, can hop on a working trolley to take a 1 ½ mile trolley ride out to Kingston Point.A Step Back in TimeKingston, Ulster County

The non-profit Trolley Museum of New York, located in the Rondout waterfront section of Kingston, has on display trolley cars from around the world. Visitors can also hop on to take a 1 ½ mile trolley ride with stops at T. R. Gallo Park and out to Kingston Point, all while taking in great views of the Hudson River and the Rondout Lighthouse.

Trolley #358, seen here, is making its way towards Kingston Point. This trolley originally operated in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. It was manufactured in 1925 by the St. Louis Car Co. for the Johnstown Traction Company. After Johnstown abandoned its street railway in June 1960 the car was sent to Stone Mountain, Georgia, where it operated as part of a tourist ride around the mountain. The Trolley Museum of New York then acquired trolley #358 in 1991 and undertook an extensive restoration. In 2000 trolley #358 began to carry its first Kingston passengers and continues this service today. The trolley weighs 38,380 pounds and originally had seating capacity for 44.

For more information about the Trolley Museum and the trolley rides, check out their website at www.tmny.com.

 

Visitors to the Trolley Museum of New York, located in the Rondout waterfront section of Kingston, can hop on a working trolley to take a 1 ½ mile trolley ride out to Kingston Point.Heading to Kingston PointKingston, Ulster County

The non-profit Trolley Museum of New York, located in the Rondout waterfront section of Kingston, has on display trolley cars from around the world. Visitors can also hop on to take a 1 ½ mile trolley ride with stops at T. R. Gallo Park and out to Kingston Point, all while taking in great views of the Hudson River and the Rondout Lighthouse.

Trolley #358, seen here, is making its way towards Kingston Point. This trolley originally operated in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. It was manufactured in 1925 by the St. Louis Car Co. for the Johnstown Traction Company. After Johnstown abandoned its street railway in June 1960 the car was sent to Stone Mountain, Georgia, where it operated as part of a tourist ride around the mountain. The Trolley Museum of New York then acquired trolley #358 in 1991 and undertook an extensive restoration. In 2000 trolley #358 began to carry its first Kingston passengers and continues this service today. The trolley weighs 38,380 pounds and originally had seating capacity for 44.

For more information about the Trolley Museum and the trolley rides, check out their website at www.tmny.com.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) 325 car Catskill Mountains Catskills fare Georgia Heading to Kingston Point Hudson River Johnstown Johnstown Traction Company Kingston mountain museum New York passengers Pennsylvania railway ride Rondout Rondout Lighthouse St. Louis Car Co. Stone Mountain street T. R. Gallo Park trolley Trolley Museum Trolley Museum of New York Ulster County water waterfront https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/heading-to-kingston-point Sat, 17 Feb 2024 13:00:00 GMT
The Statues of Academy Green, Kingston, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/the-statues-of-academy-green-kingston-new-york Academy Green holds a distinguished place in Kingston’s history. Governor Peter Stuyvesant negotiated a peace treaty here in 1660 between early settlers and the local Esopus Indians. Ulster County troops drilled on the site prior to entering the Civil War. From 1830 to 1916, Academy Green was the site of the Kingston Academy, the oldest preparatory school in New York State, which instructed students on mathematics, science, the arts and languages. After the Kingston Academy’s demolition in 1916, with students moving to a new location at the Kingston High School, Academy Green became a park in 1918. 

 

Academy Green is home to three 11-foot bronze sculptures of Peter Stuyvesant, George Clinton and Henry Hudson, each of whom left a lasting impact on the Kingston region. The 1898 monuments are the work of noted sculptor John Massey Rhind (1860-1936) and were produced by the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York. The statues were originally located Exchange Court building in Manhattan. When that building was being remodeled in the late 1940s, the sculptures, unbelievably, wound up in a junkyard as scrap. Fortunately, after seeing a newspaper article about the building remodeling, Emily Crane Chadbourne, president of Kingston’s Senate House Association, tracked down the junkyard and sought to rescue the statues. She purchased and donated the statues to the city of Kingston. The statues were installed on large pedestals of local bluestone at Academy Green, and a dedication ceremony led my Kingston Mayor Oscar Newkirk took place in June 1950. 

 

George Clinton (1739-1812) led a remarkable career and left a lasting legacy on both his home state of New York and his country. He was the first Governor of New York and served for 21 years, the longest serving governor in state history. He was a delegate to the 2nd Continental Congress, served honorably as a Brigadier General in the Continental Army during the American Revolution and is considered by many to be one of the Founding Fathers of the country. Clinton served as Vice President of the United States under two different presidents, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, one of only two men to hold that distinction. He is buried at the Old Dutch Church in the Stockade District of Kingston.

 

Peter Stuyvesant (1612-1672) was the Director General (i.e. Governor) of New Netherlands, a Dutch colony, from 1647 until 1664. In 1664, the English gained control of New Amsterdam, and thus all of the New Netherlands colony, and it was renamed New York. Stuyvesant left a lasting legacy on the colony with the introduction of strict new laws, establishment of a municipal government and the expansion of the colony beyond Manhattan.

 

Henry Hudson (c. 1570-1611) was an English sea explorer. In 1609, working on behalf of the Dutch East India Company, Hudson was the first European to sail up the Hudson River (obviously named in his honor). His explorations led to the Dutch colonization of the region, the establishment of New Netherland and the settlement of Kingston (then known as Wiltwyck).

 

George Clinton

Academy Green in Kingston, New York is home to monuments of Peter Stuyvesant, Henry Hudson and George Clinton.George ClintonAcademy Green, Kingston, Ulster County

Academy Green holds a distinguished place in Kingston’s history. Governor Peter Stuyvesant negotiated a peace treaty here in 1660 between early settlers and the local Esopus Indians. Ulster County troops drilled on the site prior to entering the Civil War. From 1830 to 1916, Academy Green was the site of the Kingston Academy, the oldest preparatory school in New York State, which instructed students on mathematics, science, the arts and languages. After the Kingston Academy’s demolition in 1916, with students moving to a new location at the Kingston High School, Academy Green became a park in 1918.

Academy Green is home to three 11-foot bronze sculptures of Peter Stuyvesant, George Clinton and Henry Hudson, each of whom left a lasting impact on the Kingston region. The 1898 monuments are the work of noted sculptor John Massey Rhind (1860-1936) and were produced by the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York. The statues were originally located Exchange Court building in Manhattan. When that building was being remodeled in the late 1940s, the sculptures, unbelievably, wound up in a junkyard as scrap. Fortunately, after seeing a newspaper article about the building remodeling, Emily Crane Chadbourne, president of Kingston’s Senate House Association, tracked down the junkyard and sought to rescue the statues. She purchased and donated the statues to the city of Kingston. The statues were installed on large pedestals of local bluestone at Academy Green, and a dedication ceremony led my Kingston Mayor Oscar Newkirk took place in June 1950.

George Clinton (1739-1812), pictured here, led a remarkable career and left a lasting legacy on both his home state of New York and his country. He was the first Governor of New York and served for 21 years, the longest serving governor in state history. He was a delegate to the 2nd Continental Congress, served honorably as a Brigadier General in the Continental Army during the American Revolution and is considered by many to be one of the Founding Fathers of the country. Clinton served as Vice President of the United States under two different presidents, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, one of only two men to hold that distinction. He is buried at the Old Dutch Church in the Stockade District of Kingston.

 

Peter Stuyvesant

Academy Green in Kingston, New York is home to monuments of Peter Stuyvesant, Henry Hudson and George Clinton.Peter StuyvesantAcademy Green, Kingston, Ulster County

Academy Green holds a distinguished place in Kingston’s history. Governor Peter Stuyvesant negotiated a peace treaty here in 1660 between early settlers and the local Esopus Indians. Ulster County troops drilled on the site prior to entering the Civil War. From 1830 to 1916, Academy Green was the site of the Kingston Academy, the oldest preparatory school in New York State, which instructed students on mathematics, science, the arts and languages. After the Kingston Academy’s demolition in 1916, with students moving to a new location at the Kingston High School, Academy Green became a park in 1918.

Academy Green is home to three 11-foot bronze sculptures of Peter Stuyvesant, George Clinton and Henry Hudson, each of whom left a lasting impact on the Kingston region. The 1898 monuments are the work of noted sculptor John Massey Rhind (1860-1936) and were produced by the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York. The statues were originally located Exchange Court building in Manhattan. When that building was being remodeled in the late 1940s, the sculptures, unbelievably, wound up in a junkyard as scrap. Fortunately, after seeing a newspaper article about the building remodeling, Emily Crane Chadbourne, president of Kingston’s Senate House Association, tracked down the junkyard and sought to rescue the statues. She purchased and donated the statues to the city of Kingston. The statues were installed on large pedestals of local bluestone at Academy Green, and a dedication ceremony led my Kingston Mayor Oscar Newkirk took place in June 1950.

Peter Stuyvesant (1612-1672), pictured here, was the Director General (i.e. Governor) of New Netherlands, a Dutch colony, from 1647 until 1664. In 1664, the English gained control of New Amsterdam, and thus all of the New Netherlands colony, and it was renamed New York. Stuyvesant left a lasting legacy on the colony with the introduction of strict new laws, establishment of a municipal government and the expansion of the colony beyond Manhattan.

 

Henry Hudson

Academy Green in Kingston, New York is home to monuments of Peter Stuyvesant, Henry Hudson and George Clinton.Henry HudsonAcademy Green, Kingston, Ulster County

Academy Green holds a distinguished place in Kingston’s history. Governor Peter Stuyvesant negotiated a peace treaty here in 1660 between early settlers and the local Esopus Indians. Ulster County troops drilled on the site prior to entering the Civil War. From 1830 to 1916, Academy Green was the site of the Kingston Academy, the oldest preparatory school in New York State, which instructed students on mathematics, science, the arts and languages. After the Kingston Academy’s demolition in 1916, with students moving to a new location at the Kingston High School, Academy Green became a park in 1918.

Academy Green is home to three 11-foot bronze sculptures of Peter Stuyvesant, George Clinton and Henry Hudson, each of whom left a lasting impact on the Kingston region. The 1898 monuments are the work of noted sculptor John Massey Rhind (1860-1936) and were produced by the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York. The statues were originally located Exchange Court building in Manhattan. When that building was being remodeled in the late 1940s, the sculptures, unbelievably, wound up in a junkyard as scrap. Fortunately, after seeing a newspaper article about the building remodeling, Emily Crane Chadbourne, president of Kingston’s Senate House Association, tracked down the junkyard and sought to rescue the statues. She purchased and donated the statues to the city of Kingston. The statues were installed on large pedestals of local bluestone at Academy Green, and a dedication ceremony led my Kingston Mayor Oscar Newkirk took place in June 1950.

Henry Hudson (c. 1570-1611), pictured here, was an English sea explorer. In 1609, working on behalf of the Dutch East India Company, Hudson was the first European to sail up the Hudson River (obviously named in his honor). His explorations led to the Dutch colonization of the region, the establishment of New Netherland and the settlement of Kingston (then known as Wiltwyck).

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Academy Green American Revolution bluestone Brigadier General colony Continental Congress dedication Director General Dutch East India Company Emily Crane Chadbourne Esopus Indians Exchange Court explorer Founding Father George Clinton Gorham Manufacturing Company Governor Henry Hudson Hudson River James Madison John Massey Rhind Kingston Kingston Academy Manhattan military monument New Amsterdam New Netherland New York Old Dutch Church Oscar Newkirk park Peter Stuyvesant sculptor sculpture Senate House Association statue Stockade District Thomas Jefferson Vice President Wiltwyck https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/the-statues-of-academy-green-kingston-new-york Sat, 10 Feb 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Billy Costello: The Pride of Kingston https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/billy-costello-the-pride-of-kingston Billy Costello (1956-2011) was a native of Kingston, New York who became a boxing world champion. Costello took up boxing at the relatively late age of 19, but showed quickly that he was a natural fighter. He won the New York Golden Gloves championship in 1978 and turned professional a year later, winning his first 30 fights. In 1984 Costello became the undefeated WBC light welterweight champion with a technical knockout of Bruce Curry. He successfully defended his title three times against Ronnie Shields, Saoul Mamby and Leroy Haley, before losing his fourth title defense to the undefeated Lonnie Smith. He left boxing in 1986 with a loss to Alexis Arguello, but returned in 1992 for nine more fights, all victories, before retiring for good in 1999. After a 20-year career, Costello retired with an impressive record of 40 wins, 2 defeats, with both defeats coming at the hands of world champions.

 

Billy Costello is fondly remembered in his native Kingston, for his humble beginnings, for notably holding three of his championship fights in his hometown, for setting up the local boxing program with the Kingston Police Athletic League, and ultimately for his toughness and dedication to the sport. The statue of Costello is prominently located at a busy intersection in that city for all those who pass to remember his athletic greatness. The life-sized, white granite statue was dedicated in 2012, only a year after his passing. The dedication ceremony was well attended by family, local residents, boxing fans and local dignitaries.

 

Inspirational quotes by Billy Costello, Kingston native and WBC light welterweight boxing champion from January 29, 1984 to August 21, 1985.

 

  • “Everyone was always telling me, ‘Billy, you can’t do this’ and ‘Billy, you can’t do that.’ But all that ever did was make me more determined than before.”

 

  • “They had some boxing equipment in the gym, and I figured, why not try it? One day on the heavy bag and it was like God saying to me, this is what you’re supposed to do.”

 

  • “I looked across the ring and I said to myself, I’m here. People put me down all my life, but I’m here.” – Billy Costello talks of his mindset on January 29, 1984 as he entered the ring for his title fight with Bruce Curry in Beaumont, Texas. Costello knocked out Curry in the 10th round to win the WBC light welterweight title.

 

Life-sized, white granite sculpture of Billy Costello, former boxing world champion and native of Kingston, New York.Billy CostelloKingston, Ulster County

Billy Costello (1956-2011) was a native of Kingston, New York who became a boxing world champion. Costello took up boxing at the relatively late age of 19, but showed quickly that he was a natural fighter. He won the New York Golden Gloves championship in 1978 and turned professional a year later, winning his first 30 fights. In 1984 Costello became the undefeated WBC light welterweight champion with a technical knockout of Bruce Curry. He successfully defended his title three times against Ronnie Shields, Saoul Mamby and Leroy Haley, before losing his fourth title defense to the undefeated Lonnie Smith. He left boxing in 1986 with a loss to Alexis Arguello, but returned in 1992 for nine more fights, all victories, before retiring for good in 1999. After a 20-year career, Costello retired with an impressive record of 40 wins, 2 defeats, with both defeats coming at the hands of world champions.

Billy Costello is fondly remembered in his native Kingston, for his humble beginnings, for notably holding three of his championship fights in his hometown, for setting up the local boxing program with the Kingston Police Athletic League, and ultimately for his toughness and dedication to the sport. The statue of Costello is prominently located at a busy intersection in that city for all those who pass to remember his athletic greatness. The life-sized, white granite statue was dedicated in 2012, only a year after his passing. The dedication ceremony was well attended by family, local residents, boxing fans and local dignitaries.

 

Life-sized, white granite sculpture of Billy Costello, former boxing world champion and native of Kingston, New York.Billy CostelloKingston, Ulster County

Billy Costello (1956-2011) was a native of Kingston, New York who became a boxing world champion. Costello took up boxing at the relatively late age of 19, but showed quickly that he was a natural fighter. He won the New York Golden Gloves championship in 1978 and turned professional a year later, winning his first 30 fights. In 1984 Costello became the undefeated WBC light welterweight champion with a technical knockout of Bruce Curry. He successfully defended his title three times against Ronnie Shields, Saoul Mamby and Leroy Haley, before losing his fourth title defense to the undefeated Lonnie Smith. He left boxing in 1986 with a loss to Alexis Arguello, but returned in 1992 for nine more fights, all victories, before retiring for good in 1999. After a 20-year career, Costello retired with an impressive record of 40 wins, 2 defeats, with both defeats coming at the hands of world champions.

Billy Costello is fondly remembered in his native Kingston, for his humble beginnings, for notably holding three of his championship fights in his hometown, for setting up the local boxing program with the Kingston Police Athletic League, and ultimately for his toughness and dedication to the sport. The statue of Costello is prominently located at a busy intersection in that city for all those who pass to remember his athletic greatness. The life-sized, white granite statue was dedicated in 2012, only a year after his passing. The dedication ceremony was well attended by family, local residents, boxing fans and local dignitaries.

 

Life-sized, white granite sculpture of Billy Costello, former boxing world champion and native of Kingston, New York.Billy CostelloKingston, Ulster County

Billy Costello (1956-2011) was a native of Kingston, New York who became a boxing world champion. Costello took up boxing at the relatively late age of 19, but showed quickly that he was a natural fighter. He won the New York Golden Gloves championship in 1978 and turned professional a year later, winning his first 30 fights. In 1984 Costello became the undefeated WBC light welterweight champion with a technical knockout of Bruce Curry. He successfully defended his title three times against Ronnie Shields, Saoul Mamby and Leroy Haley, before losing his fourth title defense to the undefeated Lonnie Smith. He left boxing in 1986 with a loss to Alexis Arguello, but returned in 1992 for nine more fights, all victories, before retiring for good in 1999. After a 20-year career, Costello retired with an impressive record of 40 wins, 2 defeats, with both defeats coming at the hands of world champions.

Billy Costello is fondly remembered in his native Kingston, for his humble beginnings, for notably holding three of his championship fights in his hometown, for setting up the local boxing program with the Kingston Police Athletic League, and ultimately for his toughness and dedication to the sport. The statue of Costello is prominently located at a busy intersection in that city for all those who pass to remember his athletic greatness. The life-sized, white granite statue was dedicated in 2012, only a year after his passing. The dedication ceremony was well attended by family, local residents, boxing fans and local dignitaries.

 

Life-sized, white granite sculpture of Billy Costello, former boxing world champion and native of Kingston, New York.Billy CostelloKingston, Ulster County

Billy Costello (1956-2011) was a native of Kingston, New York who became a boxing world champion. Costello took up boxing at the relatively late age of 19, but showed quickly that he was a natural fighter. He won the New York Golden Gloves championship in 1978 and turned professional a year later, winning his first 30 fights. In 1984 Costello became the undefeated WBC light welterweight champion with a technical knockout of Bruce Curry. He successfully defended his title three times against Ronnie Shields, Saoul Mamby and Leroy Haley, before losing his fourth title defense to the undefeated Lonnie Smith. He left boxing in 1986 with a loss to Alexis Arguello, but returned in 1992 for nine more fights, all victories, before retiring for good in 1999. After a 20-year career, Costello retired with an impressive record of 40 wins, 2 defeats, with both defeats coming at the hands of world champions.

Billy Costello is fondly remembered in his native Kingston, for his humble beginnings, for notably holding three of his championship fights in his hometown, for setting up the local boxing program with the Kingston Police Athletic League, and ultimately for his toughness and dedication to the sport. The statue of Costello is prominently located at a busy intersection in that city for all those who pass to remember his athletic greatness. The life-sized, white granite statue was dedicated in 2012, only a year after his passing. The dedication ceremony was well attended by family, local residents, boxing fans and local dignitaries.

Life-sized, white granite sculpture of Billy Costello, former boxing world champion and native of Kingston, New York.ChampKingston, Ulster County

Inspirational quotes by Billy Costello, Kingston native and WBC light welterweight boxing champion from January 29, 1984 to August 21, 1985.

“Everyone was always telling me, ‘Billy, you can’t do this’ and ‘Billy, you can’t do that.’ But all that ever did was make me more determined than before.”

“They had some boxing equipment in the gym, and I figured, why not try it? One day on the heavy bag and it was like God saying to me, this is what you’re supposed to do.”

“I looked across the ring and I said to myself, I’m here. People put me down all my life, but I’m here.” – Billy Costello talks of his mindset on January 29, 1984 as he entered the ring for his title fight with Bruce Curry in Beaumont, Texas. Costello knocked out Curry in the 10th round to win the WBC light welterweight title.

Life-sized, white granite sculpture of Billy Costello, former boxing world champion and native of Kingston, New York.ChampKingston, Ulster County

Inspirational quotes by Billy Costello, Kingston native and WBC light welterweight boxing champion from January 29, 1984 to August 21, 1985.

“Everyone was always telling me, ‘Billy, you can’t do this’ and ‘Billy, you can’t do that.’ But all that ever did was make me more determined than before.”

“They had some boxing equipment in the gym, and I figured, why not try it? One day on the heavy bag and it was like God saying to me, this is what you’re supposed to do.”

“I looked across the ring and I said to myself, I’m here. People put me down all my life, but I’m here.” – Billy Costello talks of his mindset on January 29, 1984 as he entered the ring for his title fight with Bruce Curry in Beaumont, Texas. Costello knocked out Curry in the 10th round to win the WBC light welterweight title.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Billy Costello boxer boxing Bruce Curry Catskill Mountains Catskills champion Golden Gloves Kingston monument New York sculpture statue title Ulster County WBC welterweight world champion https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/2/billy-costello-the-pride-of-kingston Sat, 03 Feb 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Patriotism https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/patriotism Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery in Kingston, New York, the 16-foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their military service during the Civil War. The 120th New York Infantry unit was led by General George H. Sharpe (1828-1900), a prominent member of the Old Dutch Church parish, and contained many men from the church. The distinguished unit fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Appomattox Court House, which are but a few of their many battles.

 

Following the Civil War, General Sharpe erected the statue in honor of the men of his command. The statue depicts “the figure of a young and beautiful woman who stands in a graceful attitude on top of the pedestal holding aloft a flag. The pedestal is of red granite from Stony Creek, Conn., and is made of the same kind of stone as that used in the construction of the statue of the Goddess of Liberty, in New York Harbor." (Kingston Daily Freeman, October 17, 1896) The statue was dedicated on October 17, 1896. The statue was created by sculptor Byron M. Pickett (1834-1907) and cast at the foundry of M. J. Power of New York City. The statue was restored in 1996 by Coryat Casting Company.

 

One plaque on the base of the statue contains an approximation of the Great Seal of the United States, which includes the United States motto of “E Pluribus Unum.” Translated from Latin, the motto means “Out of many, one.”

 

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their militaPatriotismStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their military service during the Civil War. The 120th New York Infantry unit was led by General George H. Sharpe (1828-1900), a prominent member of the Old Dutch Church parish, and contained many men from the church. The distinguished unit fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Appomattox Court House, which are but a few of their many battles.

Following the Civil War, General Sharpe erected the statue in honor of the men of his command. The statue depicts “the figure of a young and beautiful woman who stands in a graceful attitude on top of the pedestal holding aloft a flag. The pedestal is of red granite from Stony Creek, Conn., and is made of the same kind of stone as that used in the construction of the statue of the Goddess of Liberty, in New York Harbor." (Kingston Daily Freeman, October 17, 1896) The statue was dedicated on October 17, 1896. The statue was created by sculptor Byron M. Pickett (1834-1907) and cast at the foundry of M. J. Power of New York City. The statue was restored in 1996 by Coryat Casting Company.

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their militaE pluribus unumStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their military service during the Civil War. The 120th New York Infantry unit was led by General George H. Sharpe (1828-1900), a prominent member of the Old Dutch Church parish, and contained many men from the church. The distinguished unit fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Appomattox Court House, which are but a few of their many battles.

Following the Civil War, General Sharpe erected the statue in honor of the men of his command. The statue depicts “the figure of a young and beautiful woman who stands in a graceful attitude on top of the pedestal holding aloft a flag. The pedestal is of red granite from Stony Creek, Conn., and is made of the same kind of stone as that used in the construction of the statue of the Goddess of Liberty, in New York Harbor." (Kingston Daily Freeman, October 17, 1896) The statue was dedicated on October 17, 1896. The statue was created by sculptor Byron M. Pickett (1834-1907) and cast at the foundry of M. J. Power of New York City. The statue was restored in 1996 by Coryat Casting Company.

The plaque contains an approximation of the Great Seal of the United States, which includes the Unites States motto of “E Pluribus Unum.” Translated from Latin, the motto means “Out of many, one.”

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) 120th New York State Infantry Appomattox Court House Byron M. Pickett cemetery Chancellorsville church church yard Coryat Casting Company E Pluribus Unum flag Fredericksburg General George H. Sharpe Gettysburg graveyard Great Kingston M. J. Power memorial military monument motto New York City of Old Dutch Church Out of many one Patriotism restoration restore sculpture seal soldier States" statue Statue of Liberty Stockade District stone Stony Creek the Ulster County United uptown woman https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/patriotism Sat, 27 Jan 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/staff-sergeant-robert-dietz Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor.

 

Dietz served as a squad leader in Company A, 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, 7th Armored Division during World War II. During the battle for Kirchain, Germany in March 1945, Dietz braved heavy enemy fire to kill several enemy bazooka teams, bayoneted an enemy soldier, shot 3 German soldiers, all in his pursuit to prevent the enemy from using demolition charges set to blow up two bridges that were vital to the American attack on Kirchain. He succeeded in killing several teams of enemy soldiers protecting the first bridge and personally dismantled the charges on the second bridge but “as he stood up to signal that the route was clear, he was killed by another enemy volley from the left flank.”

 

Dietz is buried at Wiltwyck Cemetery in Kingston. Dietz Memorial Stadium in uptown Kingston and the Staff Sgt. Robert H. Dietz Post Office are both named in his honor.

 

Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor.Medal of HonorWiltwyck Cemetery, Kingston, Ulster County

Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor. Dietz served as a squad leader in Company A, 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, 7th Armored Division during World War II. During the battle for Kirchain, Germany in March 1945, Dietz braved heavy enemy fire to kill several enemy bazooka teams, bayoneted an enemy soldier, shot 3 German soldiers, all in his pursuit to prevent the enemy from using demolition charges set to blow up two bridges that were vital to the American attack on Kirchain. He succeeded in killing several teams of enemy soldiers protecting the first bridge and personally dismantled the charges on the second bridge but “as as he stood up to signal that the route was clear, he was killed by another enemy volley from the left flank.” Dietz is buried at Wiltwyck Cemetery in Kingston. Dietz Memorial Stadium in uptown Kingston and the Staff Sgt. Robert H. Dietz Post Office are both named in his honor.

 

Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor.Medal of HonorWiltwyck Cemetery, Kingston, Ulster County

Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor. Dietz served as a squad leader in Company A, 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, 7th Armored Division during World War II. During the battle for Kirchain, Germany in March 1945, Dietz braved heavy enemy fire to kill several enemy bazooka teams, bayoneted an enemy soldier, shot 3 German soldiers, all in his pursuit to prevent the enemy from using demolition charges set to blow up two bridges that were vital to the American attack on Kirchain. He succeeded in killing several teams of enemy soldiers protecting the first bridge and personally dismantled the charges on the second bridge but “as as he stood up to signal that the route was clear, he was killed by another enemy volley from the left flank.” Dietz is buried at Wiltwyck Cemetery in Kingston. Dietz Memorial Stadium in uptown Kingston and the Staff Sgt. Robert H. Dietz Post Office are both named in his honor.

 

Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor.Medal of HonorWiltwyck Cemetery, Kingston, Ulster County

Staff Sergeant Robert Dietz (1921-1945) was a Kingston native, soldier in the United States Army and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military award for valor. Dietz served as a squad leader in Company A, 38th Armored Infantry Battalion, 7th Armored Division during World War II. During the battle for Kirchain, Germany in March 1945, Dietz braved heavy enemy fire to kill several enemy bazooka teams, bayoneted an enemy soldier, shot 3 German soldiers, all in his pursuit to prevent the enemy from using demolition charges set to blow up two bridges that were vital to the American attack on Kirchain. He succeeded in killing several teams of enemy soldiers protecting the first bridge and personally dismantled the charges on the second bridge but “as as he stood up to signal that the route was clear, he was killed by another enemy volley from the left flank.” Dietz is buried at Wiltwyck Cemetery in Kingston. Dietz Memorial Stadium in uptown Kingston and the Staff Sgt. Robert H. Dietz Post Office are both named in his honor.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) 38th Armored Infantry Battalion 7th Armored Division army attack award bridge cemetery demolition Dietz Memorial Stadium enemy explosive flag Germany grave headstone honor Kingston Kirchain Medal of Honor military native post office Robert Dietz route soldier stadium Staff Sergeant Staff Sgt. Robert H. Dietz Post Office Ulster County United States valor Wiltwyck Cemetery World War 2 WWII https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/staff-sergeant-robert-dietz Sat, 20 Jan 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Battle Cross https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/battle-cross The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,307 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our country. In the center of the monument stands a time-honored military sculpture known as the Battle Cross, consisting of a soldier’s combat boots, their bayonet and inverted weapon stuck in the ground, dog tags hanging off the weapon and helmet resting on top of the stock of the weapon. It is meant to show honor and respect to the fallen at a battle site. Surrounding the Battle Cross are five 7-foot-high polished black granite slabs that are engraved with the names of those soldiers who have been lost. The slabs are positioned in the shape of a pentagon, representing the five branches of the military – Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The memorial was dedicated in 2015.

 

“This monument stands in eternal and heartfelt remembrance of those brave American soldiers from Ulster County who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our great nation.” – Ulster County Executive Michael P. Hein.

 

The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,306 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our coSoldiersUlster County War Memorial, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,307 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our country. In the center of the monument stands a time honored military sculpture known as the Battle Cross, consisting of a soldier’s combat boots, their bayonet and inverted weapon stuck in the ground, dog tags hanging off the weapon and helmet resting on top of the stock of the weapon. It is meant to show honor and respect at the battle site. Surrounding the Battle Cross are five 7-foot high polished black granite slabs that are engraved with the names of those soldiers who have been lost. The slabs are positioned in the shape of a pentagon, representing the five branches of the military – Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The memorial was dedicated in 2015.

 

The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,306 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our coBattle CrossUlster County War Memorial, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,307 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our country. In the center of the monument stands a time honored military sculpture known as the Battle Cross, consisting of a soldier’s combat boots, their bayonet and inverted weapon stuck in the ground, dog tags hanging off the weapon and helmet resting on top of the stock of the weapon. It is meant to show honor and respect at the battle site. Surrounding the Battle Cross are five 7-foot high polished black granite slabs that are engraved with the names of those soldiers who have been lost. The slabs are positioned in the shape of a pentagon, representing the five branches of the military – Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The memorial was dedicated in 2015.

 

The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,306 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our coIn RemembranceUlster County War Memorial, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The Ulster County War Memorial, located in front of the Ulster County Office Building in uptown Kingston, pays testament to the 1,307 Ulster County citizens that have lost their lives defending our country. In the center of the monument stands a time honored military sculpture known as the Battle Cross, consisting of a soldier’s combat boots, their bayonet and inverted weapon stuck in the ground, dog tags hanging off the weapon and helmet resting on top of the stock of the weapon. It is meant to show honor and respect at the battle site. Surrounding the Battle Cross are five 7-foot high polished black granite slabs that are engraved with the names of those soldiers who have been lost. The slabs are positioned in the shape of a pentagon, representing the five branches of the military – Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The memorial was dedicated in 2015.

“This monument stands in eternal and heartfelt remembrance of those brave American soldiers from Ulster County who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our great nation.” – County Executive Michael P. Hein.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Air Force Army Battle Cross bayonet boots branches building Catskills citizens Coast Guard country county dedication dog tags government helmet Kingston knife life lives Marine Corps memorial memory Michael Hein Michael P. Hein military monument names New York pentagon resident rifle sculpture soldier Stockade District Ulster County Ulster County Office Building Ulster County War Memorial uptown weapon https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/battle-cross Sat, 13 Jan 2024 13:00:00 GMT
JoJo’s Masterpiece: The Stone Castle of Swan Lake https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/jojo-s-masterpiece-the-stone-castle-of-swan-lake This miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake. In the 1930s, at the request of Siegel family, the owners of the former Commodore Hotel, the sculpture was constructed by Joe “JoJo” Moshini, an Italian immigrant and master mason. Moshini had arrived at Swan Lake around 1928 and quickly gained a reputation for his fine masonry work.

 

The sculpture featured the castle standing tall on a stone pedestal, a surrounding fountain and, at night, it was well lighted by lamps. Surrounding the castle was a beautiful flower garden. Moshini was also known for his other local masonry work including several other stone castles, stone pillars, stone steps and stone walls. The Commodore Hotel as well as the adjacent Stevensville Hotel were popular resort destinations. 

 

In 2013, long after the decline of Catskills tourism and the 1979 razing of the Commodore Hotel, the castle was rediscovered after years of neglect and restored by local volunteers, who now also maintain the small park. The castle serves as a lasting testament to the craftsmanship of Joe Moshini and to the memory of the once great resorts that dotted the Sullivan County landscape.

 

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake.Stone CastleSwan Lake, Sullivan County

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake. In the 1930s, at the request of Siegel family, the owners of the former Commodore Hotel, the sculpture was constructed by Joe “JoJo” Moshini, an Italian immigrant and master mason. It featured the castle standing tall on a stone pedestal, a surrounding fountain and at night was well lighted by lamps. Moshini was also known for his other local masonry work including several other stone castles, stone pillars, stone steps and stone walls. The Commodore Hotel as well as the adjacent Stevensville Hotel were popular resort destinations.

In 2013, long after the decline of Catskills tourism and the 1979 razing of the Commodore Hotel, the castle was rediscovered after years of neglect and restored by local volunteers, who now also maintain the small park. The castle serves as a lasting testament to the craftsmanship of Joe Moshini and to the memory of the once great resorts that dotted the Sullivan County landscape.

 

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake.The Work of MoshiniSwan Lake, Sullivan County

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake. In the 1930s, at the request of Siegel family, the owners of the former Commodore Hotel, the sculpture was constructed by Joe “JoJo” Moshini, an Italian immigrant and master mason. It featured the castle standing tall on a stone pedestal, a surrounding fountain and at night was well lighted by lamps. Moshini was also known for his other local masonry work including several other stone castles, stone pillars, stone steps and stone walls. The Commodore Hotel as well as the adjacent Stevensville Hotel were popular resort destinations.

In 2013, long after the decline of Catskills tourism and the 1979 razing of the Commodore Hotel, the castle was rediscovered after years of neglect and restored by local volunteers, who now also maintain the small park. The castle serves as a lasting testament to the craftsmanship of Joe Moshini and to the memory of the once great resorts that dotted the Sullivan County landscape.

 

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake.JoJo's MasterpieceSwan Lake, Sullivan County

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake. In the 1930s, at the request of Siegel family, the owners of the former Commodore Hotel, the sculpture was constructed by Joe “JoJo” Moshini, an Italian immigrant and master mason. It featured the castle standing tall on a stone pedestal, a surrounding fountain and at night was well lighted by lamps. Moshini was also known for his other local masonry work including several other stone castles, stone pillars, stone steps and stone walls. The Commodore Hotel as well as the adjacent Stevensville Hotel were popular resort destinations.

In 2013, long after the decline of Catskills tourism and the 1979 razing of the Commodore Hotel, the castle was rediscovered after years of neglect and restored by local volunteers, who now also maintain the small park. The castle serves as a lasting testament to the craftsmanship of Joe Moshini and to the memory of the once great resorts that dotted the Sullivan County landscape.

 

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake.The Commodore FountainSwan Lake, Sullivan County

The miniature, medieval-looking stone castle is located within a small park in the Sullivan County hamlet of Swan Lake. In the 1930s, at the request of Siegel family, the owners of the former Commodore Hotel, the sculpture was constructed by Joe “JoJo” Moshini, an Italian immigrant and master mason. It featured the castle standing tall on a stone pedestal, a surrounding fountain and at night was well lighted by lamps. Moshini was also known for his other local masonry work including several other stone castles, stone pillars, stone steps and stone walls. The Commodore Hotel as well as the adjacent Stevensville Hotel were popular resort destinations.

In 2013, long after the decline of Catskills tourism and the 1979 razing of the Commodore Hotel, the castle was rediscovered after years of neglect and restored by local volunteers, who now also maintain the small park. The castle serves as a lasting testament to the craftsmanship of Joe Moshini and to the memory of the once great resorts that dotted the Sullivan County landscape.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Borsht Belt castle Catskills Commodore Hotel fountain garden hotel Joe Moshini Jojo Moshini mason masonry medieval New York park pillars resort sculpture Siegel Stevenson Hotel stone Stone Castle Sullivan County Swan Lake Swan Lake Hotel volunteers walls https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2024/1/jojo-s-masterpiece-the-stone-castle-of-swan-lake Sat, 06 Jan 2024 13:00:00 GMT
Seven New Stereoviews of the Catskills by the E. & H. T. Anthony Co. https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/seven-new-stereoviews-of-the-catskills-by-the-e-h-t-anthony-co The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest views of the Catskills of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including The Artistic Series, The Glens of the Catskills, and Winter in the Catskills. Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

 

I have recently acquired seven new stereoviews of the Catskills that were published by the E. & H. T. Anthony & Company. Each of the stereoviews have all been added to the Anthony gallery, which now contains 141 of the company’s Catskills works.

 

Sunset Rock, The Bluff (# 263)

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 263 titled “Sunset Rock, The Bluff” from the “Winter in the Catskills” series.263_Sunset Rock, The BluffPublisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: Winter in the Catskills
Stereoview #: 263
Title: Sunset Rock, The Bluff.

 

Looking down Kauterskill Clove from Sunset Rock (# 264)

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 264 titled “Looking down Kauterskill Clove from Sunset Rock” from the “Winter in the Catskills” series.264_Looking down Kauterskill Clove from Sunset RockPublisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: Winter in the Catskills
Stereoview #: 264
Title: Looking down Kauterskill Clove from Sunset Rock.

 

Hanging Icicles (# 785)

Vintage E. Anthony stereoview # 785 from the “Winter in the Catskills” series depicting a large array of hanging icicles.785_Hanging IciclesPublisher: E. Anthony
Series name: Winter in the Catskills
Stereoview #: 785
Title: None listed; Description: Hanging Icicles

Reverse side: “These are some of the most remarkable Ice and Snow scenes in existence, and every assortment of stereoscopic views should contain a selection from them.”

 

Catskill Mountain House, From North Mountain (# 1340)

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview #1340 titled “Catskill Mountain House, From North Mountain” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.1340_Catskill Mountain House, From North MountainPublisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 1340
Title: Catskill Mountain House, From North Mountain

 

Fawns Leap - Kauterskill Clove (#9061)

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 9061 titled “The Fawn’s Leap – Kauterskill Clove” in “The Glens of the Catskills” series.9061_Fawns Leap - Kauterskill ClovePublisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 9061
Title: The Fawn’s Leap – Kauterskill Clove.

 

View at Hancock, looking down the North Branch of the Delaware River (#687)

Vintage E. stereoview # 687 titled “View at Hancock, looking down the North Branch of the Delaware River” in “A Ramble through the Southern Tier on the Route of the Erie Rail Road” series.687_View at Hancock, looking down the North Branch of the Delaware RiverPublisher: E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York
Series name: A Ramble through the Southern Tier on the Route of the Erie Rail Road
Stereoview #: 687
Title: View at Hancock, looking down the North Branch of the Delaware River.

 

View at Hancock, on the North Branch of the Delaware (#688)

Vintage E. stereoview # 688 titled “View at Hancock, on the North Branch of the Delaware” in “A Ramble through the Southern Tier on the Route of the Erie Rail Road” series.688_View at Hancock, on the North Branch of the DelawarePublisher: E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York
Series name: A Ramble through the Southern Tier on the Route of the Erie Rail Road
Stereoview #: 688
Title: View at Hancock, on the North Branch of the Delaware.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) catskill mountains catskills e. & h. t. anthony edward anthony gems of american scenery glens of the catskills henry t. anthony new york photographer photographs photography photos pictures stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoviews the artistic series winter in the catskills https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/seven-new-stereoviews-of-the-catskills-by-the-e-h-t-anthony-co Sat, 30 Dec 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Friendship Manor Covered Bridge https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/friendship-manor-covered-bridge The Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as the Pine Hill Covered Bridge, was built in 1992. The bridge is 72 feet long and 22 feet wide as it spans Birch Creek to serve as the entrance for the Belleayre Mountain Pine Hill Lake Day Use Area. The bridge is located on the east side of Pine Hill, a small, yet charming hamlet in the town of Shandaken in Ulster County. The one lane bridge is open for auto traffic but is only open with the day-use area. The bridge also includes a pedestrian walkway. Due to its recent construction and use of modern materials and processes the bridge is not eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge was designed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

 

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge at Pine Hill

 

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge at Pine Hill, New York

 

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge at Pine Hill, NY

 

The Friendship Manor Covered Bridge was constructed by Fort Miller Co. and Chesterfield Associates. Fort Miller is a construction company that specializes in precast concrete products and is based in Schuylerville, New York. The company was founded in 1939 by Jefferson Davis, great-grandson of the President of the Confederate States of America. Their products include bridges, highway barriers, noise barriers, wall systems and more. Chesterfield Associates is a contracting firm. The Friendship Manor Bridge utilizes a precast concrete and steel Inverset bridge which was then covered with a wooden roof to create a traditional covered bridge appearance.

 

The bridge units “utilized Grade 50W steel and were erected on cast-in-place concrete abutments”[1]. Grade 50W steel is noted for its high strength and resistance to atmospheric corrosion. The “W” “stands for weathering and denotes the fact that this material has controlled rusting characteristics that allow just enough corrosion to occur so a rust barrier is formed. Because of this barrier, painting is not required, meaning less maintenance for state highway crews. In contrast, a non-weathering steel often used in bridge construction requires constant painting and maintenance.”[2]

 

The area around the hamlet of Pine Hill, where the covered bridge is located, was first settled during the late 1700s. The settlement and industry of Pine Hill followed the traditional arc of Catskills business including subsistence farms, tanneries, lumber, bluestone, arrival of the railroad, boarding houses and tourism.

 

Aaron Adams is credited as having the first homestead at Pine Hill, located on what is now Main Street. In 1810 Adams established the aptly named Pine Hill Tavern. In 1831 the Empire Tannery, the first tannery in the town of Shandaken, was established on Birch Creek at Pine Hill by Augustus A. Guigou. In 1872, the Ulster and Delaware Railroad arrived, providing expanded tourism opportunities to visitors and in 1895 Pine Hill became an incorporated village. In the late 19th century through the early 20th century, Pine Hill was home to numerous boarding houses for those seeking out fresh air and a vacation from city life. The hamlet was known throughout the region for its sparkling fresh water, marketed by the local Crystal Spring Water Company, referred to as the “Saratoga of the Catskills,” which operated there from 1901 to 1933. In 1949, skiing became a major attraction for tourists with the construction of the adjacent Belleayre Ski Center. In 1960, Route 28 was realigned away from the village Main Street.

 

Today, although Pine Hill is long past its heyday, it does offer a step back in time with a quaint feel and slower pace. There are several hotels and restaurants, most catering to the crowds visiting the neighboring Belleayre Ski Center. The Pine Hill Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places “as a cohesive collection of late 19th century and early 20th century buildings that represent the heyday of summer tourism in the Catskill Mountains of New York.” Some district highlights include the Shandaken Historical Museum, located in the 1925 School District No. 10 building, the Elm Street Stone Arch Bridge and the 1903 Morton Memorial Library.

 

The name origin of the Pine Hill hamlet, and thus the alternate name for the covered bridge, varies slightly depending on the source. Pine Hill’s application for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places states that “its name reflects the prominence upon which it is sited.”[3] Similarly, the town website states: “Pine Hill takes its name from the steep ascent rising toward Belleayre that famously challenged travelers and settlers heading west.”[4]

 

The register of New York place names states that “this community was named for the hill on which it sits.”[5] A Harper’s Weekly article about prominent village resident Henry Morton states: “It is the jest of the place that Pine Hill is so called because there are no pines anywhere near it. Dr. Morton did not like that, so he planted a whole hill-side with pines, and they are prospering.”[6]

 

A different theory about the Pine Hill name put forward in a book about area history states: “Pine Hill received its name from the Indian word “Kauren sinck” meaning place of the pine trees.”[7] Similarly, the Central Catskills Chamber of Commerce website states: “The Indians knew Pine Hill as Kawiensinck. This was told to the interpreter Thomas Nottingham by two Esopus Indians, John Paulin and Sapan. It was placed on a map as such for the Hardenburgh Patent in 1771 by William Cockburn.”[8] The Native American term “kawiensinck” is likely the origin of the Pine Hill name as a detailed study of land deeds shows:

 

“By July 31, 1706, lawyer Jacob Rutsen of Marbletown, the father-in-law of Hardenbergh, had signed an unusual agreement with an Esopus Indian chief called Nanisinos. For two hundred pounds, Rutsen obtained a promise of lands northwest of Marbletown in Ulster County ‘called or known by the Indian names of moghogwagsinck [on the east branch of the Delaware] kawiensinck [present Pine Hill area] pakatagkan menaghenonck being a great Island [in the east branch of the Delaware] matagherack oghkananteponck and passighkawanonck which said tracts and parcels of Land Lyes upon the fish kill or River [the Delaware] that runs toward Minisinck and several other Rivers Creeks and branches that waters in the said fish kill or River. . .’. The original of this agreement is on file at Kingston’s Senate House, a New York State Historic Site.

 

This was “according to information given years later by Esopus Indians to Surveyor William Cockburn, who drew a map of the area in 1771 . . . Cockburn obtained his information through an interpreter from John Paulin and Sapan, two Esopus Indians.”[9]

 

The perennial Birch Creek, over which the covered bridge stands, is a tributary to the famed Esopus River which it joins near Big Indian. The Creek begins its life modestly on the southern flank of 3,520-foot Halcott Mountain in the town of Lexington. It flows generally southward as it crosses Upper Birch Creek Road and enters the town of Shandaken. It quickly meets and generally follows Lower Birch Creek Road and later Birch Creek Road. The Creek flows into and through the hamlet of Pine Hill before bypassing Pine Hill Lake to the east.  It then generally follows the base of Belleayre Ridge along the west side of Route 28 all the way to the hamlet of Big Indian where it joins the famed Esopus Creek. Birch Creek is approximately seven miles long.

 

Tributaries to Birch Creek include Giggle Hollow Brook, Smith Hollow Brook and Crystal Spring Brook (with its own tributaries of Cathedral Glen Brook and Woodchuck Hollow Brook which is also known as Bailey Brook). Over its course Birch Creek ranges from 10 to 30 feet wide with water depths up to 3 1/2 feet but averaging from 1/2 to 1 foot. It is home to brook trout, brown trout and rainbow trout. It has a watershed area of 8,114 acres. Birch Creek is the primary feeder into the adjacent Pine Hill Lake, with the lake “currently designed to be able to take water from the creek when flows are in excess of 5cfs” (cubic feet per second).[10]

 

The original bridge at this site was functional in nature, providing access to a popular boarding house known as Funcrest, or the Funcrest Hotel. The Funcrest Hotel was constructed in 1923 and was owned and operated David Funk, an immigrant from Hungary who arrived in the United States as a young boy. Funk had been a frequent visitor to the Pine Hill area for many summers before buying the property and building the hotel. Before opening Funcrest, David had operated the White House hotel at Pine Hill for a couple of years. The Funcrest Hotel was constructed by M. C. Myers on the former Robert Eignor property.

 

Upon opening in the summer of 1923, the Funcrest Hotel had capacity for 125 people, was located a 1/2 mile from the train depot and advertised itself as “New! Just Completed. Funcrest Hotel. For Fun – For Rest. Pine Hill, N.Y. Adjoining Lake. Catskill Mountains. The last word in hotel construction. Electric lights; hot and cold running water in every room. Rooms with private baths. Well kept tennis court. Jazz Band. Dancing. Competent instructors in all sports. Kosher Hungarian Proprietor.”[11]

 

In 1925, Funk added another thirty rooms to the hotel, making it “one of the largest and most up-to-date in this section.” In 1926 a new bridge leading to the Funcrest Hotel was constructed under the supervision of Matthew G. Thompson. In a 1927 advertisement the Funcrest Hotel advertised itself as “For Fun – For Rest. Adjoining Lake. Pine Hill, N.Y. Catskill Mountains. A Modern Hotel – All Camp Activities. Private Baths – Telephone in Every Room – Social Director – Physical Instructor. Hungarian Cuisine. Jewish Dietary Laws Observed. Special June Rates. Write for Booklet – D. FUNK.”[12]

 

By 1929 the Funcrest Hotel had a capacity for 225 people, and eventually reached a capacity of 300 people. In 1931 a new ballroom was added. Various newspaper clippings and advertisements show that they offered seasonal entertainment such as concerts, dances and shows and winter time ice skating. Funcrest also hosted a variety of family and community events.

 

The Funcrest resort was continuously operated by David Funk for 34 years until 1957 when his health would no longer permit it. The resort was then leased to Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Herskovits, who ran the hotel for 6 years. Under the management of the Herskovits family the hotel continued with its fine reputation for hospitality. “Funcrest Hotel at Pine Hill has exceptional charm which emanates from its congenial operators, the Herskovits family. Its cuisine is kosher and continental and its entertainment program is specially designed for all age groups.”[13] In 1963 David Funk sold the Funcrest Hotel to Hunt, Garvas and Benyey of New York.

 

In April 1966, the Funcrest resort was sold again to new ownership and the name was changed to “Friendship Manor,” and thus the name origin for the covered bridge. The hotel resort was purchased by an eight-owner corporation headed by Rev. R. W. Gulette who had plans to operate year-round. The June 30, 1966 issue of the Catskill Mountain News announced the resort opening: “The grand opening and get-acquainted party of Friendship Manor was held Friday and Saturday. Dinner was served Friday evening. More than 100 local and out-of-town guests attended. T.H. Edmonds is manager of the new year-round resort hotel.”[14] Famed singer, jazz composer and bandleader Noble Sissle worked as the entertainment director for Friendship Manor.

 

In April 1967 the local newspaper stated that the resort received its license to sell beer, liquor and wine on its premises. The new resort was “a 1960s-era resort catering to African Americans . . . Mr. Reed ran a bustling ethnic resort, attracting busloads of folks who’d come up from the city on weekends, where friends recall a lively music scene.”[15] The resort quickly endeared itself to the local public by opening its lake for public community use.

 

Despite its popularity, according to a local newspaper article on May 4, 1972, the property was seized in 1972 for unpaid taxes: “Friendship Manor in Pine Hill has been seized by agents of the Internal Revenue Service for unpaid federal taxes. A tax lien of $8,558.32 against Friendship Manor, Inc. was filed in the Ulster County clerk’s office on January 24 and another of $2,048.85 on March 8. Notices have been posted on the property and the buildings padlocked. The firm’s bank account has also been seized.”[16]

 

The hotel must have paid the taxes and reopened briefly as there is an advertisement in the local newspaper on September 28, 1972 announcing “One Final Fling – Join Us for One Last Party” and “This will be our last affair as Friendship Manor is closing. It has been a pleasure to entertain you. Many thanks for all the good times we have had together. Your host, D. E. Reed”.[17]

 

Soon after Friendship Manor closed the Fitzgerald family took over the hotel, and they renamed the place Fitzgeralds. The hotel quickly grew in popularity for its dinners, music and entertainment. The Fitzgerald family invested thousands of dollars in improving the facilities. Unfortunately, the popular Fitzgeralds establishment only lasted a couple of years, burning down in November 1974. The devastating and quickly expanding fire destroyed the 51-year-old building in less than 90 minutes.

 

“The devastating fire was discovered shortly before 6 p.m. In its early stages it appeared to center around the main staircase at the center back of the original building. From there it spread outward, first on the top floor, then rapidly through the other floors, and the extensions for the casino, dining room and kitchen areas. There was flame on the roof when the first fire fighters arrived.

 

Pine Hill firemen immediately sought help from companies in neighboring communities. Big Indian firemen quickly arrived with all their equipment, as did Fleischmanns with two large pumpers. Arkville firemen came with one truck, but this was sent back for standby at Fleischmanns, while Arkville men helped to man hoses of the early arriving companies. Margaretville sent a pumper also to stand by at Fleischmanns, and several firemen came to Pine Hill assist. Moving up from the eastern end were Shandaken-Allaben, which went on standby at Big Indian, and one Phoenicia pumper on standby at Shandaken.

 

The Big Indian and Pine Hill pumpers began sending water from the hotel swimming pool, about 100 yards from the structure. The Pine Hill tanker relayed lines near the hotel. The two Fleischmanns pumpers were on the main approach bridge pumping from the diminished waters of the Esopus Creek below the dam that had once held back the Funcrest lake.

 

Two portable pumps were placed in the creek near the swimming pool in an attempt to keep the pool filled. However, the two big pumpers drained this source in little more than an hour. At times water pressured dropped futilely low, dooming early hopes of confining the fire to the center and top of the hotel.

 

Meanwhile, the fire continued to grow in intensity, despite the numerous lines, high and low pressure from which water was being thrown at all angles. Fleischmanns firemen were moving in on the northwest corner at the front of the building when suddenly an ominous cracking sounded. They scrambled back quickly and most of the building collapsed. The loops in their hoses were under the porch debris, and for a moment it looked as though they were lost.

 

This collapse intensified the fire, and fanned it more rapidly into the concrete block casino and kitchen extensions. At the western end the flaming cornice dropped like a gigantic spear through the roof of the dining room extension.”[18]

 

As the entrance for the state day use area, crossing the covered bridge provides access to Pine Hill Lake. The Pine Hill Lake has an estimated surface area of 5.62 acres and has an estimated storage capacity for 29.4 million gallons of water. During the summer months, the lake is used for recreational purposes such as swimming, picnicking, boating and fishing. During the winter, the lake water is used for snowmaking on the ski slopes of Belleayre Mountain. Water is pumped over 1,000 feet higher from the lake to the Upper Reservoir area for use on the upper slopes.  Pine Hill Lake, in conjunction with the 2-million-gallon Cathedral Glen Reservoir, provide snow making capability for 150 of 155 acres, or 97%, of the Belleayre Mountain Ski Area.  

 

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, Pine Hill, New York

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge

 

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, Catskills

 

Photograph of Friendship Manor Covered Bridge, also known as Pine Hill Covered Bridge, located in Pine Hill in the central Catskills.Friendship Manor Covered Bridge

 

The artificial Pine Hill Lake was originally constructed in 1911 in order to serve cottagers during their summer vacations. In February 1911 contractor Robert Vaughn, of Windham, was awarded the contract to build Pine Hill Lake. In March 1911 Vaughn refitted the barn on the property of the Pine Hill Lake Company to make it habitable “for the Italian laborers to live in who are to work for him.” By the next month, April 1911, it was reported that he had fifty men at work on the dam which he was building for the Pine Hill Lake Company.[19]

 

By early July work on the dam was “well under way and the work is progressing rapidly. The entire base of the dam is completed and the water now runs through the large pipes near the center. An extra force of men are to be added to the present force immediately and as practically only concrete work and filling in is now to be done the work will rapidly. The Company has already ordered a carload of boats for the lake and by the time they arrive the work will be so far completed as to allow the water to flood the basin to such an extent as to permit boating and bathing. The dam appears to be a very neat and substantial structure and reflects much credit on the contractor’s manner of doing work.”[20]  

 

In July 1911 the company received a carload of boats “which they will place on the large lake in the lower part of the village now nearing completion. While the Lake is not yet completed, it is intended to turn the water in sufficient to afford good boating in a few days.”[21]

 

The July 1911 opening was featured in several New York Times articles. The July 9, 1911 article stated: “Charmingly located in a section of the Catskills noted for its beauty, Pine Hill is one of the best-known resorts in the mountains. Tuesday’s celebration here was one of the pleasantest events of the season, and brought a number of visitors from other places in the vicinity. Pine Hill Lake is completed and will be in readiness to entertain the Summer visitors next week. It will add much to the pleasure of the people who spend the Summer here, because the lack of boating and bathing up to the present time has been a serious matter for Pine Hill.”[22]

 

The July 30, 1911 follow-up article in the New York Times stated that “work on the artificial lake here has been completed and Pine Hill now adds boating and bathing to its already numerous attractions. During the week many persons have enjoyed these pastimes.”[23]

 

Within a short time of its opening, Pine Hill Lake proved to be a great success. “During the past few weeks, the 25 boats have been in almost constant use and they will be kept in use during September. The project has proved a success and added very much to Pine Hill’s popularity as a summer resort.”[24]

 

Near its 40th anniversary, disaster struck the lake, Pine Hill and the central Catskills region at large. In November 1950, the historic Rainmaker’s Flood inflicted widespread damage on the Pine Hill area, including the destruction of Pine Hill Lake.

 

“Pine Hill suffered the worst disaster in its history when the rainmaker’s flood reached a record height between 10 and 11 o’clock Saturday night, Nov. 25 . . .

 

The Pine Hill lake gave away, taking with it the small buildings, tennis courts, swimming pools, roads and bridges belonging to the Funcrest hotel and the Pine Hill Country club. The printing presses and machinery of Frank Sanchis, in the basement of his home, were under water. Currents were rushing through homes on the first floors. Chimneys toppled, lawns crumpled, oil burner motors were ruined.

 

The water mains broke. Electric lines and telephone wires came down. Autoists were stranded. One car washed downstream as its driver attempted to cross a well-washed bridge.

 

Chicken coops and outbuildings sailed downstream. Trees toppled on buildings. The small bridge on Station street collapsed and tons of dirt came down from the banks which oozed water they could no longer hold. Many lawns were piled up with unwanted gravel and debris.”[25]

 

The Catskill Mountain News also reported on the destruction from the 1950 Rainmaker’s Flood.

 

“Then the wall of water jumped into the Pine Hill Lake and broke a hole in the embankment toward the Funcrest Hotel. This let out the great volume of the 40-foot deep lake which tore down to the Ashokan dam, wrecking bridges, dwellings, public buildings and other properties. The township of Shandaken never had such losses. An appeal is being made to the state for help in the emergency.

 

The first bridge to go below the lake was the one from Route 28 to the Funcrest Hotel. The swimming pool at the Pine Hill Country Club was torn out, the Lost Cove bridge near Greenberg’s went. The Big Indian bridge was able to stand up under the flood. The Donohue bridge went.”[26]

 

The lake and dam were rebuilt in 1951 by David Funk and his son Danny Funk, owners of the adjacent Funcrest hotel. It cost an estimated $80,000 and was fully paid for by the Funk family. The new dam included a 60-foot spillway, which was double the capacity of the one washed away.

 

On July 28, 1969 during an unnamed storm the Pine Hill Lake and its dam were destroyed again by floods, sending walls of water downstream to Big Indian. “The Friendship Manor lake dam gave way and sent water charging down the Esopus . . . Major damage in the town of Shandaken was the result of the dam break at Pine Hill. Water rushed down the Esopus causing damage to buildings between Pine Hill and Big Indian and threatening campers in the Phoenicia area . . . Unlike the November 1950 flood, however, when the Pine Hill Lake was also washed out, Monday’s deluge did not take out the bridge below the dam . . . The flood had many of the characteristics of the November 1950 “rainmakers” flood, but did not cause as severe damage. Water rose rapidly catching many mountain residents unawares.”[27]

 

In the storm’s aftermath there was community opposition to rebuilding the dam and lake. An August 21, 1969 article states that:

 

“This dam has burst at least once before, has leaked frequently and has been a constant source of fear to those in its path. Its age and condition are such, that it is no longer adequate and capable of serving its purpose. Its continued use, regardless of any attempted repairs, could be catastrophic and lead to great tragedy.

 

The undersigned [property owners and residents, immediately below the village of Pine Hill] respectfully petition the above named individually and collectively, to the end that an immediate inspection be made, that the said dam be condemned and that its further use be prohibited.”[28]

 

The lake was not rebuilt again until 1988, this time by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. This time however the lake was separate from Birch Creek and no dam was built.

 

In 1992 Belleayre Beach on the lake was constructed and was opened to the public in July 1993 as the Belleayre Mountain Pine Hill Lake Day Use Area. The lake is very popular during the summer months with swimming, picnicking, boating and fishing. There are also volleyball and basketball courts as well as horseshoe pits. Other than perhaps a secluded swimming hole, the lake provides some of the best swimming in the Catskill Park. The covered bridge was constructed in 1992 to provide a scenic entrance to this mountain escape. The property is now managed by the Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA).

 

[1] Fort Miller website. Bridge Products Project Gallery. Accessed February 20, 2014.

[2] Yost, Lon; Funderburk, Scott. “High-Performance Steel Increasingly Used for Bridge Building.” American Welding Society. www.aws.org. Accessed February 20, 2014.

[3] Pine Hill Historic District. Application for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

[4] “Shandaken’s Hamlets.” www.shandaken.us. Accessed February 21, 2014.

[5] Vasiliev, Ren. From Abbotts to Zurich: New York State Placenames. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2004. p. 178.

[6] “Personal Notes.” Harper’s Weekly. Vol. 46. Harper’s Magazine Company, 1902. p. 575.

[7] Bussy, Ethel. History and Stories of Margaretville and Surrounding Area. Margaretville, NY, 1960.

[8] “A Brief History of Pine Hill.” www.chamberorganizer.com. Accessed February 21, 2014.

[9] Dunn, Shirley. “Mohican Seminar 3: The Journey – An Algonquian Peoples Seminar”. New York State Museum Bulletin 511, 2009. pp. 81-82.

[10] “Belleayre Mountain Ski Center UMP, Appendix B – Snowmaking Engineers Report.” New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. April 2011. p. 6.

[11] The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1923.

[12] The American Hebrew. May 13, 1927.

[13] Post, Larry. “Round the Resorts. New York Post. July 5, 1962.

[14] “New Manor Is Open.” Catskill Mountain News.  June 30, 1966. p. 7.

[15] Birns, William. A Catskill Archive. Fleischmanns, NY: Purple Mountain Press, 2011. p. 146.

[16] “Tax Agents Seize Friendship Manor.” Catskill Mountain News. May 4, 1972. p. 1.

[17] “Our Final Fling.” Catskill Mountain News. September 28, 1972. p. 2.

[18] “Fitzgeralds Hotel Destroyed in Pine Hill Fire.” Catskill Mountain News. November 14, 1974.

[19] “News From the Vicinity.” The Mirror-Recorder. April 19, 1911.

[20] “Weekly Home Happenings.” Windham Journal. July 6, 1911.

[21] “From All About Us.” The Mirror-Recorder. July 26, 1911.

[22] “New Artificial Lake to be in Readiness This Week.” New York Times. July 9, 1911.

[23] “The Artificial Lake Now Open for Boating and Bathing Parties.” New York Times. July 30, 1911.

[24] “From All About Us.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. 1911.

[25] Smith, Mrs. James. “The Rainmaker’s Flood Which Damaged Pine Hill.” Catskill Mountain News. December 8, 1950. p. 9.

[26] “Many Houses and Bridges Lost in Esopus Valley.” Catskill Mountain News. December 1, 1950.

[27] “Flood Wash Out Roads, Bridges.” Catskill Mountain News. July 31, 1969. pp. 1-2.

[28] “Dam Repair Opposed In Petition Submitted By Pine Hill Residents.” Catskill Mountain News. August 21, 1969. p. 1.

 

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) beach Belleayre Beach Belleayre Mountain Birch Creek bridge Catskill Mountains Catskills Chesterfield Associates covered bridge David Funk day use area Fitzgeralds Fort Miller Friendship Manor Friendship Manor Covered Bridge Funcrest Funcrest Hotel lake New York Pine Hill Pine Hill Covered Bridge Pine Hill Lake road Route 28 Shandaken swimming Ulster County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/friendship-manor-covered-bridge Sat, 23 Dec 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Coykendall Lodge at Alder Lake https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/coykendall-lodge-at-alder-lake The remains of the former Coykendall Lodge are located on the shores of Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in the town of Hardenbergh in Ulster County, New York. The lodge sits within the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest and overlooks Alder Lake, with Mill Brook Ridge to the east, Cradle Rock Ridge to the south and several unnamed hills to the north. The lodge was situated on a bluff overlooking a rolling meadow that led down to the lake.

 

Photograph of the Coykendall Lodge, located at Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in Hardenburgh township in Ulster County, New York.Coykendall Lodge at Alder LakeThe remains of the former Coykendall Lodge are located on the shores of Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in the town of Hardenbergh in Ulster County, New York. The lodge sits within the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest and overlooks Alder Lake, with Mill Brook Ridge to the east, Cradle Rock Ridge to the south and several unnamed hills to the north. The lodge was situated on a bluff overlooking a rolling meadow that led down to the lake.

 

Photograph of the Coykendall Lodge, located at Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in Hardenburgh township in Ulster County, New York.Coykendall LodgeThe remains of the former Coykendall Lodge are located on the shores of Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in the town of Hardenbergh in Ulster County, New York. The lodge sits within the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest and overlooks Alder Lake, with Mill Brook Ridge to the east, Cradle Rock Ridge to the south and several unnamed hills to the north. The lodge was situated on a bluff overlooking a rolling meadow that led down to the lake.

 

Photograph of the Coykendall Lodge, located at Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in Hardenburgh township in Ulster County, New York.Remains of Coykendall LodgeThe remains of the former Coykendall Lodge are located on the shores of Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in the town of Hardenbergh in Ulster County, New York. The lodge sits within the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest and overlooks Alder Lake, with Mill Brook Ridge to the east, Cradle Rock Ridge to the south and several unnamed hills to the north. The lodge was situated on a bluff overlooking a rolling meadow that led down to the lake.

 

The Coykendall Lodge was constructed in 1899 as the summer residence of prominent businessman Samuel Decker Coykendall (1837-1913). Coykendall was an important member of the Kingston, New York community, having a hand in a wide variety of businesses including railroads, canal operations, the trolley system, the cement industry, the brick industry, bluestone, a hotel, a water company, dry goods, banks, a newspaper and the Cornell Steamboat Company. The lodge was used by Coykendall and his guests as a retreat for fishing, hunting and entertaining. The lodge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “architecturally significant as an important regional example of “Great Camp” inspired architecture in the Catskill Region of New York State.”

 

Coykendall Lodge was designed by Downing Vaux (1856-1926), son of prominent landscape architect Calvert Vaux (1824-1895). Although he is most frequently mentioned only in context of being Calvert Vaux’s son, Downing Vaux also became a prominent landscape architect in his own right. He attended Columbia School of Mines for one year, studied and worked for three years in his father’s firm of Vaux & Radford and then worked for one year with the engineering firm of McClay & Davies. He afterwards rejoined his father’s firm in the mid-1880s, before eventually going into private practice. In addition to Coykendall Lodge, Downing also designed Coykendall’s Kingston Point Park, which served as an amusement park for local residents and for passengers of the Hudson Day liners. From 1893 to 1911 Vaux lectured on landscape architecture at the engineering school at New York University. Downing was a member of the Society for the Preservation of Scenic and Historic Places and Objects, the Architectural League of New York and the National Arts Club. Downing was one of the eleven founding members of the American Society of Landscape Architects in 1899.

 

Photograph of the Coykendall Lodge, located at Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in Hardenburgh township in Ulster County, New York.Step Back in Time - Coykendall Lodge at Alder LakeThe remains of the former Coykendall Lodge are located on the shores of Alder Lake in the upper Beaverkill Valley in the town of Hardenbergh in Ulster County, New York. The lodge sits within the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest and overlooks Alder Lake, with Mill Brook Ridge to the east, Cradle Rock Ridge to the south and several unnamed hills to the north. The lodge was situated on a bluff overlooking a rolling meadow that led down to the lake.

 

 

Alder Lake, where Coykendall Lodge is located, “was originally a very small pond, and since its surrounding land was not suitable for farming it was not developed until 1859. In 1889 Julius (June) Smith constructed a dam just upstream, transforming the pond into the fifty-five acre Alder Lake, stocked with native brook taken from the Beaverkill. The first trout hatchery established in the Beaverkill valley was constructed on Alder Lake in 1890.” (Coykendall Lodge, National Register of Historic Places.) Today, the 1.6-mile Alder Lake Loop Trail circles the lake.

 

In 1891 Coykendall helped found the Alder Lake Club, a private fishing club established “for the purpose of purchasing, acquiring, holding and improving real estate in the vicinity of Alder Lake in the town of Hardenburgh, Ulster County, and erecting and maintaining thereon a club house, cottages, and other buildings and fish ponds, and apportioning and distributing such real estate among the stockholders of the club.” (“The Alder Lake Club.” New Paltz Times. August 19, 1891.) The first directors of the club included Coykendall, John McEntee, Abram Hasbrouck, Dr. George C. Smith, Dr. Robert Loughram, Dr. J. D. Wurts, Dr. Henry VanHovenberg, John N. Cordts and George N. Hutton.

 

“The Ulster & Delaware Railroad provided transportation from Kingston to its station in Arkville, from which [Alder Lake Club] members rode stagecoaches to the clubhouse. Fishing in Alder Lake was very good, its stock of fish constantly replenished with fish from the Beaverkill, as well as from the river’s original private hatchery located there.

 

By the beginning of fishing season in 1899 Coykendall had purchased the shares of the other club members and controlled the entire lake. He planned to build a stylish estate and fishing preserve, and on a knoll overlooking the lake he constructed “a stately mansion of grand proportions.” He employed over one hundred men over the course of its construction, all materials being hauled from Livingston Manor, some sixteen miles distant. Construction was completed by June 1900, and the large three-story building became the scene of many fishing excursions and parties. The style of the lodge reflected the Victorian influence, and combined elegance in design with the rustic simplicity and feeling of comfort that had come to characterize the Catskill Mountain Resorts. Reflecting the influence as well of the local Ulster County historic stone houses, the lodge was rooted to the ground on a base of rough local stone, and its spacious porch, providing views across the lake, was also constructed in local stone. Also on the property was the original Alder Lake fish hatchery, which Coykendall maintained and kept in operation to preserve and perpetuate the excellent fishing conditions.

 

Coykendall purchased hundreds of acres of forested land around the lake, and constructed an access road over Cross Mountain from Arena. This provided safe and comfortable access to the lodge via stagecoach, which attracted many guests and fellow fly-fishing enthusiasts. Unfortunately, it also attracted poachers to the Lake, and Coykendall worked diligently to protect the natural resources of the lake and its trout as long as he owned his house.

 

Coykendall’s stewardship of the lake and the region lasted until 1945 when the estate once again became a trout-fishing club. The membership of the new Alder Lake Club came from Liberty, in Sullivan County. They maintained the lodge and the lake for fifteen years before they sold their holdings to the Nassau County Council of Boy Scouts, who used the lake and surrounding forest as a summer retreat. In 1980 Alder Lake and surrounding lands were acquired by New York State and added to the forever-wild Catskill Forest Preserve.” (Coykendall Lodge, National Register of Historic Places.)

 

After the lodge’s acquisition by New York State, it quickly fell into a state of disrepair. Given the “forever wild” policy applied to lands within the Catskills Park, the Department of Environmental Conservation took no steps to save the building. Over time, looters took anything of value, including the copper pipes and plumbing, and vandals destroyed windows, walls, etc., while bats infested the structure and natural elements took their toll.

 

There were various efforts over the years by the Alder Lake Restoration Society, a local preservation group, to save Coykendall Lodge. The society was organized in 1998 after the state of New York announced that the lodge would be torn down. However, despite best efforts the lodge was torn down by the state circa 2008. Only the stone foundations and cobblestone walls remain.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) abandoned Alder Lake Alder Lake Club Alder Lake Loop Trail architecture Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest Beaverkill Valley building camp camping Catskill Mountains Catskills Coykendall Lodge Downing Vaux fish Hardenburgh hatchery home lodge National Register of Historic Places remains residence Samuel Coykendall trail trout Ulster County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/coykendall-lodge-at-alder-lake Sat, 16 Dec 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Skene Memorial Library, Fleischmanns, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/skene-memorial-library-fleischmanns-new-york The historic Skene Memorial Library is located in the village of Fleischmanns in Delaware County, New York.

 

The Skene Memorial Library was constructed in 1901 in honor of Dr. Alexander Johnston Chalmers Skene (1838-1900), a noted physician and medical researcher, and one of the most prominent summer residents in the village of Fleischmanns. Dr. Skene was a Scottish immigrant who arrived in America at the age of nineteen. He became a surgeon and contributed to the theory, practice and teaching of gynecology. Skene was “generally looked upon as one of the foremost physicians of his time.”

 

Photograph of the Skene Memorial Library, located in the Catskills village of Fleischmanns, New York.Skene Memorial Library, Fleischmanns, New YorkThe historic Skene Memorial Library is located in the village of Fleischmanns in Delaware County, New York. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Photograph of the Skene Memorial Library, located in the Catskills village of Fleischmanns, New York.Skene Memorial Library, Fleischmanns, NYThe historic Skene Memorial Library is located in the village of Fleischmanns in Delaware County, New York. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Skene was born in the parish of Fyvie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and received his early education in his home country at Aberdeen and at Kings College. After his arrival in America at age 19, Skene first studied at Toronto, Canada, then at the University of Michigan, and ultimately graduated from Long Island College Hospital in 1863. He began his medical career as an assistant military surgeon in the U. S. Army, serving during the Civil War at Port Royal, South Carolina; Charleston Harbor, South Carolina; and at Decamp’s Hospital on Davids Island, New York. After the war Skene continued his interest in military service through his work as a surgeon for the National Guard in the 12th Regiment and the 1st Division, and also as a Lieutenant Colonel on the staff of General Molineux in 1884-1885.

 

Upon completion of his military duty in 1864 Skene entered private practice. Skene served as a professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Long Island College Hospital from 1866 to 1899, as the Dean of Faculty of that institution from 1886 to 1893, and as president from 1893 to 1899. Skene helped found the American Gynecological Society and opened his own sanitorium in Brooklyn. He was the author of numerous six books (including one novel) and dozens of papers; was a member of many domestic and foreign medical societies; is credited with inventing several surgical instruments; and has his name associated with a part of the human body – Skene’s Glands, which he discovered in 1880. His county home in Highmount, above Fleischmanns, was designed to recall a Scottish castle and named Bonnie Em.

 

Alexander Skene passed away at 62 years of age on July 4, 1900 at his summer home in Highmount after suffering from a heart ailment for some time. Funeral services were held at the family residence in Brooklyn, with the Reverend Edward P. Ingersoll officiating. Skene is buried at the family plot in Rockland Cemetery at Sparkill, New York. After Skene’s death, an impressive monument in his honor was sponsored by a committee of physicians and former patients. The monument was sculpted by John Massey Rhind and placed in 1905 at Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, New York.

 

Funding to build the library came from fundraising by local residents and summer visitors, supplemented by a $5,000 donation from steel magnate Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919), a childhood friend of Alexander Skene. No conditions were placed on Carnegie’s gift other than the library “continue to bear the honored name of Doctor Skene, whom we shall ever hold in grateful remembrance.” News of Carnegie’s donation for the construction of the Skene Library was published in various regional newspapers, several of which also reported that “Dr. Skene once saved the millionaire’s life.” Carnegie also sponsored other libraries in the Catskills region, including buildings at Catskill (1901), Kingston (1904) and Saugerties (1915).

 

Land for the library was donated in October 1901 by Herbert and Augusta Vermilyea and John and Frances Scudder. The cornerstone for the library was laid on November 25, 1901, with work beginning shortly thereafter. Construction was completed by Crosby Kelly, a lumber mill owner at Fleischmanns and builder of many local residences. Sol Myers is credited with painting the library and George Mayes completed the interior work. The library received its charter on December 19, 1901.

 

The building was designed by the architectural firm of Marshall Lansing Emery (c. 1863-1921) and Henry George Emery (1871-1956). Marshall Emery began his career with the firm of Withers and Dixon, and opened his own architectural practice in New York City in 1894. Five years later, in 1899, his younger brother Henry, having previously worked at the prestigious firms of R. M. Hunt and Warren & Wetmore, joined him to form the partnership of M. L. and H. G. Emery. Other notable buildings designed by the Emery brothers include the Jamaica Hospital on Long Island, St. George’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan, the Polheumus Memorial Library in Brooklyn and the Elks Lodge in Albany, New York. The Emery brothers also designed several buildings in the Nyack, New York area, including several personal residences, the St. Ann’s Roman Catholic Church, St. Paul’s Methodist Church, the Nyack Library and the Nyack Hospital. Remarkably the firm continues to exist today, now operating under the name of CPLA Architects.

 

Photograph of the Skene Memorial Library, located in the Catskills village of Fleischmanns, New York.Skene Memorial LibraryThe historic Skene Memorial Library is located in the village of Fleischmanns in Delaware County, New York. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Photograph of the Skene Memorial Library, located in the Catskills village of Fleischmanns, New York.Skene Memorial Library, FleischmannsThe historic Skene Memorial Library is located in the village of Fleischmanns in Delaware County, New York. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

As for the design of the Skene Memorial Library, it “combines features of the Queen Anne and Shingle styles in an eclectic, late Victorian period design. Its design is similar to other resort era buildings in the village, such as some of the larger village residences, summer homes and small hotels. Interestingly, the library’s form and some of its details are also characteristic of the designs used for some of the region’s many resort era railroad stations. The low rectangular form, broad hipped roof overhanging eaves and shingle cladding are typical of the type, while the broad, sheltering porch and distinctive octagonal tower suggest functions such as providing shelter and identifying locations. On the interior, the library’s plan is typical of other period libraries, featuring a hierarchy of public spaces and the ability to define spaces for public and private functions.” (Skene Memorial Library, National Register of Historic Places.)

 

The Skene Memorial Library is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a “distinctive intact example of an early twentieth century public library building and as a center for community life in the village of Fleischmanns for more than a century.”

 

Throughout its history the Skene Memorial Library has played an important part in Fleischmanns history, providing a community space for fairs, lectures, recitals, theater productions, movies and town meetings. For more information about the Skene Memorial Library visit their website at www.skenelib.org.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Alexander Johnston Chalmers Skene Alexander Skene Andrew Carnegie architecture building Catskill Mountains Catskills Crosby Kelly Delaware County Fleischmanns Henry Emery library Marshall Emery New York Skene Memorial Library village https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/skene-memorial-library-fleischmanns-new-york Sat, 09 Dec 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Church of St. John the Evangelist at Tannersville, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/church-of-st-john-the-evangelist-at-tannersville-new-york The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. It is bounded by Philadelphia Hill Road to the west, and by woodlands and scattered cottages to the north, south and east.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the Evangelist, Tannersville, New YorkThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the Evangelist, Tannersville, NYThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the EvangelistThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The church, constructed in 1885, long served the residential enclave known as Philadelphia Hill. The community originally consisted of a group of individuals from the city of Philadelphia who had typically spent their summers at the Blythewood boarding house operated by Alexander Hemsley (1834-1904).

 

The Blythewood resort had been established in the late 1870s by Hemsley to assist his wife, who suffered from tuberculosis, in taking advantage of the crisp mountain air. Within a few years of opening the Blythewood advertised itself in 1879 as being “beautifully situated in the heart of the Catskill Mountains.” It was “open for Boarders the 1st of June. It is accessible from Catskill village, by two daily lines of stages. The house is new, has all modern conveniences, and is comfortably furnished throughout. There is abundant shade, fine lawn and croquet ground on the premises. Good trout fishing in the neighborhood during the season. Comfortable private conveyances can always be furnished for pleasure parties, and will be sent to meet guests on the arrival of cars or steamboat, when desired. Post-office and Telegraph Station within half a mile of the house.”

 

In 1883 Hemsley acquired 43 acres of land in the town of Hunter, which was subdivided and sold in parcels to many of the guests at Blythewood as sites to build summer cottages. As part of the new development 1.5 acres was designated for the construction of a summer chapel. The chapel lot was centered within the developing community.

 

Noted architect William Halsey Wood (1855-1897) designed the church, while his brother, Reverend Alonzo Lippincott Wood, Sr. (1852-1911) served as its first minister. William Halsey Wood would later marry Florence Hemsley, daughter of Alexander Hemsley, at the church in November 1889, the first wedding conducted at the church. Alonzo’s family, including his three sons, would serve the congregation at the rural church for over 75 years.

 

William Halsey Wood, the church architect, was born on April 24, 1855 in Danville, New York, the son of Daniel Halsey Wood and Hannah Bell Lippincott. The family moved to Newark, New Jersey shortly after William’s birth and William was almost entirely educated at the Episcopal parish school of the House of Prayer in that city. At the age of 15, Wood entered the architectural profession in the New York office of John F. Miller. He received further architectural training with Thomas A. Roberts, in Newark, New Jersey, eventually joining Roberts as a partner in the firm of Roberts, Taylor & Wood. After the firm dissolved within a few years, he went into business on his own, and practiced alone for the remainder of his career, eventually establishing offices at both Newark, New Jersey and in New York City. His church, library and building designs can be found across the country, including in the states of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Tennessee, Ohio, Missouri, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Wood passed away at 41 years of age on March 13, 1897 from tuberculosis and is buried at Saint James the Less Episcopal Churchyard in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

Alonzo L. Wood, the church’s first summer minister, was born at New Providence, New Jersey in 1852. He was made deacon in the Episcopal Church in 1876 by Bishop Odenheimer and became an ordained priest in 1879 by Bishop Seymour. He served nine years as curate at the House of Prayer in Newark and then became rector at St. John’s at Woodside, Newark. On leaving St. John’s in 1892 he became rector of Tompkinsville, Staten Island, where he remained until 1908. After resigning that parish, he performed missionary work for the dioceses of Vermont and Pennsylvania. Father Wood for many years served as chaplain for the Hospital of St. Barnabas in Newark. He was the author of A Ritual Catechism and Brief Devotions for Young People. Wood passed away at Tannersville, New York at 59 years of age on August 24, 1911 after a lingering illness. He is buried in the churchyard of the Church of St. John the Evangelist in Tannersville.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the Evangelist, Tannersville, NYThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the Evangelist, TannersvilleThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the Evangelist, National Register of Historic PlacesThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located on Philadelphia Hill Road in the village of Tannersville, New York in the northern Catskills.Church of St. John the Evangelist, SpringtimeThe historic Church of St. John the Evangelist is located in the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

The single-story church design “features the mixture of textures and natural materials indicative of the Victorian architecture. The use of native stone blended with stylized half-timbering and wood panel work [that] created a naturalistic form intended to allow the building to recede into the wooded building site.”

 

The Church of St. John the Evangelist is listed on the National Register of Historic Places “as an outstanding example of late nineteenth century Victorian ecclesiastic architecture in the community of Hunter.” It “stands today virtually intact from its construction more than one-century ago. The building retains an outstanding degree of architectural integrity as well as an intact rural setting. The building is a local landmark and an important reminder of the prosperity and spiritual commitment of the Hemsley family and the enclave of Philadelphia Hill."

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[email protected] (American Catskills) Alexander Hemsley Alonzo L. Wood architecture Blythewood building Catskill Mountains Catskills Christian church Church of St. John the Evangelist community Episcopal Episcopal Diocese of Albany Florence Hemsley Greene County Hunter Hunter Foundation National Register of Historic Places New York park Philadelphia Philadelphia Hill St. John the Evangelist Tannersville William Halsey Wood https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/12/church-of-st-john-the-evangelist-at-tannersville-new-york Sat, 02 Dec 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Callicoon Theater https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/callicoon-theater The art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York. Opening night took place on July 8, 1948 with a showing of the American western film titled Green Grass of Wyoming starring Charles Coburn and Peggy Cummins. Marilyn Monroe appeared in the film as an uncredited extra.

 

Callicoon TheaterCallicoon TheaterThe art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York.

 

Movies Since 1948Movies Since 1948The art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York.

 

Callicoon Theater, Movies Since 1948Callicoon Theater, Movies Since 1948The art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York.

 

The single-screen theater, which was originally called the Harden Theater, was built by Fred H. Starck as part of a regional chain owned by Harvey D. English. The Harden Theater at Callicoon was the 13th theater in the chain. The building was built in “the Quonset style, with rounded roof coming down to the foundation on either side. The frame is of wood and has Rilco rafters.” (The Hancock Herald. July 1, 1948.) Construction was primarily completed by the Martin Hermann Lumber Company.

 

The theater originally had seating capacity for 514 people. Ray Dexter, Jr., former manager of the Park Theatre at Narrowsburg, was appointed as the first manager of the new Harden Theatre in Callicoon.

 

In 1963 the theater was purchased by the partnership James “Mickey” Roche (1933-2018) and Warren Doetsch (1936-1921), who renamed the theater by dropping the “H” and calling it the Arden Theater. Roche was a US Army veteran, a parishioner at Holy Cross Church and worked as president of Roche’s Garage, which he operated for many years in partnership with his brother “Rease” Roche. Doetsch, a graduate of Jeffersonville High School and the Albany College of Pharmacy (1958), in addition to operating the Callicoon Theater with Roche, was a pharmacist for 43 years, including owning and operating the Callicoon Pharmacy for 15 years. He worked at various other pharmacies in the area until his retirement from the New York State Department of Corrections in 2001. Doetsch, was a member of the Board of Education, the Callicoon Kiwanis Club and St. John’s Lutheran Church. Roche and Doetsch operated the Callicoon Theater for 23 years, selling it 1986 to Jim and Barbara Kayton.

 

After their purchase the Kayton’s renamed the theater to the Callicoon Theater and would successfully operate it for the next 32 years, with Jim handling the technical operations and Barbara handling personnel activities. In an October 2023 interview the Kayton’s noted that the longest movie run under their ownership was for Titanic, which was filled for every showing for three consecutive weeks.

 

Movie Night at the Callicoon TheaterMovie Night at the Callicoon TheaterThe art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York.

 

Now Playing at the Callicoon TheaterNow Playing at the Callicoon TheaterThe art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York.

 

Callicoon Theater, Since 1948Callicoon Theater, Since 1948The art-deco styled Callicoon Theater is the oldest continually operating movie theater in Sullivan County, New York.

 

In 2018 Kristina Smith, a freelance theater director and producer, purchased the theater and the theater continues to serve the regional community with first-run films and timeless classics.

 

The Callicoon Theater is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Callicoon Downtown Historic District.

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[email protected] (American Catskills) architecture Arden Theater Barbara Kayton building Callicoon Callicoon Theater D. English" film Fred Starck Harden Theater Harvey James Roche Jim Kayton Kristina Smith marquee movie National Register of Historic Theaters New York Sullivan County theater theatre Warren Doetsch https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/callicoon-theater Sat, 25 Nov 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Rock Valley School in Hancock, New York https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/rock-valley-school-in-hancock-new-york “We were young together

       And never can forget

The school house at Rock Valley

       In school days where we met.”

 

– Hancock Herald. February 14, 1957.

 

 

The Rock Valley School, also known as Hancock School District No. 22, is located in an area known as the Upper Basket in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, Delaware County. The school is situated just north of the intersection of Rock Valley Road (County Route 28) and John Milk Road; and near the confluence of   the North Branch Basket Creek and Hoffman Brook. The school is located approximately 3.8 miles north of Route 97 and the Delaware River. The historic Rock Valley Cemetery is located adjacent to the school on a sloping hillside.

 

Rock Valley School HouseRock Valley School HouseThe Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Rock Valley School House, AutumnRock Valley School House, AutumnThe Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Going to SchoolGoing to SchoolThe Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Rock Valley School House, Delaware County, N.Y.Rock Valley School House, Delaware County, N.Y.The Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The school was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry.

 

As for the name Rock Valley, “the exact origin of the name is a matter of speculation, the most common guess being the obvious one, that it was so named because of the rocks in it. Back in the days before the permanent settlers came in, when only hunters and trappers and occasional Indians visited the Basket wilderness, the lower Fernwood basin was known as the Big Rock Valley, and the suggestion has been made that somehow, in the passage of time, the name slipped over the hill. To anyone knowing the country, however, the west brook has its own rock valley, where the stream at one place falls over a rocky ledge and after running past rocky walls, finally flows over a solid rock bottom near the lower end. This, no doubt, was the beginning of Rock Valley.” (LaValley, Leslie D. “Basket Letters. A History of the Basket Brook. Chapter LV, Rock Valley.” The Hancock Herald. February 14, 1957.)

 

The classic one-story wood frame school was built at a cost of $750 by John Inman, a local mason and carpenter. As per the Hancock Herald issue of March 5, 1885, “we hear the contract to build the new school at Rock Valley has been taken by John E. Inman, consideration $750.00. If built according to contract, it will be one of the best in the county, will be perfectly ventilated, and supplied with Triumph desks.”

 

As for the timing of the construction the Hancock Herald in their April 9, 1885 issue reported that “. . . Inman has part of the lumber for our school house delivered on the ground.” The firm of Swinton, Shimer, and Co., of Port Jervis, were contracted to put the tin on the roof of the new school house, which they did in June 1885. (Hancock Herald. June 11, 1885.) The land for the school was donated by George Oestrich.

 

“The school is a one-story wood-frame building on a cut stone foundation. The main section of the building is rectangular in form, two bays wide and three bays deep (approximately 24’ by 36’). The gable roof (clad with asphalt shingles in 1975) features simple overhangs and returns in the roof line and rectangular vents in the front and rear pediments. Sided in wooden clapboards, the school has narrow cornerboards and a water table. All of the large six over six double hung windows are original to the construction and matching in size and enframements. The main entrance, approached by three flagstone tiered steps, has a four paneled wood door within a simple molded enframement. The rear entrance of the building is on the left hand side and is windowless, with a central brick chimney running up the center and a handicapped accessible ramp added to the building in 1985.

 

The interior of the school is divided into a vestibule, which was used as a cloakroom and retains its original iron coat hooks, and a single large schoolroom. The vestibule is lit by the two façade windows. Two opposing four-paneled doors on the interior wall provide access to the classroom. The interior of the classroom is large and brightly lit by the three windows on the east and west sides. The original blackboard hangs between the two entry doors and a cast-iron woodstove is in the center of the room. The school retains its original pine floors throughout. Electric lighting is supplied by hanging pendant lights, added to the building after 1910. The school has bad minimal alterations from its original construction date.”

 

The school building complied with all the latest educational mandates, and was considered one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. On March 25, 1886 the Hancock Herald reported that “Miss Minnie Biedeknapp will teach the Rock Valley school the coming term,” making her one of the earliest teachers as the Rock Valley School.

 

The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. In 1953 the school building was deeded to the Rock Valley Cemetery Association, which has maintained the school ever since. The Rock Valley Cemetery, located along John Milk Road, behind and to the west of the school, was established in 1902. A commemorative marker was mounted on the front of the building by the Basket Historical Society in 1985 to mark the 100th anniversary of the school.

 

The Rock Valley School was one of 29 school buildings that served the town of Hancock in the late 1800s. Of the 29 buildings 14 have been demolished, 10 were converted to dwellings, 3 are of unknown disposition and 2, Rock Valley and Harvard, retain their school forms.

 

Rock Valley School HouseRock Valley School HouseThe Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Rock Valley School House, SummerRock Valley School House, SummerThe Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Country School at Rock ValleyCountry School at Rock ValleyThe Rock Valley Schoolhouse, located in the small hamlet of Rock Valley in the town of Hancock, was established in 1885 in order to meet the needs of the growing population associated with local businesses such as logging, milling, bluestone quarrying, agriculture and the wood chemical industry. The classic one-story wood frame school, built at a cost of $750 with all the latest educational mandates, was considered to be one of the finest schools in the county. As was common for rural areas of the era, the one room schoolhouse served students of all grade levels. (Remarkably, although one room schoolhouses are considered a product of a long-gone era, there are still approximately 400 active one-room schoolhouses in the United States.) Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. The historic school remained in continuous operation until 1940s, when it closed due to school district consolidation. Since its closing, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings. The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Today, the school interior features many of its original fixtures such as the pine floor, blackboard, iron coat hooks and desks. Since its closing in the 1940s, the building has been used as a polling station, a community meeting house and, more recently, as a venue for artistic events such as book signings and poetry readings.

 

The 24-inch cast iron church bell located in front of the school adds to the charm of the location but has no historic association with the schoolhouse. It was acquired in the summer of 2006 by the Rock Valley Cemetery Association, the school’s owner. The bell was originally located at the old Grange and Rock Valley Methodist Church, located a 1/4 mile up the road from the schoolhouse.

 

The Rock Valley School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places “as an intact representative example of a small, vernacular nineteenth-century schoolhouse and for its association with the history and development of the town of Hancock in Delaware County.”

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) architecture Basket building community Delaware County district George Oestrich hamlet Hancock John Inman kids learning meeting house museum National Register of Historic Places New York one room school Rock Valley Rock Valley School rural school schoolhouse students teacher https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/rock-valley-school-in-hancock-new-york Sat, 18 Nov 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle: Piedmont Series https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/rip-van-winkle-piedmont-series Circa 1910 The American Tobacco Company, owners of the Piedmont brand of cigarettes, issued a series of 10 full-color cards depicting various scenes from the Rip Van Winkle tale. The rare cards each measure 5 inches by 8 inches. For each card, the “chapter” number can be seen in the lower left corner, while in the upper left-hand corner is an image of a pack of Piedmont cigarettes. The reverse side of each card contains a brief “chapter” of text from the legendary story.

 

The Piedmont cigarette brand was established by The American Tobacco Company under the Liggett & Myers (L & M) name. Piedmont, advertising itself with the slogan of “cigarettes of quality,” was once a dominant tobacco brand in the south. The American Tobacco Company (ATC), an original member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, was broken up for operating as a monopoly in 1911 by an anti-trust action from the United States government. The ATC was divided up into four companies, after which Piedmont cigarettes continued to be manufactured by Liggett & Myers well into the 20th century.

 

Complete Set of 10 Cards

 

Chapter 1 – The Catskill Mountains

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 1, The Catskill MountainsRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 1, The Catskill Mountains

 

Chapter 2 – Rip’s Home Life

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 2, Rip's Home LifeRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 2, Rip's Home Life

 

Chapter 3 – Rip at the Old Inn

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 3, Rip at the Old InnRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 3, Rip at the Old Inn

 

Chapter 4 – Rip Leaving Home

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 4, Rip Leaving HomeRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 4, Rip Leaving Home

 

Chapter 5 – Rip Meets a Gnome

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 5, Rip Meets a GnomeRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 5, Rip Meets a Gnome

 

Chapter 6 – Rip Among the Gnomes

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 6, Rip Among the GnomesRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 6, Rip Among the Gnomes

 

Chapter 7 – Rip Falls Asleep

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 7, Rip Falls AsleepRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 7, Rip Falls Asleep

 

Chapter 8 – Rip Wakes Up

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 8, Rip Wakes UpRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 8, Rip Wakes Up

 

Chapter 9 – Rip’s Return to the Village

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 9, Rip's Return to the VillageRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 9, Rip's Return to the Village

 

Chapter 10 – Rip Finds His Son and Daughter

Rip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 10, Rip Finds His Son and DaughterRip Van Winkle, Piedmont Series, Chapter 10, Rip Finds His Son and Daughter

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) advertising American Tobacco Company art artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills character cigarettes drawings illustrations Liggett & Myers marketing Piedmont Rip Van Winkle short story story tobacco Washington Irving https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/rip-van-winkle-piedmont-series Sat, 11 Nov 2023 13:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle, by Arthur Rackham https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/rip-van-winkle-by-arthur-rackham “I think Rip [is] one of the most remarkable of created characters. Created as the sheerest piece of pleasant moralizing, acknowledging, even, that it was cribbed from old-world sources, here is Rip as firmly fixed in the hearts of all good Americans as any genuine myth. I can think of hardly another modern instance.” – Arthur Rackham.

 

“There have been three creators of Rip Van Winkle. The first, who was Washington Irving, created him with his pen; the second, who was Joseph Jefferson, created him with his personality; and the third, who is Arthur Rackham, erected him with his brush.” – Eleanor Farjeon, grand-daughter of Joseph Jefferson.

 

(11) Surrounded by a Troop of Children(11) Surrounded by a Troop of Children

Surrounded by a Troop of Children.

 

Arthur Rackham (1867-1939) was one of the leading book illustrators of his time. Rackham, the son of Alfred Thomas Rackham, was educated at the City of London School and at Lambeth School of Art. After working as a clerk at the insurance firm of the Westminster Fire Office from 1885 to 1892, he officially began his art career in the early 1890s working as a journalistic illustrator for several London newspapers and contributing occasional illustrations to magazines. His first work as a book illustrator can be seen in the travel book titled To the Other Side, by Thomas Rhodes, published in 1893, and The Dolly Dialogues, by Anthony Hope, published in 1894.

 

Throughout his nearly 50-year career he would illustrate a range of classic stories including Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (1906), Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1907), Gulliver’s Travels (1900, 1909), Hansel and Gretel (1920) and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (1928), among many others. His last book illustrations, which he worked on while in failing health, were for The Wind in the Willows, published posthumously in 1940.

 

Rackham was commissioned in the middle of 1904 by Ernest Brown and Phillips, joint owners of Leicester Galleries, to complete 51 color illustrations for the to-be-published book titled Rip Van Winkle. Rackham was paid 300 guineas total, or about six guineas per drawing, for both the original drawings and all the rights associated with them. The publishing rights were then resold to William Heinemann (1863-1920). With his reputation firmly established with the publishing of Rip Van Winkle, Rackham would negotiate much improved terms for further book illustrations, his contracted price beginning at five guineas for the copyright for each illustration, but now with Rackham retaining ownership of the originals. (Hamilton, James. Arthur Rackham: A Life with Illustration. Great Britain: Pavilion Books Limited, 1995. pp. 67-72.)

 

In 1905 the book Rip Van Winkle, as illustrated by Rackham, was published by William Heinemann of London and in the United States by Doubleday, Page and Co. The book contained 51 illustrations that were reproductions in full color of the original drawings by Rackham. The illustrations depicted various scenes from throughout Irving’s beloved Catskills tale. In conjunction with the release of the book, the drawings were exhibited at Leicester Galleries in London in the spring of 1905. Most of the original drawings were sold at the exhibition.

 

(7) Taught Them to Fly Kites(7) Taught Them to Fly Kites

Taught Them to Fly Kites.

 

(28) He Even Ventured to Taste the Beverage(28) He Even Ventured to Taste the Beverage

“He even ventured to taste the beverage, which he found had much of the flavour of excellent hollands.”
 

 

(1) Rip Wakes Up(1) Rip Wakes Up

Rip wakes up. “Surely,” though he, “I have not slept here all night . . . Oh! that flagon! that wicked flagon! what excuse shall I make to Dame Van Winkle?”
 

 

Leicester Galleries, where Rackham first exhibited his Rip Van Winkle drawings in 1905, was established only three years prior in 1902 by brothers Cecil and Wilfred Philips, who were then joined a year later by Ernest Brown. Originally operating at Leicester Square in central London, the gallery’s first exhibition took place and 1903. Over its 74-year history, Leicester Galleries held over 1,400 exhibitions, with its last being held in 1975. Rackham’s work was regularly exhibited at Leicester Galleries, including every year from 1905 to 1913. Upon Rackham’s passing in 1939 a memorial exhibition was held in his honor.

 

The first edition of Rip Van Winkle was published as a limited edition of 250 copies, all numbered and signed by the artist. The book was “bound in vellum with gold pictorial stamping and lettering on the cover and gold lettering on the spine, gilt top. 57 number pages of printed matter and fifty-one full-page illustrations in color mounted on brown paper. Size of page 8 3/4 x 11.” (Latimore, Sarah Briggs; Grace Clark Haskell. Arthur Rackham: A Bibliography. New York: Burt Franklin, 1936.)

 

“The illustrations, all gathered together at the back of the book, are ‘tipped in’, that is, printed on coated paper and stuck on to thicker card because it was then technically impossible to print in color on text pages. The 51 illustrations, for a story of not more than five thousand words, enable the story to be told twice, one through Irving’s words, and once again, image by image, through Rackham’s pictures with their text extracts printed as titles on India paper flyleaves.” (Hamilton, James. Arthur Rackham: A Life with Illustration. Great Britain: Pavilion Books Limited, 1995.)

 

After the limited-edition books quickly sold out, a trade edition was issued, “bound in green cloth with the same [as the original pictorial stamping in gold and gold lettering, with fifty-one full-page illustrations mounted on green paper, 57 number pages, 7 1/4 x 9 3/4.” (Latimore, Sarah Briggs; Grace Clark Haskell. Arthur Rackham: A Bibliography. New York: Burt Franklin, 1936.)

 

(35) He Found the House Gone to Decay(35) He Found the House Gone to Decay

“He found the house gone to decay . . . ‘My very dog,’ sighed poor rip, ‘has forgotten me.’”
 

 

(40) Sure Enough, It is Rip Van Winkle(40) Sure Enough, It is Rip Van Winkle

“Sure enough! it is Rip Van Winkle – it is himself!”
 

 

(45) He Preferred Making Friends Among the Rising Generation(45) He Preferred Making Friends Among the Rising Generation

“He preferred making friends among the rising generation, with whom he soon grew into great favour.”
 

 

In 1916 Rip Van Winkle was reissued “bound in light gray-blue cloth with pictorial stamping in gold on the cover and gold lettering on the cover and spine. 36 numbered pages, 6 7/8 x 9 3/4. Twenty-four full-page illustrations in color, five full-page drawings in black and white, nine black and white drawings in the text, and pictorial end-papers, all by Arthur Rackham. This book is a reprint of the 1905 edition, with many new black and white illustrations added and some of the original colored plates left out.” (Latimore, Sarah Briggs; Grace Clark Haskell. Arthur Rackham: A Bibliography. New York: Burt Franklin, 1936.)

 

The exhibition at Leicester Galleries of the Rip Van Winkle drawings would lead to further success for Rackham. The exhibition was attended by J. M. Barrie, author of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens. After admiring Rackham’s work, Barrie asked Rackham to produce a set of drawings for his story featuring the character Peter Pan. Rackham agreed, and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens would become one of the most popular gift books of 1906.

 

Rackham’s Rip Van Winkle received much positive praise in various newspaper reviews, both in England and in the United States. The reviews commented on many aspects of the book and its illustrations, including their originality, the use of color, the book’s unique layout, the quality of materials used to manufacture the book and that Rackham’s drawings were in the original spirit of Irving’s tale. 

 

March 11, 1905. “‘Rip Van Winkle’ is the subject of fifty water colors by Mr. Arthur Rackham, A.R.W.S., shortly to be on view at the Leicester Galleries. No story could offer better subjects to an artist of Mr. Rackham’s peculiar gifts, and those who have been privileged to see his pictures regard them as the best work he has yet done.” (“Art and Artists.” Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. March 11, 1905.)

 

March 13, 1905. “. . . Mr. Rackham is exhibiting a collection of delightfully quaint and delicate drawings illustrative of “Rip Van Winkle.” His designs are full of intricate detail; and, while droll, they appeal to the intelligence as strongly illuminating the most appealing features of the famous legend of the Catskills. Technically, too, the drawings are important. Mr. Rackham, though he works on absolutely independent lines, realizes his ideas in a manner that all groups of artists will applaud.” (“Our London Correspondence.” Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. March 13, 1905.)

 

March 13, 1905. “As to Mr. Rackham, his illustrations to “Rip Van Winkle” are delightful, and will be highly appreciated in New York, where they are to be exhibited next autumn. There is genuine comedy here, while now and then, as in the drawing of “Rip’s Daughter and Grandchild,” the artist shows us that he can paint a pretty woman with much daintiness. In other drawings, his dragons, wolves, and other fierce creatures are properly terrifying.” (“Art Exhibitions.” The Times (London). March 13, 1905.)

 

March 13, 1905. “An exhibition of extraordinary interest has just been opened at the Leicester Galleries. It consists of a series of drawings by Mr. Arthur Rackham, an artist who holds an absolutely unique position among our present-day painters of imaginative motives. The majority of these drawings are intended as illustrations for an edition of “Rip Van Winkle,” which is to be published shortly, but with these are included a number of his other fantasies and a few of the illustrations which he has executed during recent years for “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” and for various books of the same order. The special characteristics of Mr. Rackham’s work are its amazing freedom of imagination and its remarkable beauty and originality of treatment. He works a vein of fantastic humour, in which he seems to find an inexhaustible supply of suggestions that he turns to account in an absolutely fascinating manner, and with delightful quaintness of expression. He affects particularly those subjects which give him scope for the display of his charming power of grotesque exaggeration, for the assertion of a capacity for invention which is partly humorous and partly poetic, but always spontaneous and brilliantly personal. Even in his most surprising flights of fancy he never misses those essentials which stamp his work as that of a sincere artist and a man of serious conviction, and in nothing that he does, however grotesque, is there the smallest hint of vulgarity. As an executant he takes the highest possible rank; his pen-drawings, tinted with delicious washes of color, are wonderfully accomplished and full of decorative beauty, and his pure water-colors, though, perhaps, a little less confident and masterly in handling, have admirable qualities and show a very correct perception of appropriate technicalities.” (Birmingham Daily Post (Birmingham, England). March 13, 1905.)

 

September 30, 1905. “Art books and gift books, chiefly in demand for the holiday trade, are already coming in unusual supply from both English and American publishers. There have been great improvements lately in the art of color printing, and richly illustrated books, dealing with the lives of artists, and critical studies of their works, can be produced now at a comparatively small cost. A book which is sold at retail nowadays at as high a price as $5 ought to be positively a thing of beauty and of permanent worth. Such a book is the new edition of Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle,” (published here by Doubleday, Page & Co.) The pictures are by Arthur Rackham, an English artist, who has poetic fancy and technical skill in plenty, and a good enough comprehension of his subject, derived largely, probably, from studies in old Holland rather than the neighborhood of the New Netherlands and the Kaatskill Mountains. But the spirit of the mountains he has caught from Irving. The forty-odd colored plates, mounted loosely on dark green boards, are charming in tone and excellent as illustrations. Perhaps some of the housewives are a bit too young and comely, but that is a small fault. The humor and the poetry of Irving are all in the pictures, without a hint of the theatrical quality. The type and paper are all that they should be.” (“Saturday Review of Books.” The New York Times. September 30, 1905.)

 

September 30, 1905. “One of the most beautifully and artistically gotten up books that we have seen in the “Rip Van Winkle,” with Mr. Arthur Rackham’s illustrations, published by William Heinemann in London and Doubleday, Page & Co. in New York. First comes the test of Irving’s tale splendidly printed in large type; then follow Mr. Rackham’s fifty pictures, exquisitely reproduced, looking like paintings on ivory and each mounted on tinted cardboard. The drawing of the pictures is very good. The effect is decorative, perhaps, rather than illustrative, and the artist we fancy, has tried at times to make an attractive picture rather to show the author’s meaning, but the pictures, whether grotesque, fanciful, comical or purely descriptive, are charming. The price of the book is remarkably low.” (“Some Interesting Picture Books.” The Sun (New York, New York). September 30, 1905.)

 

October 2, 1905. “Illustrated books abound nowadays, but it is rarely that we see so charming a book as the Rip Van Winkle of Washington Irving with fifty colored pictures by Mr. Arthur Rackham. Here we have a young artist of talent who has at last found a congenial subject. Mr. Rackham is favorably known as an illustrator of Georgian and Victorian novels, but his true sphere is obviously in the Teutonic fairyland, peopled with gnomes and pixies, which Washington Irving rediscovered among the Catskills. He enjoys the grotesque humor of the old Dutch legend as heartily as Irving did, and he renders it in line and color with the same quiet skill. By a happy innovation the text is printed at the beginning of the book and the plates are kept together at the end; it is easy, therefore, to follow Mr. Rackham as he retells the story in his own delightful way. The drawings are not all original. The village scenes remind us now of Caldecott and now of George Boughton in their airy grace and freshness. But when Mr. Rackham has brought Rip into the mountains and confronted him with the “odd-looking persons playing at ninepins” who hand him the flagon of excellent Hollands we find ourselves in the company of an artist whose imagination is unfettered by precedent. Hendrik Hudson and his men in these pictures are the creations of a lively and delicate fancy, and the rocks and fir trees among which these strange beings move are as fantastic as they. The treatment of landscape recalls Japanese pictures; the precise outlines that reinforce the color often produce an effect similar to that of a Japanese wood-block. But Mr. Rackham is never a mere imitator, and his most whimsical compositions have a beauty that is all their own. In the last but one of the series, for instance, the idea of the “old squaw spirit who hung up the new moons in the skies and cut up the old ones into stars” is rendered with amazing ingenuity and at the same time makes an exquisite moonlight landscape I purplish grey tones. Among the pictures of mortals, those of Rip awaking and of Rip telling stories to children by firelight may be named also for their dramatic force and their vivid play of light and shade. But almost every one of these clever and thoughtful drawings is good to look upon. They have been reproduced with considerable success; though the more delicate drawings lose some of their piquancy, other certainly gain in coherence by the reduction in size that they have had to bear, and the color-printing is far more accurate than usual, probably because Mr. Rackham’s style suits the process. We could not, in fact, wish for a better illustrated version of Rip Van Winkle.” (“New Books.” The Guardian (London). October 2, 1905.)

 

October 5, 1905. “There have been not a few illustrated editions of “Rip Van Winkle,” but never has Washington Irving’s story been illustrated so delightfully as in the book just published by Mr. Heinemann (price 15s. net). It contains fifty fine reproductions in color of a series of drawings by Mr. Arthur Rackham which were greatly admired at an exhibition last spring. In the strange scenes and quaint characters of the story this accomplished artist has found congenial themes, and the pictures, but turns weird and fantastic, graceful and humorous, are throughout wonderfully effective.” (Truth. Vol. 58. 1905. October 5, 1905.)

 

October 13, 1905. “Rip Van Winkle. In the form in which Washington Irving’s immortal story is presented by Mr. Heinemann it is a genuine pleasure to renew acquaintance with the hero of the Kaatskill Mountains. For it is not merely the familiar tale that we meet with afresh, but the legend adorned with illustrations that must needs delight by reason of their fancy, aptness, and charm. Mr. Arthur Rackham may be congratulated sincerely upon the task and the art he has brought to bear upon these quaint and imaginative drawings. The stage has frequently familiarized us with the picturesque figure of the Rip of tradition, with his shrewish wife, the village children he delighted to romp with, and his companions-in-idleness. But Mr. Rackham “pictures” them all anew, and in accordance, not with accepted convention, but with his own delicate fancy, which is revealed quite at its best in these welcome pages. There is both humor and pathos in the artist’s treatment of the well-worn classic, and he has been peculiarly happy in preserving its spirit. Never, indeed, has the famous story been presented in a more attractive guise.” (“New Novels.” The Daily Telegraph (London, England). October 13, 1905.)

 

October 26, 1905. “Mr. Heinemann’s edition of “Rip Van Winkle” has been beautifully illustrated by Mr. Arthur Rackham, A.R.W.S., and modern methods of reproduction in colors have assisted in the publication of an exceedingly artistic book. Some fifty examples of Mr. Rackham’s art follow the letterpress, and the whole is enclosed in a binding of tasteful simplicity.” (“William Heinemann.” The Daily Telegraph (London, England). October 26, 1905.)

 

November 25, 1905. “Rip Van Winkle. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham. (Heinemann.) – In the minds of many the story of Rip Van Winkle is identified not so much with Irving the author as with “Joe” Jefferson the actor. Jefferson’s marvelous impersonation of the cheerful vagabond has become the authentic portrait of Rip, and hence it is inevitable that all other alleged portraits should wear an appearance of doubtful authenticity. Mr. Rackham’s drawings, which constitute the real reason for the existence of this beautiful edition of Irving’s story, are of remarkable merit, both in conception and execution. Especially is this true of the pictures representing the supernatural features of the story. That much overworked adjective “weird” faithfully describes many of them, and they cannot be other than a delight to all lovers of true art. Yet it must be said that Mr. Rackham’s conception of Rip Van Winkle will somewhat disappoint those who know him as presented by Jefferson. Mr. Rackham’s Rip is a silly, even a weak-minded person, whereas the true Jeffersonian Rip was conspicuous for his shrewdness. But to seem to find fault with admirable work merely because it does not entirely correspond with certain other admirable work is hardly fair. Mr. Rackham has demonstrated in these drawings that he is not only a master of the pencil, but also an artist of real power. This will not be news to those who have been familiar with his work, but not every one has had that privilege, and to those who have not, his drawings will come as a delightful surprise.” (The Athenaeum. No. 4074. November 25, 1905.)

 

November 29, 1905. “Two sumptuous holiday books have just made their appearance bearing the imprint of Doubleday, Page & Company. The first is Arthur Rackham’s illustrated “Rip Van Winkle.” This is perhaps the most remarkably illustrated version of the great American classic. Mr. Rackham is an eminent English artist, and at the exhibition of the originals of this book every one was sold. He shows a richly humorous imagination and a unique power of invention.” (The Buffalo Commercial. November 29, 1905.)

 

December 2, 1905. “Rip Van Winkle. – This new edition of Washington Irving’s well-known story is especially designed for the holidays. The text is printed on an excellent quality of heavy paper in clear black type, and following it are fifty illustrations in color by Arthur Rackham, an English illustrator. The spirit and humor of Irving’s story are all in the pictures, which are loosely mounted on dark green paper and charming in tone and color. These drawings were recently exhibited at the Leicester Galleries, in London, and attracted considerable attention. The volume is tastefully bound in dark green cloth and lettered in gold.” (The New York Times. December 2, 1905.)

 

December 2, 1905. “The holiday editions of American authors are led off by a sumptuous reprint of “Rip Van Winkle” (Doubleday, Page & Co.), in which text and plates are put together after a new fashion. The former occupies the first fifty-seven pages, and occupies them, we may add, with every circumstance of luxury. No holiday book of the season has been better printed. Then follow the illustrations, printed in quiet tints, and each mounted on its separate leaf of stout, dark green paper. This mounting idea is not a bad one, for it gives to each illustration the value of an independent picture set on a mat, as if for framing, but, unfortunately, the wrong color was chosen. Mr. Arthur Rackham’s designs merited a better background, though we are not unprepared to hear that he himself chose the somber tint. We would have preferred something a shade lighter. As it is, these drawings excite our lively admiration. They are original in conception and in style, they really illustrate the famous tale, and they are executed with authority, making us feel that the artist knew just what he wanted to say and knew just how to say it. His restrained, tawny tones are especially gratifying. The book is manufactures with marked thoroughness. Here we have one more of those Christmas publications which are not meant for Christmas alone.” (“Literary News and Criticism.” New York Tribune. December 2, 1905.)

 

December 10, 1905. “Rip Van Winkle in Color. Washington Irving’s immortal romance, “Rip Van Winkle,” has been published in numerous editions, and with all grades of decorative adornment, but it is doubtful if this classic American story ever received a quainter or more artistic setting that the edition which is issued by Doubleday, Page & Co. The charm of the edition lies in the illustrations, which are from water color drawings by Arthur Rackham, an associate of the Royal Water Color Society. In form, the book is a large, handsomely bound, and with appropriate cover design. The text is in a large-faced type, and instead of sandwiching the illustrations between the pages of the text, the legend comes first – prefaced by the author’s quaint introduction, relative to our old friend Mr. Diedrich Knickerbocker. Following the text, the pictures are grouped together, as if in a portfolio, each with its appropriate legend on the fly leaf that covers it. The frontispiece is an ideal portrait of Rip Van Winkle, as he appeared after his twenty years slumber. All of the plates, about fifty in number, are in simulation of water color drawings, and are mounted on heavy paper, of a dull-toned olive tint, affording an effective background. Mr. Rackham has been singularly fortunate in his conception of the legend, and has put into his drawings all of the quaintness and originality of its antic quality. His grotesque never descends to the buffoonery of caricature; it is filled with weirdness; his gnomes of the mountain are the gnomes of fairy romances, reminding one the pleasantly uncanny sort of fellows that childhood conjures up, and delightfully shivers over. His ideals of the old time settlement, with its flavor of the Dutchman’s ideas in architecture, the pictures of the folk – are all in the happiest sort of keeping with the spirit of the legend. One must have studied Rip Van Winkle with loving care and appreciation to have caught Irving’s atmosphere so perfectly. In the matter of color as well, the artist has avoided the fault so often apparent in illustrative work of this sort, of overcoloring. He has painted with due restraint; there is no glare of primary tints in his pictures. In a word, they are a delight to the eye, appealing to the taste and giving one a sense of artistic completeness. Altogether, a most successful illustration of this much loved legend. From these delightful color pictures the mind runs back to Felix O. C. Darley’s drawings in outline of years ago, illustrative of the Van Winkle legend – drawings which in their outline sketch style seemed to have been suggested by Flaxman’s illustrations of Homer. The contrast between those cold and not very inspiring designs and the warmth of color and originality of Mr. Rackham’s pictures is wonderfully satisfactory. It means an advance that is shared by the artist’s public as well as the artist.” (“More Holiday Books for All Sorts of Folks.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. December 10, 1905.)

 

December 23, 1905. “So great has been the demand for the edition of “Rip Van Winkle” illustrated by Arthur Rackham that Doubleday, Page & Company have brought out a second large edition. Mr. Rackham has a richly humorous imagination, and the fifty full-page colored illustrations reveal a new and quaint world of elves, goblins and mountain characters. It has been said of these pictures that the artist has caught the spirit of Irving’s classic, and interpreted anew it ‘old-fashioned grace and elfin playfulness.’” (Nashville Banner. December 23, 1905.)

 

1905. “Rip Van Winkle, by Washington Irving, with fifty-two drawings by Arthur Rackham, A.R.W.S. How such an exquisitely beautiful volume as this can be produced for so small a sum as fifteen shillings we cannot pretend to know; it is a veritable triumph in the art of colored illustration, worthy of a place on the shelves of the most eclectic of bibliophiles. Mr. Rackham’s drawings in color evince the most delicate art; indeed, we find it difficult to praise them adequately. Imagination, fancy, humor, grotesqueness, pathos, weirdness – all these qualities may be discovered freely expended on his work; the pictures introduce us to a new world, a world wherein we dwell with great delight and profit to ourselves. Each drawing is pasted on to a separate page and may easily be removed if required for framing purposes. It is a book which must bring honor to both artist and publisher.” (The Publishers’ Circular. Vol. 83. 1905.)

 

Despite the widespread praise of the Rackham’s Rip Van Winkle drawings, one critic from The Daily Telegraph in London found the artwork lacking in many different areas.

 

“At the Leicester Galleries we find two new exhibitions; one a group of water-colors illustrating Rip Van Winkle, and other Fantasies, by Mr. Arthur Rackham, of the Royal Society of Painter is Water Colors . . . Mr. Arthur Rackham shows here on a larger scale, and with more of elaboration and deliberation, the same grim, yet not, save exceptionally, cruel or unamiable vein of fantasy that has won for him much favorable notice at the more recent exhibitions of the “old” society. It is an Anglo-Teutonic mode of conception, in the realms of the fantastic, the goblinesque, the macabre, that distinguishes the young English artist. His method, his means are derived from many sources; his way of looking at his subjects is, nevertheless, quite personal and engaging; up to a certain point he interests and convinces, even though the sources of his art may not yet have so mingled and coalesced as to make up a perfectly homogeneous whole.

 

Obviously, the chief inspirer of these strange little creatures who swarm through the Rip Van Winkle designs is “Dicky” Doyle, most amiable and inventive of all limners of the fairy and hobgoblin tribe. In the rustic scenes that most expressive of draughtsmen and exquisitely tender of humorists, Randolph Caldecott, has not less obviously been the exemplar. And again Mr. Rackham as an executant owes much – yet as regards essentials perhaps not enough – to the great Hokusai and the comparatively late Japanese draughtsmen of his period.

 

While taking genuine pleasure in this delicately fantastic and in its way attractive art, we must in conscience level against Mr. Rackham a reproach which as addressed to a draughtsman is a very serious one. His drawings show a tangle of lines ingenious and elaborate rather than truly expressive; his line is wanting in flexibility and in power; with all its appearance of incisiveness it conveys too little. Vitality, momentariness, and the suggestion of movement – so necessary in caricature and humorous fantasy – are, if not entirely wanting, at any rate present in no high degree of intensity. This is disquieting, if we are to look upon this promising artist as a candidate for the highest honors.

 

It is a pity that his carefully-wrought and at its best really imaginative series of drawings should not have been arranged in the order of the story, familiar and dear to all, both on this and the other side of the Atlantic. It is very hard on the pictorial humorist that the spectator should be compelled to absorb his humor and digest his characterization in this jerky and uneven fashion.

 

Thus, perhaps, the most genuine creating of the series and certainly in its quiet way the most original piece of color, is “The old squaw spirit who hung up new moons in the skies.” But this is divorced by the whole length of the gallery from a companion piece of the same grimly jocular type, “If displeased, she (the old squaw spirit), would brew up clouds as black as ink.” Caldecott-like, with a difference – that is less spontaneous, more deliberate – is, among other drawings, “Those mountains are regarded by all good wives, far and near, as perfect barometers.”

 

The “Curtain-lecture – indirect cause of all Rip’s strange adventure – is, with all its elaboration, a failure. No such comely, undemonstrative, and expressionless female could have driven Rip to despair and self-banishment. The power to evoke new types of quaintness, engaging and disquieting at the same time – like the goblins in Ibsen’s “Peer Gynt” – is well shown in “His father had seen them (the Hollander-gnomes) in their old Dutch dresses, playing at nine-pins.” The type of Rip himself – the ancient Rip of the elf locks and the weird garments – is pathetic, but not strongly personal. Japanese in intention, but unfortunately without the synthetic quality, the concision, or the intense expressiveness of fine Japanese art, is ‘He was only answered by a flock of idle crows.’” (“Leicester Galleries.” The Daily Telegraph (London, England). March 23, 1905.)

 

This seemingly over-the-top negative review had no impact on the sales of Rip Van Winkle, and could almost be dismissed in its entirety, as it was so far outside the norm of general opinion, and was so greatly outnumbered by the positive reviews. With history as a guide, author Jeff A. Menges, in The Arthur Rackham Treasury, writes of Rip Van Winkle’s impact on the publishing industry at large.

 

“In completing 51 color pieces for a classic Early American tale, Rackham created a work that was to become a turning point in the production of books. The recent perfection of color-separated printing had made the accurate reproduction of color artwork possible, and British publisher William Heinemann found the perfect marriage in this pairing of Rackham with Washington Irving’s Rip Van Winkle, an atmospheric tale of rustic America. The book became an instant classic, and popularized the production of lavishly illustrated gift editions of well-known tales – a trend that delighted both publishers and consumers.”

 

Derek Hudson, in his biography titled Arthur Rackham: His Life and Work, wrote of the summary impact of the publishing of Rip Van Winkle on Rackham and his career.

 

“The first work that greatly advanced his fame in the years immediately following his marriage was his edition of Rip Van Winkle, with its fifty-one color plates, published in 1905.

 

This lovely book decisively established Rackham as the leading decorative illustrator of the Edwardian period. One does not know which to admire most – the superb artistry of his landscapes, the poetry of the scenes of Rip by the riverside, the charm of his children and fairies, or the grotesque groups of Hendrick Hudson and his crew which so long anticipated the art of Walt Disney. With Rip Van Winkle he began his fruitful association with the firm of William Heinemann, who issued the book in a limited edition and a trade edition, while American, French, German and other foreign editions were also called for, setting a pattern of publications to be followed for many years. Another profitable precedent was established by the exhibition of the originals at the Leicester Galleries in March 1905. All except eight of the pictures were sold, and the deluxe edition of the book was fully subscribed before the exhibition closed. Henceforth Rackham’s book illustrations were regularly exhibited at the Leicester Galleries at the time of their publication, and they found ready buyers.” 

 

Given the location of his birth and upbringing, Rackham is rightfully regarded as one of the great British illustrators in history, but through his delightful work in Rip Van Winkle he can also justly claim a place in American illustration history. Dozens of illustrators from the 1800s through to the current day have created their visual interpretation of Irving’s tale, many with great success, but Rackham’s originality, use of color and technical expertise, all of which were used in a combination that had not been seen before, continue to place his Rip Van Winkle interpretation amongst the most revered, even though it is been more than a century since its original publication.   

 

 

Rip Van Winkle illustrations by Arthur Rackham

 

Illustration 1. Rip wakes up. “Surely,” though he, “I have not slept here all night . . . Oh! that flagon! that wicked flagon! what excuse shall I make to Dame Van Winkle?”

 

Illustration 2. “He found the old burghers, and still more their wives, rich in that legendary lore so invaluable to true history.”

 

Illustration 3. “These fairy mountains.”

 

Illustration 4. “Some of the houses of the original settlers.”

 

Illustration 5. “A curtain-lecture is worth all the sermons in the world for teaching the virtues of patience and long-suffering.”

 

Illustration 6. “The good wives of the village never failed in their evening gossipings, to lay all the blame on Dame Van Winkle.”

 

Illustration 7. “Taught Them to Fly Kites.”

 

Illustration 8. “Certain biscuit-bakers have gone so far as to imprint his likeness on their new-year cakes.”

 

Illustration 9. “These mountains are regarded by all good wives, far and near, as perfect barometers.”

 

Illustration 10. “These fairy mountains.”

 

Illustration 11. “Surrounded by a troop of children.”

 

Illustration 12. “Not a dog would bark at him throughout the neighborhood.”

 

Illustration 13. “He would sit on a wet rock and fish all day.”

 

Illustration 14. “The women of the village used to employ him to do such little odd jobs as their less obliging husbands would not do for them.”

 

Illustration 15. “His cow would go astray or get among the cabbages.”

 

Illustration 16. “So that he was fain to draw off his forces and take to the outside of the house – the only side which, in truth, belongs to a hen-pecked husband.”

 

Illustration 17. “His children were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody.”

 

Illustration 18. “Equipped in a pair of his father’s cast-off galligaskins, which he had as much ado to hold up as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.”

 

Illustration 19. “He used to console himself by frequenting a kind of perpetual club of the sages, philosophers and other idle personages, which held its sessions before a small inn.”

 

Illustration 20. “When anything displeased him he was observed to smoke his pipe vehemently, and to send forth short, frequent and angry puffs.”

 

Illustration 21. “Mutually relieving one another they clambered up a narrow gully.”

 

Illustration 22. “A company of odd-looking persons playing at ninepins.”

 

Illustration 23. “Their visages too were peculiar.”

 

Illustration 24. “There was one who seemed to be the commander.”

 

Illustration 25. “They maintained the gravest faces.”

 

Illustration 26. “They stared at him with such fixed, statue-like gaze, that his heart turned within him and his knees smote together.”

 

Illustration 27. “They quaffed their liquor in profound silence.”

 

Illustration 28. “He even ventured to taste the beverage, which he found had much of the flavour of excellent hollands.”

 

Illustration 29. “The sleep of Rip Van Winkle.”

 

Illustration 30. “He was only answered by a flock of idle crows.”

 

Illustration 31. “They all stared at him with equal marks of surprise and invariably stroked their chins.”

 

Illustration 32. “A troop of strange children ran at his heels, hooting after him and pointing at his gray beard.”

 

Illustration 33. “The dogs too, not one of whom he recognized for an old acquaintance, barked at him as he passed.”

 

Illustration 34. “Strange names were over the doors – strange faces at the windows – everything was strange.”

 

Illustration 35. “He found the house gone to decay . . . ‘My very dog,’ sighed poor rip, ‘has forgotten me.’”

 

Illustration 36. “They crowded round him, eyeing him from head to foot with great curiosity.”

 

Illustration 37. Rip’s son, “a precise counterpart of himself, as he went up the mountain.”

 

Illustration 38. Rip’s daughter and grand-child.

 

Illustration 39. “All stood amazed.”

 

Illustration 40. “Sure enough! it is Rip Van Winkle – it is himself!”

 

Illustration 41. “Old Peter Vanderdonk was the most ancient inhabitant of the village.”

 

Illustration 42. “The Kaatskill Mountains had always been haunted by strange beings.”

 

Illustration 43. “His father had seen them in their old Dutch dresses playing at ninepins.”

 

Illustration 44. “He soon found many of his former cronies, though all rather the worse for the wear and tear of time.”

 

Illustration 45. “He preferred making friends among the rising generation, with whom he soon grew into great favour.”

 

Illustration 46. “Even to this day they never hear a thunderstorm about the Kaatskill but they say Hendrick Hudson and his crew are at their game of ninepins.”

 

Illustration 47. “I have even talked with Rip Van Winkle myself, who, when I last saw him, was a very venerable old man.”

 

Illustration 48. “The Kaatsberg or Catskill mountains have always been a region full of fable.”

 

Illustration 49. “The Indians considered them the abode of spirits.”

 

Illustration 50. “They were ruled by an old squaw spirit who hung up the new moons in the skies and cut up the old ones into stars.”

 

Illustration 51. “If displeased, she would brew up clouds black as ink, sitting in the midst of them like a bottle-bellied spider in the midst of its web; and when these clouds broke, woe betide the valleys!”

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) 1905 art Arthur Rackham artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills Cecil Philips character Doubleday Page & Co. drawings Ernest Brown illustrations illustrator Leicester Galleries Rip Van Winkle short story story Washington Irving Wilfred Philips William Heinemann https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/11/rip-van-winkle-by-arthur-rackham Sat, 04 Nov 2023 12:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle, by George P. Webster https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/rip-van-winkle-by-george-p-webster Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving was published to international acclaim in 1819. Set in the Catskills, an amiable Rip wanders off in the woods with his dog Wolf to escape his wife’s nagging and to avert “all kinds of profitable labor” only to encounter a silent group of short, bearded men playing nine-pins. After drinking some of their liquor he falls asleep for twenty years. Upon waking, he returns to his village to learn that his wife has died, the American Revolution has occurred and that he must face the fact that many of his former friends have either died, moved on or simply do not recognize him. The short story is an American classic.

 

Author George P. Webster poetically re-told Irving’s tale of Rip Van Winkle in a rhyming poem and published it as a children’s book. This version of the book, published by McLoughlin Brothers of New York, was published in 1889. There are multiple versions of Webster’s book, each with same words, but with different illustrations.

 

McLoughlin Brothers was a publishing company that operated from 1858 to 1920. The company was founded by John McLoughlin (1827-1905), who then took on his younger brother Edmund McLoughlin (1833/4-1889) as a partner. McLoughlin Brothers was considered a pioneer in the use of color printing technology for children’s books, and later expanded their product line to include puzzles, games and toys. The company was sold to their chief competitor Milton Bradley in 1920.

 

Rip Van WinkleRip Van Winkle

 

Rip Van Winkle Scolded by His WifeRip Van Winkle Scolded by His Wife

 

Rip With the ChildrenRip With the Children

 

Rip At the TavernRip At the Tavern

 

Rip Van Winkle With His Dog WolfRip Van Winkle With His Dog Wolf

 

Rip Van Winkle In the MountainsRip Van Winkle In the Mountains

 

The Nine-Pin GameThe Nine-Pin Game

 

In the MountainsIn the Mountains

 

Rip Van Winkle AwakesRip Van Winkle Awakes

 

Old Rip Van WinkleOld Rip Van Winkle

 

Old Rip Van Winkle With the ChildrenOld Rip Van Winkle With the Children

 

 

Rip Van Winkle

 

Near to the town, in a cottage small,

Lived RIP VAN WINKLE, known to all

As a harmless, drinking, shiftless lout,

Who never would work, but roamed about,

 

Always ready with jest and song –

Idling, tippling all day long.

“Shame on you, Rip!” cried the scolding vrows;

And old men muttered and knit their brows.

 

Not so with the boys, for they would shout,

And follow their hero, Rip, about,

Early or late – it was all the same,

They gave him a place in every game.

 

At ball he was ready to throw or catch;

At marbles, too, he was quite their match;

And many an urchin’s face grew bright,

When Rip took hold of his twin and kite.

 

And so he frittered the time away –

“Good natured enough,” they all would say;

But the village parson heaved a sigh

As Rip, in his cups, went reeling by,

 

With a silly and drunken leer –

His good dog Schneider always near.

Rip was fond of his rod and line,

And many a time, when the day was fine,

 

He would wander out to some neighb’ring stream,

And there with his dog, would sit and dream;

Hour after hour, would he dozing wait,

And woe to the fish that touched his bait.

 

But the stream of his life ran sometimes rough,

And his good “Vrow” gave him many a cuff,

For she was never a gentle dame,

And Rip was a toper, and much to blame.

 

But little did Rip Van Winkle care

For his wife or his home – he was seldom there –

But tried in his cups his cares to drown;

His scolding wife, with her threat’ning frown,

 

At his cottage-door he was sure to see –

“Ah! This,” said Rip, “is no place for me.”

So down to the tavern to drink his rum,

And waste his time with some red-nosed chum,

 

He was sure to go; for he knew that there

He would find a glass and a vacant chair,

And jolly fellows, who liked his fun,

And the tales he told of his dog and gun.

 

But his was still but a sorry life,

For, sot as he was, he loved his wife;

But he would tipple both day and night,

And she would scold him with all her might.

 

Thus Rip Van Winkle had many a grief,

And up ’mongst the mountains sought relief.

For lowering louds or a burning sun

He cared but little; his dog and gun

 

Were his friends, he knew; while they were near

He roamed the forests, and felt no fear.

If tired at last, and a seat he took,

And his dog came up with a hungry look,

 

He had always a crust or bone to spare,

And Schneider was certain to get his share.

And then if a squirrel chanced to stray

In range of his gun, he would blaze away,

 

And he held it too with a steady aim –

Rip never was known to miss his game.

But over his ills he would sometimes brood,

And scale the peaks in a gloomy mood;

 

And once he had climbed to a dizzy height,

When the sun went down, and the shades of night

Came up from the vale, and the pine-trees tall,

And the old gray rocks, and the waterfall

 

Grew dusky and dim, and faded away,

Till night, like a pall, on the mountain lay.

Full many a mile he had strayed that day,

And up in the mountains had lost his way;

 

And there he must stay through the gloomy night,

And shiver and wait for the morning light.

He thought of the stories, strange and old,

Which the graybeards down in the village told;

 

“And what,” said he, “if the tale were true

I have heard so oft of a phantom crew,

Who up in the Catskills, all night long,

Frolic and revel with wine and song.”

 

Just then a voice from a neighb’ring hill

Cried “Rip Van Winkle!” and all was still.

Then he looked above and he looked below,

And saw not a thing but a lonely crow.

 

“Ho, Rip Van Winkle!” the voice still cried,

And Schneider skulked to his master’s side.

Just then from a thicket a man came out –

His legs were short and his body stout,

 

He looked like a Dutchman in days of yore,

With buttons behind and buttons before;

And held a keg with an iron grip,

And beckoned for help to the gazing Rip.

 

Rip had his fears, but at last complied,

And bore the keg up the mountain side;

And now and then, when a thunder-peal

Made the mountain tremble, Rip would steal

 

A look at his guide, but never a work

From the lips of the queer old man was heard,

Up, up they clambered, until, at last,

The stranger halted. Rip quickly cast

 

A glance around, and as strange a crew

As ever a mortal man did view

Were playing at nine pins; at every ball

’Twas fun to see how the pins would fall;

 

And they rolled and rolled, without speaking a word,

And this was the thunder Rip had heard.

Their hats looked odd, each with sugar-loaf crown,

And their eyes were small, and their beards hung down,

 

While their high-heeled shows all had peaked toes,

And their legs were covered with blood-red hose;

Their noses were long, like a porker’s snout,

And they nodded and winked as they moved about.

 

They tapped the keg, and the liquor flowed,

And up to the brim of each flagon glowed;

And a queer old man made a sign to Rip,

As much as to say, “Will you take a nip”

 

Nor did he linger to stop of think,

For Rip was thirsty and wanted a drink.

“I’ll risk it,” though he; “it can be no sin,

And it smells like the best of Holland gin;”

 

So he tipped his cup to grim old chap,

And drained it, then, for a quiet nap,

He stretched himself on the mossy ground,

And soon was wrapped in a sleep profound.

 

At last he woke; ’twas a sunny morn,

And the strange old man of the glen was gone;

He saw the young birds flutter and hop,

And an eagle wheeled round the mountain-top;

 

Then he rubbed his eyes for another sight –

“Surely,” said he, “I have slept all night.”

He thought of the flagon and nine-pin game;

“Oh! What shall I say to my fiery dame!”

 

He, faintly faltered; “I know that she

Has a fearful lecture in store for me.”

He took up his gun, and strange to say,

The wood had rotted and worn away;

 

He raised to his feet, and his joints were sore;

“Said he, “I must go to my home once more.”

The, with trembling step, he wandered down;

Amazed, he entered his native town.

 

The people looked with a wondering stare,

For Rip, alas! was a stranger there;

He tottered up to his cottage door,

But his wife was dead, and could scold no more;

 

And down at the tavern he sought in vain

For the chums he would never meet again;

He looked, as he passed, at a group of girls

For the laughing eye and the flaxen curls

 

Of the child he loved as he loved his life,

But she was a thrifty farmer’s wife;

And when they met, and her hand he took,

She blushed and gave him a puzzled look;

 

But she knew her father and kissed his brow,

All covered with marks and wrinkles now;

For Rip Van Winkle was old and gray

And twenty summers had passed away –

 

Yes, twenty winters of snow and frost

Had he in his mountain slumber lost;

Yet his lover for stories was still the same,

And he often told of the nine-pin game.

 

But the age was getting a little fast –

The Revolution had come and passed,

And Young America, gathered about,

Received his tales with many a doubt.

 

Awhile he hobbled about the town;

Then, worn and weary, at last laid down,

For his locks were white and limbs were sore –

And Rip Van Winkle will make no more.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) art artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills character drawings George P. Webster illustrations illustrator McLoughlin Bros McLoughlin Brothers New York Rip Van Winkle short story story Washington Irving https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/rip-van-winkle-by-george-p-webster Sat, 28 Oct 2023 12:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson, Illustrated by Frances Brundage https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/rip-van-winkle-a-tale-of-the-hudson-illustrated-by-frances-brundage Frances Lockwood Brundage (1854-1937) was a noted illustrator of children’s books. She illustrated over 200 books during her career, in addition to her work on postcards, valentines, prints, trade cards and calendars. Her works were published by several companies including Raphael Tuck & Sons, Samuel Gabriel Company and Saalfield Publishing, among others.

 

Rip Was at Length Routed by His Termagant Wife (35)Rip Was at Length Routed by His Termagant Wife (35)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson, as illustrated by Brundage, was published in 1927 by the Saalfield Publishing Company of Akron, Ohio. The 92-page book contains 62 illustrations, including 17 full page illustrations, depicting various scenes from the classic American short story by famed author Washington Irving. Full page illustrations included:

 

  • Frontispiece. The children of the village, too, would shout with joy whenever he approached.
  • Page 16. It is a little village of great antiquity.
  • Page 22. He taught them to fly kites and shoot marbles.
  • Page 25. His children were as ragged as if they belonged to nobody.
  • Page 28. He shrugged his shoulders, shook his head, cast up his eyes, but said nothing.
  • Page 30. At the least flourish of a broomstick, he would fly to the door with yelping precipitation.
  • Page 37. “Poor Wolfe, thy mistress leads thee a dog’s life of it!”
  • Page 39. He could overlook all the lower country for many a mile of rich woodland.
  • Page 47. A company of odd-looking personages playing at nine-pins.
  • Page 51. He was naturally a thirsty soul. One taste provoked another.
  • Page 56. He reached to where the ravine had opened through the cliffs to the amphitheater; but no traces of such an opening remained.
  • Page 62. Rip called him by name, but the cur snarled, showed his teeth, and passed on. “My very dog,” sighed poor Rip, “has forgotten me!”
  • Page 65. A tall, naked pole, and from it was fluttering a flag, on which was a singular assemblage of stars and stripes.
  • Page 67. The orator bustled up to him and inquired “on which side he voted?”
  • Page 70. The self-important man demanded again, what he came there for, and whom he was seeking?
  • Page 76. She had a chubby child in her arms, which, frightened at his looks, began in cry.
  • Page 81. It was affirmed that the great Hendrick Hudson kept a kind of vigil there every twenty years, with his crew of the half-moon.

 

It Is a Little Village of Great Antiquity (16)It Is a Little Village of Great Antiquity (16)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

He Taught Them to Fly Kites and Shoot Marbles (22)He Taught Them to Fly Kites and Shoot Marbles (22)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

A Strange Figure Slowly Toiling Up the Rocks (43)A Strange Figure Slowly Toiling Up the Rocks (43)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

He Was Naturally a Thirsty Soul (51)He Was Naturally a Thirsty Soul (51)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

He Reached to Where the Ravine Had Opened (56)He Reached to Where the Ravine Had Opened (56)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

He Met a Number of People, But None Whom He Knew (59)He Met a Number of People, But None Whom He Knew (59)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

Rip Preferred Making Friends Among the Rising Generation (85)Rip Preferred Making Friends Among the Rising Generation (85)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

Hendrick Hudson Kept a Kind of Vigil There Every Twenty Years (81)Hendrick Hudson Kept a Kind of Vigil There Every Twenty Years (81)Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson. By Washington Irving. Illustrated by Frances Brundage. Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, 1927.

 

Brundage was born on June 28, 1854 in Newark, New Jersey. Her ancestors were long established in the United States, and were noted patriots, it being estimated that 195 of her father’s ancestors fought in the American Revolution and another 23 ancestors having fought in the Colonial wars.

 

Her father, Rembrandt Lockwood (b. 1815), was an architect, engraver and painter of church murals. Rembrandt was perhaps most associated with his large work, measuring 17 feet by 27 feet, titled The Last Judgment, “a work of nine years, which was commenced in Germany, where he resided for four years, and completed in Newark, N. J.” Rembrandt married Sarah Ursula Despeaux (1820-1907), who passed away in 1907 at 87 years of age after a three-year struggle following a stroke of paralysis.

 

Brundage never attended art school, but began sketching at the age of four. She received much of her informal art training from her father. She began her professional career in her teens when she sold a sketch illustrating a Louisa M. Alcott poem to the author.

 

“Her start as a professional artist was made when she was in her teens. Like most girls, she had a favorite author. The honors in this case went Louisa M. Alcott. One day the aspiring young painter purchased a poem written by Mrs. Alcott – made a folio of it and illustrated it. With much trepidation, she sent the finished work to the writer, asking “if she had caught the idea.” The answer was – Mrs. Alcott bought the illustrations.” (Leigh, Virginia. “Anyone Can Paint Who Will Observe.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 2, 1931.)

 

In 1931 the Brooklyn Daily Eagle published a full-page profile of Brundage, including insights into her background, her career and her thoughts on art.

 

“The loneliness that is so terribly feared by every human being bereft of relatives at the twilight of life holds no such terror for her. Drawing has always been her whole existence. Every waking moment has been filled either with thinking about it, studying it or working at it. She has no need for human relations. She can create with just a few strokes of her pencil a compatible companion that will liven up any dreary moment. The cataract that threatened to blind her turned out to be just a threat. “I would not want to live two minutes,” she said, “if I could not draw.” It is characteristic of Mrs. Brundage that her idea of heaven is a haven for artists where paint, pencils, brushes and time are always in abundance. “I would prefer to go to the bad place down below where I could do little things if in heaven they would not permit me to draw,” she emphatically declared . . .

 

If this talented woman has a pet theory it is that she can teach any one to paint just by making them learn to observe the little things that happen in normal everyday living. She believes that discerning observation will help even a grocery clerk, and that success is totally dependent on having trained one’s self to watch everything that is going on. She bases this theory on the common knowledge that eighty-seven percent of understanding is gotten through the eye, eleven percent through the ear and two percent through the other senses.”

 

During more than 50 years as a commercial artist, she illustrated all of Louisa M. Alcott’s books, and many others including “A Child’s Garden of Verse,” “Rip Van Winkle,” “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” “Mother Goose Rhymes,” “The Pied Piper of Hamelin,” “Black Beauty,” “Robinson Crusoe,” “Treasure Island,” “King Arthur,” “Arabian Nights” and several of Shakespeare’s plays. She also wrote and illustrated four books for children including “The Adventures of Jack,” “What Happened to Tommy,” “Boys and Girls Around the Country,” and “Little Maids.”

 

Brundage was married to William Tyson Brundage (1849-1923), a well-known marine artist. He was one of the original members of the Salmagundi Club, an art organization in Manhattan that was founded in 1871 and is still in operation today. William and Frances had one child, Mary Frances Brundage, who passed away at 17 months of age in 1891. William passed away at his home in 1923 following a stroke of apoplexy. His last painting was of an old Dutch fishing boat.

 

Brundage considered Brooklyn to be her home town, although she had also lived in Washington, D. C., and spent the summer months at Cape Ann, Massachusetts for many years. Frances Brundage passed away at her home at the age of 83 on March 26, 1937 after having heart trouble since the prior December. She is buried at Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. At the time of her death, she had just completed a children’s textbook on art called “It’s Fun to Draw.

 

For more information on this notable artist, see the book titled A Bit of Brundage: The Illustration Art of Frances Brundage by authors Sarah Steier and Donna Braun. For more information on the genealogy of Frances Brundage, through her father Rembrandt Lockwood and back to the Lockwood ancestors who fought in the American Revolution, see History of the Lockwood Family in America by Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood.

 

See all the Rip Van Winkle illustrations by Brundage on the gallery page >> Rip Van Winkle, Gallery 2.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) A Bit of Brundage art artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills character drawings Frances Brundage Frances Lockwood Brundage illustrations illustrator Louisa M. Alcott New York Raphael Tuck Rembrandt Lockwood Rip Van Winkle Rip Van Winkle: A Tale of the Hudson Saalfield Publishing Salmagundi Club Samuel Gabriel short story story The Last Judgment Washington Irving William Tyson Brundage https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/rip-van-winkle-a-tale-of-the-hudson-illustrated-by-frances-brundage Sat, 21 Oct 2023 12:00:00 GMT
The Child’s Rip Van Winkle, Illustrated by Maria Louise Kirk https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/the-child-s-rip-van-winkle-illustrated-by-maria-louise-kirk Maria Louise Kirk (1860-1938) was a popular American painter and illustrator. She was born in Philadelphia, the daughter of George H. Kirk and Harriet A. (Craig) Kirk. She studied art in Philadelphia at the School of Design for Women and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and later at the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

The Child's Rip Van Winkle (Cover), Illustrated by M. L. KirkThe Child's Rip Van Winkle (Cover), Illustrated by M. L. Kirk

 

In 1894 Kirk won the Mary Smith prize at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts for best painting by a woman. The Mary Smith prize had been established in 1879 by Russell Smith in memory of his daughter, Mary Smith. The prize was annually awarded “to the Painter of the best painting in oil or water colors exhibited at the Academy by a resident Woman Artist, for the qualities ranking as follows: 1st, Originality of Subject; 2d, Beauty of Design or Drawing; 3d, Color and Effect; and, lastly, Execution.”

 

Kirk illustrated over 50 books throughout her career, including Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland (1904), The Secret Garden (1911), Heidi (1915) and Pinocchio: The Story of a Puppet (1919).

 

In 1908 Kirk illustrated The Child’s Rip Van Winkle with 12 full color illustrations. The book was published by the Frederick A. Stokes Company of New York. The book followed the same plot line as in Irving’s classic tale, but substituted simpler words and phrases for those that children could not understand. The result was easier reading for younger children.

 

The reviews of Kirk’s illustrative work for The Child’s Rip Van Winkle were very positive.

 

  • “This beautiful legend of the historic Catskill Mountains is very elaborate and artistically illustrated in color by Maria L. Kirk.” The Washington Post, October 3, 1908.

 

  • “. . . with some very sprightly and interesting illustrations in most vivid and tasteful colors by M. L. Kirk.” The Boston Globe, October 7, 1908.

 

  • “Miss Kirk’s twelve illustrations in color are unusually attractive, and will intensify the pleasure of youthful readers in the tale itself.” Brooklyn Times Union, October 10, 1908.

 

  • “The colored pictures by M. L. Kirk and the illuminated cover make this a beautiful holiday book.” Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, New York), October 27, 1908.

 

  • “The book is illustrated in colors by Maria L. Kirk, who has offered a dozen full-page pictures of a high degree of merit.” Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 7, 1908.

 

  • “Miss Kirk’s pictures are well worth looking at even by the older reader; for children, they will be a delight. Full page, in many bright colors, with a great deal of child interest, and capitally drawn, they are in truth really illustrations of the fascinating old legend of the Catskills.” The Standard Union (Brooklyn, New York), November 15, 1908.

 

  • “The illustrations in color, twelve in number, are full of freshness and charm. They are essentially pictures for children to look at, conceived with an understanding of the child’s imagination, and made to show the little parts in the story that interest a child. This is an element of no little importance and one often slighted. Miss Kirk, moreover, has followed the traditions of the story closely and has not altered any of the familiar characters.” The Los Angeles Times, December 13, 1908.

 

  • “. . .the twelve full-page illustrations in color by Miss Kirk are true to the spirit of the story and most artistic.” The Publishers’ Weekly, December 19, 1908.

 

The 12 illustrations in The Child’s Rip Van Winkle depict scenes from throughout the story, including:

 

  • The children of the village hanging on his skirts and climbing on his back

The Children of the Village Hanging on His Skirts and Climbing on His BackThe Children of the Village Hanging on His Skirts and Climbing on His BackThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • His cow would get among the cabbages

His Cow Would Get Among the CabbagesHis Cow Would Get Among the CabbagesThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • Like a colt at his mother’s heels

Like a Colt at His Mother's HeelsLike a Colt at His Mother's HeelsThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • At the least flourish of the broomstick he would fly yelping

At the Least Flourish of the Broomstick He Would Fly YelpingAt the Least Flourish of the Broomstick He Would Fly YelpingThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • A strange figure slowly toiling up the rocks

A Strange Figure Slowly Toiling up the RocksA Strange Figure Slowly Toiling up the RocksThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • Odd-looking persons playing nine-pins

Odd-Looking Persons Playing Nine-PinsOdd-Looking Persons Playing Nine-PinsThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • They stared at him with a fixed statue-like gaze

They Stared at Him with a Fixed Statue-Like GazeThey Stared at Him with a Fixed Statue-Like GazeThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • Surely I have not slept here all night!

Surely I Have Not Slept Here All Night!Surely I Have Not Slept Here All Night!The Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • Strange children ran at his heels

Strange Children Ran At His HeelsStrange Children Ran At His HeelsThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • My very dog has forgotten me

My Very Dog Has Forgotten MeMy Very Dog Has Forgotten MeThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • Does nobody know poor Rip Van Winkle!

Does Nobody Know Poor Rip Van Winkle?Does Nobody Know Poor Rip Van Winkle?The Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

  • People love to hear his stories of old times

People Love to Hear His Stories of Old TimesPeople Love to Hear His Stories of Old TimesThe Child's Rip Van Winkle. Illustrated by M. L. Kirk.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) art artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills character drawings illustrations illustrator M. L. Kirk Maria Louise Kirk New York Rip Van Winkle short story story The Child's Rip Van Winkle Washington Irving https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/the-child-s-rip-van-winkle-illustrated-by-maria-louise-kirk Sat, 14 Oct 2023 12:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle, Illustrated by Eric Pape https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/rip-van-winkle-illustrated-by-eric-pape Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

 

He Taught Them to Fly KitesHe Taught Them to Fly KitesRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

He Taught Them to Fly Kites.

 

A Long Ramble on a Fine Autumnal DayA Long Ramble on a Fine Autumnal DayRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

A long ramble on a fine autumnal day.

 

He Bore on His Shoulders a Stout KegHe Bore on His Shoulders a Stout KegRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

He bore on his shoulders a stout keg.

 

This illustrated edition of the Rip Van Winkle story was positively reviewed by the Evening Star, of Washington D. C. upon its release in 1925. “On our own ground here with an author who pays to be remembered. We can visit Sleepy Hollow. We can see the places that Irving has made so mellow and soft and whimsically dear to us, a place to which Joseph Jefferson has added much to the original charm set by the author himself, a place also which the pictures of this edition, by Eric Pape, bring out to a new effect of reality mingled with the fancy that Irving himself used to happily in the stories and legends of the Catskills.” (“Selecting Books for the Young.” Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). November 8, 1925.)

 

Illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle portion of the book include:

 

  • Cover design: Chanticleer calling, “Rip Van Winkle! Rip Van Winkle!” (cover)
  • End paper: “At the foot of these mountains the voyager may have descried the light smoke curling up from a village”
  • Washington Irving as he appeared in 1820 (page i)
  • Rip Van Winkle (frontispiece)
  • Sundial (page iii)
  • Diedrich Knickerbocker’s small hair-covered chest, bound with iron, in which letters, valuable papers and deeds were kept; date about 1775 (page v)
  • D. K. – the keys to his papers (page xi)
  • Old night watchman, returning in the early morning after an all night vigil (page xii)
  • Wrought iron door hinge, date about 1750 (page xiii)
  • The tale was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker (page xix)
  • The famous biscuit, with the likeness of Diedrich Knickerbocker (page 1)
  • The Waterloo Medal. Obverse, head of his Grace the Duke of Wellington. Reverse, date; joined hands; emblems of the co-operation of the allied generals (page 2)
  • The Queen Anne farthing. Obverse, head of “Anna Regina.” Reverse, figure of “Britannia” and date (page 3)
  • “I have seen a certificate, taken before a country justice and signed with a cross in the justice’s own handwriting. – D. K.” Stand with Betty lamp, flint, steel and striker, and pocket tinder box. (page 5)
  • “He taught them to fly kites.” (facing page 6)
  • “Morning, noon and night, her tongue was incessantly going.” (page 8)
  • “He would fish all day” (page 11)
  • “He would never refuse to assist a neighbor, even in the roughest toil” (page 15)
  • Utensils commonly used at an inn; wooden sconce with removable irons for holding candles, curly maple trenchers and wooden mug, mortar and pestle, candle molds, and a ball of wick floss (page 17)
  • The tavern sign: “A rubicund portrait of his majesty George the Third” (page 19)
  • “How solemnly they would listen” (page 21)
  • Nicholas Vedder, the landlord of the inn (page 23)
  • Nicholas Vedder’s pipe-rack and portable sconce, candle hook-holder, snuffers and toddy irons. Also smoker’s small tongs, tobacco pouch and pocket fire outfit (page 24)
  • Wrought iron door latch, tulip design, date about 1760 (page 26)
  • “Wolf would look wistfully in his master’s face” (page 27)
  • “A crow wining its solitary flight across the mountain (page 29)
  • “A long ramble on a fine autumnal day” (page 31)
  • The solitary crow (page 33)
  • “He bore on his shoulders a stout keg” (page 35)
  • “Hendric Hudson and his crew. (The people of the Kaatskill never heard a thunder storm without referring to him and his crew at their game of ninepins.) (facing page 38)
  • Wrought iron door latches, lily and tulip design, date about 1745 (page 41)
  • “He met a number of people, but none whom he knew” (page 43)
  • “The roof had fallen in, the windows shattered, and the doors were off their hinges” (page 47)
  • “A flag on which was a singular assemblage of stars and stripes” (page 51)
  • “A sword was held in the hand instead of a sceptre” (page 55)
  • Wrought iron chest-handle and hinges, date about 1740 (page 57)
  • “An old man replied in a thin piping voice” (page 59)
  • Wild purple raspberry (page 61)
  • “The Kaatskill Mountains has always been haunted by strange beings” (page 66)
  • Wrought iron chest-hinge, date about 1770 (page 70)
  • D. K.’s precious chest (page 71)
  • Wrought iron cupboard latch, date about 1760 (page 72)
  • “Kept a kind of vigil there every twenty years” (page 73)
  • D. K. – the key to his papers (page 75)
  • Morning glories or hedge weed (page 77)
  • “Gay castles in the clouds that pass” (page 78)

 

 

Hendrick Hudson and His CrewHendrick Hudson and His CrewRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.
Hendrick Hudson and His Crew.

 

Singular Assemblage of Stars and StripesSingular Assemblage of Stars and StripesRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.
A flag on which was a singular assemblage of stars and stripes.

 

Rip Van WinkleRip Van WinkleRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.
Rip Van Winkle.

 

Frederic L. M. Pape (1870-1938), more commonly known as Eric Pape, was a highly regarded painter, engraver and illustrator. Pape was born and raised in San Francisco, California. He studied art in San Francisco the School of Design and later in Paris under noted artists such as Boulanger, Lefebvre, Constant, Doucet, Blanc and Delance. He then furthered his studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts under famous instructors such as Gerome, Delauney and Jean Paul Laurens. Pape was well traveled, having lived in England, France, Germany, Mexico and Europe. After five years abroad from around 1888 to 1893 Pape returned to the United States in 1894. He taught during 1897 in Boston at the Cowles Art School, which was established by painter Frank Cowles (1839-1928) and operated from 1883 to around 1900.

 

The next year, in 1898, Pape established his own school, the Eric Pape School of Art at Boston, Massachusetts. The school offered “drawing and painting “from life,” separate classes for men and women. Portraiture, still life, water-color, paste, pyrogravure, wood-carving, composition. Illustration, with costume models, pen, wash, gouache, poster and book-cover designing, decorative illustration for books.” The school, soon after its founding, “has been signally successful and quickly recognized as one of the foremost schools of its kind in this country.” (“Representative Young Illustrators: Eric Pape, Illustrator and Painter.” The Art Interchange. Vol. 44, no. 5. May, 1900.) Among the students at his school was N. C. Wyeth, who later published his own highly regarded illustrated version of the Rip Van Winkle story in 1921. The school operated until 1913.

 

Pape’s fine art work had been exhibited at the Paris Salon and at expositions in Munich (1897) Chicago (1893), Cincinnati, Detroit, Omaha (1899), Paris (1900), Buffalo (1901) and St. Louis (1904). Some of his noted paintings include The Spinner of Zeven (1889); The Great Sphinx by Moonlight (1891); The Two Great Eras (1892); The Angel with the Book of Life (1897); Approaching Storm, The Great Dane and Early Morning (1900); and Foam Surges (1902). His illustrative work can be found in many special edition books and illustrated magazine articles of the time.

 

Pape also worked as a stage designer for theater productions, including a showing of Rip Van Winkle in 1925 at the Repertory Theatre in Boston. This version of the timeless classic featured noted American actor Francis Wilson (1854-1935) portraying Rip Van Winkle in an “effective revival of stage classic.” Wilson was an ardent admirer of Joseph Jefferson, who played the role of Rip Van Winkle on stage for over 40 years. Wilson, who at the age of 12 first saw Jefferson in 1870, also authored a biography on Jefferson. In a review of the show, it was noted that “Eric Pape, noted illustrator and scenic artist, has designed and painted special settings of extraordinary beauty for this production.” (“Rip Van Winkle at the Repertory.” The Boston Globe. November 24, 1925.)

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[email protected] (American Catskills) art artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills character Eric Pape Eric Pape School of Art Francis Wilson Frederic L. Pape illustration illustrator Macmillan Company N. C. Wyeth New York Rip Van Winkle Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow short story story Washington Irving https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/10/rip-van-winkle-illustrated-by-eric-pape Sat, 07 Oct 2023 12:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle's Dream https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/9/rip-van-winkles-dream Rip Van Winkle’s Dream was published in 1883 in dedication to the Michigan Central Railroad – The Niagara Falls Route. The book contains over 30 beautiful, full-page illustrations, many of them featuring the beloved Rip Van Winkle. Wemple & Co., of New York, worked on the book as lithographers.

 

Rip Van Winkle's DreamRip Van Winkle's DreamRip Van Winkle’s Dream was published in 1883 in dedication to the Michigan Central Railroad – The Niagara Falls Route. The book contains over 30 beautiful, full-page illustrations, many of them featuring the beloved Rip Van Winkle. Wemple & Co., of New York, worked on the book as lithographers.

The first seven pages of the book, unrelated to the main story of Rip Van Winkle, includes “A Parody on Iolanthe,” written by Davison Dalziel, which is an alternative take on the Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera Iolanthe, but is instead dedicated to the conductors of the Chicago & Alton Railway. The last 22 pages of the book contain advertisements for a variety of businesses around Chicago, including, as just a few examples, the Ansonia Clock Company, the Crescent Steel Works, the Leland Hotel and the Haverly Theatre.

Rip Van Winkle’s Dream was published by Davison Dalziel (1852-1928), of Chicago. Dalziel was born and raised in London, England, and after being “granted the privileges of a superior education” he entered the journalism industry. He was engaged in newspaper work in Sydney, Australia in the late 1870s. He afterwards went to San Francisco, where he established the San Francisco Daily Mail. He then relocated to Chicago, where he remained prominent in the newspaper industry and served as the editor of the Chicago News Letter, “the leading dramatic newspaper in America.” He then returned to London, where he formed Dalziel’s News Agency and became an influential businessman in the transportation industry. He served as president of the Pullman Car Company and the International Sleeping Car Company. He was elected to serve as a Member of Parliament for Brixton from 1910 to 1923 and again from 1924 to 1927. Dalziel passed away in 1928 after a short illness.

Rip and the Men of Henry Hudson (13), Rip Van Winkle's DreamRip and the Men of Henry Hudson (13), Rip Van Winkle's DreamRip Van Winkle’s Dream was published in 1883 in dedication to the Michigan Central Railroad – The Niagara Falls Route. The book contains over 30 beautiful, full-page illustrations, many of them featuring the beloved Rip Van Winkle. Wemple & Co., of New York, worked on the book as lithographers.

The first seven pages of the book, unrelated to the main story of Rip Van Winkle, includes “A Parody on Iolanthe,” written by Davison Dalziel, which is an alternative take on the Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera Iolanthe, but is instead dedicated to the conductors of the Chicago & Alton Railway. The last 22 pages of the book contain advertisements for a variety of businesses around Chicago, including, as just a few examples, the Ansonia Clock Company, the Crescent Steel Works, the Leland Hotel and the Haverly Theatre.

Rip Van Winkle’s Dream was published by Davison Dalziel (1852-1928), of Chicago. Dalziel was born and raised in London, England, and after being “granted the privileges of a superior education” he entered the journalism industry. He was engaged in newspaper work in Sydney, Australia in the late 1870s. He afterwards went to San Francisco, where he established the San Francisco Daily Mail. He then relocated to Chicago, where he remained prominent in the newspaper industry and served as the editor of the Chicago News Letter, “the leading dramatic newspaper in America.” He then returned to London, where he formed Dalziel’s News Agency and became an influential businessman in the transportation industry. He served as president of the Pullman Car Company and the International Sleeping Car Company. He was elected to serve as a Member of Parliament for Brixton from 1910 to 1923 and again from 1924 to 1927. Dalziel passed away in 1928 after a short illness.

 

The first seven pages of the book, unrelated to the main story of Rip Van Winkle, includes “A Parody on Iolanthe,” written by Davison Dalziel, which is an alternative take on the Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera Iolanthe, but is instead dedicated to the conductors of the Chicago & Alton Railway. The last 22 pages of the book contain advertisements for a variety of businesses around Chicago, including, as just a few examples, the Ansonia Clock Company, the Crescent Steel Works, the Leland Hotel and the Haverly Theatre.

 

Old Rip Van Winkle in the Mountains (16), Rip Van Winkle's DreamOld Rip Van Winkle in the Mountains (16), Rip Van Winkle's DreamRip Van Winkle’s Dream was published in 1883 in dedication to the Michigan Central Railroad – The Niagara Falls Route. The book contains over 30 beautiful, full-page illustrations, many of them featuring the beloved Rip Van Winkle. Wemple & Co., of New York, worked on the book as lithographers.

The first seven pages of the book, unrelated to the main story of Rip Van Winkle, includes “A Parody on Iolanthe,” written by Davison Dalziel, which is an alternative take on the Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera Iolanthe, but is instead dedicated to the conductors of the Chicago & Alton Railway. The last 22 pages of the book contain advertisements for a variety of businesses around Chicago, including, as just a few examples, the Ansonia Clock Company, the Crescent Steel Works, the Leland Hotel and the Haverly Theatre.

Rip Van Winkle’s Dream was published by Davison Dalziel (1852-1928), of Chicago. Dalziel was born and raised in London, England, and after being “granted the privileges of a superior education” he entered the journalism industry. He was engaged in newspaper work in Sydney, Australia in the late 1870s. He afterwards went to San Francisco, where he established the San Francisco Daily Mail. He then relocated to Chicago, where he remained prominent in the newspaper industry and served as the editor of the Chicago News Letter, “the leading dramatic newspaper in America.” He then returned to London, where he formed Dalziel’s News Agency and became an influential businessman in the transportation industry. He served as president of the Pullman Car Company and the International Sleeping Car Company. He was elected to serve as a Member of Parliament for Brixton from 1910 to 1923 and again from 1924 to 1927. Dalziel passed away in 1928 after a short illness.

 

Rip Van Winkle Sees a Train for the First Time (left image) (20), Rip Van Winkle's DreamRip Van Winkle Sees a Train for the First Time (left image) (20), Rip Van Winkle's DreamRip Van Winkle’s Dream was published in 1883 in dedication to the Michigan Central Railroad – The Niagara Falls Route. The book contains over 30 beautiful, full-page illustrations, many of them featuring the beloved Rip Van Winkle. Wemple & Co., of New York, worked on the book as lithographers.

The first seven pages of the book, unrelated to the main story of Rip Van Winkle, includes “A Parody on Iolanthe,” written by Davison Dalziel, which is an alternative take on the Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera Iolanthe, but is instead dedicated to the conductors of the Chicago & Alton Railway. The last 22 pages of the book contain advertisements for a variety of businesses around Chicago, including, as just a few examples, the Ansonia Clock Company, the Crescent Steel Works, the Leland Hotel and the Haverly Theatre.

Rip Van Winkle’s Dream was published by Davison Dalziel (1852-1928), of Chicago. Dalziel was born and raised in London, England, and after being “granted the privileges of a superior education” he entered the journalism industry. He was engaged in newspaper work in Sydney, Australia in the late 1870s. He afterwards went to San Francisco, where he established the San Francisco Daily Mail. He then relocated to Chicago, where he remained prominent in the newspaper industry and served as the editor of the Chicago News Letter, “the leading dramatic newspaper in America.” He then returned to London, where he formed Dalziel’s News Agency and became an influential businessman in the transportation industry. He served as president of the Pullman Car Company and the International Sleeping Car Company. He was elected to serve as a Member of Parliament for Brixton from 1910 to 1923 and again from 1924 to 1927. Dalziel passed away in 1928 after a short illness.

 

 

Rip Van Winkle’s Dream was published by Davison Dalziel (1852-1928), of Chicago. Dalziel was born and raised in London, England, and after being “granted the privileges of a superior education” he entered the journalism industry. He was engaged in newspaper work in Sydney, Australia in the late 1870s. He afterwards went to San Francisco, where he established the San Francisco Daily Mail. He then relocated to Chicago, where he remained prominent in the newspaper industry and served as the editor of the Chicago News Letter, “the leading dramatic newspaper in America.” He then returned to London, where he formed Dalziel’s News Agency and became an influential businessman in the transportation industry. He served as president of the Pullman Car Company and the International Sleeping Car Company. He was elected to serve as a Member of Parliament for Brixton from 1910 to 1923 and again from 1924 to 1927. Dalziel passed away in 1928 after a short illness.

 

The lengthy advertisement for the Michigan Central Railroad at the back of Rip Van Winkle’s Dream provides an overview of the company and the Niagara Falls Route.

 

                “Michigan Central. The Great Highway of East and West Travel.

 

The Michigan Central has become the deservedly favorite route between the great cities and Summer resorts of the East and West, being the only route under a single management between Chicago, Niagara Falls and Buffalo, and offering to the traveling public the many great advantages resulting from that fact. Whether one travels East or travels West, he finds that the Michigan Central has spared no pains nor expense to make his journey as rapid, safe, comfortable and pleasant as possible. He finds not one only, but many, daily Fast Express trains, made up new and sumptuous Parlor, Dining and Sleeping Coaches, replete with every convenience that money can provide and ingenuity devise. These trains are veritable first-class hotels upon wheels, in which the passenger can eat, drink, smoke, sleep, lounge and take comfort as in his own inn. And the traveler is sure of quick time and close connection at junction points.

 

The title of “The Niagara Falls Route” belongs peculiarly and especially to the Michigan Central, for it is the only route running trains directly to the Great Cataract itself. Its trains halt at Falls View Station, almost at the very brink of the down-pouring flood, where the views is finer than is obtainable from any other point. From this point, the trains follow the course of the river to the great Cantilever Bridge, which is a marvelous triumph of engineering science. It is constructed of steel, with a double track, and stood the severest test upon its completion. It is the first bridge ever built upon its particular principle, and is probably the safest, as it is one of the most elegant, in the world. Crossing this grand structure, two hundred and fifty feet above “the angriest bit of water in the world,” the traveler sees again the great Falls, the dark river gorge, and the rushing Whirlpool Rapids.

 

The route to Buffalo follows the river bank for miles, affording varied and delightful pictures of the emerald flood, the foam-crested Rapids, the Falls, the leafy islands and peaceful Canada shore, while the thunders of the great Cataract sink with distance into a monotone, and are finally lost, save as their echoes long linger in memory.

 

Entering the beautiful city of Buffalo, the traveler finds the superb Palace Cars taken on without change to Albany and New York, by the New York Central and Hudson River, and from Albany to Boston by the Boston and Albany railroads. To the Michigan Central, and to no other road, all this applies, and therefore it is that the public have bestowed upon it the title of “The Niagara Falls Route.”

 

Excepting only the almost inaccessible Yellowstone Park, there is no spot combining so many of the glories, beauties and advantages of a tourists’ paradise as Mackinac Island. Rising grandly over 300 feet above the channel in which the waters of the earth’s greatest unsalted seas meet and blend in billowy harmony, it is nearly nine miles in circumference. The United States Government has, with a just appreciation of its wonderful attractions, reserved entire island for a National Park, and the Michigan Central has made it accessible to tourists.

 

O. W. Ruggles, Gen. Passenger and Ticket Agent, Chicago.

F. I. Whitney, Ass’t Gen. Pass. And Ticket Ag’t, Chicago.”

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[email protected] (American Catskills) A Parody on Iolanthe ad advertisement art book Catskill Mountains Catskills character D. Dalziel Davison Dalziel drawings illustrations lithography Michigan Central Railroad New York Niagara Falls Route publisher railroad Rip Van Winkle Rip Van Winkle's Dream short story story Washington Irving Wemple & Co. https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/9/rip-van-winkles-dream Sat, 30 Sep 2023 12:00:00 GMT
Rip Van Winkle, with Illustrations by Rhoda Campbell Chase https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/9/rip-van-winkle-with-illustrations-by-rhoda-campbell-chase Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving was published to international acclaim in 1819. Set in the Catskills, an amiable Rip wanders off in the woods with his dog Wolf to escape his wife’s nagging and to avert “all kinds of profitable labor” only to encounter a silent group of short, bearded men playing nine-pins. After drinking some of their liquor he falls asleep for twenty years. Upon waking, he returns to his village to learn that his wife has died, the American Revolution has occurred and that he must face the fact that many of his former friends have either died, moved on or simply do not recognize him. The short story is an American classic.

 

This miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

 

Rip Van Winkle, CoverRip Van Winkle, CoverThis miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

 

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

 

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

 

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Rip and His ChildrenRip and His ChildrenThis miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Rip Cast Out From His HouseRip Cast Out From His HouseThis miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Rip Takes a DrinkRip Takes a DrinkThis miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Rip Awakes Twenty Years LaterRip Awakes Twenty Years LaterThis miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

The World Has Changed in Twenty YearsThe World Has Changed in Twenty YearsThis miniature version of the Rip Van Winkle story, measuring only 2 3/16 inches by 2 3/4 inches, served as an advertising booklet for Packard Pianos. The 12-page booklet contains a short, summarized version of the Rip Van Winkle story along with six colorized illustrations. The advertisement for Packard Pianos, which noted that “you can’t get a better piano at any price,” can be found on the back page. The booklet was published in 1916 by John H. Eggers of New York.

Each of the six images in the Rip Van Winkle booklet were created by illustrator Rhoda Campbell Chase (1881-1959), whose work can be found in numerous school and children’s books. Rhoda was the daughter of Henry Seymour Chase (1853-1889), a well-known marine artist, and Laura Emeline Eames Chase (1856-1917), a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a graduate of Iowa State University dental school and the first woman accepted as a full member of the American Dental Association.

Following in her father’s footsteps Rhoda would become a well-respected artist. She attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, lived in Paris while working with Theophile Steinlen as a mentor and studied at the Art Students’ League in New York City.

Beginning in 1917 Chase illustrated a new line of products issued by Harper & Brothers called the Bubble Book, an innovative product which combined books with records. The Bubble Book series, marketed with a slogan of “books that sing,” were aimed at children who could learn to read while singing along to the records at the same time. The record/book combination proved immensely popular, with millions sold every year after its initial release. For more information on the history of the Bubble Book series, see Jacob Smith’s book titled Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures.

For approximately 45 years, from the mid-1910s to her passing in 1959, Rhoda lived in the art-friendly village of Woodstock, New York in the Catskill Mountains, near the setting for the Rip Van Winkle story. She was an active member of the Christian Science Church in Woodstock. Rhoda died on August 1, 1959 at Kingston Hospital in Kingston, New York and was survived by her brother Irwin Chase, of Deep River, Connecticut; a nephew, Rear Admiral Irwin Chase Jr., USN, Ret., of Deep River; and a niece, Mrs. Roger C. Cunningham of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rhoda Campbell Chase is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Other books illustrated by Rhoda Campbell Chase include:

 

Hansel and Gretel (1914)

The Merrill Readers: Third Reader (1915)

The Merrill Readers: Fourth Reader (1915)

Wonderdays and Wonderways Through Flowerland (1916)

Rip Van Winkle (1916)

Aladdin (1916)

Puss in Boots (1916)

The Bubble Book (1917)

The Sandman’s Hour: Stories for Bedtime (1917)

The Child’s World: First Reader (1917)

The Child’s World: Second Reader (1917)

The Story of Little Angels (1917)

Sandman Christmas Stories (1918)

Sandman Twilight Stories (1918)

Second Bubble Book (1918)

Third Bubble Book (1918)

The Animal Bubble Book (1918)

The Pie Party: Fifth Bubble Book (1919)

The Pet Bubble Book (1919)

The Funny Froggy: The Seventh Bubble Book (1919)

Happy Go Lucky: Bubble Book (1919)

The Merry Midgets: The Ninth Bubble Book

The Fairy Detective (1919)

The Little Mischief: Tenth Bubble Book (1920)

The Tippy Toe Bubble: 11th Book (1920)

Sandman’s Rainy Day Stories (1920)

Sandman’s Goodnight Stories (1921)

Sandman’s Might-Be-So Stories (1922)

Dot and Don with Mother (1923)

Dot and Don at School (1924)

Visiting Days with Dot and Don (1924)

Dot and Don: The Thoughtful Twins

The Christmas Reindeer (1926)

For the Children’s Hour (1927)

Busy Days with Bobby and Betty (1928)

The Doings of Bobby and Betty (1928)

Good Times for Bobby and Betty (1928)

The Peter-Pan Twins Are Glad to Help (1928)

The Peter-Pan Twins Are Now in School (1928)

Playtime for the Peter-Pan Twins (1928)

Play Fellows (1928)

Friends to Make (1928)

Happy Hour Readers: Good Friends (1935)

And Then We Came Home (1943)

Bob and Betty’s Busy Days (1943)

Bob and Betty’s Play Days (1943)

A Child’s Book of Verse (1943)

 

 

Rip Van Winkle

 

In a little village in the Catskill mountains near the Hudson river there lived many years ago a simple, good-natured fellow named Rip Van Winkle. He was lazy and would not work, but roamed the woods with his dog and gun, hunting and fishing.

 

All the village children loved him because of his kind heart and simple ways, and would follow him about while he played their games and told them stories.

 

While he thus idled away time, his farm was neglected, weeds overran his garden, his fences fell down for want of repair and his wife and children were in rags.

 

Rip’s wife would scold him for his idleness and shiftless ways, and in order to have peace he would take his dog Wolf and to the village inn, where he would sit on a bench in the sun and gossip with his neighbors, and escape his wife’s sharp tongue.

 

One day, after a harder scolding than usual, Rip took his dog and gun and set off for the mountains, hoping to bring home a squirrel of two to put his wife in good humor again. As he left, he could hear her voice calling after him that he was an idle good-for-nothing, and had better keep out of her sight, and he felt glad to escape the sound of her voice.

 

He tramped all day and shot many a squirrel and when he grew tired he lay down to rest on the soft grass under the shade of a tree.

 

Suddenly he heard his name called. He sat up, and looked about him, but he saw no one. Again he heard it – “Rip van Winkle – Rip van Winkle” – several times.

 

Wolf growled and came close to his master.

 

Looking again, Rip saw far down in the glen, slowly toiling up among the rocks, a strange little figure. He had a long beard and was dressed in old Dutch style, with a high peaked hat, and on his back he carried a keg of liquor. When he saw Rip he beckoned without speaking, and Rip saw that he was asking for help with his load.

 

Rip was always willing to help anyone, so he shouldered the keg and took turns with the dwarf in carrying it along the rocky path. Neither spoke a word, and the only sound was from the distant thunder that echoed among the mountains.

 

At last they reached the top. Rip and his guide entered a small hollow, and there Rip saw a company of strange little men. All wore the peaked hats, and had long beards and great baggy trousers. They were playing nine-pins, but stopped to gaze at Rip.

 

No one spoke or smiled, but one, who seemed to be the leader and wore red stockings and pointed red shoes, ran to Rip and took the keg. Then they offered it to him, and after taking a drink he grew bolder, and finding it good he took another and another.

 

Soon he began to feel very drowsy, he eyes closed and he fell into a deep sleep.

 

When Rip awoke, the sun was shining. He rubbed his eyes and said, “I must have slept here all night.” Slowly the memory of the dwarfs and the wine came back to him, and he cried out, “Oh, that wicked wine! What will my wife say?”

 

He looked for his gun but saw only an old rusty one, falling apart with age. He thought the little men had stolen his. He whistled for Wolf, who did not come; then he tried to walk, but found he was stiff and sore. He made his way down the mountain with great difficulty, expecting to meet his dog as he went.

 

He felt very hungry and weak, and dreaded to meet his wife, but felt that he must go on or starve in the mountains.

 

When he reached the village, he saw many people, but none whom he knew. All stared at him, and the children were strange. Looking down, he saw that his beard had grown long and white, and his clothes were ragged. He made his way to his own house and found it in ruins.

 

Much distressed, he wandered on, asking those he met about his old friends, but all were dead.

 

In the crowd that gathered about him there was a young woman carrying a child. Rip finally turned to her and asked her name. Her face and voice were familiar and he learned that she was his own daughter, grown up and married. From her he learned that he had disappeared and had been given up for dead twenty years ago! His wife had died soon after his disappearance.

 

The daughter welcomed her father with joy, and took him to her home to liver with her husband and children. There he spent his old age in contentment, and never again visited Hendrik Hudson and his band, who played nine-pins in the mountains.

 

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David J. Auchmoody – Kingston, New York Photographer (Part 2) https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/9/david-j-auchmoody-kingston-new-york-photographer-part-2 David J. Auchmoody was a much-respected photographer located at the city of Kingston in Ulster County, New York from 1868 to circa 1893. He photographed thousands of Kingston’s citizens over the course of his 25 years in business. Auchmoody also published a popular series of stereoviews that included scenes of Kingston, Rondout, Rosendale, Rifton, Lawrenceville, Saugerties, Shandaken, Shokan and the surrounding Catskills region. After leaving the photography business Auchmoody worked in the insurance industry and for several fraternal organizations.

 

Continued from September 9, 2023.

 

Creek Cement Works, from SleightsburghCreek Cement Works, from Sleightsburgh Creek Cement Works, from Sleightsburgh.

 

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In 1884, as Auchmoody became more involved with various fraternal organizations, he founded the Fraternal Indicator. The publication was described as “a monthly journal devoted to the interest of Fraternal Societies. Official Organ of the Supreme Lodge, Knights of Columbia. An attractive journal, with a large circulation.” Auchmoody served as both editor and publisher. The publication was typically four pages long, sized 16x23. Annual subscription was 25 cents. Annual circulation was 2,000.

 

Reviews about the newly created Fraternal Indicator were quite positive. On January 19, 1884 the Kingston Daily Freeman wrote that “The ‘Knights of Columbia Indicator’ is the name of a new paper printed at the Freeman job printing establishment, by the Committee of Supplies of the Knights. It has four pages and is neatly printed on tinted paper, and is in every way creditable to its editors. The first number contains an excellent photograph of D. J. Auchmoody, the well known photographer, who was the first Supreme Governor of the Knights of Columbia. It will be published monthly, and its subscription price is only 25 cents a year.”

 

In another positive review, on August 8, 1884 the Kingston Daily Freeman wrote that “we have received the first number of a new monthly publication styled the Fraternal Indicator, the editor and publisher of which is D. J. Auchmoody of this city. It is an interesting four page paper, and besides what it contains in reference to mutual benefit and secret societies has a good selection of miscellaneous matter, and is ably edited. We bespeak for it a good reception among all interested in society matters.”

 

Throughout approximately 25 years as a photographer, Auchmoody’s gallery was located at several different locations. He was at first located at the corner of Garden and Ferry streets. He then worked at 29 Union Avenue, and was then listed at both 18 and 20 Union Avenue.

 

Luther, David’s son, seems to have assisted his father at the photographic gallery in the early years of his career, before becoming an automobile salesman. In 1890 L. M. Auchmoody, who would have been 19 years old at the time, submitted pictures of the family studio to Wilson’s Photograph Magazine, and those pictures were positively reviewed.

 

“Mr. L. M. Auchmoody, of Rondout, N.Y., sends a series of pictures which would be very interesting to any of our younger aspirants. They are of his studio, printing room, and reception rooms, showing their fitting an arrangement. As interiors they are excellent, not only pictorially, but also in the extreme order and regularity of appointments, and the cheerfulness of their aspect. Enlivened with plants and pictures, Mr. Auchmoody’s place seems a charming one to be in, suggesting good work; and even the printing room is not the well-lit den of rubbish and horror that it sometimes unhappily becomes, but contains a whole gallery of prints and pictures smiling from its sunny walls.”[1]

 

Auchmoody left the photography business around 1893 or 1894, according to the annual business directories for the city of Kingston. After leaving the photography business Auchmoody began to work in the insurance industry and became quite involved with a number of fraternal societies.

 

“He [Auchmoody] was a past grand chancellor of the grand lodge of Knights of Pythias of New York state and past state councilor of the United Order of Mechanics. He also served for many years as state deputy of the Knights of Pythias. He was a member of Hope Lodge, No. 65, Knights of Pythias, of Port Ewen, and Ulster County Council, United Order of American Mechanics, the Order of the Golden Seal and the Knights of Honor.”[2]

 

Auchmoody was a founding member of the Knights of Honor, lodge 791, at the city of Kingston. The lodge was formed on November 7, 1877. In 1880 Auchmoody was serving as “Reporter” for the lodge. The Knights of Honor organization was founded in 1873 in Louisville, Kentucky by James A. Demaree. The organization grew from its original 17 members to a membership of 120,000 by 1889, including 190 lodges in the state of New York.

 

The Knights of Pythias, in which Auchmoody served as state deputy and grand chancellor, was formed at Washington, D. C. in 1864 by Justus H. Rathbone (1839-1899), a federal government clerk. The organization began with 13 members, but grew rapidly, reaching a membership of 450,000 in 1895, and 1,000,000 in the early 1920s. Its cardinal principles include Friendship, Charity, and Benevolence, and their motto is “Be Generous, Brave, and True.” The rituals for the Knights of Pythias are based on the mythological friendship of Damon and Pythias. The Knights of Pythias were the first fraternal organization in the United States to receive a charter through an Act of Congress. The organization continues to operate today.

 

In addition to his work in the insurance industry and with various fraternal organizations, Auchmoody also served, for a time, as director and secretary of the S. R. Deyo Company. The company, which manufactured pure apple cider, was founded by Sylvester R. Deyo in 1886. The company had grown significantly over the years, producing 15,000 to 20,000 barrels of sweet cider and vinegar each season. “The business was one of the largest of its kind in this section of the country and annually filled large contracts, including many contracts with the United States Government.”[3]

 

The 1900 United States census listed 51-year-old Auchmoody as living in the city of Kingston, New York. He was living with his 48-year-old wife Elvina, who was shown as having been born in April 1852. They were married for 29 years. Auchmoody’s occupation was listed as “state deputy, K of P. [Knights of Pythias].”

 

D. J. Auchmoody published at least 320 different views of Kingston, Rondout, Saugerties, Shandaken and the surrounding Catskills region. Below is a summary of the 320 views, based on the imprints contained on the reverse side of some his stereoviews.

 

Road at Steep RocksRoad at Steep Rocks Road at Steep Rocks.

 

R.R. Depot at Rosendale, N.YR.R. Depot at Rosendale, N.Y R. R. Depot at Rosendale, N.Y.

 

View of Lawrenceville Cement Works, from the hills, N.Y.View of Lawrenceville Cement Works, from the hills, N.Y. View of Lawrenceville Cement Works, from the hills, N.Y.

 

1-16.      See above for Overlook Mountain House series.

17.          Cement Quarry at Creek Locks.

18.          Cement Quarry at Creek Locks.

19.          Cement Quarry at Creek Locks.

20.          Cement Quarry at Creek Locks.

21.          Cement Quarry at Creek Locks.

22.          Cement Quarry at Creek Locks.

23.          Esopus Creek near Shandaken.

24.          Deep Hollow in Shandaken.

25.          Shandaken Centre.

26.          Valley and Lost Clove Mountain near Shandaken depot.

27.          Esopus Creek south of Phoenicia, looking south.

28.          The Notch in Shandaken.

29.          N. Y. K. & S. R. R. Track at Shandaken.

30.          The Notch in Shandaken.

31.          Shandaken Village.

32.          Esopus Creek near Phoenicia.

33.          Esopus Creek near Phoenicia.

34.          The Notch in the Clove in Shandaken.

35.          Bushkill Creek and Valley in Shandaken.

36.          Bushkill Creek and Valley in Shandaken.

37.          Lament’s Hotel, Shandaken, front view.

38.          Lament’s Hotel, Shandaken, rear view.

39.          Mountains near Bushnellville, Shandaken, looking south.

40.          Rustic View near Shandaken.

41.          Steep Rocks Road.

42.          Steep Rocks.

43.          Bank of the Hudson near Steep Rocks.

44.          Bank of the Hudson near Steep Rocks.

45.          Bank of the Hudson near Steep Rocks.

46.          Lower Falls at Glenerie.

47.          Upper Falls at Glenerie.

48.          Upper and Lower Falls at Glenerie.

49.          Glenerie.

50.          Glenerie.

51.          Glenerie White Lead Works.

52.          Cement Works at Flatbush.

53.          Cement Works at Flatbush.

54.          On the Banks of the Hudson, horse in the foreground.

55.          Group of Men and Animals.

56.          Store at Flatbush.

57.          Hudson River near Flatbush.

58.          Private Residence at Malden.

59.          Private Residence at Malden.

60.          Private Residence at Malden.

61.          Carriage House.

62.          View at Malden.

63.          Private Residence near Saugerties.

64.          Private Residence near Saugerties.

65.          Private Residence near Saugerties.

66.          Flower Garden.

67.          Flower Garden.

68.          Saugerties.

69.          Saugerties.

70.          Esopus Lake near Saugerties.

71.          Rustic View.

72.          Rifton Falls on Wallkill.

73.          Rifton Falls on Wallkill.

74.          Rifton Falls on Wallkill.

75.          Buttermilk Falls on Wallkill near Rifton.

76.          Buttermilk Falls on Wallkill near Rifton.

77.          Dashville Falls on the Wallkill.

78.          Dashville Falls on the Wallkill.

79.          Maple Grove, Shokan.

80.          Maple Grove, Shokan.

81.          Pic-Nic Party at Maple Grove, Shokan.

82.          Pic-Nic Party at Maple Grove, Shokan.

83.          Croquet Party.

84.          Old Hurley Bridge.

85.          Old Hurley Bridge.

86.          Esopus Creek near Old Hurley.

87.          Esopus Creek near Old Hurley. (2 views.)

88.          Esopus Creek near Old Hurley. (2 views.)

89.          Baptist Church, Kingston.

90.          Interior of Dining Saloon, Kingston.

91.          County Clerk’s Office, Kingston.

92.          St. John’s Church, Kingston – Episcopal.

93.          St. Joseph’s Church, Kingston – Catholic.

94.          Corner Wall and North Front Streets, Kingston.

95.          Wall Street, Kingston.

96.          Wall Street, Kingston.

97.          John Street, Kingston.

98.          Fair Street, Kingston.

99.          Main Street, Kingston.

100.        Academy at Kingston.

101.        First Reformed Church, Kingston.

102.        Second Reformed Church, Kingston.

103.        Savings Bank, Kingston.

104.        Kingston Bank, Kingston.

105.        State of New York Bank, Kingston.

106.        Interior of St. John’s Church, Kingston.

107.        Interior of Baptist Church, Kingston.

108.        Interior of 2nd Reformed Church, Kingston.

109.        Interior of 2nd Reformed Church, Kingston.

110.        Interior of 1st Methodist Church, Kingston.

111.        Interior of 1st Methodist Church, Kingston.

112.        Moses’ Rock in Jacob’s Valley.

113.        Fly Mountain near Eddyville.

114.        Statuary (copy).

115.        Lilly.

116.        Road near Eddyville Bridge.

117.        Road near Eddyville Bridge.

118.        Bridge at Eddyville.

119.        Mill Dam at Eddyville.

120.        Looking up the Creek from Eddyville Bridge.

121.        Looking up the Creek from Eddyville Bridge.

122.        Looking down the Creek from Eddyville Bridge.

123.        Rondout Creek near Wilbur.

124.        Stone Yard at Wilbur.

125.        Stone Yard at Wilbur.

126.        Stone Yard at Wilbur.

127.        Rondout Creek at Wilbur.

128.        Wilbur Road and Rondout Creek.

129.        Rondout Creek and South Rondout.

130.        Rondout Creek and South Rondout.

131.        View from the Road between Kingston and Wilbur.

132.        Rustic View near Rondout.

133.        Entrance to Cement Quarry near Rondout.

134.        Entrance to Cement Quarry near Rondout.

135.        School House in Rondout.

136.        Bird’s Eye View of Rondout.

137.        Kingston Point from Sleightburgh.

138.        Rondout from Sleightburgh.

139.        Rondout from Sleightburgh.

140.        Rondout from Sleightburgh.

141.        Rondout Creek and Coal Docks.

142.        Interior of Washington Hall, decorated for a Festival.

143.        Interior of Union Church at North Haven.

144.        Interior of Union Church at North Haven.

145.        Organ in Union Church at North Haven.

146.        Private Residence at Sleightburgh.

147.        North Haven from Sleightburgh Hill.

148.        Kingston Point from Sleightburgh Hill.

149.        Rondout from Sleightburgh Hill.

150.        Rondout from Sleightburgh Hill.

151.        Light House and River.

152.        The Day Boat M. Martin leaving Rondout.

153.        Coal Dock, Creek, South Rondout, Hussy’s Hill, & c.

154.        Creek, Dry Docks, with Ferry Boat Lark, & c.

155.        Corner of The Strand and Union Avenue, Rondout.

156.        Fire Steamer Lindsley and Weber Hose Carriage.

157.        Ferry Street, Rondout.

158.        Private Residence on The Strand, Rondout.

159.        Private Residence in North Rondout.

160.        Cross Street, Rondout.

161.        Schooner Juliette Terry.

162.        Rondout and Sleightburgh Ferry.

163.        Methodist Church at Port Ewen.

164.        Reformed Church at Port Ewen.

165.        Interior of Episcopal Church, Rondout.

166.        The Strand, Rondout.

167.        Private Residence on Union Avenue, Rondout.

168.        Interior of St. Mary’s Church, Rondout.

169.        Interior of St. Mary’s Church, Rondout, with group.

170.        The Watch Dog.

171.        The Watch Dog.

172.        Dog Smoking.

173.        Union Hotel Road and Canal, Rosendale.

174.        Looking up the Creek from Rosendale toward Lawrenceville.

175.        View of Rosendale Village from near W. V. R. R. Bridge.

176.        The Bluff and West End of W. V. R. R. Bridge, Rosendale.

177.        W. V. R. R. Bridge, looking down Canal, 150 feet high.

178.        W. V. R. R. Bridge from near Depot, 876 feet long, 150 high.

179.        W. V. R. R. Bridge from near Depot, 876 feet long, 150 high.

180.        W. V. R. R. Bridge near end of Bridge, 876 feet long, 150 high.

181.        Creek and distant view of W. V. R. R. Bridge, at Rosendale.

182.        Canal and distant view of W. V. R. R. Bridge, at Rosendale.

183.        W. V. R. R. Depot at Rosendale.

184.        W. V. R. R. Track, looking south from Depot.

185.        Rosendale Bridge looking up the Creek.

186.        Rosendale from near Canal Bridge.

187.        Rosendale from near Drug Store.

188.        Lawrenceville Cement Works.

189.        Lawrenceville Cement Works.

190.        Lawrenceville Cement Works.

191.        Canal, & c., at Lawrenceville.

192.        Canal and Rocks in foreground at Lawrenceville.

193.        Looking up the Creek from Lawrenceville.

194.        Looking down the Creek from Lawrenceville.

195.        High Falls, side view.

196.        High Falls, front view.

197.        High Falls, front view.

198.        The Covered Bridge at High Falls.

199.        The Aqueduct at High Falls, front view.

200.        The Aqueduct at Hight Falls, side view.

201.        Looking up the Creek from under Aqueduct at High Falls.

202.        The Strand, Rondout.

203.        Birdseye view of Rondout from east.

204.        Birdseye view of Rondout and Creek.

205.        Birdseye view of Rondout from Catholic Church.

206.        Birdseye view of Rondout from Catholic Church.

207.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

208.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

209.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

210.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

211.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

212.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

213.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

214.        Island in Copake Lake.

215.        Falls at Philmont.

216.        Bashabe Falls.

217.        Centre Falls of Bashabe.

218.        Copake Island and Lake.

219.        Pond, & c., near Hudson.

220.        Birdseye view of Hudson.

221.        Birdseye vie of Rondout.

222.        Skeleton Leaves arranged on Cross.

223.        Skeleton Leaves arranged on Cross.

224.        Skeleton Leaves arranged on Cross.

225.        Basket of Shells and Flowers.

226.        Basket of Shells and Flowers.

227.        Wreath of Flowers.

228.        Purity (medallion).

229.        Rondout Creek, Hudson River, & c.

230.        Rondout Creek, Hudson River, & c.

231.        Mouth of Rondout Creek.

232.        Ship Yard, Stone Yard, Hudson River, & c.

233.        The Mocking Bird.

234.        The Mocking Bird and Trainer.

235.        The Beautiful Snow (taken April 29, 1874).

236.        Pic-Nic Part at Ellsworth’s Grove, Port Ewen.

237.        St. Mary’s Church, Rondout (Catholic).

238.        Christian Brothers’ House, Rondout.

239.        Priest’s House, Rondout.

240.        View of an Arbor and Group.

241.        St. Mary’s School House, Rondout.

242.        St. Mary’s School House, Rondout.

243.        Sisters’ House, Rondout.

244.        Episcopal Church, Rondout.

245.        Private Residence on Pierpont Street.

246.        Private Residence on Pierpont Street.

247.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

248.        Quarry Hill near Rondout.

249.        Cement Works opposite Wilbur.

250.        Skeleton Leaves on a Cross.

251.        Skeleton Leaves in a Frame.

252.        The Old Woman who lives in her shoe.

253.        Fair and Festival in Presbyterian Chapel.

254.        Fair and Festival in Presbyterian Chapel.

255.        Fair and Festival in Presbyterian Chapel.

256.        Home for Invalids (side view).

257.        Home for Invalids (front view).

258.        A cosy Retreat.

259.        A cosy Retreat.

260.        A House built about 1760 (side view).

261.        A House built about 1760 (end view).

262.        A farm scene in haying time.

263.        A Dead Beet.

264.        A Wreath of Flowers.

265.        Corner of Union av. and Strand.

266.        The Village Blacksmith.

267.        Private Residence in Port Ewen.

268.        Private Residence in Port Ewen.

269.        A Wreath of Flowers.

270.        Corner of Hone and Spring Street.

271.        Mary Powell (model).

272.        City Hall, Kingston, N.Y.

273.        Crow, Blue Jay, & King Fisher.

274.        Sparrow Hawk, & Parrott.

275.        Crane and Rail.

276.        Rock Eagle & Gray Squirrel.

277.        Quack & Rail.

278.        Crane, Quack, & Rail.

279.        Sparrow Hawk, Owl & Muskrat.

280.        Guinea Pigs, Squirrel & white breasted bird.

281.        Coatmundi and Muskrat.

282.        The Pelican.

283.        Catamount and Sea Gull.

284.        Catamount and Racoon.

285.        Sea Gull and Owl.

286.        The Fox.

287.        Taxidermist with Birds and Animals.

288.        Robin, Canary, Blue Jay & c.

289.        Corner Bowery and Furnace Street.

290.        Interior of 2nd M. E. Church, Kingston.

291.        Port Ewen, (Street near M. E. Church).

292.        Anthracite Fuel works from the River.

293.        Anthracite Fuel works from the Shore.

294.        Hudson River Light House Ferry Boat & c.

295.        Looking up the Creek from Cranes dock.

296.        South Rondout.

297.        Machine Shop & Round House R. & C. R. R.

298.        Cross of Flowers.

299.        Rapid Hose Carriage.

300.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

301.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

302.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

303.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

304.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

305.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

306.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

307.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

308.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

309.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

310.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

311.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

312.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

313.        Cement Quarry near Rondout.

314.        Birds-eye view of Rondout from opposite side of Creek.

315.        Birds-eye view of Rondout from Sleightburg in Winter.

316.        Birds-eye view of Rondout the Creek & South.

317.        Birds-eye view of Rondout the Creek & South.

318.        Looking up the Creek from Sleightburgh.

319.        North Rondout from near Catholic Church.

320.        Interior of Presbyterian Church, Rondout.

 

Legacy

 

The thousands of portraits of Ulster County citizens taken by Auchmoody over the course of his 25-year career as a photographer and his hundreds of scenic views from throughout the county both leave a lasting impression of the region in the late 1800s.

 

Upon his passing it was written that Auchmoody “was a man of many sterling traits of character and endeared himself to a wide circle of friends.”

 

David J. Auchmoody passed away at 58 years of age on January 11, 1907. He died at his home on West Strand several days after catching “a severe cold, which greatly weakened him and hastened the end.” Two funeral services were held, the first being a private service at his home at 11 West Strand, and a second public service was held at Pythian Hall at Port Ewen under the direction of the Hope Lodge, Knights of Pythias. David was survived by his wife and two sons, Luther Auchmoody, of New York, and Lester D. Auchmoody, of Albany, New York. He is buried at Port Ewen Cemetery.

 

[1] Wilson’s Photographic Magazine. Vol. 27, no. 371. June 7, 1890. p. 351.

[2] “D. J. Auchmoody Dead.” Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York). January 11, 1907.

[3] “Postmaster Deyo Dead at Saranac.” Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York). May 26, 1917.

 

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[email protected] (American Catskills) business Catskill Mountains Catskills D. J. Auchmoody David J. Auchmoody Elvina Ackerman gallery Kingston New York Overlook Mountain House Petere J. Auchmoody photographer photographs photography pictures portraits Rondout stereoscope stereoscopic studio Ulster County views https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/9/david-j-auchmoody-kingston-new-york-photographer-part-2 Sat, 16 Sep 2023 12:00:00 GMT
David J. Auchmoody – Kingston, New York Photographer (Part 1) https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2023/9/david-j-auchmoody-kingston-new-york-photographer-part-1 Introduction

 

David J. Auchmoody was a much-respected photographer located at the city of Kingston in Ulster County, New York from 1868 to circa 1893. He photographed thousands of Kingston’s citizens over the course of his 25 years in business. Auchmoody also published a popular series of stereoviews that included scenes of Kingston, Rondout, Rosendale, Rifton, Lawrenceville, Saugerties, Shandaken, Shokan and the surrounding Catskills region. After leaving the photography business Auchmoody worked in the insurance industry and for several fraternal organizations.

 

Rondout Creek and Wilbur RoadRondout Creek and Wilbur Road Rondout Creek and Wilbur Road.

 

Biography

 

David Jeremiah Auchmoody, more commonly known as D. J., was born at New Paltz, New York on July 19, 1848. He was the son of Peter J. Auchmoody, who worked as a carpenter, and Elmira (Deyo) Auchmoody.

 

One reference noted that Auchmoody was a native of the hamlet of Plutarch, located on the northeastern edge of the town of New Paltz. The farming community was once home to a post office, a general store, a one room schoolhouse, a blacksmith shop and a church which was constructed in 1861. The Plutarch post office operated for about six months in 1886, closing on November 18, 1886, but was reestablished on August 11, 1890, and then operated for 15 years until its final closing on December 15, 1905. The Plutarch section of the town was at one time called Grawhow (or Grahow), for Great Ridge, was later known as Cold Spring or Cold Spring Corners, from “a fine spring of water” located north of the church, before becoming Plutarch in honor of the Greek philosopher.

 

According to Ralph Lefevre in his History of New Paltz, New York, the Auchmoody family in Ulster County, New York can be traced back to Jeames Auchmoide, a young man who was born in Scotland. He married Mari Doyo in October, 1731. They built a house in the Bontecoe neighborhood and had six children together, including three sons and three daughters.[1]

 

The 1850 United States census listed 1-year-old David as living with his parents, 22-year-old Peter and 20-year-old Elmira (sometimes spelled Almira) Auchmoody, in the town of New Paltz in Ulster County, New York. Peter was listed with an occupation of carpenter.

 

The 1855 New York state census listed 6-year-old Auchmoody as residing with his parents Peter J. and Elmira Auchmoody in the town of Lloyd in Ulster County, New York. Also living in the household was David’s sister, 2-year-old Catherine Auchmoody. Peter was listed with an occupation of carpenter.

 

The 1860 United States census listed 11-year-old Auchmoody as residing with his parents Peter and Elmira at New Paltz, New York. Also living in the household was David’s sister, 7-year-old Catherine Auchmoody. Peter was listed with an occupation of laborer.

 

The 1865 New York state census listed 17-year-old Auchmoody as residing with his parents Peter and Elmira at New Paltz in Ulster County, New York. Also living in the household was David’s sister, 13-year-old Catherine Auchmoody. No profession was listed for Peter or David.

 

For several years, “when a young man,” Auchmoody taught school in the town of Esopus.

 

In December 1868 Auchmoody, at the age of 20, “started what is now [as of 1881] the oldest photograph gallery in the lower part of the city. Since his venture into business, which at first, of course, was but on a small scale, he has been enabled by strict attention to business, and good work to build up an establishment second to none in the county.” His early gallery was located over Van Deusen’s Drug Store at the corner of Garden and Ferry Streets in the Rondout section of Kingston, New York.

 

The 1870 United States census listed 22-year-old Auchmoody as living with his parents Peter and Elmira at Rondout in Ulster County, New York. Also living in the household were David’s two sisters, 18-year-old Catherine and 4-year-old Cecilia. Peter was listed with an occupation of carpenter and David was listed with an occupation of photographer.

 

Catherine (1853-1934), David’s sister, married Martin L. Van Keuren. She lived in Port Ewen for her entire married life. “She was well liked and was a good friend and neighbor and will be missed by her friends and neighbors. She was a member of the Port Ewen Methodist Church and was a very active member until forced to give up some of her duties because of her age and her health.”[2] Catherine passed away in 1934 and is buried at Port Ewen Cemetery.

 

Celia Auchmoody, David’s sister, “a very attractive and much beloved young lady at Port Ewen, aged about 17 years, and a sister of D. J. Auchmoody of this city, died of typhoid fever after a very short and severe illness.”[3] Celia passed away in 1883.

 

David Auchmoody married Elvina Ackerman on December 22, 1870. Elvina was the daughter of Oliver Ferris Ackerman (1817-1862) and Jane Ann (Degraff) Ackerman (1816-1900). Elvina passed away at Flushing, Long Island in 1935 and is buried at Port Ewen Cemetery. Elvina was a lineal descendant of Geoffrey Ferris, one of the founders of Greenwich, Connecticut, and also Lieutenant Commander Oliver Ferris (1753-1825), a Revolutionary War officer whose home, Sunnyside, at Tarrytown, later became the home of Washington Irving.

 

“Capt. Oliver Ferris was born in Greenwich, Conn., Nov. 22, 1753, the son of Josiah, and through John, Jr., and John, was descended from Jeffrey Ferris, the ancestor of that family in this country. Oliver Ferris was married to Abigail, daughter of Enos Lockwood on the 10th of Feb., 1776, by the Rev. Blackleach Burritt, who, on the 17th of the following June was taken prisoner and carried away to be incarcerated in the old Sugar House Prison on account of his staunch patriotism.

 

Captain Ferris did good service in the Connecticut Militia, and after the Revolution came over to Tarrytown and purchased the historic Major Jacob Van Tassel place, the date of transfer being March 31, 1802. He died Aug. 17, 1825, and his son, Benson Ferris, Sr., in 1835, sold the homestead, comprising ten acres to Washington Irving, who re-built it, and gave it the title of Wolfert’s Roost. Mr. Benson Ferris, son of Benson, Sr., and grandson of Capt. Oliver Ferris, was born there.

 

The records of the Pension Office at Washington show that Oliver Ferris enlisted May 10, 1775, and was in the expedition to Canada under Gen. Montgomery; was in Col. John Mead’s Regt. From Aug. 14 to Sept. 25, 1776; in Col. Wooster’s Regt. 1777; in 1778 Quartermaster in Col. John Mead’s Regt.; March 9, 1779, appointed Commander of the war vessel “Wakeman”; July 4, 1781, commissioned Brigade Quartermaster of the 4th Brigade of Militia of the State of Connecticut.”[4]

 

David and Elvina had three children, including Luther M. Auchmoody (1871-1947); George Auchmoody (b. 1877); and Lester Auchmoody (1879-1963).

 

Luther Auchmoody was born at Port Ewen, New York. He worked as an automobile dealer and sales manager for the H. J. Heinz Company. He married Ellen (Blodgett) Auchmoody. He died at the home of his son in 1947 and is buried at Riverview Cemetery in Port Ewen, New York.

 

Lester Auchmoody for a time worked at the Standard Oil Company in Albany, New York. He later lived at Denver, Colorado.

 

In 1870 Auchmoody placed an advertisement in the New Paltz Independent. “D. J. Auchmoody, Photographer, Garden and Ferry Streets, (Over Van Deusen’s Drug Store), Rondout, N.Y. Pictures of all kinds taken. Frames and cases of every style constantly on hand.”

 

In 1871 Auchmoody was advertising his business in the Rondout Freeman. “Photographs! Pictures & Frames! Auchmoody’s Gallery, (Over Van Deusen’s) Garden & Ferry Sts., is the place to get them.”

 

Auchmoody advertised his gallery twice in the Gazetteer and Business Directory of Ulster County, N.Y. for 1871-2.

 

“D. J. Auchmoody’s Gallery and Picture Frame Store, Garden and Ferry Streets, Rondout, N.Y. Stereoscopes and Stereoscopic Views. Picture Frames, all sorts and sizes, very cheap. Every style of Picture taken.”

 

“D. J. Auchmoody’s Gallery and Picture Frame Store, Garden and Ferry Sts., Rondout, N.Y., is one of the great centers of attraction. Any kind of Picture, with any style of Frame, can be procured here. Call and examine specimens of work and then consult your taste and your purse. If you want a good stereoscope, here is the place to get it.”

 

In 1871 Auchmoody issued a series of 16 stereoscopic views of the newly constructed Overlook Mountain House. The same set of views was published by both D. J. Auchmoody and fellow Kingston photographer Edward Lewis.

 

5_South Piazza, Overlook Mountain House5_South Piazza, Overlook Mountain House

South Piazza, Overlook Mountain House.

 

7_Parlor, Overlook Mountain House7_Parlor, Overlook Mountain House Parlor, Overlook Mountain House.

 

16_Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west16_Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west.

 

Located north of Woodstock near the summit of Overlook Mountain, the Overlook Mountain House first opened its doors to guests in 1871, was destroyed by fire in 1875, was rebuilt and reopened in 1878, only to be destroyed by fire again in 1923. There was an attempted 3rd rebuilding that was never completed, the remains of which are still visible on a hike to the summit of Overlook Mountain.

 

At its height the Overlook Mountain House provided accommodations for approximately 300 guests and offered visitors the latest in modern conveniences and experiences. One of the early advertisements for the Overlook Mountain House, published in 1871, beautifully described its superior accommodations and the mountain setting.

 

“Overlook Mountain House, Catskill Range. J. E. Lasher, Proprietor. This elegant House will be opened to the public early in the season, and will afford a rare treat for the lovers of the Beautiful, the Grand, and the Sublime, who can enjoy the loveliest of scenery in a first-class hotel.

 

The house cost $50,000, and is complete throughout, furnishing accommodations that will please the most fastidious and satisfy the most exacting tastes.

 

The view is unsurpassed not only on the Catskills, but in the country, and combines a grand combination of mountain, valley, river, forest, and cultivated fields. No one who has seen it has failed to speak of it with admiration.

 

It will be found a delightful spot for excursion and picnic parties, for whom special accommodations will be provided.

 

A Stage Line from West Hurley on the R. & O. R. R. will be run by the Proprietor of the Overlook, and will connect with the trains. Guests can also obtain the best of livery establishments at Rondout and Kingston.

 

John E. Lasher, Proprietor. Overlook Mountain House, Woodstock, March 24, 1871.”

 

John E. Lasher (1827-1899), the first proprietor of the Overlook Mountain House, had previously operated the Mansion House at Kingston, New York from after the Civil War until his taking control of the Overlook.

 

In order to promote his new hotel, Lasher invited Edward Lewis to photograph the establishment prior to its official opening on June 15, 1871. “Mr. John Lasher, the lessee of the new hotel on the Overlook, has had Mr. E. Lewis, of Kingston, up there taking views of the house and grounds about it during the past week. The views are to be engraven from the photographs, and used in advertising this beautiful new summer resort. Mr. Lewis has the name of being the best artist in Ulster County.”[5]

 

Given that the set of 16 views was published by both Auchmoody and Lewis, it is likely that Auchmoody also photographed the Overlook Mountain House.

 

The imprint on the back of each stereoview included a brief description of the hotel, travel directions and a listing of the 16 different views that were available for purchase.

 

“New Summer Resort in the Catskill Mountains. The OVERLOOK MOUNTAIN HOUSE, 3,800 feet above tide water, on the highest point of the Catskill range, was opened June 15th, 1871. All modern conveniences, including Gas and Telegraph facilities. Reached by Boat or Rail to Rondout; Rondout and Oswego Railroad to West Hurley (9 miles); thence by the Hotel Stages in 3 hours. Overlook Mountain House, Woodstock, Ulster Co., N.Y. John E. Lasher, Proprietor.

 

No. 1. Catskill Mountains from ascent to the Overlook.

No. 2. Overlook Mountain House, Rocks in foreground.

No. 3. Overlook Mountain House, distant view.

No. 4. Overlook Mountain House, near view.

No. 5. South Piazza, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 6. West Piazza, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 7. Parlor, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 8. Dining Room, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 9. View from the ledge in front of the House.

No. 10. Pulpit Rock, near the House.

No. 11. Devil’s Kitchen, near the House.

No. 12. Cleft in Rocks, near the House.

No. 13. Rocky declivity, near the House.

No. 14. Path to the Overlook.

No. 15. Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking east.

No. 16. Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west.

 

The subject published on this card is indicated by a mark under the number and name.

 

D. J. AUCHMOODY, Photographer, Rondout, N.Y.”

 

The demand for the stereoscopic views of the Overlook Mountain House published by both Auchmoody and Lewis was very strong. One year after the opening of the Overlook Mountain House the Kingston Daily Freeman wrote of the demand and the scenic views available throughout the region.

 

“Stereoscopic views. Our photographic artists are turning the natural beauties of this section to good advantage and are making some fine views of the scenery hereabouts. The Overlook furnishes many good views, which find a ready sale at the Mountain House, Mr. Auchmoody and Mr. Lewis being kept pretty busy just now supplying the demand. Of course few visitors wish to leave the spot without some memento of their visit, and a faithful representation of the scenes they have gazed upon in the shape of a stereoscopic view is as pleasing a reminder as they can have. The landscapes about our own city, sketches of scenery along the Wallkill, Rondout and Esopus creeks also are visited by these artists and their beauties transferred to the negative. The wild scenes of Olive and Shandaken and among the Shawangunk Mountains also often form the subject of the picture, and in fact so numerous are the scenes of interest hereabouts that a person can gather a very extensive collection of stereoscopic views comprising only scenes in our own immediate neighborhood.”[6]

 

The local newspapers frequently published small articles about Auchmoody and his photographic business.

 

April 4, 1872, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Fine Gallery. David Auchmoody has one of the finest and best photographic galleries in the vicinity. It has been greatly enlarged and improved, refurnished and remodeled, and is now decidedly a pleasant attractive place. David’s smiling face welcomes all his patrons, and he is gaining a reputation for good work which must bring him success.”

 

April 4, 1872, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“The finest lot of stereoscopic pictures in the city, comprising views of Yosemite Valley, the White Mountains, Niagara, and ever other noted place in the country, also of noted persons of the day, foreign views, statuary, etc. Constantly on hand a large and complete assortment of picture frames and all articles usually kept in first-class photograph galleries. A newly furnished room, greatly enlarged and improved, and all the essentials for making good pictures. Satisfaction guaranteed. David Auchmoody, Van Deusen’s Building.”

 

August 1, 1872, The Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York)

 

“Chromos, Photographs and Stereoscopic Views.– Mr. D. J. Auchmoody, the Photographer, is closing out his fine stock of Chromos, which he is selling at greatly reduced prices, preparatory to procuring a new stock. Those who wish to obtain fine pictures at exceedingly low prices will do well to call at once. Also a large and varied assortment of Stereoscopic Views. Photography in all its branches carefully and satisfactorily attended to. D. J. AUCHMOODY’S, over Van Deusen’s Drug Store, Rondout.”

 

December 21, 1872, The Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York)

 

“All wishing photographs for the holidays should call as soon as convenient, so as to give us time to finish them properly. D. J. Auchmoody, Photographer, Garden and Ferry Sts., Rondout.”

 

December 18, 1872, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“A large stock of picture frames of every size and style on hand and made to order at Auchmoody’s Photograph Gallery, Garden and Ferry Sts., Rondout.”

 

December 30, 1872, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Chromos, Stereoscopic Views and Photographs. Auchmoody, the Photographer, has a fine assortment of Chromos, representing the famous paintings – landscapes, views, etc., – of our most noted artists. Also a large and varied stock of Stereoscopic Views, embracing scenes of every description, home and foreign. Photographs and other pictures carefully taken.”

 

September 16, 1873, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“A new lot of plain and very fine polished moulding for square frames of any size at AUCHMOODY’S Photography Gallery, Garden street, Rondout.”

 

December 10, 1873, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Sime Wood’s advertising card, photographed by Auchmoody from drawings of John C. Horton is a unique thing and a bully dodge.”

 

December 12, 1873, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“TWENTY-TWO different styles of STEREOSCOPES and over 5,000 views to select from at Auchmoody’s Photographic and Picture Frame Rooms, Garden street.”

 

March 31, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Moth will not eat wire picture cord; for sale at Auchmoody’s Photograph Gallery, Garden street. Also Picture Frames of every style.”

 

May 9, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Auchmoody, the photographer, has in his gallery a very fine collection of stereoscopic views, his latest being an excellent photograph of the house of Jansen Hasbrouck, taken from the Garden street entrance April 29th, the grounds being covered with a mantle of snow. The photograph is well toned and very artistically finished.”

 

December 19, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Auchmoody, the photographer, on Friday took a number of views of the Presbyterian chapel on Abeel street, with its decorations for the fair, including the fancy dressed waiters.”

 

December 21, 1874 advertisements, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

           “Graphoscope. Come and see the little graphoscope at Auchmoody’s, The Strand, Rondout.”

 

“Picture Frames. The largest assortment of Picture Frames of all sizes and styles and Auchmoody’s, The Strand, Rondout.”

 

“Stereoscopes and views. A new lot at Auchmoody’s, The Strand, Rondout.”

 

Aqueduct, at High Falls, N.Y.Aqueduct, at High Falls, N.Y. Aqueduct at High Falls.

 

The 1875 New York state census listed Auchmoody as living in the first election district of the town of Esopus in Ulster County, New York. He was living with his wife Lavina and his 3-year-old son Luther Auchmoody. Auchmoody was listed with an occupation of photographer.

 

May 27, 1875 advertisement, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“D. J. Auchmoody, Photographer, and dealer in Picture Frames in large assortment. Strand and Ferry Street.”

 

September 16, 1875, The Times (New Paltz)

 

“D. J. Auchmoody, photographer in Rondout, was in our village Tuesday. He had on his head a straw hat large enough to cover half of Rondout. As an artist he has no equal, and a visit to his gallery will convince most any person of the truth of this fact.”

 

November 18, 1875, The Independent (New Paltz)

 

“We received a call on Saturday from David J. Auchmoody, the artist of Rondout. Mr. Auchmoody has won a reputation as a good artist, and has met an extensive patronage. Give him a trial when you want your pictures taken. He has also a great variety of stereoscopic views, no less than 170 in number, including many of local interest. He deals in picture frames also, and those who need any can obtain what they want by calling on him.”

 

December 17, 1875, Red Hook Journal

 

“Mr. D. J. Auchmoody, of Rondout, continues to take pictures in his usual artistic manner, and can give you a perfect likeness of yourself at short notice. He also has a large stock of views, picture frames, & c., constantly on hand.”

 

November 1, 1876, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Auchmoody’s fancy pictures excite the open-mouthed wonder and covetousness of the small boys.”

 

November 1, 1876, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Best Photographs in the City. At Auchmoody’s is the place to get them. Call and see specimens at the new rooms, 29 Union avenue, Rondout.”