American Catskills: Blog https://www.americancatskills.com/blog en-us Copyright (C). All Rights Reserved. 2009-2021. Matthew Jarnich. dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Mon, 12 Apr 2021 15:42:00 GMT Mon, 12 Apr 2021 15:42:00 GMT https://www.americancatskills.com/img/s/v-12/u21107031-o922362058-50.jpg American Catskills: Blog https://www.americancatskills.com/blog 120 80 Murals of Kingston, New York: Midtown https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/murals-of-kingston-new-york-midtown The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspects of the festival are the beautiful, and often large-scale, murals seen throughout the city.

 

Included in this post is a sampling of murals that can be found in, or close to, the midtown section of Kingston.

 

The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston.Anos de SoledadMidtown, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this front section of the mural is “a portrait of Nina Gualinga, the environmental & indigenous rights activist and Hija del Primer Levantamiento - from a photograph taken by Marc Silver during his documentation of traditional ayahuasca medicine in the Ecuadorian Amazon. It also depicts images of migration, local Kingston natural landscapes . . .” A side section of the mural (seen separately) depicts “an Inca Inti gold piece over #coal and #marble, which were natural resources mined from the area to build cities and capitals. Traditional medicine, modern technology, wellness and health divided by years of solitude.”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston.IncaMidtown, Kingston, Ulster County

This side section of a larger mural was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this section of the mural depicts “an Inca Inti gold piece over #coal and #marble, which were natural resources mined from the area to build cities and capitals. Traditional medicine, modern technology, wellness and health divided by years of solitude.”

The front section of the mural is the large scale, incredibly vibrant art piece titled Anos de Soledad. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this front section of the mural is “a portrait of Nina Gualinga, the environmental & indigenous rights activist and Hija del Primer Levantamiento - from a photograph taken by Marc Silver during his documentation of traditional ayahuasca medicine in the Ecuadorian Amazon. It also depicts images of migration, local Kingston natural landscapes . . .”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.

Anos de Soledad

The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this front section of the mural is “a portrait of Nina Gualinga, the environmental & indigenous rights activist and Hija del Primer Levantamiento - from a photograph taken by Marc Silver during his documentation of traditional ayahuasca medicine in the Ecuadorian Amazon. It also depicts images of migration, local Kingston natural landscapes . . .” A side section of the mural (seen separately) depicts “an Inca Inti gold piece over #coal and #marble, which were natural resources mined from the area to build cities and capitals. Traditional medicine, modern technology, wellness and health divided by years of solitude.”

 

The midtown mural titled “Ain’t I a Woman?”, in honor of Sojourner Truth”, was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artists Jess X. Chen and Chip Thomas.Ain't I A WomanKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “Ain’t I a Woman?” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artists Jess X. Chen and Chip Thomas. The mural honors the well known speech by the same name that was delivered by Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), a 19th century abolitionist and women’s rights activist, at the 1851 Ohio Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. Sojourner Truth was born into slavery south of Kingston in the village of Swartekill (near today’s Rifton). She gained her freedom in 1827 with New York’s abolition of slavery. Through her faith, lectures, and preaching, Truth would become one of the most vocal and prominent leaders of the national abolition and civil rights movement. In 2014 the Smithsonian Institute named Sojourner Truth one of the “100 Most Significant Americans of All Time.”

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Ain’t I a Woman

The midtown mural titled Ain’t I a Woman? was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artists Jess X. Chen and Chip Thomas. The mural honors the well-known speech by the same name that was delivered by Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), a 19th century abolitionist and women’s rights activist, at the 1851 Ohio Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. Sojourner Truth was born into slavery south of Kingston in the village of Swartekill (near today’s Rifton). She gained her freedom in 1827 with New York’s abolition of slavery. Through her faith, lectures, and preaching, Truth would become one of the most vocal and prominent leaders of the national abolition and civil rights movement. In 2014 the Smithsonian Institute named Sojourner Truth one of the “100 Most Significant Americans of All Time.”

 

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone, painted by Eugene Stetz, Jr., adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston.FishboneKingston, Ulster County

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Eugene Stetz, Jr. in 2016 as part of the 7th annual O+ festival in Kingston. Stetz is a High Falls resident and artist who works in various mediums such as illustration, sculpture and large-scale murals. For more information about Eugene Stetz visit his website at www.stetzism.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.

Fishbone

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Eugene Stetz, Jr. in 2016 as part of the 7th annual O+ festival in Kingston. Stetz is a High Falls resident and artist who works in various mediums such as illustration, sculpture and large-scale murals. For more information about Eugene Stetz visit his website at www.stetzism.com.

 

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone, painted by Eugene Stetz, Jr., adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston.Fishbone, photobombKingston, Ulster County

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Eugene Stetz, Jr. in 2016 as part of the 7th annual O+ festival in Kingston. Stetz is a High Falls resident and artist who works in various mediums such as illustration, sculpture and large-scale murals. For more information about Eugene Stetz visit his website at www.stetzism.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Fishbone, Photobomb

 

Touching mural in Kingston, Ulster County that honors four friends that tragically died in a 2015 car accident in nearby Saugerties.FriendsKingston, Ulster County

This touching midtown mural honors four friends that tragically died in a 2015 car accident in nearby Saugerties. According to newspaper reports, “Meredith McSpirit, the 19-year-old driver of the car, was the only survivor of the crash, in which the vehicle she was driving went down a 110-foot embankment, hit a house and landed on its roof on Dock Street in the village of Saugerties.” (Pineiro-Zucker, Diane. Daily Freeman. www.dailyfreeman.com. August 27, 2015).

Clockwise from the top are Adam (Jeff) McQueen (1993-2015), Kaireem Meeks Jr. (age 24), Dante Crump (1993-2015) and Jonte Clark (1989-2015). Jalani Crooks, artist and Kingston native, painted the mural in honor of his high school friends during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Friends

This touching midtown mural honors four friends that tragically died in a 2015 car accident in nearby Saugerties. According to newspaper reports, “Meredith McSpirit, the 19-year-old driver of the car, was the only survivor of the crash, in which the vehicle she was driving went down a 110-foot embankment, hit a house and landed on its roof on Dock Street in the village of Saugerties.” (Pineiro-Zucker, Diane. Daily Freeman. www.dailyfreeman.com. August 27, 2015).

 

Clockwise from the top are Adam (Jeff) McQueen (1993-2015), Kaireem Meeks Jr. (age 24), Dante Crump (1993-2015) and Jonte Clark (1989-2015). Jalani Crooks, artist and Kingston native, painted the mural in honor of his high school friends during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

 

The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known artist Lady Pink.Native Americans Discover ColumbusKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known graffiti and mural artist Lady Pink. Her real name is Sandra Fabara and she is popularly known as the “first lady of graffiti.” Starting out in the New York City sub-culture of subway graffiti artist of the early 1980s, she eventually turned to legal art, and now several of her pieces are within the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known artist Lady Pink.Native Americans Discover ColumbusKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known graffiti and mural artist Lady Pink. Her real name is Sandra Fabara and she is popularly known as the “first lady of graffiti.” Starting out in the New York City sub-culture of subway graffiti artist of the early 1980s, she eventually turned to legal art, and now several of her pieces are within the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Native Americans Discover Columbus

The midtown mural titled Native Americans Discover Columbus was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well-known graffiti and mural artist Lady Pink. Her real name is Sandra Fabara and she is popularly known as the “first lady of graffiti.” Starting out in the New York City sub-culture of subway graffiti artist of the early 1980s, she eventually turned to legal art, and now several of her pieces are within the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

 

The historically focused mural titled Pretty Nose adorns the side of the Keegan Ales building in midtown Kingston.Pretty NoseKingston, Ulster County

The historically focused mural titled “Pretty Nose” adorns the side of the Keegan Ales building in midtown Kingston. The mural depicts a Native American woman of the Arapaho tribe known as Pretty Nose. The original photo, the basis of the mural, was taken circa 1878 at Fort Keogh, Montana. The mural was created by artist Lmnopi in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Pretty Nose

The historically focused mural titled Pretty Nose adorns the side of the Keegan Ales building in midtown Kingston. The mural depicts a Native American woman of the Arapaho tribe known as Pretty Nose. The original photo, the basis of the mural, was taken circa 1878 at Fort Keogh, Montana. The mural was created by artist Lmnopi in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston.

 

The mural titled “M’YMCA” adorns the YMCA building in Kingston, New York; and was created by Woodstock artist Julia Santos Solomon.M'YMCAKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “M’YMCA” adorns the YMCA building in the midtown section of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by Woodstock artist Julia Santos Solomon in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According to the artist, the M’YMCA project “is an urban initiative to bring the people of Midtown Kingston together to create a portrait of the neighborhood” in order “to celebrate the rich diversity of its residents, its history and heritage.” For more information about the artist visit her website at www.juliasantossolomon.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
M’YMCA

The mural titled M’YMCA adorns the YMCA building in the midtown section of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by Woodstock artist Julia Santos Solomon in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According to the artist, the M’YMCA project “is an urban initiative to bring the people of Midtown Kingston together to create a portrait of the neighborhood” in order “to celebrate the rich diversity of its residents, its history and heritage.” For more information about the artist visit her website at www.juliasantossolomon.com.

 

The three-story mural titled “O Wind, Take Me To My Country” was created by artists Jess X. Chen and Jia Sung as part of the 2016 O+ festival in Kingston.O Wind, Take Me To My CountryKingston, Ulster County

The three-story mural titled “O Wind, Take Me To My Country” was created by artists Jess X. Chen and Jia Sung as part of the 2016 O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American poet, and contains the following inscription: “In solidarity with our mothers & sisters & bird friends who have been migrating across borders.”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
O Wind, Take Me To My Country

The three-story mural titled O Wind, Take Me To My Country was created by artists Jess X. Chen and Jia Sung as part of the 2016 O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American poet, and contains the following inscription: “In solidarity with our mothers & sisters & bird friends who have been migrating across borders.”

 

The Stockade District mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo.SWAKKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. It is one half of the “SWAK” mural pair, with the other SWAK version being located in the Stockade district of Kingston.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
SWAK

The midtown mural titled SWAK was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. It is one half of the “SWAK” mural pair, with the other SWAK version being located in the Stockade district of Kingston.

 

Mural in Kingston, New York with man playing the saxophone with the words “If the thunder don’t get you, the lightning will.”Thunder and LightningKingston, Ulster County

This catchy street art is located in Kingston, New York. It includes the words “If the thunder don’t get you, the lightning will.”

Thunder and Lightning

This catchy street art is located in midtown Kingston, New York. It includes the words “If the thunder don’t get you, the lightning will.”

 

Mural of the Atlantic Sturgeon at Keegan Ales in Kingston, Ulster County created by Will Lytle, artist and owner of Thorneater Comics.Atlantic SturgeonKingston, Ulster County

As the title implies, the mural depicts the Atlantic Sturgeon, a bony, somewhat prehistoric looking fish that is considered to be one of the oldest fish species in the world, perhaps even predating the dinosaurs. The ancient looking fish mural is located at Keegan Ales in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Will Lytle, artist and owner of Thorneater Comics, during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Atlantic Sturgeon

As the title implies, the mural depicts the Atlantic Sturgeon, a bony, somewhat prehistoric looking fish that is considered to be one of the oldest fish species in the world, perhaps even predating the dinosaurs. The ancient looking fish mural is located at Keegan Ales in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Will Lytle, artist and owner of Thorneater Comics, during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

 

The midtown Kingston mural known as Justice, appropriately located on the side wall of a legal practice, depicts Lady Justice, the scales of justice and a city skyline.JusticeKingston, Ulster County

The midtown Kingston mural known as Justice, appropriately located on the side wall of a legal practice, depicts Lady Justice, the scales of justice and a city skyline. The mural was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by artist George Loizou, the son of the owners of Dietz Stadium in Kingston.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Justice

The midtown Kingston mural known as Justice, appropriately located on the side wall of a legal practice, depicts Lady Justice, the scales of justice and a city skyline. The mural was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by artist George Loizou, the son of the owners of Dietz Stadium in Kingston.

 

The mural titled “Moving Mountains” was created by Brooklyn street artist Vince Ballentine in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.Moving MountainsKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “Moving Mountains was created by Brooklyn street artist Vince Ballentine in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival. The mural seeks “to honor indigenous heritage and generational wisdom.”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Moving Mountains

The mural titled Moving Mountains was created by Brooklyn street artist Vince Ballentine in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival. The mural seeks “to honor indigenous heritage and generational wisdom.”

 

The mural titled “Flight Sequence was created by artist Justin Suarez and is located on the side of The Anchor bar and restaurant in midtown Kingston, New York.Flight SequenceKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “Flight Sequence” is located o the side of the Anchor bar and restaurant in midtown Kingston, New York. The mural depicts the flight sequence of the barn owl during its nocturnal hunt. The mural was created by Rochester based artist Justin “Mr. PRVRT” Suarez in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. For more information about the artist visit his website at www.mrprvrt.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Flight Sequence

The mural titled Flight Sequence is located on the side of the Anchor bar and restaurant in midtown Kingston, New York. The mural depicts the flight sequence of the barn owl during its nocturnal hunt. The mural was created by Rochester based artist Justin “Mr. PRVRT” Suarez in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. For more information about the artist visit his website at www.mrprvrt.com.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist Catskill Mountains Catskills festival Hudson Valley Kingston medicine murals New York O positive O+ Festival paintings Stockade District street art https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/murals-of-kingston-new-york-midtown Sat, 10 Apr 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Maurice Farrington – Delhi Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/maurice-farrington-delhi-photographer Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

 

Logo for photographer Maurice Farrington of Delhi, New YorkFarrington LogoMaurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

 

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Maurice Farrington was born on July 17, 1837 on the Farrington homestead at East Delhi in Delaware County, New York. The family homestead was eventually taken over by Zenas Farrington, Maurice’s brother, where “he [Zenas] took charge of the home farm, which he bought in 1865, and has since carried on a thriving business in general agriculture, of late years making a specialty of dairying, keeping a valuable herd of Guernsey cows, and making a superior article of butter, which finds a ready market in New York City.” (The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, New York. Boston: Biographical Review Publishing Company, 1895. p. 364-366.)

 

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.
Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

Maurice Farrington was the grandson of March Farrington (1762-1849), an early pioneer, veteran of the American Revolution and the War of 1812, and farmer. “. . . March Farrington, who was of English antecedents, was born in this State in October, 1762. He had an honorable record as a soldier in the Revolution and the War of 1812, and as a pioneer of Delaware County. On first arriving in this region, having followed a route marked by blazed trees, he located his home in that part of the town of Meredith now known as Meredith Square; and, when he built his humble log cabin, his nearest neighbor was in Delhi, some six miles away. He and his family subsisted mainly for a time on the game and fish to be found in the vicinity. He subsequently removed to Delhi, where he and his cherished wife spent their declining years, she passing to her eternal rest November 10, 1841, in the seventy-eight year of her age, having been born April 17, 1764, and he dying April 1, 1849. Her maiden name was Betsey Colton; and by her and her husband five children were reared – Morris L., Paulina, Betsy Ann, Florella, and Polly. (The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, New York. Boston: Biographical Review Publishing Company, 1895. Pages 364-366.)

As an undoubted patriot March enlisted to serve his country during the American Revolution at the tender age of 13. “With patriotic fire burning in his veins, early in the spring of 1776 [he] enlisted in Col. Sergent’s regiment for a period of one year. He was only thirteen years of age, so thus the only course open to him was to enlist as a drummer boy. In this he was successful, serving out the full years’ service.” (“Bi-Centennial Corner.” Republican Express. October 23, 1975.) March joined the same unit, the 16th Continental Infantry, as his father, then Captain Thomas Farrington. March was stationed near the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775 where his father was leading his unit.

 

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.
Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

“Colonel Thomas Farrington [Maurice’s great grandfather] was a lieutenant in Israel Putnam’s company during the early days of the War for Independence. Coming from Massachusetts, he had already served the province from 1755 until the time of the reduction of Canada advancing in the service from Private to Captain. At the beginning of hostilities with the mother country, he was desirous of entering the service and applied for any officer vacancy in the Continental army. Receiving a commission, he hurried to the Boston area. At the Battle of Bunker Hill he was in command of the Putnam company and continued in the service until the close of the war. On Jan. 1, 1777, he received his commission as Lieutenant Colonel, thus carrying the title of Colonel from that time on.” (“Bi-Centennial Corner.” Republican Express. October 23, 1975.) For more information on Thomas Farrington see the article titled “Bi-Centennial Corner” in the October 23, 1975 issue of the Republican Express.

Unfortunately, which the article above does not mention, is that the story of Thomas Farrington took a downward turn with his commission in January 1777 as a Lieutenant Colonel of the 5th Massachusetts Regiment. Only five months later from May 15 to May 17, 1777 he was court-martialed for “behaving in a Scandalous, & infamous Manner, such as is unbecoming an Officer & Gentle Man, by receiving & passing Counterfeit Money, Knowing it by such.” (“To George Washington from Major General William Heath, 19 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

Abigail Adams in a letter dated May 6, 1777 to her husband, and future President, John Adams wrote of the accusations against Thomas Farrington.

 

“I must add a little more. A most Horrid plot has been discovered of a Bank of villans counterfeiting to a Great amount, no person scarcly but what has more or less of these Bills. I am unlucky enough to have about 5 pounds LM of it, but this is not the worst of it. One Col. Farrington who has been concerned in the plot, was taken sick, and has confessd not only the Counterfeiting, but as they had engaged and inlisted nearly 2 thousand Men who upon the Troops comeing to Boston were to fall upon the people and make a General Havock. How much mercifull God than man, in this providentially bringing to light these Horrid plots and Schemes. I doubt not Heaven will still continue to favour us, unless our iniquities prevent.” (“Abigail Adams to John Adams, 6 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

 

Major General Heath in a May 19, 1777 letter to General George Washington wrote of the court martial against Farrington.

 

 “Saturday last the General Court Martial appointed for the Tryal of Lieut. Colonel Farrington of Colo. Putnams Regiment (charged with behaving in a scandalous and infamous manner) gave in their Judgement that He was guilty of the Charge alleged against him & have adjudged him to be discharged from the Army – Incapable to serve in the Continental Service and ordered him to be published in the News Papers. I have approved the Judgment which has this Day been put in execution – Immediately upon his being discharged from his Arrest the Council ordered him under close confinement.” (“To George Washington from Major General William Heath, 19 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

 

General, and future President, George Washington spared no mercy with his thoughts on the actions of Thomas Farrington, believing that he should be sentenced to death. In a May 23, 1777 letter to Major General William Heath, George Washington wrote:

 

“The conduct of those who desert & receive double Bounties, deserves severe punishment, the practice has prevailed to a great & scandalous degree, and the desertions after they have come into the Field, have been truly vexatious. However, I have heard nothing of such malignity or of so fatal a tendency, as the conduct of Lieutt Colo. Farrington. You say, you hope the Army will get rid of him. Will not the World too? I hope the State has provided Laws against such Offenders, for I can not conceive, that any Crime should be punished with more severity or more certain death, than what this Man has been Guilty of. Money is the sinews of War. That in which we are engaged is just One, and we have no means of carrying it on, but by the Continental or State Notes. Whoever attempts to destroy their credit, particularly that of those, emitted by the United States, is a flagitious Offender & should forfeit his life, to satisfie the demands of public justice. In the case before us, the enormity of the crime, is aggravated in a peculiar manner by the post, Farrington held.” (“From George Washington to Major General William Heath, 23 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

 

On May 26, 1777, Thomas Farrington was “cashiered” from the Continental Army. His military career had ended in disgrace.

Interestingly, in several sources the positive aspects of Farrrington’s service were discussed, with no mention of how his military career had ended. For example, in The History of Delaware County, New York it was noted that “This gentleman was a lieutenant in Israel Putnam’s company, and commanded the company at Bunker Hill; he continued in the service as lieutenant colonel to the close of the war.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. Page 150.) This was not true; Thomas was dishonorably discharged from the military in 1777, and did not serve throughout the war. Perhaps the stories told in the community and passed on within the family from generation to generation only included Thomas Farrington’s heroic actions, while leaving out the fact that that he was court-martialed from the Continental Army and was reviled by none other than General and President George Washington.

Ever the patriot, in 1780, now at the age of 18, March Farrington again enlisted in the Continental Army, this time for three years, serving in the Massachusetts State line. He served in the company commanded by Captain John Abbot and later the unit of Captain John Williams. He served for 2 years, 9 months before being discharged at the end of the American Revolution. Around 1792 March followed his father to the remote lands of Delaware County, New York.

March Farrington, at the age of 50, again enlisted as a Private on July 18, 1812 for a period of five years, through July 18, 1817. He joined the 25th Infantry company commanded by Captain Henry Devanworth. The unit marched to Greenbush, then on to Fort Niagara, and later to the western frontier. He fought at the Battle of Chippawa on July 5, 1814 at what is now Ontario, Canada. He was discharged as a musician on March 27, 1815 “being incapable of performing the duties of a soldier in consequence of a lameness of the left hip.” (United State Congressional Serial Set. Volume 409.) March Farrington is buried at the Frisbee Family Cemetery in Delhi, near the Delaware County Historical Association.

Maurice Farrington, the photographer, was the son of Morris Lamb Farrington (1793-1882) and Ruth Frisbee (1797-1876). Morris Lamb Farrington was born on February 7, 1793, son of March Farrington and Betsey (Colton) Farrington. Morris served in the War of 1812, with the rank of Corporal in the New York Militia under both Captain F. P. Foot’s and Captain H. R. Phelps. Morris enlisted on August 24, 1812 and was discharged six months later on February 24, 1813. For his service he was awarded some bounty lands, listed as “11972 80 50.” His later occupation was as a farmer.

 

Views In and About Delhi, N.Y. Maurice Farrington, Photographer. Author’s collection.Views In and About Delhi, N.Y. by Maurice FarringtonViews In and About Delhi, N.Y. Maurice Farrington, Photographer. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.
Views In and About Delhi, N.Y. Maurice Farrington, Photographer. Author’s collection.

 

“Morris L. Farrington was but two years old when he came with his parents to this county, and at that early day educational advantages were here very limited. He began early to assist in the labors of the farm, growing more and more useful each year, remaining with his parents until he attained his majority, and afterward taking care of them in their latter years. In 1830 he bought the farm which is now included in the homestead of his son Zenas, of which he cleared a large portion, further improving it by erecting the present substantial set of frame buildings. Here he spent a long period of useful activity, loving to the venerable age of ninety years. He was a very intelligent man, taking part in the management of local affairs, and serving in many of the minor offices of the town. He married Ruth Frisbie, the daughter of Judge Gideon Frisbie, one of the original settlers of Delhi, and the first Judge of Delaware County, the first circuit of the county being held in his house. Judge Frisbie came here on horseback, long ere the time of public highways, and was for many years one of the most prominent men in this section of the county.” (The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, New York. Boston: Biographical Review Publishing Company, 1895. Pages 364-366.)

Morris married Ruth Frisbee on January 31, 1827 in Delhi, New York. She was the daughter of Judge Gideon Frisbee (1758-1828) and Huldah (Kidder) Frisbee (1756-1804). Together Morris and Ruth had five children, two of them dying at a young age, including Anzolette (1828-1872); Zenas (1831-1902); Maurice (Morris) (1837-1914); Alida (1839-1841); and Elizabeth (1840-1842).

Maurice’s mother, Ruth (Frisbee) Farrington, passed away in Delhi on March 28, 1876. Upon Ruth’s passing it was written that “Though invalid for some years she was always cheerful, and making those around her feel that they were not living in vain. The needy and afflicted always found in her a kind and sympathizing friend on whom they could rely for aid and consolation. She has gone to receive the reward for the blessings and kindnesses bestowed on others here.” (Delaware Gazette. April 5, 1876.)

Maurice’s father, Morris Lamb Farrington, passed away at Delhi on October 12, 1882. Upon his passing it was written that “Mr. Farrington was at the time of his death, perhaps the oldest resident of the town, and has always been one of its most respected, intelligent and upright citizens . . . About two years since a paralytic stroke nearly prostrated his mental and physical powers, memory failed and he has since been visibly approaching the end of earth, having lost the intelligent and comprehensive grasp of affairs for which he had up to that time always been distinguished. Now has disappeared from view one our most ancient and worthy landmarks – an interesting relic of the past and an exemplary, respected and aged patriarch and pioneer has taken his departure. ‘Take him all and all, we shall never look on his like again.’” (“Obituary.” Delaware Gazette. October 18, 1882.)

Both Morris Lamb Farrington and his wife Ruth (Frisbee) Farrington are both buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi, New York.

Maurice Farrington married Frances Eliza Thompson of Meredith in 1872. Frances was born in Delhi on April 24, 1849.  She was the daughter of Nathaniel R. and Caroline C. (Whitlock) Thompson. Together Maurice and Frances had had two children, Frank Maurice Farrington and Pauline Farrington.

Frank Maurice Farrington was born on December 28, 1872 at Delhi. Frank married Elizabeth Alexander Gallagher (1878-1955) of Marietta, Ohio. Frank was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church for 68 years and for a time served as trustee. During World War I Frank “served as executive in the entertainment division of the Army YMCA at Camp Lee, Va. and as YMCA secretary of various military camps. His services as lecturer at school assemblies and luncheon clubs took him to communities throughout the state.

Mr. Farrington was a charter member of the Delhi Kiwanis Club, and always took an active part in such local activities as Old Home Week and the Automobile Shows which were formerly held in the Delhi Opera House. For several years he conducted a drug store in the building now occupied by the Elm Tree Restaurant.

After selling his business to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries, Mr. Farrington devoted his time to writing books, stories and articles for trade magazines. He was considered an authority on Abraham Lincoln. In later years he engaged in the antique business with his wife.

He is survived by his wife and one sister, Miss Pauline Farrington of Delhi. An only daughter, Mrs. Virginia Wilson, died in 1951.” (Frank Farrington, Life-Long Delhi Resident, Dies.” The Delaware Republican Express. February 24, 1955.)

Frank passed away at the Delaware Sanitorium on February 21, 1955 where he had been a patient for 8 months. Funeral services were held at the McCall Funeral Home with services conducted by Rev. T. Howard Akland, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church. He is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

Pauline Farrington was born at Delhi on August 3, 1876 at Delhi, New York. As a youth she attended the Delaware Academy. For 14 years from 1905 to 1918 she worked as a music teacher at the New York Institution for the Blind in New York City. She then served as librarian from 1918 to 1948 at the Cannon Free Public Library in Delhi. Upon her retirement from the library, The Stamford Mirror-Recorder, the local newspaper wrote of contributions to the community.

 

“The retirement of Miss Pauline Farrington as Librarian at the Cannon Free Library cannot fail to leave a vacuum in the cultural life of Delhi. Her withdrawal from service terminates a period of thirty years faithful attendance at this institution, she having been the only librarian since the inception of the library. She was ever courteous and kindly toward the patrons of the institution, and has done much in guiding the reading habits of both young and old. Any book not immediately available she would get from the State Library, and no one was ever greeted with aught but a smile. Miss Farrington is withdrawing to enable her to do some of the things she has wanted to do and not be so confined, after a long period of fine service. The Library has been efficiently staffed, and while her pleasant and kindly smile will be missed, her influence will be indelibly stamped upon it. She was a keen student of books, and not at all averse to some of the modern trends. Her resignation is and will be a great loss to the patrons of the library.” (“Librarian Leaves Excellent Record.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. August 12, 1948.)  

 

Always committed to her Second Presbyterian Church, Pauline served as the organist, was a Sunday School teacher, a member of the Ladies’ Aid and the Missionary Society. She died after a brief illness at the age of 88 on December 24, 1964. Funeral services were held at the R. J. McCall Funeral Home at Delhi in a service officiate by the Rev. Cameron B. Reed. There were no close survivors. She is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

In his youth Maurice would have seen the work and galleries of professional photographers plying their trade at the village of Delhi. There was J. Churchill who operated out of rooms over the store of Griswold and Wright and later in rooms over the offices of Dr. Almiron Fitch. In 1855 Churchill announced that he “has returned once more to the village of Delhi, where he is practicing the art of Daguerreotypes . . . He flatters himself from his long experience in the business that he can ensure to his patrons Pictures which for richness of beauty and clearness, cannot be surpassed. Gentlemen and Ladies and the public in general, are invited to call. Satisfaction given in all cases, or no charge. Instructions given in the art.” (Delaware Gazette. September 10, 1856.) He offered ambrotypes, daguerreotypes, and melanotypes. An 1860 advertisement noted that Churchill had been operating for 12 years in the photography business.

Another early Delhi photographer was E. C. Riggs, “Ambrotype Artist,” who operated in rooms over the Post Office and later in rooms over Elwood’s Store. Riggs began his business in 1856, noted by several advertisements in local newspapers that can be found for his business. The operation seems to have only lasted a few years. In 1859 Riggs would leave the photography business as he sought to engage in a different line of work. He rented out his rooms and sold his equipment, including “his ENTIRE STOCK of GOODS AND APPARATUS used in the Ambrotype business. One ½ Size and one ¼ Size CAMERA, and Shields belonging to them; Cases, Mats, Preservers, Baths, & c.” (The Star of Delaware. January 15, 1859.)

 

Photographer E. C. Riggs operated a photographic “ambrotype” gallery from 1856 to 1859 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype ArtistE. C. Riggs was an “Ambrotype Artist” at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for four years from 1856 to 1859. E. C. Riggs advertisement. Delaware Gazette. September 10, 1856.

 

Photographer competition of the 1850s was tough in the small village of Delhi, with E. C. Riggs and J. Churchill occasionally battling in the local newspapers about each other’s motivations, quality and pricing. In one notable back-and-forth letter / advertisement published in the Delaware Gazette, a local newspaper, E. C. Riggs first wrote:

 

“IMMENSE EXCITEMENT! Ambrotypes at Reduced Prices!!

The subscriber would say to the public that, notwithstanding the TREMENDOUS EXERTIONS of our “up town” Philosopher to the contrary, he is alive and attending to business as usual. And his “ignorance of common philosophy” does not prevent him from selling the most beautiful pictures taken in this county, and at lower prices than they have ever been sold before.

As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false; and I defy the gentleman (?) who takes so much pains to injure me and make himself appear ridiculous, to produce one that has faded in the least. And I would like to have him give satisfaction to his customers, whose pictures I have taken over and finished off after passing through his philosophic hands. I will warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits. I respectfully invite the public to examine both sides – they shall be the judges.

Call in ladies and gentleman, and see who takes the cheapest and best pictures. A poor picture is dear at any price.

My Rooms are over Elwood’s Store.

Office hours are 9 A.M. to 3 ½ P. M.

E. C. Riggs. (Delaware Gazette. December 17, 1856.)

 

In response Churchill wrote:

 

“Pictures on Glass. The subscriber invites the attention of the public to his advertisement in another column, and his assertations therein contained, are in every respect true and correct. But it is not his intention to publish here, but to correct some misrepresentations which I see in an advertisement signed E. C. Riggs, in which he states as follows “As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false, and I defy the gentleman to produce one that has faded in the least.” If I am the man to whom he alludes as the “up town philosopher,” and the man who took so much pains to injure him, then I say the gentleman has stated a wicked falsehood, and he could not be ignorant of it. I never said a word about his Ambroytpes fading, for there is not one to be found, probably, that is more than three or four months old. And how does he know whether he asserts the truth or not?

I did say they were of short duration, and this I am able to maintain.

He further says “I warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits.” With what degree of propriety does he warrant his work, and what assurance can he give the public of its duration? Will the few months he has been in business be a sufficient time to test their durability? Let the public judge. Yet he is willing to warrant his work, but is careful not to say how long; he is then willing it shall stand upon its own merits. So am I, but it will not upon its own merits or any other.

If the Patented Ambrotype was of such durability, why did Brady and others of New York give them up? Because they were worthless, and his information is from one of the best men in this town, taken from his own lips.

I now come to is last italicized sentence. “A poor picture is dear at any price.” This is my sentiments exactly; and those who have been so unfortunate as to get one of your Patented Ambrotypes, will probably find out in a short time the truth of this assertion to their sorrow.

Gentlemen and ladies, call at my office and get you a fifty cent picture, and I will make it as durable as the rock of Gibraltar.

Yes, when your flesh in dust shall lie,

When death’s grey film o’er spread your beaming eye,

My life-like   mocking at decay,

Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day.

 

A Splendid Stock just received.

J. CHURCHILL.” (Delaware Gazette. December 24, 1856.)

 

In 1859 the E. C. Riggs gallery business was bought by B. F. Gilbert, who had previously operated at Hobart and Stamford. “New Ambrotype Gallery in Delhi. The subscriber would inform the inhabitants of Delhi and vicinity that he has taken the rooms formerly occupied by E. C. Riggs, where his is prepared to put up pictures in any of the late improved styles, and much superior in clearness of tone and expression to any that has ever been offered in this place. The public are invited to call and examine specimens. Rooms over Elwood’s store. B. F. GILBERT.” (“New Ambrotype Gallery in Delhi.” Bloomville Mirror. February 8, 1859.) Gilbert would later operate in rooms over the Gazette Office in Delhi.

On the 1855 New York State census, Gilbert, age 26, was listed as being at the town of Andes. His occupation was listed as “Merchant.” Also listed on the census was his wife Jane Gilbert, age 26; and their son Cortlandt Gilbert, at only 2 months old. On the 1860 US census Gilbert, age 30, was listed as living at Delhi with an occupation of “Artist.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 30; Cortland T. Gilbert, age 5; and Leland Gilbert, age 4.

On the 1865 census, Gilbert, age 36, was listed at being at the town of Delhi. He had the profession of “Photographer.” Also listed were Jane Gilbert, age 36; Cortland T. Gilbert, age 10; and Leland Gilbert, age 9. On the 1870 US census Gilbert, age 42, continued at Delhi, now with the occupation of “Photographer.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 40; Courtni Gilbert, age 15; David Gilbert, age 14; and John, age 4.

On the 1875 US census Gilbert, age 45, appears to be listed twice. First, he was listed at the town of Andes as a “Boarder” with an occupation of “Artist.” No family was listed. Second, Gilbert, age 46, was listed as residing in the village of Cobleskill in Schoharie County. He had an occupation of “Photographer.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 45; Cortland Gilbert, age 20; and Jennie Gilbert, age 9. By the 1880 US census Gilbert, age 50, was residing at Albany County, with the occupation of “Photographer.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 49; Cortland T. Gilbert, age 25; David L. Gilbert, age 24; and Jennie Gilbert, age 13.

B. F. Gilbert operated at the village of Delhi, off and on, from c. 1859 to c. 1873. He operated at a number of locations including “Rooms over Elwood’s store,” “Rooms over the Gazette Office,” “at his old stand opposite the Republican Office,” “over the millinery store of Mrs. E. F. Hutson,” “opposite Mrs. Hutson’s Millinery store,” “on the ground floor, opposite Mendel & Bros’ Store” and “in the Utilitarian Building.”

In 1868 there was a Benjamin F. Gilbert of Delhi who declared bankruptcy. Although it is not clear that this is the same person, it is likely, and would perhaps explain why, a year earlier he sold his photograph gallery to Byron R. Johnson. In 1873 it was reported that “B. F. Gilbert has sold out his interest in the Photograph business to Maurice Farrington.” (Delaware Gazette. November 19, 1873.) By 1875 Gilbert was operating at Cobleskill in Schoharie County.

On the 1855 New York State census Maurice was listed with a profession of “Farmer.” No occupation was listed for him on either the 1860 US census or the 1865 New York State census. The 1870 US census, the 1875 New York State census and the 1880 US census had his occupation listed as “Photographer.”

In the early 1860s Maurice moved to Michigan where he resided for approximately five years. Zenas Farrington, Maurice’s brother, had also moved to Michigan, where he spent one year working as a farm laborer. Maurice served during the Civil War for the state of Michigan. After the Civil War Maurice returned to his hometown of Delhi, where he would stay for the remainder of his life.

Maurice began his career as a photographer soon after the Civil War. In 1867 the Bloomville Mirror, a local newspaper noted: “Maurice Farrington, a photographist; a good looking bach of thirty; prides himself much on his jet-black flowing beard and beautiful mustache.” (Bloomville Mirror. October 22, 1867.)

In June, 1867, it was noted that “B. F. Gilbert has associated with him the Photograph business Mr. Byron Johnson, long successful operator in California.” (Delaware Republican. June 23, 1867.) Around October, 1867 Byron R. Johnson purchased the gallery of B. F. Gilbert. An October 1867 advertisement in the Delaware Gazette for the Johnson gallery noted that “Byron R. Johnson having purchased B. F. Gilbert’s Photograph Gallery in Delhi . . . Mr. B. F. Gilbert is retained in the employ of B. R. Johnson and will be glad to wait on any of his old customers as usual.” (Delaware Gazette. October 2, 1867.)

Johnson came to his gallery with a great deal of experience. “B. R. Johnson is well and favorably known by all first-class Artists in the United States as an Artist of superior merit, having carried on the most extensive Gallery in San Francisco for the last sixteen years.” (“Now is your Time!” Delaware Gazette. December 11, 1867.) “Mr. Johnson has had the advantages that few Artists in this part of the world have had; he has carried on extensive business in this line for the last 17 years in San Francisco, and has been acknowledged to be at the head of his profession by all good judges of the art.” (Bloomville Mirror. February 16, 1869.)

 

Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery LogoByron R. Johnson Art Gallery LogoByron R. Johnson operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. Logo for the Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery. Author's collection. 

 

Johnson’s full advertisements in the local newspapers highlighted the extended offerings available at his new gallery.

 

Delaware Gazette, October, 1867. “Now is your Time! Byron R. Johnson having purchased B. F. Gilbert’s Photograph Gallery in Delhi is now prepared to do better work and at shorter notice, than any Gallery in Delaware county, having fitted it up with the latest and most approved style of Instruments, Apparatus, Imperial Grounds, Fancy Chairs, & c. In fact, every thing necessary to make work equal to the first Gallery in the worlds. B. R. Johnson is well and favorably known by all first-class Artists in the United States as an Artist of superior merit, having carried on the most extensive Gallery in San Francisco for the last sixteen years. Persons wishing fine work done in the line of Photography, would do well to call and examine his work of art and satisfy themselves as to his facility and ability for doing fine work, and that his prices are 25 per cent less than New York prices. Photographs taken from the size of a pea to full life size, either Plain, India Ink, Water, Oil or Patelle colors. Old Pictures Copies to all sizes. If you have an Old Picture of a friends or relative ever so indistinct, I can bring it out as perfect as life by the new improved Copying instrument made expressly for such work, You will find the Imperial Card Pictures, Graces and Sun Pearls something entirely new. VIEWS OF DWELLINGS, LANDSCAPE, MACHINERY, & c.. taken at short notice. Visitors can pass off time in viewing our collection of California views, which are free to all for inspection. Attention is called to his large and varied stock of Oval and Square Frames, Also, Mouldings of every size and description. The largest and finest assortment of Albums ever brought to Delaware county. Also, a good assortment of English Steel Engravings, all of which are offered to customers and the trade generally, at prices so low as to exclude competition. INSTRUCTION given in every branch of the art. Instruments, Apparatus and Stock for sale. N.B. Mr. B. F. Gilbert is retained in the employ of B. R. Johnson and will be glad to wait on any of his old customers as usual.” (Delaware Gazette. October 2, 1867.)

 

Bloomville Mirror, February, 1869. “Cheapest and Best Photographs Are to be had at B. R. Johnson’s Justly Celebrated Gallery, Delhi, N.Y. over Dr. Calhoun’s Drug Store. Mr. Johnson has had the advantages that few Artists in this part of the world have had; he has carried on extensive business in this line for the last 17 years in San Francisco, and has been acknowledged to be at the head of his profession by all good judges of the art. Those wishing Good Work and at Reasonable Rates, should call and see for themselves the best collection of work ever exhibited in this part of the world. All pictures shown by Mr. Johnson are made by him in his gallery. Mr. Johnson would call particular attention to his life-size Portraits from life, and enlarged from old defaced Pictures, and made perfect by the art of the brush. He has the only Patent Copying Instrument in Delaware Co., and claims copying as a specialty. All the old style of Pictures, such as Ambrotypes, Tintypes, Porcelain, & c., made at short notice. Mr. Johnson’s India Ink Portraits, new style Sun Pearls, are the admiration of every person. He has the most extensive assortment of Oval and Square Frames, Picture Nails, Cords and Tassels, Albums, & c. in Delhi. Give him a call before squandering your money on inferior work elsewhere. B. R. JOHNSON.”  (Bloomville Mirror. February 16, 1869.)

 

His work was quickly well received by the Delhi public. “We have visited B. R. Johnson’s fine Art Gallery and pronounce it and his pictures the finest we ever saw. Delaware county should be proud of such an establishment.” (Delaware Gazette. December 18, 1867.) Also, “Go to Johnson’s Gallery of Art if you want the best style picture.” (Delaware Gazette. January 1, 1868.)

Johnson’s time at the village of Delhi did not last long. By early 1869 Johnson was preparing to move to Europe. Johnson advertised for sale many of his possessions including a piano, a leather top buggy, harness, saddle, bridle, blanket, household furniture and more.

In September 1869 it was noted in the local newspaper that Johnson’s Art Gallery, over Calhoun & Son’s Drug Store, was being managed by proprietors I. M. Arnout, a photographer formerly of Frederick’s, N.Y., and O. Bingenheimer, Artist.

 

Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. By Farrington’s. Printed in Germany. Postmark 1909. Author’s collection.Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y.Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. By Farrington’s. Printed in Germany. Postmark 1909. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.
Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. By Farrington’s. Printed in Germany. Postmark 1909. Author’s collection.

 

However, by December 1869 Maurice Farrington was the new proprietor of the Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery at Delhi, New York. This would have included the business along with the equipment. “The public will be gratified to learn that Maurice Farrington had purchased the picture gallery of Byron R. Johnson in this place, and has taken possession and engaged in business. He has the skill, experience, and every facility for doing the best of work, and will doubtless meet with success. For further particulars respecting his business, see advertising columns.” (“Local and Miscellaneous.” Delaware Republican. December 18, 1869.) The gallery was located over the Calhoun & Sons Drug Store.

 

Maurice Farrington, Johnson Gallery advertisement.Maurice Farrington, Johnson Gallery advertisement.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

 

Over the next two years local newspapers carried a number of advertisements from proprietor Maurice Farrington for the Johnson Gallery.

 

“Prepare for the Holidays! Go to the Well Known Johnson Gallery And have your orders for a Photograph, Sun Pearl, or India Ink Picture, For less money than in any other Gallery west of New York. All work guaranteed. Maurice Farrington, Proprietor.” (Bloomville Mirror. December 21, 1869.)

 

“‘Procrastination is the thief of time.’ Then don’t delay, but go at once to the celebrated Johnson Gallery opposite White’s brick building, Delhi, and sit for one of those Life size solar Photographs which can be had no where else in this vicinity, as there is not another solar instrument in Delaware County. At the same time bring along that old picture of a lost friend, no matter how badly it is faded, and have it copied and enlarged. It can only be properly done by means of the Solar Camera.” (Delaware Republican. February 5, 1870.)

 

“Just Received at the Johnson Gallery, A Large stock of Picture Frames, comprising a complete assortment of new and elegant patterns. A stock of stereoscopic views constantly on hand, consisting of views from nearly all parts of the known world. The best and cheapest, Photographs, Sun Pearls, & c., & c., to be had in Delaware county, taken at the Johnson Gallery. Call and see. MAURICE FARRINGTON, Proprietor.” (Delaware Gazette. April 20, 1870.)

 

“All in pursuit of picture frames of any kind, either oval, square or rustic, will find it in their interest to call at the old Johnson Gallery, where they can make their selections from a New Stock, consisting of a large assortment of new and elegant patterns. If you don’t happen to have a picture that needs framing, just step in and sit for one, when you will see the propriety of having it put up in a handsome frame. You will also find a new stock of Stereoscopic Views of places of interest, such as Rocky Mountain and Lake Superior Scenery, Holy Land Views, & c.” (Delaware Republican. May 28, 1870.)

 

“It is scarcely necessary to mention a fact so well known to this community as the one at the Johnson Gallery, as has always been the case, is turning out the finest work in the line of Photographs of all kinds, to be had short of first class city galleries, and at prices astonishingly low. Persons wishing large work either plain, or finished in India Ink, will find it to their interest to call and examine the work now on exhibition before allowing themselves to be deceived with work done in fifth rate city galleries which would be dear at any price.” (Delaware Republican. October 1, 1870.)

 

“Don’t you know that the place to get your Pictures is at the old Johnson Gallery, now owned and occupied by Maurice Farrington? If you don’t just ask one our thousand and one customers, (to whom we tender our thanks for their very liberal patronage,) and they will tell you that we are turning out New Styles of Works Which Have Never Been Equalled in Delaware Co. That we have the BEST GALLERY and FACILITIES for doing Good Work, unequalled in this vicinity, is a fact that is UNDISPUTED! We have only instrument within a Hundred Miles of Delhi, that will make a Cabinet Photograph, or anything larger. Our instruments for Copying and Enlarging are of superior make, and have all the Latest Improvements. The Porcelain Picture, the finest ever made, can be had of us, and no where else in town, We have an enormous Stock of Frames of all kinds, which will be sold Cheap. Stereoscopes and views in large quantities, which will be sold in large lots at WHOLESALE RATES. Also a stock of Prang’s Celebrated Chromos, and some Large Views along the Line of the PACIFIC R.R. Give us a call, and you can’t fail to be suited. Rooms over CALHOUN & SON’S DRUG STORE. Fourth door East of Edgerton House, Delhi, N.Y.” (Delaware Republican.)

 

“Call at the Johnson Gallery if you are in want of anything in the picture line, where you will find a general assortment of frames, stereoscopes and views, brackets, &c. A novelty in the decoration line is the wall pocket, made of black walnut, handsomely carved. Likewise bear in mind that it is the gallery for first class work of all kinds.” (Delaware Republican. November 12, 1870.)

 

“That the pictures made at the Johnson Gallery in this village are far superior to anything of the kind made elsewhere in this vicinity is a fact which none who have visited the Gallery will be disposed to deny. The reason is simply this: that in Photography, as in everything else, the best is always found to be the cheapest in the end. None but the best materials are used. The instruments, of which the Gallery contains a complete set, are of all the best make known in Europe or America. The light is such that by means of screens and curtains it can easily be adapted to any complexion, and furthermore, there is not a modern invention which is of least assistance in furnishing first class work but will be found in use there.” (Delaware Republican.)

 

“Look at this Change of Programme. Maurice Farrington has purchased the well-known Picture Gallery of Byron R. Johnson, in Delhi, and is pleased to announce to Everybody and their friends, that he his prepared, by his Extended Experience, an Excellent Suite of Rooms, and all the Modern Improvements in Apparatus, to execute all kinds of work, from Life-Size Photographs, to the SMALLEST LOCKET, in Better Style, and at Cheaper Rates, than can be had in any Gallery West of New York. Particular attention will be given to Copying and Enlarging pictures of deceased friends; a class of work which can not be done successfully in ANY OTHER GALLERY IN DELAWARE COUNTY. Do not allow the only picture you have a lost friend, to be sent to New York by irresponsible parties, and risk its loss, when you can get better work here, and Twenty-five Per Cent. Cheaper. Call and Examine our Work, you will be convinced that we can accomplish all we advertise. A large assortment of Frames and Albums always on hand. Also, Rang’s Chromos for sale. Remember the place. Fourth door above the Edgerton House, Over Calhoun & Son’s Drug Store.” (The Delaware Republican. January 21, 1871.)

 

Maurice Farrington continued to use the “Johnson Gallery” name for several years. Around 1872 Maurice began to use the name “Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” Over the following years he would run countless advertisements with the new gallery name in the local newspapers, of which the below are just a few.

 

1872: “Farrington’s (formerly Johnson’s Photograph Gallery), continues to be THE Gallery of Delaware County. No slop shop work turned out – nothing but the best quality of pictures, notwithstanding the “rush.” And what is still more important, customers who sit and pay for pictures, always get them, and that without delay. He challenges a comparison of work with any other gallery in the county.” (Delaware Republican. February 17, 1872.)

 

1872: “A new stock of Stereoscopic views can be found at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, consisting of Anthony’s Yosemite, Wilson’s Scotch, Bierstadt’s Niagara, and a variety of American and foreign, by less celebrated artists. Also a stock of Delhi views constantly on hand.” (Delaware Republican. May 11, 1872.)

 

1873: “A few reasons why you should patronize Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, over Calhoun’s Drug Store. His rooms and light are decidedly superior to any others in this vicinity. His Instruments are of the very best manufacture. His chemicals are the best in the market, and warranted pure. Pictures made with cheap chemicals invariably fade. Especial care is taken in washing and finishing prints to make them permanent. Pictures not thoroughly washing and carefully finished, never last long. His prices are as low as good work can be afforded. Very cheap work is generally poor work, and to say the least, the merit of cheapness is a questionable one in pictures.” (Delaware Republican. February 15, 1873.)

 

1873: “A fine assortment of picture frames of all kinds may be seen at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, also pictures of various kinds to fit said frames. Good-looking folks can have their pictures taken cheap for cash; those that don’t look quite so well, same price. Give him a call at his rooms over Calhoun’s Drug Store, (opposite Mitchell & Hunt’s), and leave your measure for a Photograph. You’re sure of a fit every time.” (Delaware Republican. August 30, 1873.)

 

1873: “A new stock of FRAMES, BRACKETS, WALL POCKETS, & c., just received at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” (Delaware Gazette. December 31, 1873.)

 

1873: “A fine assortment of picture frames of all kinds may be seen at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, also pictures of various kinds to fit said frames. Good-looking folks can have their pictures taken cheap for cash; those that don’t look quite so well, same price. Give him a call at his rooms over Calhoun’s Drug Store, (opposite Mitchell & Hunt’s), and leave your measure for a Photograph. You’re sure of a fit every time.” (Delaware Republican. August 30, 1873.)

 

1874: “The most beautiful crosses in mats and Illuminated Texts ever seen in Delhi, are on exhibition at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” (Delaware Gazette. December 16, 1874.)

 

1879: “The cheapest place in Delaware County to buy Picture Frames, is at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” (Delaware Republican. May 17, 1879.)

 

1879: “Farrington’s Fresh Supply of Holiday Goods, Picture Frames, Nick Nacks and everything in stock are offered at Bed Rock Prices! Photographs in attractive styles. Pictures of All Kinds Taken, Way Down! Your Inspection Is Invited.” (Delaware Republican. November, 29, 1879.)

 

Farrington’s advertisement. Delaware Republican. December 13, 1879.Farrington’s advertisement. Delaware Republican. December 13, 1879.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Farrington’s advertisement. Delaware Republican. December 13, 1879.

 

1881: “Don’t forget to call at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery before you make your Christmas purchases. It will pay you.” (Delaware Gazette. December 21, 1881.)

 

1882: “Keep it in mind that Farrington has on exhibition and for sale at his photograph gallery the finest Holiday Goods in town. He has engravings that will be a joy forever to the possessor, Christmas Cards of all grades, Frames and Albums by the gross, Books for all sizes and ages, besides a thousand other articles suitable for holiday presents. Call and look them over.” (Delaware Gazette. December 13, 1882.)

 

1885: “Farrington has an enormous stock of Cabinet Frames of all grades, from a 15 cent velvet to the most elegant bronze and plush.” (Delaware Gazette. December 9, 1885.)

 

1887: “It is pretty evident from the superior finish of Farrington’s Photos, that his retoucher is not excelled anywhere, and yet his prices are low enough for the hardest of times – Cabinets only 3.00 per doz.” (Delaware Gazette. May 18, 1887.)

 

1887: “Farrington has on exhibition a fine life size photograph of the late Dr. Ira Wilcox, made upon what is known as “Permanent Bromide Paper.” “Permanent Bromide” photographs are of quite recent introduction, but their superiority, especially in permanence, having no tendency to fade, and the fact that they are comparatively inexpensive, would indicate that they will supersede all other styles of large photographs. Mr. Farrington is prepared to furnish large Bromide prints at moderate prices.” (Delaware Gazette. May 25, 1887.)

 

1887: “Call at Farrington’s Gallery and examine some of the finest specimens of the Photography to be seen this side of New York. Also remember that his prices are lowest. Large work furnished at figures that will astonish you.” (Delaware Republican. 1887.)

 

1887: “For the next 30 days parties sitting for cabinet photographs at Farrington’s gallery and ordering not less than a dozen, will have one framed in a fine silk plush cabinet frame without extra charge. All work of the finest quality while prices are the lowest in this vicinity.” (Delaware Republican. July 16, 1887.)

 

1888: “Farrington, the leading photographer of Delaware county, has just received a fresh stock of Photo Albums and Frames which will be sold at prices below those at which the same quality of goods have ever before been offered in Delhi.” (Delaware Gazette. October 24, 1888.)

 

~1889: “Farrington’s large operating room with its broad sky light and wide side light is just the place for babies’ pictures. He catches them “Quicker’n a wink.” (Delaware Republican. ~1886-1889.)

 

1891: “Hello, George! Where did you get that splendid Photo?”

“At Farrington’s.”

“Why, some one said his work was cheap.”

“Oh, well that’s the old cry of ‘stale fish,’ always resorted to by the man that’s undersold. Fact is, Farrington always has made the finest work to be had in town, and is doing it to-day.” (Delaware Gazette. September 9, 1891.)

 

Portrait of a Young Lady by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Portrait of a Young Lady. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

 

Portrait of a Young Lady, Seated by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady, Seated by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady, Seated. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.
Portrait of a Young Lady, Seated. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

 

In the 1880s Maurice broadened his businesses to include being a “Bookseller” and subscription agent. He would act as the agent for the sale of certain books at the village of Delhi. Also, one advertisement stated that Maurice represented over 2,500 newspapers and magazines. “Subscription agent. The undersigned has a list of abut 2500 newspaper and Magazines, for which he will receive subscriptions at or below the publisher’s price. Those wishing to subscribe or to renew will find it to their advantage to apply for terms to M. Farrington, Photographer and Bookseller, Delhi, N.Y.” (Delaware Gazette. December 2, 1885.) In addition, Farrington was Delhi agent for the firm of J. B. Alden, “the noted Publisher of cheap, standard literature, 393 Pearl Street, New York.” (Delaware Republican. December 19, 1886.)

 

Maurice Farrington. 1875 United States Census.Maurice Farrington. 1875 United States Census.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Maurice Farrington. 1875 United States Census.

 

Maurice Farrington. 1880 United States Census.Maurice Farrington. 1880 United States Census.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Maurice Farrington. 1880 United States Census.

 

Around 1886 Maurice Farrington, in addition to his photography business, entered the drug store business. “Dr. John Calhoun has sold the stock of goods in his drug store and rented his store to Maurice Farrington for a term of five years. The doctor will keep his office in the store and assist in conducting the business.” (Delaware Republican. ~1886.)

According to W. W. Munsell in his History of Delaware County, N.Y., John Calhoun was an influential member of the Delhi community. “DR. JOHN CALHOUN was born in 1819, in Scotland, and in 1834 came to America, settling at Bovina with his parents. In 1841 he commenced the study of medicine at Andes with Dr. Peake; in 1844 was admitted, and practiced there two years, then in Bovina until 1865, when he was elected sheriff of the county of Delaware. At the expiration of his term of office in 1868, he resumed his practice and opened a drug store in Delhi, the firm name being J. Calhoun & Son. The son, J. D. Calhoun, died suddenly on Christmas, 1878. Mr. Calhoun married Jane Davis, of Andes, in 1845. He has been prominent in the history of the county.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 167.) Dr. John Calhoun died on April 20, 1893, leaving behind his wife and daughter.

 

Frank Farrington, son of photographer Maurice FarringtonFrank Farrington, son of photographer Maurice FarringtonMaurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Frank Farrington holding Profitable Storekeeping. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

By 1891 Maurice had been occupying the Dr. Calhoun Drug Store for quite some time. That year he purchased the building from J. S. Page for $3,500. His son, Frank Farrington, helped his father manage the drug store, later purchasing the business from him. Frank would later author in 1914 a book titled Making a Drug Store Pay about his experiences managing the drug store with his father. Below is a small excerpt of his experiences.

 

“I hadn’t really any time to think whether I wanted to be a druggist or not. I was not asked. And anyway I don’t remember that I cared particularly. There was no money to send me to college, and I didn’t see why I couldn’t have a pretty good time working at the drug business – for my father.

Father did not stay in the store. He had other work. A nice old physician [Calhoun] who was also a druggist because he had been in the business when the pharmacy law was first passed, made the store his office, and he and I ran or tried to run the business – except the buying, which was done by my father, with our recommendations.

You know what kind of a store this was – old-fashioned front with small panes of glass – wooden steps and platform clear across the front, making a first-class place for idlers to idle – dingy paint and paper inside – showcases on one side with tops that lifted up to give entrance – showcases on the other side that had been nickel-plated in their day – prescription desk that was possessed of a pair of scales sensitive to a grain or two (sometimes, depending upon the weather) – weights that weighted what they were marked, more or less – running water only in the cellar. Reached by a trap-door through the floor back of the counter.

There was no awning. It wasn’t needed, because there was nothing in the windows that the sunlight would injure, and then, anyway, awnings cost money, and that store had not had any money spent upon it in many a moon.

The inventory showed a stock of about $1,500, much of which was as unsalable as last year’s birds’ nests.

For a few years we hung on without creating any great commotion in local business circles. There were three other drug stores; and the population of the town was (and is) less than 2,000. Some days we did as much as three dollars in cash receipts. We didn’t do any credit business, and it was big day when the sales ran up to fifteen dollars . . . .

It was not long after this that my father’s financial affairs assumed a stormy aspect, and since the plan was for me to take the business as soon as I could swing it, it was then decided that the sooner I took it, the better. It was turned over to me for an inventory of about $2,000, and I assumed obligations of my father’s to the amount paid for the business.” (Farrington, Frank. Making a Drug Store Pay. New York: The Ronald Press Company, 1914. Pages 8-9.)

 

Frank would eventually sell the drug store business to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries. The partnership of Pierre “Pete” Merrill (1880-1975) and William A. Humphries took over the drug store on May 2, 1911. Humphries was a graduate of the Albany College of Pharmacy while Merrill graduated from the Buffalo College of Pharmacy. Both of them had worked at Farrington’s Drug Store for several years before taking over the business. In 1928 the partnership dissolved as Humphries began work at an insurance company, with Merrill continuing as the sole proprietor. Merrill continued to operate the store for decades, eventually selling the business in 1956 to Marc Guy, but continued to assist at the store until the 1960s.

 

Vintage postcard by Merrill and Humphries of the Delaware River below Sherwood’s Bridge in Delhi, New York.Below Sherwood’s Bridge, Delhi, N.Y.Sherwood’s Bridge crosses the West Branch of the Delaware River on Sherwood Road in the town of Delhi, New York. According to the history of the county “The first church in the town of Delhi stood just below Sherwood’s bridge on the opposite side of the river, and was built in 1811.”

The postcard was published by Merrill & Humphries of Delhi, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1919.
Below Sherwood's Bridge, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1919. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

Vintage postcard depicting a scenic spot along the Delaware River in Delhi, New York published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries.Delaware River, Delhi, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicting a scenic spot along the Delaware River in Delhi, New York was published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries. The postmark on the reverse side shows that the postcard was mailed in 1922. Delaware River, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1922. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.
 

In 1890 the staff of the Delaware Gazette, the local newspaper, praised Farrington’s recent photographic work. “A few days ago a photograph of J. A. Parshall was placed over the door heading into the composing room of the Gazette, through which for nearly fifty-two years he had daily passed to and from his accustomed labor. The photograph was taken by Mr. Farrington, and is conceded by those who have seen it to be one of his best.” (Delaware Gazette. July 2, 1890.)

Many years, including 1906 and 1908, Maurice would travel to New York City to attend the annual convention of the New York State Photographers’ Association.

The Delaware County Historical Association maintains a collection of photos and negatives and other materials related to Maurice and his son Frank. In addition, the New York Heritage website (www.nyheritage.org) maintains the Farrington Photograph Collection, which contains 73 photographs from the Farrington family, some possibly taken by Maurice, but many more likely taken by Frank Farrington or others in the family. Occasionally some of Maurice Farrington’s work can be found available for purchase on eBay.

 

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.
Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

Edward S. Frisbee in his genealogy study of the Frisbee family wrote glowingly of Maurice and his contributions to the village and the Delhi community at large. “After establishing himself in business in the village, he lived for several years on the homestead at East Delhi, and was a great power for good in that neighborhood, especially among the young people. Gifted with a fine tenor voice and having a good knowledge of music, he was an acceptable conductor of singing schools in various parts of the county. He was a zealous worker in the union Sunday School at East Delhi, taught the Bible class, and to the great joy of the children, introduced the first Christmas tree in that section. The influence of his work still lives there, and his memory is precious to those who were associated with him.

In his early years he joined the Second Presbyterian Church, of this village, was active in its work, and at his death he had been an elder of the Church for more than twenty years. He was one of the founders of the Zeta Phi, a literary society which was long maintained and in which he was prominent as one of its most active workers. He was one of the oldest members of the Delhi Lodge of Freemasons, his connection with it dating from 1868. He was Master of the Lodge in 1883-84, and for more than ten years previous to his death he was its Historian.

Sterling integrity, faithfulness to his friends, and loyalty to his Church were conspicuous traits in Mr. Farrington’s character, and the quiet strength of his noble life remains as a benediction to his friends.” (Frisbee, Edward S. The Frisbee-Frisbie Genealogy. Rutland, Vermont: The Tuttle Company, 1926. p. 442-443.)

In 1912 Maurice “had an unfortunate fall after which he was quite lame, but as soon as he was able he went to his studio and continued to do so until last week.” (Delaware Gazette.” October 28, 1914.) In 1914 he was again in poor health. “For the past two years he had been in feeble health, the result of a fall which, though disabling, did not entirely prevent attention to his business. A few days ago he had an attack of acute indigestion from which he was not able to rally.” (Frisbee, Edward S. The Frisbee-Frisbie Genealogy. Rutland, Vermont: The Tuttle Company, 1926. p. 442-443.)

Maurice Farrington died at 77 years of age on October 26, 1914 at Delhi, New York. Upon his passing he was described as “one of Delhi’s oldest and best citizens.” (Delaware Gazette. October 28, 1914.) Frances E. Farrington passed away in 1922. They are, along with their two children Frank and Pauline, buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Maurice Farrington please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) B. F. Gilbert B. R. Johnson Benjamin F. Gilbert Byron R. Johnson Civil War Delaware County Delhi drug store E. C. Riggs Farrington's Drug Store Frances E. Farrington Frank Farrington gallery John Calhoun March Farrington Maurice Farrington Merrill and Humphries Morris L. Farrington Pauline Farrington photographer photography Ruth Frisbee studio Thomas Farrington veteran Zenas Farrington https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/maurice-farrington-delhi-photographer Sat, 03 Apr 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Murals of Kingston, New York: Stockade District https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/murals-of-kingston-new-york-stockade-district The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspects of the festival are the beautiful, and often large-scale, murals seen throughout the city.

 

Included in this post is a sampling of murals that can be found in, or close to, the historic Stockade District of Kingston. The streets are laid out today just as they were in 1658 when the village was formed. The district contains a mix of architecturally appealing buildings from across the 17th, 18th, 19th centuries, including stone houses, storefronts, office buildings, apartment buildings and former warehouses. The murals provide an interesting contrast of modern-vs-historic. The Stockade District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The large scale mural titled Pronkstilleven was created by Gaia, a Baltimore based artist and muralist, in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston.PronkstillevenStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale, and visually stunning mural titled Pronkstilleven was created by Gaia, a Baltimore based artist and muralist, in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts John Vanderlyn, Kingston-born painter, and Sojourner Truth, abolitionist and women’s rights activist. The title is a Dutch word meaning “ornate or ostentatious, still life” and also describes a 17th century Dutch style of painting. Gaia created the impressive work on the side of the historic Stuyvesant Building in the Stockade District of Kingston. Gaia is familiar to the Kingston art community and fans of the O+ festival as the creator of the popular and equally impressive Artemis Emerging From the Quarry during the 2013 O+ Festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Pronkstilleven

The large scale, and visually stunning mural titled Pronkstilleven was created by Gaia, a Baltimore based artist and muralist, in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts John Vanderlyn, Kingston-born painter, and Sojourner Truth, abolitionist and women’s rights activist. The title is a Dutch word meaning “ornate or ostentatious, still life” and also describes a 17th century Dutch style of painting. Gaia created the impressive work on the side of the historic Stuyvesant Building in the Stockade District of Kingston. Gaia is familiar to the Kingston art community and fans of the O+ festival as the creator of the popular and equally impressive Artemis Emerging from the Quarry during the 2013 O+ Festival.

 

This interesting mural titled The Eye of Your Storm was created in 2015 by painter Kathleen Griffin in collaboration with government physicist Christos Kapetnakos.The Eye of Your StormStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

This interesting mural titled The Eye of Your Storm was created in 2015 by painter Kathleen Griffin in collaboration with government physicist Christos Kapetnakos. The mathematical formulas detail now de-classified aspects of the government’s 1980s-era “Star Wars” project. Merging space-related wind turbulence formulas with earth-bound tornados creates a dynamic and stark contrast. Visit Kathleen’s website at www.kathleen-griffin.com for more information on the artist and this interesting piece.
The Eye of Your Storm

This interesting mural titled The Eye of Your Storm was created in 2015 by painter Kathleen Griffin in collaboration with government physicist Christos Kapetnakos. The mathematical formulas detail now de-classified aspects of the government’s 1980s-era “Star Wars” project. Merging space-related wind turbulence formulas with earth-bound tornados creates a dynamic and stark contrast. Visit Kathleen’s website at www.kathleen-griffin.com for more information on the artist and this interesting piece.

 

The large scale mural titled Know Thyself was created by artist and Baltimore resident Ernest Shaw, Jr. in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival.Know ThyselfStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale mural titled Know Thyself was created by artist and Baltimore resident Ernest Shaw, Jr. in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival. Shaw has created murals throughout Baltimore, participated in Baltimore’s Open Walls project, and works as a teacher at the Maryland Academy of Technology & Health Sciences.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Know Thyself

The large-scale mural titled Know Thyself was created by artist and Baltimore resident Ernest Shaw, Jr. in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival. Shaw has created murals throughout Baltimore, participated in Baltimore’s Open Walls project, and works as a teacher at the Maryland Academy of Technology & Health Sciences.

 

Artemis Emerging From the Quarry street art mural painted by Gaia of Baltimore in the Stockade District of Kingston during the annual O+ festival.Artemis Emerging from the QuarryStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

This 6-story outdoor street art mural titled Artemis Emerging from the Quarry depicts the Greek goddess Artemis as she emerges from a stone quarry with her outstretched arms over New York City. In Greek mythology Artemis, daughter of Zeus and twin sister of Apollo, was the goddess of the wilderness, the hunt and wild animals; and fertility. The mural was painted by the emerging Baltimore artist Gaia and took nearly a week to complete. The mural is not without controversy, however, with some locals feeling that it is out of place for Kingston’s historic district.

The Artemis mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013, 4th annual O+ festival, a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Artemis Emerging from the Quarry

This 6-story outdoor street art mural titled Artemis Emerging from the Quarry depicts the Greek goddess Artemis as she emerges from a stone quarry with her outstretched arms over New York City. In Greek mythology Artemis, daughter of Zeus and twin sister of Apollo, was the goddess of the wilderness, the hunt and wild animals; and fertility. The mural was painted by the emerging Baltimore artist Gaia and took nearly a week to complete. The mural is not without controversy, however, with some locals feeling that it is out of place for Kingston’s historic district. The Artemis mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013, 4th annual O+ festival.

 

The Stockade District mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo.SWAKKingston, Ulster County

The Stockade District mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. The mural is the first of a pair, the second SWAK mural being located in midtown Kingston.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
SWAK

The Stockade District mural titled SWAK was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. The mural is the first of a pair, the second SWAK mural being located in midtown Kingston.

 

Carousel mural painted by Kimberly Kae in the Stockade District of Kingston during the annual O+ festival.CarouselStockade District, Kingston

This engaging Carousel mural, located in the Stockade District of Kingston, was painted by Artist Kimberly Kae of Ulster Park in collaboration with her husband Matt DiFrancesco. Kimberly received her Bachelor in Fine Arts in Painting from the University of Washington and trained in Italy for three years. She currently owns her own company, Murorosso, which provides custom interior murals and backdrops for homes and businesses.

This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013 and 4th annual O+ festival, a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Bilancia

This engaging carousel mural titled Bilancia was painted by Artist Kimberly Kae of Ulster Park in collaboration with her husband Matt DiFrancesco. Kimberly received her Bachelor in Fine Arts in Painting from the University of Washington and trained in Italy for three years. She currently owns her own company, Murorosso, which provides custom interior murals and backdrops for homes and businesses. This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013 and 4th annual O+ festival.

 

The BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) building in the Stockade District of Kingston first operated as a vaudeville and movie house and today serves as home to a dance venue and concert theater.SomewhereStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) building was constructed in the late 1800s, first operating as Cohen’s Vaudeville Theater. The building “originally served as a vaudeville and movie house for Kingston residents and tourists who came up the Hudson River by ferry. The building has gone through a number of changes, but its historical features and ornaments remain largely intact, including the awe-inspiring proscenium arch which still bears the marking “RKT” (Reade’s Kingston Theatre) at its crest.” By 1918 the building was home to Keeney’s Theater, and in 1926 it was sold again to the Walter Reade movie chain, which expanded the space to 2,500 seats and renamed it the Kingston Theater. During the 1960s, Reade sold all of its theaters, with sales contracts stating that the buildings could not be used as any sort of entertainment venue for 10 years. The building became a Standard Furniture show room until the 1980's and was then abandoned until 2001. Today the BSP building serves as home to a dance venue and concert theater for a range of performers and musicians.
Somewhere

Created by artist Erika DeVries, the pink-and-white neon sign Somewhere is based off her 6-year-old son’s handwriting. This edition of the sign was located at the BSP building in the Stockade District, an historic building constructed in the late-1800s which long served as a theater, became a furniture show room before today operating as a dance venue and concert theater.

 

This fading ghost sign for Standard Furniture is located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York.After Dinner, Wash the DishesStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

This fading ghost sign in the Stockade District of Kingston offers a testament to the businesses of yesteryear. It advertised the business of Standard Furniture, which operated out of the BSP building on Wall Street for many years. Standard Furniture was founded in 1901 by Abraham I. Feinberg, who started by selling home furnishings door to door. By 1907, with an established loyal following, Feinberg has opened his first store located in Albany. The Kingston store, the company’s second branch, opened in 1939. Standard Furniture was once one of the top ranking furniture organizations in the country.

The BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) building, where Standard Furniture once operated, was constructed in the late 1800s, first operating as Cohen’s Vaudeville Theater. The building “originally served as a vaudeville and movie house for Kingston residents and tourists who came up the Hudson River by ferry. The building has gone through a number of changes, but its historical features and ornaments remain largely intact, including the awe-inspiring proscenium arch which still bears the marking “RKT” (Reade’s Kingston Theatre) at its crest.” By 1918 the building was home to Keeney’s Theater, and in 1926 it was sold again to the Walter Reade movie chain, which expanded the space to 2,500 seats and renamed it the Kingston Theater. During the 1960s, Reade sold all of its theaters, with sales contracts stating that the buildings could not be used as any sort of entertainment venue for 10 years. The building became a Standard Furniture show room until the 1980's and was then abandoned until 2001. Today the BSP building serves as home to a dance venue and concert theater for a range of performers and musicians.
After Dinner, Wash the Dishes

 

The large scale mural known as “Matt” adorns the side of brick building in the Stockade District of historic Kingston. It was created in 2014 by Nils Westergaard, a well known street artist and film mMattStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale mural known as “Matt” adorns the side of brick building in the Stockade District of historic Kingston. It was created in 2014 by Nils Westergaard, a well known street artist and film maker from Virginia.

This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2014 and 5th annual O+ festival, a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.

Matt

The large-scale mural known as Matt adorns the side of brick building in the Stockade District of historic Kingston. It was created in 2014 by Nils Westergaard, a well-known street artist and film maker from Virginia. This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2014 and 5th annual O+ festival.

 

Kingston, New York mural on a brick wall with a silhouette of a young man holding a sign saying “Your Slogan Here.”Your Slogan HereKingston, Ulster County

Your Slogan Here

 

The mural titled “Between Realms We Grow Roots” was created by artists Jia Sung and Sarula Bao in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.Between Realms We Grow RootsKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “Between Realms We Grow Roots” was created by artists Jia Sung and Sarula Bao in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Between Realms We Grow Roots

The mural titled Between Realms We Grow Roots was created by artists Jia Sung and Sarula Bao in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.

 

“Vignettes of Home is a small, yet colorful mural by local artist Jane Bloodgood-Abrams located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York.Vignettes of HomeKingston, Ulster County

“Vignettes of Home” is a small, yet colorful mural located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by local artist Jane Bloodgood-Abrams in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Vignettes of Home

Vignettes of Home is a small, yet colorful mural located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by local artist Jane Bloodgood-Abrams in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival.

 

Located in Kingston, New York, this outdoor art tribute to the civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. features his famous quote: “What are you doing for others?”What Are You Doing For Others?Stockade District, Kingston

“An individual has not begun to live until he can rise above the narrow horizons of his particular individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity. Every person must decide, at some point, whether they will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness. This is the judgment: Life's most persistent and urgent question is, ’What are you doing for others?’”

This famous quote was part of a speech called “Conquering Self-Centeredness” given by the influential civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on August 11, 1957 at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. This outdoor art display dedicated to that famous quote was located in the historic Stockade District of Kingston.n
What Are You Doing for Others?

This famous quote was part of a speech called “Conquering Self-Centeredness” given by the influential civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on August 11, 1957 at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. This outdoor art display dedicated to that famous quote was located in the historic Stockade District of Kingston.

 

“An individual has not begun to live until he can rise above the narrow horizons of his particular individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity. Every person must decide, at some point, whether they will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness. This is the judgment: Life's most persistent and urgent question is, ’What are you doing for others?’”

 

The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, was created in 2014 by Kingston native Matthew Pleva.The Hobgoblin of Old Dutch ChurchPeace Park, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church was created in 2014 by Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate Matthew Pleva. The 50 x 28 mural, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.
The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, was created in 2014 by Kingston native Matthew Pleva.The Hobgoblin of Old Dutch ChurchPeace Park, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church was created in 2014 by Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate Matthew Pleva. The 50 x 28 mural, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.
The Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church

The large-scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church was created in 2014 by Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate Matthew Pleva. The 50 x 28 mural, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

 

Street scene on Fair Street in the historic Stockade District of Kingston, New York.Street SceneStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County Street Scene

 

An untitled mural by artists Geddes Paulsen and Raudiel Sanudo in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York; created for the 2011 O+ festival.Title UnknownStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

Although the title of this mural is unknown and is tucked away off the street, it will still not escape attention from any Kingston visitor who stumbles upon it. The mural was created by artists Geddes Paulsen and Raudiel Sanudo in 2011 as part of the 2nd annual O+ festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Title Unknown

Although the title of this mural is unknown and is tucked away off the street, it will still not escape attention from any Kingston visitor who stumbles upon it. The mural was created by artists Geddes Paulsen and Raudiel Sanudo in 2011 as part of the 2nd annual O+ festival.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist Catskill Mountains Catskills festival Hudson Valley Kingston medicine murals New York O positive O+ Festival paintings Stockade District street art https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/murals-of-kingston-new-york-stockade-district Sat, 27 Mar 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Photographing Upon Mount Washington https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/photographing-upon-mount-washington Clough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

 

Photographs from that expedition included the Tip Top House, the Summit House, the Lizzie Bourne Monument, winter closeups of frost, snow and ice, views from Mount Washington and many more. For interesting details about the winter scientific mission upon Mount Washington, one in which Kimball almost died, see the Clough and Kimball 1871 writeup that was included as part of Mount Washington in Winter or The Experiences of a Scientific Expedition Upon the Highest Mountain in New England. For more information about Clough, see In Search of Amos Clough, written by Robert W. Averill and published in 2019.

 

Below is an excerpt from Chapter 9 of the expedition summary at the top of Mount Washington in Winter, with an emphasis on photography. The paragraph was written by both Clough and Kimball. It provides an interesting perspective on the lengths photographers will go through to get “the shot.”

 

“Photographing Upon Mount Washington.

 

As photography has got to be so common in every-day life, and so necessary to the full success of every expedition of importance, its omission on the present occasion would have been a great oversight, and have left the practical results of the expedition but half complete. It is the province of the photographer to bring to the eyes of the public that which is not of a readily accessible character; thus to give those who cannot visit such places a chance to see wonders and beauties, while they enjoy the comforts of home, enduring none of the perils, dangers, or hardships, which are necessary to get at the real.

 

Though the pictures can convey to the mind but a small portion of the real grandeur of the scenes as beheld by the eye, they nevertheless have a fascinating beauty that charms and gives a sense of sublimity to the lover of nature, in her varied forms.

 

The photographer who makes nature his study, with a view to reproduce her various charms, soon becomes an enthusiast, and is ready to brave almost any hardship or danger in order to secure the likeness of a gem or “bit.” A musical waterfall, or thundering cataract, a peaceful vale where the flocks graze in quiet security, the wild mountain crag where the eagle screams its shrill notes, a tropical bower where perpetual summer brings forth rich and continuous verdure, and the barren, desolate mountain peaks of snow and frost towering far above the clouds; they will afford some subject for the Knight of the Camera to “bang away at,” and from which to bear off a trophy that shall delight “the millions,” and fittingly reward the enthusiasm of the true artist . . .”

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Tip-top House, frost two feet thickClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Tip-top House, frost two feet thick." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ac-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Tip-top House, frost two feet thick.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Tip-top House, frost two feet thick." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ac-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Summit House, frost two feet highClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Summit House, frost two feet high." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ae-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Summit House, frost two feet high.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Summit House, frost two feet high." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ae-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top HouseClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89b8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89b8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Arctic SentinelClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Arctic Sentinel." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89d2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Arctic Sentinel.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Arctic Sentinel." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89d2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Frost Crown of New EnglandClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Frost Crown of New England." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89c4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Frost Crown of New England.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Frost Crown of New England." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89c4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) A. F. Clough Amos Clough C. H. Hitchcock Clough and Kimball Concord H. A. Kimball Howard A. Kimball ice J. H. Huntington Lizzie Bourne Monument Mount Washington New England New Hampshire photographer photography pictures S. A. Nelson snow stereoviews Summit House Theodore Smith Tip Top House winter https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/photographing-upon-mount-washington Sat, 20 Mar 2021 12:00:00 GMT
John Jacob Loeffler – Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/john-jacob-loeffler-scenery-of-lake-mohonk-and-vicinity John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.

 

In addition to his Catskills work, Loeffler photographed and published a stunning series of photographs under the title “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity.” The series includes photographs of the Mohonk House, Lake Mohonk, Sky Top, Peterskill Falls, Eagle Rock, The Traps, Pinnacle Rocks, Rosendale Bridge, High Falls and much more.

 

Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity

First Series

1

View from Sky-Top.

2

View from Thurston Rock.

3

House from Sky-Top Path.

4

House from Sky-Top Path.

5

House from Sky-Top Path.

6

House from Pine Bluff.

7

Rear of House.

8

The Great Crevice.

9

From the Great Crevice.

10

Pine Bluff, looking South.

11

Pine Bluff, looking North.

12

Rock Scene.

13

View from House Verandah.

14

The Labyrinth.

15

The Labyrinth.

16

The Boat Landing.

17

The Boat Landing.

18

The Boat Landing.

19

The Boat Landing.

20

View from Labyrinth.

21

View from Labyrinth.

22

View from Labyrinth.

23

Sky-Top, from the Bridge.

24

Sky-Top, from the East.

25

Sky-Top, from Woodlawn Drive.

26

Sky-Top, across Lake.

27

Cave Rock.

28

The Summer Houses.

29

The Summer Houses.

30

Undercliff Bridge.

31

Tower upon Sky-Top.

 

Second Series

32

The West Shore.

33

The Bridge.

34

The Bridge.

35

Sentinel Rock.

36

The Lake, from Eagle Cliff.

37

Sky-Top, from Eagle Cliff.

38

View from Cope’s Lookout.

39

The old Man of the Mountain.

40

The old Man of the Mountain.

41

The Traps, and Gertrude’s nose.

42

Pinnacle Rock.

43

The Clove, from Pinnacle Rock.

44

The Gate of the Winds.

45

Entrance to Cave of Aeolus.

46

Near Gate of the Winds.

47

Rocks at Eagle Cliff.

48

Rocks at Eagle Cliff.

49

Rocks at Eagle Cliff.

50

The Well.

51

Cliffs, near Pinnacle Rock.

52

The Icicles.

53

The Icicles.

54

Upper Falls of Peterskill.

55

Upper Falls of Peterskill.

56

Upper Falls of Peterskill.

57

Lower Falls of Peterskill.

58

High Falls.

59

High Falls.

60

High Falls.

61

Rosendale Bridge.

62

Rosendale Bridge.

 

The famous Mohonk House resort, located near the village of New Paltz, was established in 1869 and continues to be a treasured destination today for those seeking the beauty of the Shawangunk Mountains region. Visit the Mohonk House website at www.mohonk.com for more information about accommodations, activities and history. Having stayed at the resort I can confirm that it is every bit as beautiful as the pictures make it out to be.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new photographs by John Jacob Loeffler from his “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series. They have all been added to the Loeffler gallery, which now contains over 100 of his works.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “House from Sky-Top Path” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; First Series, # 3.House from Sky-Top Path. (1st Series, # 3)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 3
Title: House from Sky-Top Path.
House from Sky-Top Path

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The Great Crevice” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; First Series, # 8.The Great Crevice. (1st Series, # 8)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 8.
Title: The Great Crevice.
The Great Crevice

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “From the Great Crevice” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; First Series, # 9.From the Great Crevice. (1st Series, # 9)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 9.
Title: From the Great Crevice.
From the Great Crevice

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Pine Bluff, looking North” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk” series; First Series, # 11.Pine Bluff, looking North. (1st Series, # 11)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 11.
Title: Pine Bluff, looking North.
Pine Bluff, looking North

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The West Shore” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; Second Series, # 32.The West Shore. (2nd Series, # 32)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 32.
Title: The West Shore.
The West Shore

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The Bridge” from the “Scenery of Mohonk Lake and Vicinity” series; no series listed, # 20.The Bridge. (No series listed, # 20)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Mohonk Lake and Vicinity
Catalog #: No series listed, # 20.
Title: The Bridge.
The Bridge

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler untitled stereoview from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; no series listed, no number listed.Lake Minnewaska. (No series listed; no number listed)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Mohonk Lake and Vicinity
Catalog #: No series listed, no number listed.
Title: None; utilizing Lake Minnewaska based on inscription on front left.
Lake Minnewaska

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Peterskill Falls” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; no series listed, no number listed.Peterskill Falls. (No series listed; no number listed)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: No series listed, no number listed. Hand-written note on reverse side states “Peterskill Falls 8/15, 1882.” Based on that hand-written title this stereoview is likely 2nd Series, number 54, 55, 56 or 57.
Title: Peterskill Falls.
Peterskill Falls

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountain Scenery Catskill Mountains Catskills J. Loeffler John Jacob Loeffler Lake Mohonk Loeffler Mohonk House New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity Staten Island stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoscopic view stereoview Tompkinsville https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/john-jacob-loeffler-scenery-of-lake-mohonk-and-vicinity Sat, 13 Mar 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Henry B. Aldrich – Village of Catskill, New York Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/henry-b-aldrich-village-of-catskill-new-york-photographer                Henry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

 

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Henry B. Aldrich was originally from the state of Massachusetts. He was born on July 12, 1833 to Daniel Aldrich and Polly Stockwell. He was descended from “Daniel Aldrich, of the old and original stock of Rhode Island Quakers.” (“Real Business.” The Billboard. September 28, 1901.) He was of English ancestry.

On the 1855 Massachusetts State Census Henry B. Aldrich, age 23, was listed as living at Clarksburg in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. He was living with his wife Laura, age 25, and his daughter Mary, age 2. Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Laborer.” His wife was Laura Louise Gray (Grey). She was born in 1832, although some census calculations and other resources sometimes provide alternative years. She was of Irish and French ancestry.

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1855 Massachusetts State Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Laborer.” 1855 Massachusetts State Census.

 

On the 1860 United States Census Aldrich, age 27, was listed as living at Adams in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. He was living with his wife Laura, age 30; his daughter Mary, age 6; and his son Joseph, age 4. His owned real estate was valued at $400 and his personal estate was valued at $300. Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Ambrotype Artist.”

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1860 United States Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Ambrotype Artist.” 1860 United States Census.

 

As per the Library of Congress “An ambrotype is comprised of an underexposed glass negative placed against a dark background. The dark backing material creates a positive image . . . The invention of wet collodion photography processes in the 1850s allowed the development of two new kinds of photographs--ambrotypes and tintypes. These new formats shared many characteristics with the earlier daguerreotypes but were quicker and cheaper to produce. Primarily used for portraiture, each photo is a unique camera-exposed image and was available in the following standard-sizes. The most common size was the sixth plate.

 

  • Imperial or Mammoth Plate - Larger than 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Whole Plate - 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Half Plate - 4.25 x 5.5 inches
  • Quarter Plate - 3.25 x 4.25 inches
  • Sixth Plate - 2.75 x 3.25 inches
  • Ninth Plate - 2 x 2.5 inches
  • Sixteenth Plate - 1.5 x 1.75 inches.”

 

James A. Cutting (1814-1867) was an American photographer and inventor who is often credited as the inventor of the Ambrotype photographic process. Cutting patented his improvements on the ambrotype process in 1854, and thus attached his name to the process. Ambrotypes would reach their height of popularity in the mid-1850s to the mid-1860s. Ambrotypes were eventually replaced with Cartes de visite and other paper print photographs, both of which were easily available in multiple copies.

The 1860 publication of the New England Business Directory by Adams, Sampson, & Co. listed “Mrs. H. B. Aldrich” as working at North Adams, Adams, Massachusetts. There was no street address given. She was listed under the industry category of “Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes, and Photographs.” She was one of 143 photographers listed in the directory as working in the state of Massachusetts.

In 1864 The New York State Business Directory by Adams, Sampson & Co. listed H. B. Aldrich as operating as a photographer at the village of Catskill. Aldrich was the only photographer listed in the guide as operating as a photographer in the village of Catskill.

In July, 1865 the partnership of J. N. Gilmore and Aldrich opened a gallery at No. 2. First Street in Troy, New York. The gallery was located across the street from the Troy House. They published a series of advertisements in The Troy Daily Times.

 

               “Fine Art Gallery! No. 2 First Street, Opposite Troy House.

               Gilmore & Aldrich,

Would most respectfully call the attention of the citizens of Troy and vicinity to the fact that they have purchased this finely located Gallery, and remodeled, refitted and furnished it in the most modern style. They have spared neither time, labor, nor expense, in making this one of the finest Galleries in the State. It is in point of elegance and artistic arrangement, unsurpassed. We shall make all kinds of sun pictures known to the Photographic world, from the largest life-size to the smallest miniatures. Also the celebrated Visiting or Wedding Card Pictures.

Particular attention paid to copying and enlarging old and faded pictures, which we re-touch in oil, water colors or ink, making them as life-like as if taken from the original.

We have just received a new and elegant stock of Goods, consisting of the latest patterns of FRAMES and CASES, PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, and in fact, everything which can be found in any first-class Gallery; and as our motto is “Small Profits and Quick Sales,” you will do well to call on GILMORE & ALDRICH before going elsewhere.

Please give us a call, whether wishing pictures or not. Remember the place, No. 2 First st., opposite the Troy House.” (The Troy Daily Times. July 1, 1865.)

 

On July 22, 1865, the Troy Daily Times provided a flattering portrayal of the new Gilmore & Aldrich partnership. “PHOTOGRAPHIC. – Messrs. Gilimore [sic] & Aldrich, formerly of Geneva, N.Y., have thoroughly refitted the gallery at the junction of First and River streets, New and elegant carpets and furniture, handsome and conveniently arranged toilet rooms, and, in fact, every desirable improvement, has been added, rendering the rooms among the finest in the city. Messrs. G. & A. are both practical artists, and enjoy the benefit of long experience in the art. They are now producing accurate and handsomely finished pictures from the size of a three cent piece to life size. They have taken the rooms with the intention of building up a large, first-class business on the strength of their superior pictures. A first-class gallery has long been needed in the lower part of the city, and we bespeak for them success, if they continue to turn out work equal to that produced by them since they have taken the rooms.”

The partnership placed a new advertisement in several July and August 1865 issues of the Troy Daily Times. “Photographs, AMBROTYPES, and all other Sun Pictures, made and finished in the highest style of the art, at GILMOUR & ALDRICH’S new Fine Art Gallery, No. 1 First st. Also a large stock of Frames, Photograph Albums, & c.; and as our motto is “Small Profits and Quick Sales,” you will do well to call on us before going elsewhere.”

In August 1865 it was reported that H. B. Aldrich, after only a few months working together, had bought out his partner J. N. Gilmore and would continue operating as a sole proprietorship at Troy, New York. “H. B. Aldrich WOULD RESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE to the public of Troy and vicinity the fact that he has purchased the interest of J. N. Gilmore, in the firm of Gilmore & Aldrich, No. 2 First street, and is now prepared to furnish all kinds of sun pictures known to the photographic world, finished in the finest style of the art. This is the place to get your old and faded pictures copies, enlarged and made as good as new.” (Troy Daily Times. August 25, 1865.)

Unfortunately, only a few weeks after buying out his partner, tragedy struck the business. “H. B. Aldrich’s new Photograph Gallery in Troy, (formerly Aldrich & Gillmore,) took fire, it is asserted by the Troy Times, from combustion of chemicals, last Sunday, and the proprietor’s loss is put down at $2,000.– The Times does not place him among the insured. He was formerly engaged in the same business in Penniman’s Row in this village.” (Geneva Daily Gazette. September 8, 1865.)

It was believed the “combustion of chemicals” at Aldrich’s Gallery started the fire. “The upper part of the buildings on the corner of River and First streets was smoking briskly, and before the firemen could get around there was a lively blaze that threatened a bad fire. The sky-light of the photograph gallery made a complete chimney, up which the flames leaped for twenty feet above the roof. But we never saw our steamers make such short work of a formidable fire. In ten minutes it had changed from a first-class conflagration to a mere charred attic. Our entire department was out – No. 5 came up from the Nail Factory, and the Roy steamer and Oswald Hose from West Troy – streets were crowded with spectators, and nearly everybody seemed to get a wetting. There were three buildings damaged by the fire and water. They have each been on fire several times before. On this occasion the combustion of chemicals in Aldrich’s gallery, started the ball in motion. He loses about $2000. L. C. Everett, second story, dealer in photographic materials, loss not large. Frank Hartsfield & Co., hoop skirts, loss $1000. Wm. Johnson, clothing dealer, loss $3000; insured; Jacob Sinshimer, cigar dealer, loss $500; insured; Peter Baltimore, barber, loss $300. If all these parties had had as good friends as Mr. Baltimore, their loss would have been slight. His customers, including the B. G. club, broke open the doors, rushed in and took out nearly every article of value, removing it to his new base over Young & Benson’s store.” (Troy Daily Times. August 28, 1865.)

Possibly as a result of the Troy fire, Aldrich moved to the village of Catskill where he opened a new photographic gallery. The gallery was located in the building once occupied by Granby and Van Hoesen. His wife operated a millinery shop on the first floor of the building. Imprints on the back of Aldrich’s later portraits had his location as “Opposite The Tanners Bank, Catskill, N.Y.” and “Over Van Loan’s Bookstore, Catskill, N.Y.” Below is one of his early Catskill advertisements, placed in a December 1865 issue of the local newspaper.

 

“New Photograph Gallery. H. B. Aldrich Has fitted up a new PICTURE GALLERY, in Catskill, over the Millinery Store opposite the Tanners’ Bank, and has spared neither time, labor nor expense in making it One of the Finest Galleries in the State.

It is furnished in the most modern style, and in point of elegance and artistic arrangement is unsurpassed.

I shall make all kinds of PICTURES known to the art, from the largest life size to the smallest Miniature.

Particular attention is paid to Copying and Enlarging old and faded Pictures, which I will retouch in Oil, Water Colors, or India Ink, making them as life-like as if taken from life.

My Stock and Instruments are all new and of the best quality, and with a superior Light, I flatter myself I shall be able to please.

A LARGE AND SELECT STOCK OF ALBUMS,

Which I will sell at cost,

Please call and examine work and prices.

Catskill, Dec. 8, 1865.”

 

Mrs. Henry B. AldrichMrs. Henry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Mrs. H. B. Aldrich, “Fashionable Millinery.” Windham Journal. 1866.

 

In 1867 The New York State Business Directory by Sampson, Davenport & Co. listed “H. P. [sic] Aldrich” operating as a “Photographist” at the village of Catskill. There was also listed a W. B. Waldron operating at Catskill as a Photographist.

 

Portrait of unknown man by photographer Henry B. AldrichPortrait of unknown man by photographer Henry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Portrait of Unknown Young Man by H. B. Aldrich. Author’s collection.

 

In 1870 The New York State Business Directory by Sampson, Davenport, & Co. listed H. B. Aldrich as operating as a “Photographist” at the village of Catskill. Aldrich was the only photographer listed in the guide as operating as a photographer in the village of Catskill. After Aldrich’s career change from photography to the livery industry in 1871, the 1874 directory shows that Aldrich was replaced at Catskill with two new “photographists,” Frank Allen and C. E. Van Gorden.

On the 1870 United States Census Henry B. Aldrich, age 36, was listed as living in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York. He was living with his wife Laura, age 38, who had an occupation of “Keeping House”; his daughter Mary, age 16; his son Joseph, age 14; Lizzie Gray, age 15, who was born in Michigan; and Mary Walters, age 18, who was born in New York. The Aldrich family real estate was valued at $4,000 and their personal estate was valued at $2,000. The Aldrich family must have been doing quite well as Mary Walters was listed with an occupation of “Domestic Servant.” Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Photographer.”

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1870 United States Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Photographer.” 1870 United States Census.

 

In the summer of 1871 Aldrich left the photography business and began a partnership with Edward Cargill in the livery business. He would continue with this line of work until his passing. In one of the first announcements of the new partnership, it was advertised “Cargill & Aldrich’s New Livery Stables! In New Brick Building, Opposite the Catskill House, Main Street, Catskill. This is the most extensive Livery in town, and can furnish Rigs in all styles. Headquarters of the Omnibus Line. Order Slate in the Office. June 9, 1871.” (The Catskill Recorder. August 11, 1871.)

In order to procure the best horses for his livery business Aldrich often searched in far-ranging places. He was noted for searching across the west, including Indiana and around Galena, Kansas, where his son Joseph had moved. He also traveled to Canada to look for the best stock.

 

“Western Horses! THE UNDERSIGNED have just returned from Indiana with a large selection of excellent Work Horses, which they offer for sale at reasonable rates. CARGILL & ALDRICH. Catskill, April, 2, 1872.” (The Catskill Recorder. April 12, 1872.)

 

“H. B. Aldrich has arrived from Canada with a carload of extra-large draft horses, matched pairs weighing from 2400 to 3200. May be seen at Cargill & Aldrich’s stable, this village. Those intending to buy this Spring would do well to call early and get the benefit of a liberal discount.” (The Catskill Recorder. April 20, 1888.)

 

“H. B. Aldrich arrived from the West yesterday with a carload of extra-fine road, coach and farm horses, among them some well-matched pairs, selected with care.” (The Catskill Recorder. June 15, 1888.)

 

“Horses! Horses! Horses! The Third Carload of Horses For the Spring Trade has arrived from the west. These Horses are note sent here by Western dealers, but are carefully selected by Mr. H. B. Aldrich, and are suitable for all classes of work. We guarantee each horse to be as represented or money refunded. Early buyers get best bargains. No trouble to show. CARGILL & ALDRICH, Livery, Sale and Exchange Stables, Opposite Opera House, Main Street, Catskill, N.Y.” (The Catskill Recorder. June 7, 1889.)

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. August 11, 1871.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. April 12, 1872.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. April 22, 1877.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. April 27, 1877.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. December 7, 1883.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. July 20, 1888.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. May 10, 1889.

 

Edward Cargill, Henry’s partner, was a longtime livery operator at Catskill. He had previously partnered with Samuel Mallory. After Henry’s passing Cargill partnered with Wilbur Brown from 1890 to 1893. Wilbur had previously operated with the Selleck & Brown confectionary and ice cream firm for 22 years, and as a partner for 15 of those years. After Brown left the firm Cargill continued to operate as a sole proprietor.

The Cargill & Aldrich livery stable was located on the site now occupied by the Greene County Court House. “The lower floor was occupied as an office and for the storage of carriages. There was an entrance on Bridge street for the horses, who went up a ramp to the second floor where they were quartered.” (Greene County Examiner-Recorder. March 6, 1947.)

In 1945 the Greene County Examiner-Recorder offered a detailed and interesting article on the livery trade at the village of Catskill.

 

“‘Thanks for the buggy ride.” That was an expression quite common a half century ago, but is now obsolete, along with the livery horse and buggy.

That, of course, was before the advent of the automobile which put liverymen out of business. At one time there were several livery stables in Catskill village where a horse and buggy could be rented for a reasonable price and many a young man would hire one and take his girl for a ride. When he drove up to her home after a drive often she would say: “Thanks for the buggy ride.”

Only a comparatively few young men owned their own rigs, but would hire one from the livery . . .

One could not cover as much ground in an hour with a horse and buggy as he can today with an auto. It was a good horse that could cover the ground between Catskill and Cairo in an hour and there were few who could do it. The trip usually took from an hour and a quarter to an hour and a half.

Often Catskillians would take a drive up Windham Mountains, through Hunter and Haines Falls and down the Clove Road, a trip which took a good half day with a livery horse and buggy.

It was the custom to drive to Cairo and have dinner or supper at Walters’ or Jennings’ hotel, or go to Coxsackie and eat at Cummings’ Eagle Hotel.

Most of the livery horsed were gentle animals, not given much to speed, but safe for anybody to drive. Once in a great while a liveryman would get stuck with a balky horse, that would stop on the road and refuse to go any further until he was good and ready . . .

On the occasion of some dances, such as the Rip Van Winkle Club annual ball and other like events, young men would engage from the livery a carriage, team and driver to take him and his girl or, if married, himself and wife to the affair and return later to convey them home. Often a couple of young men would hire a rig between them and ride in style to the ball.

The local liveries had some swell turnouts and their horses were always kept slick and looking in the pink of perfection. In those days not so many local residents owned horses and carriages as they do automobiles today, hence the liveries did an excellent business.

But the auto came and gradually forced the livery stables to the wall, until they all disappeared.”

(“Backward Glimpses.” Greene County Examiner-Recorder. August 23, 1945.)

 

On the 1875 New York State Census, Aldrich, age 40, was listed as living in the town of Catskill in Greene County, New York. Interestingly his last name, and the last names of his family, were all spelled “Aldridge” on this census. He is listed as living with his wife Laura, age 38; his daughter Mary, age 19; his son Joseph E., age 17; and Josephine Dixon, age 23. Josephine was listed with an occupation of “Domestic Servant.” Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Proprietor of Livery Stable.”

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1875 New York State Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Proprietor of Livery Stable.” 1875 New York State Census.

 

Mary Aldrich, the Aldrich’s daughter, was born in 1854 and moved to Catskill with her family in her childhood years. She attended school at the Moravian school in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and at St. Agnes School in Albany, New York. On September 14, 1875 Mary Aldrich married Samuel N. Andrews of Little Falls, New York. Given the likely prominence of the Aldrich family in Catskill there was a lengthy write-up of the wedding in the local newspaper.

 

“The Wedding. A large and fashionable party assembled at the Presbyterian church on Tuesday, at the marriage of Miss Minnie E., daughter of our townsman H. B. Aldrich, Esq., to Mr. Samuel N. Andrews, of Little Falls, N.Y. Rev. Dr. Howard officiated. Miss Mary Olmstead presided at the organ, and rendered the Wedding Mach and other choice gems of music. Messrs. Charles Gregory, of New York, and J. E. Aldrich acted as ushers.

The bride was beautifully and richly attired in white silk, en train, point lace, orange blossoms and flowing white veil. The four bridesmaids – Misses Moffatt, Fox, Browne and Bacon (daughter of Judge Bacon) – were dressed in exquisite taste and made a charming picture. A costume of pale pink was very much admired, as was also one of the light blue trimmed with tulle and natural flowers. They were attended by Messrs. Brainard, Champney, Wiswell and Morgan.

After the ceremony the bridal party and invited guests attended the reception at the residence of the bride’s parents, on Summit Avenue, where a bountiful collation was spread. The parlors were tastefully decorated with bouquets and vases of rare flowers presented by friends of the bride. The presents were numerous and valuable, both of American and European manufacture, aggregating a value of several thousand dollars. Among them may be noted one set solid silver service; one elegant cream-spoon from Chas. Gregory; a set of sterling silver spoons, of splendid design, from Mrs. D. Harris, of 49 West 25th st., New York; silver fruit-dish, of unique design from Hon. G. A. Harding and wife; gold watch and chain, more silver service, etc. etc.; silver cake-basket from Mrs. L. J. Clark, silver table ware, and jewelry, etc., of all designs. At the reception there were many elegant toilets, that of Mrs. D. Harris, peach silk and Parisian lace, being much admired. The wedded pair left town at 6 P.M., on a tour to Niagara and the Thousand Islands.” (The Catskill Recorder. September 17, 1875.)

 

In 1880 Mary Aldrich and family moved to Galena, Kansas, where she would remain for the rest of her life. Only two years after their arrival, Samuel N. Andrews, Mary’s husband and Henry B. Aldrich’s son-in-law, was killed in 1882 at Kansas as a result of a tragic hunting accident.

              

“Accidentally Killed. For the following particulars of the sad death of S. N. Andrews, son-in-law of H. B. Aldrich of this village, we are indebted to the Short Creek (Kansas) Republican:

“On Tuesday morning S. N. Andrews, in company of J. E. Aldrich of this city, Hank Gray and several other gentlemen of Carterville and Carthage, started for a few days’ hunt. All went well and the party were enjoying the sport to their heart’s content until Wednesday at about 11 o’clock, when the distressing accident above-mentioned occurred.

“The party were on Elm Creek, a small stream about 10 miles West of Baxter. They had become separated, so that at the time of the accident the deceased and Mr. Gray were alone together. According to Mr. Gray’s statement, they were kneeling down awaiting an opportunity to fire at some ducks that were flying overhead. Mr. Andrews said: ‘Hank, you take the right and I’ll take the left.’ Just then some ducks came along and Mr. Gray turned and fired at them. Immediately following the report of his gun, that of Mr. Andrew’s was heard. Mr. Gray turned, to see Mr. Andrews falling, his brains flying in every direction. He hastened to him and found him dead. The charge from the gun had torn away the entire skull immediately above the left eye. Death was instantaneous. He had the gun resting against his knee, and the supposition is that in raising it it was accidentally discharged, with the result mentioned. His companions were summoned and the sad party started homeward with the remains, arriving at the residence of Mr. Aldrich at 6 o’clock in the evening. The wife, who had but a few moments before been notified of the sad occurrence, was almost crazed at the sight of all that remained of him who, but a few short hours before, had parted from her in the full enjoyment of life and health.

“The occurrence is one of the saddest that ever befell us and casts a deep gloom o’er the heart of every citizen of Galena. Mr. Andrews was among the first to locate on the Creek, and remained until a few months ago, when he moved to Carterville, where he was largely interested in mining and other business.

“The hunting party was made up of Carthage, Webb City and Carterville gentlemen. They came through this city and were joined by J. E. Aldrich. Mrs. Andrews accompanies her husband thus far, and was to remain here until his return from the hunt.

“The parents and the relatives of the deceased, residing in New York, have been notified and the remains will be kept until Sunday, awaiting their arrival.” (The Catskill Recorder. November 24, 1882.)

 

After the passing of her first husband Samuel N. Andrews, Mary Aldrich remarried to Edward E. Sapp on December 24, 1885. Edward (1858-1930) was been born on July 12, 1858 at Jackson, Michigan to Rev. Reison and Margaret Ferry Sapp. His father was a minister at the Methodist Episcopal Church at Grand Rapids. Edward was educated in the schools of Grand Rapids, Michigan. He moved from Michigan to Kansas in March, 1877, and resided at Galena, Kansas since January 1884. He was admitted to the bar in 1883. Edward would become extremely successful as a lawyer, city attorney, judge, a director in local mining companies and “one of the large capitalists and leading citizens of Galena.” “His professional standing, either at the bar or on the bench, cannot be assailed. He served his fellow citizens for many years in high positions, with the justice, fairness and dignity which reflects upon him the greatest credit, both as an upright exponent of the law and as a man of high personal aims and character.” (Allison, Nathaniel Thompson. History of Cherokee County, Kansas, and Representative Citizens. Chicago, IL: Biographical Publishing Company, 1904. p. 461-462.)

 

Edward E. Sapp, son-in-law of Henry B. AldrichEdward E. Sapp, son-in-law of Henry B. AldrichEdward E. Sapp, son-in-law of Henry B. Aldrich, photographer from Catskill, New York. Edward E. Sapp, son-in-law of Henry B. Aldrich. “Edward Elisha Sapp Succumbs to Heart Trouble, Age 72 Years.” The Galena Journal. January 24, 1930.

 

Mary was also successful in her own right. In 1890 Mary and her husband Edward constructed Sapp’s Opera House in Galena, Kansas, which she then operated. The Opera House, located at the corner of Main Street and Seventh Street, had capacity for 850 people. The interior design was completed by W. A. Farris and included a brilliantly painted ceiling, a proscenium arch on the stage, modern lighting and much more, “the whole forming a grand picture of elegance and master skill.” At the time of its construction, “Not only is it the largest block ever built in Galena, but we question if it has a superior in the country.” (Galena Weekly Republican. October 25, 1890.)

Sapp’s Opera House hosted concerts, shows, boxing matches and much more. In perhaps some of the most memorable shows ever presented at the Opera House in January 1898 the famous illusionist and stunt performer Harry Houdini thrilled the audiences with card tricks, escaping handcuffs and a “metamorphosis trick.” The historic Sapp’s Opera House building would only last for 41 years, being destroyed in March 1931 by a devastating fire.

 

Mrs. Mary Sapp, daughter of Henry B. AldrichMrs. Mary Sapp, daughter of Henry B. AldrichMary Sapp, owner and operator of Sapp's Opera House and the Galena Bill Posting Company at Galena Kansas. Mary was the daughter of photographer Henry B. Sapp of Catskill, New York. Mrs. Mary Sapp, daughter of Henry B. Aldrich. The Billboard. September 28, 1901.

 

Mary also operated the Galena Billposting Company at Galena. She was featured on the cover of The Billboard publication on September 28, 1901. The industry publication covered theaters, parks, circuses, fairs and more. For all her success in the often male-dominated industry it was written that she was “a living witness to the fact that women can succeed in the billposting business. Though usually signing her business correspondence “M. E. Sapp,” this busy woman finds it necessary to prefix the “Mrs.” if she would convince the public that she is not a hustling, business-getting man, instead of a woman of refinement, who attends to her many business affairs with remarkable skill and judgment and still finds time to devote to a woman’s usual social duties. It is said of Mrs. Sapp that she is one woman who can consistently and intelligently combine business and social duties – the church and the theater – so that it is impossible to tell where one begins or the other ends.” (“Galena’s Woman Billposter.” The Galena Evening Times. April 11, 1902.)

 

Galena Bill Posting CompanyGalena Bill Posting CompanyThe Galena Bill Posting Company was owned and operated by Mary Sapp, daughter of Henry B. Aldrich. The Galena Bill Posting Company was owned and operated by Mrs. Mary Sapp, daughter of Henry B. Aldrich. The Billboard. 1900-1902.

 

Edward Elisha Sapp passed away from kidney, bladder and heart trouble at St. John’s Hospital in Joplin, Missouri on January 21, 1930. Funeral services were conducted at his home about a mile west of Galena and interment was at the family mausoleum in the Galena cemetery.

Mary E. Sapp passed away at the age of 80 at her home west of Galena, Kansas on February 1, 1934. Funeral services were conducted at her home, and officiated by Reverend Alfred du Domaine, pastor of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Joplin, Missouri. She was buried at the Sapp mausoleum in the Galena cemetery. Her obituary noted that she was survived by her son Thomas Sapp of Treece and her daughter, Miss Vira Sapp. Their son Dexter had died years earlier in 1917: “Dexter, son of Judge E. E. Sapp of Galena, Kansas, died suddenly on June 21st, [1917] aged about twenty-one years. The young man, who was of brilliant promise, was a grandson of the late H. B. Aldrich of Catskill.” (Catskill Recorder. 1917.)

Joseph Elmer Aldrich, Henry’s son, was born on December 2, 1855 at North Adams, Massachusetts. After his early education at the village of Catskill he attended Rutgers College at New Brunswick, New Jersey, where he graduated from in 1879. He then moved to Galena, Kansas, where he became a prominent miner. In June, 1881 Joseph married Alice A. H. Bacon, a native of North Adams, Massachusetts. Alice was the daughter of Joel and Elizabeth Bacon and “a scion of some of the oldest families in the city and state of her nativity.” (Livingston, Joel T. A History of Jasper County, Missouri and Its People. Volume 2. New York: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1912.) In 1881 Henry Aldrich joined his son Joseph in the mining industry when it was reported that he had taken a stake in a mine located at Galena, Kansas. Henry and his wife Laura would also come to own several buildings at Galena.

“[Joseph] Aldrich was one of the most successful mine operators in the southwestern mining district . . . Among the large number of mines which he owned at one time or another were the Oasis, the Tender Foot, the Mooney, the Sun Flower and the Mary Ann. The last named property was a rich property. It was located at Galena on the “Lost Forty,” and was one of the wonders of the mining district of that time. At one time Aldrich was accounted as one of the wealthiest men in the district.

The former mine operator brought into the locality of his mines the first steam drill ever used in this section of the country, and erected the third concentrating plant in the United States. He also introduced the first ore crusher used in this part of the country. The crusher was manufactured at the Fort Scott foundry, and it was the first one ever turned out by that company. The mill for the crusher cost $14,000, and the crusher would crush and clean thirty tons at a shift, a great amount in that day.

Aldrich had been a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for many years, and was actively interested in civic affairs during his prime. The Aldrich building, owned by him, now houses the Joplin Supply Company.” (“J. E. Aldrich, Retired Mine Operator, Dies.” Joplin Globe. March 23, 1929.)

Joseph Aldrich retired from active business in 1912. He passed from heart failure away at age 74 in March 1929. Funeral services were conducted at the Frank-Sievers Chapel. The services were officiated by Reverend A. R. Foster of Anderson. Aldrich was buried at Mount Hope cemetery. Joseph was survived by his widow, Hattie Aldrich, sister, Mrs. E. E. Sapp of Galena, and a nephew, Henry A. Halihan of St. Joseph.

Henry’s first wife Laura L. Aldrich passed away in Catskill at the age of fifty-six years, 11 months on December 10, 1886. She may have been sick for some time as an August 27, 1886 newspaper article in The Catskill Recorder noted that her son Joseph was traveling from Galena, Kansas to Catskill to visit his ill mother. Her will was probated on December 28, 1886 with her husband listed as heir and executor. Witnesses to the will were E. J. Hill and John R. Hicks, both of Catskill.

In addition to their Catskills dealings, Henry and Laura owned property at Galena, Kansas, which was held in her name. “Shortly before her death, Laura L. Aldrich executed a will, in which she bequeathed her property . . .  to her husband, H. B. Aldrich, and it is alleged that it was transferred to him under an agreement that the property was to be held by him in trust for the two children, Joseph and Mary, and was to be divided between them when they could agree on a division of the property. Joseph intermarried with Alice H., and Mary was married to E. E. Sapp, all of whom, together with the second wife, Hattie J. Aldrich, and her infant daughter, were made parties defendant. In the latter part of 1889 Joseph and Mary agreed upon a division of the property held in trust for them by their father, and this was done at his earnest solicitation. Afterward he executed deeds conveying to Mary the property allotted to her, but it appears that Joseph was involved in financial troubles and the conveyance to him was delayed.” For more information about this property and the court case in which it was central claim see “Aldrich v. Boice” argued before the Supreme Court of Kansas. (Randolph, A. M. F. “Alice H. Aldrich, et al. v. J. H. Boice et al.” Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of the State of Kansas. Topeka, Kansas: The Kansas State Printing Company, 1896. p. 170-173.)

After his first wife Laura passed away, Aldrich remarried two years later to 21-year-old Hattie Jane Still (1866-1921) in the afternoon of March 8, 1888. She was the daughter of Hiram Still (1844-1908) and Jane “Jennie” S. (Peck) Still (1845-1927) of Warwick, Orange County, New York. The Still family was listed in the 1875 New York State census as living at Warwick and on the 1880 United States census as living at Catskill. Hiram was listed in 1875 with an occupation of “Laborer” and in 1880 with an occupation of “Engineer.” Together Henry and Hattie had a daughter by the name Laura L. Aldrich, who was named after his Henry’s first wife. After Henry’s passing Hattie would remarry to William Case Eager of Warwick. Hattie passed away in 1921.

Less than two years after getting remarried to Hattie J. Still, Henry B. Aldrich passed away of heart disease at the age of 56 on January 18, 1890. “Sudden death is always startling, but in the demise of H. B. Aldrich, of the firm for Cargill & Aldrich, it was peculiarly so. Judged by the average standard of life it seemed that many years should be accorded to him. He died from what is termed by the late medical writers, “heart failure.” For some time he had been driven to his place of business, as the ascent or descent of a hill aggravated the trouble. On Saturday he paid off the employees of the firm, as was his custom. His death occurred on Sunday evening, between nine and ten o’clock. It was so quiet that it was unobserved. The family could not realize it, and it was only when Dr. Robert Selden said he was gone, that the fact was comprehended.” (Windham Journal. January 30, 1890.)

Upon his passing a local newspaper remembered Henry’s previous trade prior to the livery business by writing that “many of the oldest readers of the Examiner will recall him as a photographer of no mean acquirements.” (Windham Journal. January 30, 1890.)

Catskill Lodge No. 468, F. & A. M. (Free and Accepted Masons) passed a touching resolution in honor of their longtime member Henry B. Aldrich.

 

“Obituary Resolutions. Resolutions of Catskill Lodge No. 468, F. & A. M.

               WHEREAS, It has pleased the Grand Master of the Universe to call from Labor to Refreshment Henry B. Aldrich, a good citizen, an honest man, an upright Mason, and a valued member of this Lodge; therefore be it

               Resolved, That while we bow in humble submission to this dispensation of a higher power, we recognize the summons that sooner or later will come to us all.

Resolved, That while we mourn our loss we cherish the memory and example of the many virtues of our deceased Brother.

Resolved, That we tender his family and friends in their hour of affliction our deep and sincere sympathy.

Resolved, That the Lodge be draped in mourning, and that these resolutions be spread upon the minutes and published in the village papers, and a copy furnished to the family of the deceased.

J. B. Olney,

H. C. Bulkley,

Rob’t Selden,

Committee.

               (The Catskill Recorder. February 14, 1890.)

 

The funeral for Henry B. Aldrich took place on Thursday at 3pm at the Presbyterian Church with the Reverend D. Howard officiating. At this time of his passing he was survived by his wife Hattie, their infant son, and two children from his first marriage, Mary and Joseph. His body was taken to North Adams, Massachusetts, where he lived previously, for interment.

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Henry B. Aldrich please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) ambrotype artist cartes de visite Catskill Catskill Mountains Catskills Edward Cargill Edward E. Sapp Galena Galena Billposting Company gallery Greene County H. B. Aldrich Hattie J. Still Henry B. Aldrich horses Hudson Valley Joseph E. Aldrich Kansas livery Mary Aldrich Mary E. Sapp Massachusetts mine miner mining North Adams photographer photography portraits Samuel N. Andrews Sapp's Opera House stable stereoviews studio village https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/henry-b-aldrich-village-of-catskill-new-york-photographer Sat, 06 Mar 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain. (A True Story.) https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/paul-jones-of-overlook-mountain-a-true-story In researching details about the history of Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills I came across an amazing short story, one of adventure, regret and friendship. I will not share any details here, so as to not give anything away, but needless to say I was captivated. It was written by popular author Laura Winthrop Johnson (1825-1889) and was first published in the December 1878 issue of the St. Nicholas publication (Volume 6, no. 2.). The story was then republished in numerous newspapers across the country including in New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Wisconsin and more. The events of the reportedly true story took place in the year 1821.

 

“Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain” is a short story by Laura Winthrop Johnson about an adventure in the northern Catskills during the winter of 1821.Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain. (A True Story.)From the short story "Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain" by Laura Winthrop Johnson, as published in the December 1878 issue of the St. Nicholas publication (Volume 6, no. 2.). Illustration by James E. Kelly.

See blog post of February 27, 2021 for the full story of "Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain."

“Afraid? No! Father told me to stay here, and I’m going to do it.”

Illustration by James E. Kelly.

 

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Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain. (A True Story.)

By Laura Winthrop Johnson.
 

“My children, would you like to hear an old man’s story? Then gather ‘round my great arm-chair, and listen.

“Do I remember the Revolutionary war?”

Not quite, I must say; but I can look back to the time when this century was a very young one, and younger than any of you. I will tell you a story of something that happened to me when this same century had just come of age, –that is, in the year 1821.

I was then about eighteen years old, and my father had hired me out to a lumber merchant at Glenn’s Falls, who had sent me down the river into the Catskills as one of a gang for cutting timber and getting out hemlock-bark. It was hard work, but we had jolly rough times, and I liked the life, and the dry, cold air of the mountains. There was always something going on in our lumber-camp. It was fine to hew down the great trees, and to hear them fall with a crash that seemed to shake the hills, and we liked rolling the great logs, all singing in chorus, and the building of roaring campfires at night, with plenty of songs and stories and jokes as we sat around them. We were simple young fellows, and very small jokes lasted a long time, and could be used over and over again, while the dark woods rang with our uproarious laughter.

The river then was very unlike what it is now. There is still plenty of wilderness among the Catskills, more than there was twenty or thirty years ago. For then there were tanneries in every valley, but now they all have disappeared, and the big hemlock-trunks, stripped of their bark, lie rotting in labyrinths on the long slopes, covered with a dense new growth.

At that time, however, half the course of the Hudson was a wilderness. Here and there at long intervals were small towns and villages, and farms and manors were seen, where the banks were less high and shaggy. No railroad trains rushed along the shores; no steam-whistles broke the silence; no great three-story steam-boats thundered by, thronged with people. The river was a quiet place in those days. Light, graceful sloops, and slow-moving barges and arks were all the craft we saw on its waters, excepting the little steam-boats, not much larger than one of our small tugs, that came up sometimes, and were still looked upon with a touch of wonder.

As for the great ice-houses, the factories, the fine country-seats and pretty villas that now crown the shores of the broad river, they had not been dreamed of. The scream of the eagle and the blue-say alone broke the silence.

Our boss was a first-rate fellow, and one Christmas-day he let us have a holiday and a big sleigh-ride. All the girls of the country round were invited, the snow lay just deep enough, and the sleighing was capital.

But I was sulky and would not go, because I’d been ‘cut out,’ as we called it, with the girl I wanted to take. I was very fond of still-hunting, and in my vexation I went off to look for deer. Beyond the Kauterskill Clove, I didn’t know the country very well, but an old man told me they often crossed the pass above Plauterkill and I went to look for them there.

I hunted all day, and found no deer; they had grown shy and scarce, and had gone away, over the mountains toward Hunter. I had a long chase over their tracks, up the Clove to Hayne’s Falls, and away over the top of Plauterkill Clove, and then along the pass by the shoulder of Indian Head, to the side of Overlook Mountain. It was coming on toward night, with a wild sunset blazing, and gusts of wind springing up, and I began to think of getting back, or, at least, of finding some place to sleep; for, in my eagerness for deer, I had gone too far to return to Catskill village that night. I thing I might get as far as Plauterkill or Haynes’ Falls, where there were a few houses.

I was turning to go up the pass again, when, just on the edge of the hemlock forest, under a ledge of rocks on the mountain-side, I saw a small quarry, where a few paving stones had been taken out, and close by a smoke curling into the air. I looked sharp, and, sure enough, there was a little hut tucked under the ledge; just a shed, so rough that it seemed like part of the rock, with a stone wall, and few slabs and boughs to roof it over.

The sun was setting angrily down the valley, behind the distant Shandaken range, and pouring on the near mountains great dashes of orange light; and the purple chasms between, and the black pines and hemlocks stood out against the heights where the snow was sky-blue and gold, –all had a strange and stormy look. I was just thinking how handsome those mountains were, and yet what dangerous faces they had, as if they meant to have a wild night of it among themselves. Overlook had his white cap on, and the others were gathering mist around their tops. The day had been still, but now a strong wind blew from the hills, and drove the loose snow in fine powder before it. I was just noticing all this, you know, and saying to myself that there was not a moment to spare, and I must hurry, or the storm would be upon me, when I heard a little voice near me, calling out:

“Mister! Have you seen my father, anywhere?”

I started with surprise to see in that lonely wintry place the figure and face of a pretty little boy, about ten years old, suddenly standing out against the sunset sky.

“Your father? No, my boy,” said I. “But what are you doing here, miles away from any house, all alone at this time of day?”

“Why, you see, sir,” said the boy, as cheerful as a chipmunk, “my father told me to stay till he came back. He went down this morning to Woodstock to get news of mother who is very sick. If she’s no better, he’ll come up tonight and take me home tomorrow, but, if she is better, he’ll want me to stay here with him, and help get out some more stone.”

“But, my boy,” said I, “there’s a heavy snowstorm coming. Look down there toward Shandaken. Look at the queer colors in that sky. If you stay here tonight you will be covered in with drifts till next summer and never come out alive. Have you got food?”

“Enough for tonight,” said the brave little fellow.

“And are you not afraid of ----” I stopped short. I was going to say bears, for I had seen plenty of their tracks that day.

“Afraid? No! Father’s sure to come. He told me to stay, and I’m going to do it.”

I went into the little cabin and found a tiny stove, a few armfuls of chips, a pitcher of water, a bit of bread and cheese, and a pair of tattered blankets; that was all. My heart sank. Fuel, to be sure, was plenty, but how was that heroic little fellow to bring enough to keep himself from freezing if his father did not come.

It seemed almost certain death for him to remain there in the lonely pass through such a storm as was close at hand. It was growing dusk in the high valley; light flurries, forerunners of the tempest, were beginning to sweep down from the heights and long lines of white clouds were filing through the gorges.

“Come with me, my boy,” I cried. “Come at once! We may get across the head of Plauterkill before the storm bursts, and we shall me more sheltered in the woods. See how dark it grows all of a sudden.”

“I must mind my father,” said he. “He told me to stay, and I’m going to stay. He’ll be sure to come.”

“Who knows,” thought I, “but your father may be drinking all this time in the old tavern at Woodstock? Yet so sharp a boy would have learned already not to trust such a father as that.”

“Look here, my little man,” I said; “you’ve got to come with me. If you won’t, I shall carry you. I must not leaved you here. Come along! You’ve got to go!”

As I started forward to take hold of him the boy gave a shout of laughter, and springing through the door-way vanished among the woods in a twinkling. I drew a long breathe of wonder, and ran as fast as I could in the direction in which he had disappeared, but though I searched the mountain-side for nearly half an hour, so cunningly had he hidden himself away in the bewilderment of rocks and fallen trees, that my search was vain. He knew too well, all the caves and fastnesses of Overlook, and was laughing at me, safely hidden away in one of them, like a little Puck, or mocking mountain sprite. The powdering drifts that were flying about had already hidden his small footsteps. The twilight was nearly gone, large flakes of snow began to fall thickly, and an ominous roar could be heard in the tops of the pines. The storm was upon me. I though it best to take care of number one, as I had lost the half one, but I was sorely troubled and could not bear to leave that boy behind. Yet, though my conscience smote me, I hurried on as fast as possible through the pathless woods, often straying out of my course in the whirling tempest, till I reached, I hardly known how, the charcoal-burners at the top of the pass. There I got warm and rested a little, and then go on a little further to Plauterkill Falls, where I spent what was left of the night.

Next morning I started early to get back to my work, though it was a very hard tug, and the storm not much abated. But I did not want the boss to think that I had been carousing overnight. I valued my character a great deal, and meant to keep it up. I tried to persuade the people at Plauterkill to go over for the boy, but they would not go out-of-doors that day, they said, for Jones’s boy, or any other boy. He might take care of himself.

Our lumbering stopped for a while by that storm, and our gang was sent over to Rondout to ship timber, and from there back to Glenn’s Falls, and I never knew what became of that boy. I always blamed myself for not staying with him for the night, or at least till his father came, and for my cowardice in caring more about losing my place, or possibly my life (for I came mighty near being lost in that storm), than for the safety of that fine, manly little fellow, whose bright face haunted me for many a day. Well, time went on. I was married to the very girl for whose sake alone I took to the woods that day; I tried to gain some education and read all the books I could get; I rose to be a partner and then to be a boss lumber-man myself. I grew rich, and middle-aged, and old, and still I heard nothing of the boy, though I made many inquiries after him. I never had any children of my own, to live, and I kept wishing I could adopt that boy; for, strange to say, it never occurred to me that if he were alive, he would a middle-aged man, only eight or ten years younger than I. He always appeared to my fancy as the fine, handsome child of ten whom I had seen darting through the cabin-door into the forest, dim with winter twilight. I used often to go up and down the river then on business, but I never much fancied to pass by the Catskills. I don’t know it was, but it seemed as if that little fellow had somehow got a hold on my heart, and wouldn’t let go. One day I was on the Albany boat, –it was in the fall of 1860, –and when about noon, or later, we came in sight of the fine old mountains, looking just the color of blue-bells and periwinkle flowers, I turned my back to them. There was a handsome man, with hair just turning iron-gray, standing near, who looked at me rather hard, as I wheeled short round, as if he wondered what I was about, for I suppose I looked as if I had something on my mind.

So I said to him: “I don’t much like to look at those splendid old fellows, because I have been always afraid that I may have been partly the cause of the death of a little chap, away up there by Overlook, many years ago.”

“Why, how was that?” said the gentleman, as polite as possible. Then I told him all the story, just as I have told it to you, and he listened, with a query twinkle in his eye; but the water stood in them, too.

“Then,” he said, “my friend, don’t trouble yourself any more about that boy. You were not at all to blame. He is still alive, to my certain knowledge; for here he stands before you, and his name’s Paul Jones.”

I could scarcely believe my senses, and it was a minute or two before I could take it all in.

“You that boy!” said I, and starting back, I nearly went over the guards in my wonder. “Why, you must be Rip Van Winkle himself! But, do tell me about it.”

“Well,” said he, “I was tickled enough when I found I had outwitted you, and saw you go away beaten. I knew my father would come, for he never broke his word to me, and in about an hour he did come; but he’d had a very hard time getting there. My mother was better, and it wouldn’t do to try, he said, to get home that night. I tell you we had a rough time in that hut, all snowed in and nearly frozen; but we managed to hold out till the next afternoon, when the storm abated a little, and hunger started us back to Woodstock. We managed to struggle through. My father carried me most of the way on his back; there were a few farm-houses at the foot of Overlook to rest in, and, though we were almost frozen again, we reached Woodstock before night-fall. I was as much troubled about you as you were about me; for I did not think you knew the woods as well as my father. I was right about my father, you see? I was sure he would come, and come he did; but we didn’t get out any more stone for a good while.

“He did not care for danger, my father didn’t; if he’d given me his word he kept it, and I kept mine. So here I am, Rip Van Winkle if you like, and you may make friends with our jolly mountains, who are good friends of mine, too. Why haven’t we both made our money out of ‘em, –you in lumber, I in stone? I was brought up among them, and I’m fond of them. I know every nook and cranny of ‘em, and I could have told you that day where to find the deer you were after. I even knew of a famous bear-hole, where if you’d wanted, you could have found a bid she-one with cubs. My father got them some time afterward with me and the dog. And now, if you’ll land here, at Rondout, you’ll find my team waiting, and I’ll drive you over to my house, beyond Kingston toward the quarries, where you’ll find my wife, as pretty a woman as any on the river, and as fine a family of boys and girls as you’d wish to see. We shall be just in time for a good old-fashioned early tea, and a good appetite.”

The end of it was that he persuaded me to accept his invitation, and I went to visit my old and new friend, Paul Jones. And there, among the children of the household, I found a little Paul, –a manly boy of ten, –who seemed the very same whom I had left along in the mountain-pass forty years before.

He has always spent a great deal of time with me ever since, and I have considered him as my child.

I should be very lonely now if it were not for my friend, Paul Jones, and his charming family. They form quite a large colony, and I am always quite at home among them; for the best friend of my old age is the boy whom I found and lost on the side of Overlook Mountain on that wild winter’s night of 1821.”

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) 1821 adventure Catskill Mountains Catskills Kaaterskill Clove Laura Winthrop Johnson lumber Overlook Mountain Paul Jones Paul Jones of Overlook Mountain Plattekill Falls Plauterkill quarry Rondout Shandaken short story snow stone storm story timber winter Woodstock https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/paul-jones-of-overlook-mountain-a-true-story Sat, 27 Feb 2021 13:00:00 GMT
MacHenry Mill, Perseverance and Spirit https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/machenry-mill-perseverance-and-spirit The seemingly historic MacHenry Mill building is located along a back-country road in the northern Catskills. In talking to the owner one time while photographing the mill, it seems the building isn’t quite as historic as it may first appear. She confirmed that there was once a mill on the site. However, the owner, who appeared to be in her late 20s or early 30s, confirmed that she had herself hand tiled the “MacHenry Mill” sign when she was a child. No matter its historic origin, the one-of-a-kind charm of this workshop building is classic Catskills.

 

An old barn or workshop in the northern Catskills with a hand tiled name on front saying “MacHenry Mill.”The MillThe seemingly historic MacHenry Mill building is located along a back-country road in the northern Catskills. In talking to the owner one time while photographing the mill, it seems the building isn’t quite as historic as it may first appear. She confirmed that there was once a mill on the site. However, the owner, who appeared to be in her late 20s or early 30s, confirmed that she had herself hand tiled the “MacHenry Mill” sign when she was a child. No matter its historic origin, the one-of-a-kind charm of this workshop building is classic Catskills.

Adding to the building’s unique charm I particularly like the two historic quotations on the wood above the double doors. The first quote reads “Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages.” Although the wood carving states 1776, it was actually written by George Washington (1732-1799) on August 20, 1775 in a letter to Major General Philip Schuyler (1733-1804). In writing to provide updates to Schuyler, and perhaps add a little motivation with the American Revolution having just begun, the full quote reads “Animated with the Goodness of our Cause, and the best Wishes of your Countrymen, I am sure you will not let Difficulties not insuperable damp your ardour. Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

Showing the spirit of the American Revolution the second quote reads “We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.” This was written in 1780 by General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), who served in the Continental Army throughout the Revolutionary War and was considered one of George Washington’s best and most capable officers. Greene County, New York, where this building is located, is named in Greene’s honor.

 

An old barn or workshop in the northern Catskills with a hand tiled name on front saying “MacHenry Mill.”MacHenry MillThe seemingly historic MacHenry Mill building is located along a back-country road in the northern Catskills. In talking to the owner one time while photographing the mill, it seems the building isn’t quite as historic as it may first appear. She confirmed that there was once a mill on the site. However, the owner, who appeared to be in her late 20s or early 30s, confirmed that she had herself hand tiled the “MacHenry Mill” sign when she was a child. No matter its historic origin, the one-of-a-kind charm of this workshop building is classic Catskills.

Adding to the building’s unique charm I particularly like the two historic quotations on the wood above the double doors. The first quote reads “Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages.” Although the wood carving states 1776, it was actually written by George Washington (1732-1799) on August 20, 1775 in a letter to Major General Philip Schuyler (1733-1804). In writing to provide updates to Schuyler, and perhaps add a little motivation with the American Revolution having just begun, the full quote reads “Animated with the Goodness of our Cause, and the best Wishes of your Countrymen, I am sure you will not let Difficulties not insuperable damp your ardour. Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

Showing the spirit of the American Revolution the second quote reads “We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.” This was written in 1780 by General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), who served in the Continental Army throughout the Revolutionary War and was considered one of George Washington’s best and most capable officers. Greene County, New York, where this building is located, is named in Greene’s honor.

 

Adding to the building’s unique charm I particularly like the two historic quotations on the wood above the double doors. The first quote reads “Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages.” Although the wood carving states 1776, it was actually written by George Washington (1732-1799) on August 20, 1775 in a letter to Major General Philip Schuyler (1733-1804). In writing to provide updates to Schuyler, and perhaps add a little motivation with the American Revolution having just begun, the full quote reads “Animated with the Goodness of our Cause, and the best Wishes of your Countrymen, I am sure you will not let Difficulties not insuperable damp your ardour. Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

 

An old barn or workshop in the northern Catskills with a hand tiled name on front saying “MacHenry Mill.”Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all agesThe seemingly historic MacHenry Mill building is located along a back-country road in the northern Catskills. In talking to the owner one time while photographing the mill, it seems the building isn’t quite as historic as it may first appear. She confirmed that there was once a mill on the site. However, the owner, who appeared to be in her late 20s or early 30s, confirmed that she had herself hand tiled the “MacHenry Mill” sign when she was a child. No matter its historic origin, the one-of-a-kind charm of this workshop building is classic Catskills.

Adding to the building’s unique charm I particularly like the two historic quotations on the wood above the double doors. The first quote reads “Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages.” Although the wood carving states 1776, it was actually written by George Washington (1732-1799) on August 20, 1775 in a letter to Major General Philip Schuyler (1733-1804). In writing to provide updates to Schuyler, and perhaps add a little motivation with the American Revolution having just begun, the full quote reads “Animated with the Goodness of our Cause, and the best Wishes of your Countrymen, I am sure you will not let Difficulties not insuperable damp your ardour. Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

Showing the spirit of the American Revolution the second quote reads “We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.” This was written in 1780 by General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), who served in the Continental Army throughout the Revolutionary War and was considered one of George Washington’s best and most capable officers. Greene County, New York, where this building is located, is named in Greene’s honor.

 

Showing the spirit of the American Revolution the second quote reads “We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.” This was written in 1780 by General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), who served in the Continental Army throughout the Revolutionary War and was considered one of George Washington’s best and most capable officers. Greene County, New York, where this building is located, is named in Greene’s honor.

 

An old barn or workshop in the northern Catskills with a hand tiled name on front saying “MacHenry Mill.”The MacHenry MillThe seemingly historic MacHenry Mill building is located along a back-country road in the northern Catskills. In talking to the owner one time while photographing the mill, it seems the building isn’t quite as historic as it may first appear. She confirmed that there was once a mill on the site. However, the owner, who appeared to be in her late 20s or early 30s, confirmed that she had herself hand tiled the “MacHenry Mill” sign when she was a child. No matter its historic origin, the one-of-a-kind charm of this workshop building is classic Catskills.

Adding to the building’s unique charm I particularly like the two historic quotations on the wood above the double doors. The first quote reads “Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages.” Although the wood carving states 1776, it was actually written by George Washington (1732-1799) on August 20, 1775 in a letter to Major General Philip Schuyler (1733-1804). In writing to provide updates to Schuyler, and perhaps add a little motivation with the American Revolution having just begun, the full quote reads “Animated with the Goodness of our Cause, and the best Wishes of your Countrymen, I am sure you will not let Difficulties not insuperable damp your ardour. Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

Showing the spirit of the American Revolution the second quote reads “We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.” This was written in 1780 by General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), who served in the Continental Army throughout the Revolutionary War and was considered one of George Washington’s best and most capable officers. Greene County, New York, where this building is located, is named in Greene’s honor.

An old barn or workshop in the northern Catskills with a hand tiled name on front saying “MacHenry Mill.”MacHenry MillThe seemingly historic MacHenry Mill building is located along a back-country road in the northern Catskills. In talking to the owner one time while photographing the mill, it seems the building isn’t quite as historic as it may first appear. She confirmed that there was once a mill on the site. However, the owner, who appeared to be in her late 20s or early 30s, confirmed that she had herself hand tiled the “MacHenry Mill” sign when she was a child. No matter its historic origin, the one-of-a-kind charm of this workshop building is classic Catskills.

Adding to the building’s unique charm I particularly like the two historic quotations on the wood above the double doors. The first quote reads “Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages.” Although the wood carving states 1776, it was actually written by George Washington (1732-1799) on August 20, 1775 in a letter to Major General Philip Schuyler (1733-1804). In writing to provide updates to Schuyler, and perhaps add a little motivation with the American Revolution having just begun, the full quote reads “Animated with the Goodness of our Cause, and the best Wishes of your Countrymen, I am sure you will not let Difficulties not insuperable damp your ardour. Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

Showing the spirit of the American Revolution the second quote reads “We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.” This was written in 1780 by General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), who served in the Continental Army throughout the Revolutionary War and was considered one of George Washington’s best and most capable officers. Greene County, New York, where this building is located, is named in Greene’s honor.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) get beat rise American Revolution and fight again architecture barn building Catskill Mountains Catskills George Washington Greene County Haines Falls MacHenry Mill Matthew Jarnich mill Nathanael Greene New York perseverance and spirit Philip Schuyler photographer photographs photography photos pictures quotation quote shed sightseeing tourism tourist travel We fight workshop https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/machenry-mill-perseverance-and-spirit Sat, 20 Feb 2021 13:00:00 GMT
John Jacob Loeffler – New Catskills Photographs https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/john-jacob-loeffler-new-catskills-photographs John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new Catskills photographs by John Jacob Loeffler. They have all been added to the Loeffler gallery, which now contains over 100 of his Catskills works.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Haines’ Falls” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; First Series, # 216; Second series, # 216.Haines’ Falls. (1st Series, # 216, alternate version)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 216. (Note: The reverse side is titled as the Second Series, but actually includes stereoviews from the 1st, 2nd and 3rd series. Stereoview number 216 is in the 1st series.)
Title: Haines’ Falls.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
Haines’ Falls.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Rocks at the head of Cauterskill Fall” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; Second series, # 234.Rocks at the head of Cauterskill Fall. (2nd Series, # 234)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 2nd Series, No. 234.
Title: Rocks at the head of Cauterskill Fall.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the greatest Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
Rocks at the head of Cauterskill Fall.

 

John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Morning Mist in the Cauterskill Clove” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; First Series, # 210; No series, # 231.Morning Mist in the Cauterskill Gorge. (1st Series, # 210)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, # 210. Although the caption on reverse side has no series listed, and a catalog number of 231, based on the unique title it can be considered 1st Series, # 210. The title is sometimes referred to as “Morning Mist in the Ravine.”
Title: Morning Mist in the Cauterskill Gorge. Alternatively, “Morning Mist in the Ravine.”
Morning Mist in the Cauterskill Gorge.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Palensville” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; First Series, # 226.Palensville. (1st Series, # 226)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 226. (Note: The reverse side is titled as the Second Series, but actually includes stereoviews from the 1st, 2nd and 3rd series. Stereoview number 226 is in the 1st series.)
Title: Palensville.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
Palensville.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Cauterskill Falls” within the Catskill Mountain Scenery set; First Series, # 202.Cauterskill Falls. (1st Series, # 202, alternate version)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 202, alternate version (green background). (Note: The reverse side is titled as the Second Series, but actually includes a listing of stereoviews from the 1st, 2nd and 3rd series. Stereoview number 202 is in the 1st series.)
Title: Cauterskill Falls.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
Cauterskill Falls.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Laurel House” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; First Series, # 201.Laurel House. (1st Series, # 201, version 3)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 201.
Title: Laurel House.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
Laurel House.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “View from Sunset Rock” within the Catskill Mountain Scenery set; First Series, # 212.View from Sunset Rock. (1st Series, # 212, version 2)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 212.
Title: View from Sunset Rock.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
View from Sunset Rock.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The Lake and Round Top” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; First Series, # 229.The Lake and Round Top. (1st Series, # 229, version 2)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 229.
Title: The Lake and Round Top.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
The Lake and Round Top.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; Fifth Series, # 349.Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove. (5th Series, # 349)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 5th Series, No. 349.
Title: Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.
Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountain Scenery Catskill Mountains Catskills J. Loeffler John Jacob Loeffler Loeffler New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures Staten Island stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoscopic view stereoview Tompkinsville https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/john-jacob-loeffler-new-catskills-photographs Sat, 13 Feb 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Merrill & Humphries – Delhi, New York Photography Partnership https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/merrill-humphries-delhi-new-york-photography-partnership The partnership of Merrill and Humphries operated a drug store located at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York while also publishing scenic postcards of the western Catskills region from 1911 to 1928. After the partnership dissolved in 1928, Pierre B. Merrill continued to publish postcards under his own name.

 

Fitch's Bridge and Delaware River, Delhi NYFitch's Bridge and Delaware River, Delhi NYEast Delhi, Delaware County

Vintage postcard of Fitch’s Covered Bridge as it spans the Delaware River at East Delhi in Delaware County. New York. The postcard was published by Merrill & Humphries, located at Delhi, New York.

The historic Fitch’s Covered Bridge was constructed in 1870 by James Frazier and James Warren at a cost of $1,900. The bridge is a single span, one lane wide, constructed using native materials and is 106 feet long as it spans the West Branch of the Delaware River. The bridge was originally located on Kingston Street in Delhi but was moved in 1885 when the town decided to replace the covered bridge with a newer, more durable iron structure. Instead of destroying the relatively new bridge (constructed only 15 years prior), it was moved several miles upstream to its current location. The historic bridge was recently restored in 2001 at a cost of $425,000. Fitches Covered Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

According to the Fitch family website, the bridge is named for Dr. Thomas Fitch (1774-1849) and his younger brother Dr. Cornelius Root Fitch (1783-1846). “Thomas bought a farm at the (site of the future) bridge on the river in 1803. When he left Delhi for Philadelphia in 1806, he sold the farm to Cornelius, who continued to practice medicine in Delhi for 33 years.”

Fitch's Bridge and Delaware River, Delhi N.Y. No postmark. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

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The photographic work of the firm Merrill and Humphries was the fifth, and last, in a succession of photographers to own the same company at the village of Delhi. The firm began with E. C. Riggs, the “Ambrotype Artist,” who operated his gallery from 1856 to 1859; he was succeeded by B. F. Gilbert, who operated from 1859 to 1867; West Coast photographer Byron R. Johnson then purchased the gallery, operating from 1867 to 1869; next, Maurice Farrington acquired the gallery in late 1869, and operated for the next 45 years from 1869 to 1914; and, finally, the partnership of Merrill & Humphries operated well into the 20th century.

 

Vintage postcard published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries of Watauga Falls at Delhi in Delaware County, New York.Upper Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts beautiful Watauga Falls located at Delhi in Delaware County, New York. It was published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries located at Delhi, New York. The reverse side shows that the postcard was mailed but the postmark is illegible.

Watauga Falls are located in a small glen on Falls Creek near its junction with the West Branch of the Delaware. They are about one-mile northeast of the village of Delhi near the intersection of Route 28 and Falls Mills Road. Although they were once accessible the falls are now located on private property.

The village of Delhi website highlights how the region earned its reputation as the “Garden Spot of the Catskills”: “Due to the majestic presence of the Catskill Mountains, the intriguing presence of babbling brooks that flow through the mystical valleys created by these mountains and the delightful presence of flora and fauna indigenous to the topography of this rural area, Delaware County exudes a sense of peaceful and tranquil beauty unsurpassed by other areas of our country. So sensuous is the magnificence of this area, an early postcard producer developed a series of postcards photographically depicting the local area as “Delhi – The Garden Spot of the Catskills.”
Upper Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark illegible. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

The beginnings of the drug store firm of Merrill & Humphries can be traced back to around 1868, when Dr. John Calhoun opened a drug store at Delhi. According to W. W. Munsell in his History of Delaware County, N.Y., John Calhoun was an influential member of the Delhi community. “DR. JOHN CALHOUN was born in 1819, in Scotland, and in 1834 came to America, settling at Bovina with his parents. In 1841 he commenced the study of medicine at Andes with Dr. Peake; in 1844 was admitted, and practiced there two years, then in Bovina until 1865, when he was elected sheriff of the county of Delaware. At the expiration of his term of office in 1868, he resumed his practice and opened a drug store in Delhi, the firm name being J. Calhoun & Son. The son, J. D. Calhoun, died suddenly on Christmas, 1878. Mr. Calhoun married Jane Davis, of Andes, in 1845. He has been prominent in the history of the county.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 167.) Dr. John Calhoun died on April 20, 1893, leaving behind his wife and daughter.

In 1886 when Maurice Farrington, in addition to his photography business, entered the drug store business. In that year “Dr. John Calhoun has sold the stock of goods in his drug store and rented his store to Maurice Farrington for a term of five years. The doctor will keep his office in the store and assist in conducting the business.” (Delaware Republican. ~1886.)

By 1891 Maurice had been occupying the Dr. Calhoun Drug Store for quite some time. That year he purchased the building from J. S. Page for $3,500. His son, Frank Farrington, helped his father manage the drug store, later purchasing the business from him.

Frank Farrington would eventually sell the drug store business to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries. The partnership of Pierre “Pete” Merrill (1880-1975) and William A. Humphries took over the drug store on May 2, 1911. Both of them had worked at Farrington’s Drug Store for several years before taking over the business. Upon taking over the store they wrote in an advertisement in the local newspaper that

 

“We Make Our Bow.

This is our first appearance as proprietors.

We have bought the business of the Farrington Drug Store. We take possession May 2d.

We have been connected with the store long enough so that we feel that its customers have been our customers and we hope that you will continue to be so.

We are here to stay and we are going to treat every man, woman and child coming to store in the very way we know how.

With two licensed pharmacists, both graduates of college of pharmacy, in charge of the store you can be sure that your drugs will be just what they ought to be.

Anything that you buy from us that is not just as we represent it to be will be made so. We want every customer to be a satisfied customer.

Our advertising will occupy hereafter the space formerly used by Mr. Farrington and we believe that you will find something there every week worth reading.

Send us mail or telephone orders just the same as heretofore and they will receive the same care.”

(Delaware Gazette. May 3, 1911.)

 

Pierre B. Merrill, the first half of the partnership, was born on January 23, 1880 to Augustus and Sarah (Pierce) Merrill at Homer, New York. He graduated from the Homer Academy in 1902. In 1906 Merrill graduated from the Buffalo College of Pharmacy. Upon graduation he moved the following year from his hometown of Homer, New York to the village of Delhi where he began working for Frank Farrington at Farrington’s Drug Store.

 

Vintage postcard depicting a scenic spot along the Delaware River in Delhi, New York published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries.Delaware River, Delhi, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicting a scenic spot along the Delaware River in Delhi, New York was published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries. The postmark on the reverse side shows that the postcard was mailed in 1922. Delaware River, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1922. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

Pierre married Marguerite Honeywell at the age of 36 on September 27, 1916. She was the daughter of James R. and Mary (Walsworth) Honeywell. Marguerite was a graduate of the Delaware Academy, the Wells College in 1912 and attended Columbia University for post-graduate study. She was a school teacher, as well as an active member of the Village Improvement Society and the Tourist Club. She was a 56-year member of the First Presbyterian Church, where she was a teacher and superintendent of the Sunday school. She passed away on June 24, 1976 at Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, New York. Together Pierre and Marguerite had two children.

 

Pierre B. Merrill marriage licensePierre B. Merrill marriage licenseThe partnership of Merrill and Humphries operated a drug store located at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York while also publishing scenic postcards of the western Catskills region from 1911 to 1928. After the partnership dissolved in 1928, Pierre B. Merrill continued to publish postcards under his own name. Pierre B. Merrill and Marguerite Honeywell marriage license, 1916.

 

Pierre B. Merrill, World War I Registration CardPierre B. Merrill, World War I Registration CardThe partnership of Merrill and Humphries operated a drug store located at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York while also publishing scenic postcards of the western Catskills region from 1911 to 1928. After the partnership dissolved in 1928, Pierre B. Merrill continued to publish postcards under his own name. Pierre B. Merrill’s World War I Draft Card from 1918.

 

Pierre and Marguerite’s daughter, Sarah “Sally” Merrill, was born in 1920. She was a graduate of the Delaware Academy and was a graduate of Cornell University, College of Home Economics, class of 1942. In 1944 she married Richard Alan Shotwell. They had one daughter, Beth. She was a teacher for two years at Andrew S. Draper Central School at Schenevus, New York. He was a graduate of Cayuga Lake Academy and a graduate of Cornell University, College of Agriculture, class of 1942. He was a vocational agriculture teacher at Union Springs Central School. She resided at Union Springs from 1946 until her passing in 1988. She died on April 3, 1988 after a long illness. She is buried at Chestnut Hill Cemetery in Union Springs, New York.

Pierre and Marguerite’s son, Lewis H. Merrill, graduated from the local Delaware Academy. He served three years in the U. S. Army Air Force, and was stationed in the North Pacific, including at the headquarters of the 11th Air Force in the Aleutians. For college he graduated from Ohio State University at Columbus, Ohio in 1950. At Ohio State he received a bachelor of science degree in in agriculture, with a specialty in floriculture. Lewis began working at Baker & Sons at Utica, New York, a wholesale and retail florist company that specialized in roses and orchids. He was later employed by Stamford Hall in Stamford, Connecticut; and then worked at Ezzles Florist and Garden Supply House at Stamford, Connecticut. He married Helen Marie Peterson in 1958. She graduated from New Canaan High School and for a time worked as a secretary for Jon Whitcomb in Darien, Connecticut.

Walter A. Humphries, the second half of the partnership, was the son of William J. Humphries and Charlotte (Tucker) Humphries. As per his obituary in the local newspaper, the father

 

“Mr. Humphries was born Aug. 17, 1856, at Mt. Brydges, Ontario, Canada, son of Samuel and Caroline Bowen Humphries, who came from England and settled in Canada. In 1885 he married Charlotte Tucker of New York City.

As a young man he went to New York City and was employed by the Brewster Carriage Co. as a carriage draftman. He came to Delhi in 1884 and was employed by the Huber Carriage Co. and had lived in Delhi for 66 years.

He was a member of the Baptist Church and of Delhi Lodge, F & AM, Delhi Chapter, RAM. He was master of the Delhi lodge in 1885 and 1886, high priest of Delhi Chapter, 1889 through 1902. Recently he received the Masonic 70-year medal.

Surviving are a son, William A. Humphries of Delhi; one sister, Mrs. William Laurie, Tampa, Fla.; a granddaughter Mrs. John F. Steel, of Pittsfield, Mass.; and two grandsons, W. A. Humphries, Jr. of Bethlehem, Pa., and Robert W. Humphries of Delhi.” (“Humphries’ Funeral Today at Delhi.” Binghamton Press. June 19, 1950.)

 

Walter A. Humphries was a graduate of the Delaware Academy and then the Albany College of Pharmacy. He went to work for Frank Farrington at Farrington’s Drug Store in Delhi upon graduation.

 

Vintage postcard by Merrill and Humphries of the Delaware River below Sherwood’s Bridge in Delhi, New York.Below Sherwood’s Bridge, Delhi, N.Y.Sherwood’s Bridge crosses the West Branch of the Delaware River on Sherwood Road in the town of Delhi, New York. According to the history of the county “The first church in the town of Delhi stood just below Sherwood’s bridge on the opposite side of the river, and was built in 1811.”

The postcard was published by Merrill & Humphries of Delhi, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1919.
Below Sherwood's Bridge, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1919. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

Walter married Gertrude Whitney Young on October 21, 1915. Gertrude was born on December 5, 1889 at Delhi to Robert A. and Emma (Whitney) Young. She was a graduate of the Delaware Academy and Cornell University, class of 1913. She was a member of the Village Improvement Society and was over a 50-year member of First Presbyterian Church. Gertrude passed away on February 13, 1975 at O’Connor Hospital at Delhi, New York. A private funeral service was held on February 15, 1975, with Reverend David H. Foubert and Reverend Kenneth White officiating.

Together Walter and Gertrude had three children, including William A. Humphries, jr., of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Ruth H. Steele, of Delhi; and Robert W. Humphries, of Delhi. Both of Walter’s sons, William and Robert, as well as his son-in-law, John Steele, honorably served during World War II.

William, jr. first reported as an aviation cadet in the communication division of the United States Army Air Corps and upon graduation was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Air Force. He was later promoted to Captain, working as navigator and briefing officer for the Air Transport Command in the Army Air Force. He spent some time stationed in the country of Brazil. In November 1944 he reported for duty with the 7th Ferrying Group, Ferrying Division, Air Transport Command, at Great Falls, Montana. Around September 1945 he was reassigned to A. T. C. headquarters at Cincinnati, Ohio where he served as an administrative and services inspector. He graduated with a bachelor of science degree from Syracuse University. In August, 1950 William married Congetta A. Ronca of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. She was a graduate of Fountain Hill High School and the Bethlehem Business College; and worked in the secretarial division of the Legal Department at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. At the time of his marriage William was an assistant in the property and tax division of the Bethlehem Steel Company but would become the controller of the Bethlehem Steel Company (Canada) L.T.D.

Robert Humphries (b. 1924), Walter and Gertrude’s son, entered the service in February 1943, serving at Camp Swift in Texas, at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri and later in Hawaii. By July 1944 he was sent to the Pacific theater of operations. He was assigned to a joint assault company of infantry forces, and fought in several invasions in the Pacific Ocean including the Battle of Luzon and the Battle of Leyte. On April 13, 1945 he was wounded at the battle of Okinawa against the Imperial Japanese Army. He had a leg injury and was moved to the fleet hospital in the Marianas. After his recovery he was moved to the Philippines where he rejoined the 96th Division. After the war he resumed his college studies at Syracuse University in 1946 and graduated from Delhi. In July, 1950 Robert married LaVonne Marie Hartman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Hartman of Wooster, Ohio. She was a graduate of Mushingham College in New Concord, Ohio and at the time of the marriage she was a dramatics teacher at Delaware Academy and Central School; but would become a professor of Dramatics, Speech and English at the State University of Delhi, NY. Robert was active in the community, being a member of the Delhi Volunteer Fire Department and the Delhi American Legion. He worked as the Assistant Secretary of the Security Mutual Fire Insurance Company and was president of the Associated Cooperative Inland Marine Conference. His wife LaVonne (“Bonnie”) passed away on August 10, 1988 at Elmira. William passed away the next month at the age of 64 on September 25, 1988 at Elmira, New York.

Ruth Humphries, Walter and Gertrude’s daughter, graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in English literature and drama from Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts. She was married in 1942 to John S. Steele at Trinity Church in Springfield, Massachusetts. He was the son of Mrs. James E. Steele of Longmeadow. John also served during World War II, including time at Camp Millard and in the country of India.

In 1914, three years after first acquiring Farrington’s drug store, Merrill and Humphries “bought the one [drug store] across the street (later occupied by the A. & P.) owned by Harry England. Both were operated separately until 1917 when the men purchased the building where the store is now located and moved both into the new location.” (“Merrill’s Drug Store Now Has New Owner.” Delaware Republican-Express. October 4, 1956.)

The partnership firm of Merrill and Humphries lasted for 17 years. In 1928 the partnership dissolved as Humphries began work at an insurance company, with Merrill continuing as the sole proprietor.

After leaving the Merrill and Humphries partnership, Humphries went to work for the Security Mutual Fire Insurance Company at Delhi, starting as secretary and manager and later becoming its president. He later held various senior executive positions with insurance organizations at Delhi, Albany and Ithaca, including the Security Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Ithaca. He was an influential member of the community. He was a member of the Delhi Board of Education, a 50-year member of the First Presbyterian Church, a 29-year trustee of the Cannon Free Library and served as a director and vice president of the Delaware National Bank of Delhi. In addition, he was a member and later president of the Board of Education for the Delaware Academy and Central School, member of the Board of Visitors of State University College and a charter member of the Delhi Kiwanis Club. He retired from business around 1964.

 

Vintage postcard by Merrill and Humphries of South Main Street in Delhi, New York.South Main Street, Delhi, N.Y.The partnership of Merrill and Humphries published the postcard of quiet, residential South Main Street in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1926. South Main Street, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1926. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

While owning the drug store the partnership of Merrill and Humphries published scenic postcards from around the Delhi area. Based on the history of the drug store, postcards with the caption of “Merrill & Humphries” can be dated from between 1911 and 1928. Existing inventory may have carried over for a few years, leading to postmarks after 1928. After the drug store partnership dissolved in 1928 postcards no longer used “Merrill & Humphries,” and were then published under the name “P. B. Merrill” or “P. B. Merrill, Pharmacist.”

 

Vintage photograph by P. B. Merrill of the Cannon Free Library in Delhi, New York.Cannon Free Library, Delhi, N.Y.The Cannon Free Library at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York was established on January 24, 1917 with a charter from the Regents of the University of the State of New York.

According the library’s website “The object and purpose of the corporation was to maintain a circulating library and reading room free for the public use to the inhabitants of the Town of Delhi and vicinity. Plans for a library building then began. The library was built as a gift to the community by Mr. Henry White Cannon in memory of his parents, George Bliss Cannon and Ann Eliza White Cannon, and he endowed the library with money to keep it functioning.

On April 9, 1918, the doors to the new library building were opened to the public. Over 4,000 volumes were stacked on the shelves, and the first librarian, Miss Pauline Farrington issued 159 library cards.”

Pauline Farrington was born at Delhi on August 3, 1876 at Delhi, New York. As a youth she attended the Delaware Academy. For 14 years from 1905 to 1918 she worked as a music teacher at the New York Institution for the Blind in New York City. She then served as librarian from 1918 to 1948 at the Cannon Free Public Library in Delhi. Upon her retirement from the library, The Stamford Mirror-Recorder, the local newspaper wrote of contributions to the community.

“The retirement of Miss Pauline Farrington as Librarian at the Cannon Free Library cannot fail to leave a vacuum in the cultural life of Delhi. Her withdrawal from service terminates a period of thirty years faithful attendance at this institution, she having been the only librarian since the inception of the library. She was ever courteous and kindly toward the patrons of the institution, and has done much in guiding the reading habits of both young and old. Any book not immediately available she would get from the State Library, and no one was ever greeted with aught but a smile. Miss Farrington is withdrawing to enable her to do some of the things she has wanted to do and not be so confined, after a long period of fine service. The Library has been efficiently staffed, and while her pleasant and kindly smile will be missed, her influence will be indelibly stamped upon it. She was a keen student of books, and not at all averse to some of the modern trends. Her resignation is and will be a great loss to the patrons of the library.” (“Librarian Leaves Excellent Record.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. August 12, 1948.)

Always committed to her Second Presbyterian Church, Pauline served as the organist, was a Sunday School teacher, a member of the Ladies’ Aid and the Missionary Society. She died after a brief illness at the age of 88 on December 24, 1964. Funeral services were held at the R. J. McCall Funeral Home at Delhi in a service officiate by the Rev. Cameron B. Reed. There were no close survivors. She is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

The postcard was published by P. B. Merrill of Delhi, New York. The postcard was never mailed.
Cannon Free Library, Delhi, N.Y. No postmark. Published by P. B. Merrill. Author’s collection.

 

Vintage postcard of the Second Presbyterian Church, now the United Ministry of Delhi, at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.Second Presbyterian Church, Delhi, N.Y.The Second Presbyterian Church of Delhi was established in 1831. The church building was designed by Charles Hathaway, a county judge and an agent for Robert Livingston during the Anti-Rent Wars. “The one story clapboard church with gable roof has an elaborate centre steeple of varying levels, one of which houses a clock face. The doorway is centered under the tower and framed by a moulded entablature and ionic columns.” Some of the early Reverends of the church included Samuel G. Orton 1831-32; Orlando Kirtland 1832-35; Daniel W. Waterbury 1836-38; Bloomer Kent 1838-39; and Nathaniel H. Griffin 1839-41. The Second Presbyterian Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Delaware County Courthouse Square District. Today the church operates as the United Ministry of Delhi.

The vintage postcard of the Second Presbyterian Church was published by P. B. Merrill located at Delhi, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Source: Levy, Steven S. National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form for the Delaware County Courthouse Square District. Albany, NY: National Park Service, June 26, 1973.
Second Presbyterian Church, Delhi, N.Y. No postmark. Published by P. B. Merrill. Author’s collection.

 

Merrill continued to operate the store as sole proprietor for decades, from 1928 to 1956. He sold the business on October 1, 1956 to Marc E. Guy. Merrill continued to assist at the store until the 1960s. Marc Guy was a 1952 graduate of the Albany School of Pharmacy and was a veteran, having served for two years from 1953 to 1955 as a medic in Korea. Richard K. Aikens joined the business as a partner in 1968.

In 1984 Merrill’s Pharmacy closed after 73 years of operation. Co-owners Marc E. Guy, then mayor of the village of Delhi, and Richard K. Aikens sold the store to the Rite-Aid Corporation. Guy and Aikens continued to work there as pharmacists.

Upon his exiting the drug store business in 1956, the local newspaper editor wrote of Merrill. “Forty-five years is a long time to serve community as druggist and owner of a store completely stocked with all the items people have come to learn they could find at Merrill’s A friendly, accommodating atmosphere has made a lasting reputation for Merrill’s Drug Store. Its patrons extend thanks to its former owner for the years of service.” (“Merrill’s Drug Store Now Has New Owner.” Delaware Republican-Express. October 4, 1956.)

Merrill was active in local community organizations. He was a member of the Delhi Lodge, N. 439 F. and A. M., the local Masonic fraternity, for over 60 years; he was a member and past president of the Delhi Kiwanis Club; and he was a 68-year member of the First Presbyterian Church at Delhi.

Pierre B. Merrill passed away at the age of 95 on September 9, 1975 at O’Connor Hospital in Delhi, New York. The funeral was held on September 11, 1975 at the Moxley McCall Funeral Home at Delhi. Services were officiated by Rev. David H. Foubert, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Delhi. He was survived by his wife; his daughter, Mrs. Sarah Shotwell, of Union Springs; and his son, Lewis H. Merrill of New Canaan, Connecticut. He is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi, New York.

William A. Humphries passed away on August 1, 1974 at Fox Hospital in Oneonta. He had been sick for extended period. He was survived by his wife, Gertrude (Young) Humphries; a daughter, Mrs. Ruth Steele, of Delhi; two sons, William A. Humphries, Jr. of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; and Robert W. Humphries, of Delhi.

 

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         If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer partnership of Merrill and Humphries please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountains Catskills Delaware County Delhi drug store Farrington's Drug Store Frank Farrington Maurice Farrington Merrill & Humphries Merrill and Humphries Merrill's Drug Store New York photographer photographs photography Pierre B. Merrill postcards shop store William A. Humphries https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/2/merrill-humphries-delhi-new-york-photography-partnership Sat, 06 Feb 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Gloria Dei at Palenville: A Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/gloria-dei-at-palenville-a-study The historic Gloria Dei church at the hamlet of Palenville sits “nestled in a grove of odorous pines in the purple shadows of the beautiful Catskills.” In my estimation Gloria Dei can certainly be considered one of the most beautiful churches in the Catskills.

 

Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Gloria Dei Church, PalenvilleThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.
Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.The Red Door to HeavenThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.

 

Architect and Catskill resident William H. Day, “one of the most earnest and valuable friends of the new church project,” designed and then helped supervise construction of the Gloria Dei building. Day had gained a reputation as a church architect, but also designed residential and institutional buildings. Other churches designed by Day include the Chapel of Transfiguration (1879), now the Christ and Saint Stephen’s Church in New York City; and St. George’s Episcopal Church (1893) at Helmetta, New Jersey.

 

Gloria Dei church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone taken from local quarries and with a roof from open timber. The building was designed at 28’ by 50’ on the outside, with room for a chancel, robing room, organ chamber, etc. The church walls were 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The interior contained cathedral-stained glass windows, with all the seats and interior wood work made of pine, finished in natural color. The organ was donated in 1881 by Trinity parish of Catskill. When fully completed the church had a capacity of 135 people.

 

Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Gloria Dei, 1879The Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.
Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Window to GodThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.
Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Upon This RockThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.

 

The estimated cost of construction was over $4,000, which is particularly notable with the church having adopted a resolution that “no debt should be contracted, and that the work should progress as fast only as the state of the funds would allow.” By 1882 “the original intention of the organizers has been adhered to, and the church is free of debt.” (“Palenville – Gloria Dei Mission.” The Churchman. July 22, 1882.)

 

The grounds of the church were generously donated be deed to the Albany diocese in the spring of 1878 by Sallie Travis on condition that a church would be built there. Construction work began in May 1879 with the digging of the cellar and trenches, as “neighbors and friends cheerfully gave their labor in making ready the foundations.” Addison Garrison, “a conscientious workman, had supervised the building of the foundations, which seemed of rock-like firmness on the day the corner stone was laid. (“Gloria Dei.” The Catskill Recorder. August 1, 1879.)

 

The cornerstone for the Gloria Dei church was officially laid at a ceremony at 4:30pm on July 30, 1879. The ceremony was attended by approximately 200-300 people, a number diminished by poor weather. The cornerstone included a tin box that contained a Bible, a Prayer Book, the last issues of The Churchman, The Examiner, The Recorder and a history of the Palenville mission.

 

Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Gloria Dei Church at Entrance to Kaaterskill CloveThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.
Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.St. Francis of AssisiThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.
Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Gloria Dei Church, PalenvilleThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.

 

Bishop William Croswell Doane (1832-1913), from the diocese of Albany, led the ceremony and wrote of that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir).

 

I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here.

 

After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get in, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1880.)

 

The following poem, a tribute to the new Gloria Dei church at Palenville, was published in the August 8, 1879 issue of The Catskill Recorder. There was no author noted.

 

“Gloria Dei.”

“Her foundations are upon the holy hills.”

 

Within the mountain’s solemn shade

            They temple, Lord, we raise–

Here early will our vows be paid,

Here on virgin altar laid

            Our sacrifice of praise.

 

O’er emerald slope, o’er glassy streams,

            Half hidden ‘midst the leaves;

‘Round quiet home that lie between

The sunny uplands clothed in green

            And rich with garnered sheaves;

 

And high among the mist-crowned hills,

            And through the cloistered dells,

The waiting silence shall be stirred

By sweeter sound than brook or bird–

            The chime of Sabbath bells.

 

Liked winged incense on the air

            The voice of praise ascend;

While, silent round the modest fold,

Like giant sentinels and old,

            The hoary mountains bend.

 

To Thee, our Omnipresent God–

            Through ages aye the same,

Before whose face the heavens were bowed,

Who spake in Sinai’s thunders loud,

            And Horeb’s voice of flame.

 

Here in the mountain’s solemn shade

            Thy temple, Lord we raise–

Here early will our vows be paid,

Here on the virgin altar laid

            Our sacrifice of praise.”     

 

Reverend J. H. Young, appointed missionary by Bishop Doane, preached during that first summer of 1879. The first church officers were E. T. Mason, treasurer, and Charles H. Chubb, warden. The first church members included E. T. Mason and wife, Charles H. Chubb, M. D., and wife, Mrs. Amelia Greetham, Miss Eva Baker, and E. Potterfin.

 

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. “A temporary church was built in the rear of the site of the permanent edifice – Mr. John Goodwin doing the work gratuitously – and services have been held in the rude but helpful building.” (“Gloria Dei.” The Catskill Recorder. August 1, 1879.)

Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Follow MeThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.

 

Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Cross to HeavenThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.

 

The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

 

The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the community today. For more information about the church and their services visit their website at www.calvarygloriadei.org.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) 1879 1885 Addison Garrison architecture bishop bluestone building C. H. Chubb Catskill Mountains Catskills Christian church congregation corner stone Episcopal Gloria Dei Gloria Dei Church Gloria Dei Episcopal Church J. H. Young Kaaterskill Clove New York Palenville Sallie Travis W. H. Day William Croswell Doane William H. Day https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/gloria-dei-at-palenville-a-study Sat, 30 Jan 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: Plattekill Falls https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/catskills-then-and-now-plattekill-falls The stunningly beautiful Plattekill Falls are located in the northern Catskills of Greene County, New York. The falls are located along the Plattekill Creek within the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated to the CCCD in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to the falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies at the retreat, quietly surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove. Fortunately, the lands of the CCCD are open to the public.

 

Plattekill Falls, located at the head Platte Kill Clove, tumbles over a 65-foot single drop in to a cliff-enclosed bowl of idyllic splendor. Although popular, but with a reputation that seems to grow each year, this location is a nice alternative to the much larger crowds typically found at Kaaterskill Falls. It is accessible via a short but steep 0.5-mile roundtrip hike. There are signs along the path identifying different trees and a sign that details the geological history of the Catskills and Platte Clove.

 

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in his 1845 Letters from a Landscape Painter: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favorite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.” (See pages 48-51 from his Letters from a Landscape Painter for Lanman’s longer ode to the beauties of Plauterkill Clove.)

 

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

 

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

 

The historic stereoview seen here was taken by John Jacob Loeffler, who can be considered one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. His photographs were published as part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery.

 

In addition to this being a wonderful scene, a second interesting aspect of this stereoview is the camera setup located off to the right. The four men standing at the bottom of the falls provide an interesting sense of scale for the 65-foot falls.

 

This John Jacob Loeffler stereoview of Plattekill Falls was likely taken circa the 1870s/1880s. The stereoview was titled “Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove.” It is number 349 from Loeffler’s 5th series within the Catskill Mountain Scenery set. My photograph was taken approximately 140 years later in the spring of 2019.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; Fifth Series, # 349.Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove. (5th Series, # 349)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 5th Series, No. 349.
Title: Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove” from the “Catskill Mountain Scenery” series; Fifth Series, # 349.Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove. (5th Series, # 349)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Catskill Mountain Scenery
Catalog #: 5th Series, No. 349.
Title: Plauterkill Fall, Plauterkill Clove.

John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.

 

Plattekill Falls is a beautiful 65-foot drop waterfall located on the Plattekill Creek within the Platte Clove Preserve in Greene County, New York.Plattekill FallsPlatte Clove, Greene County

Plattekill Falls tumbles over a 65-foot single drop in to a cliff-enclosed bowl of idyllic splendor. Although popular, this location is a nice alternative to the larger crowds typically found at Kaaterskill Falls. The falls are accessible via a short but steep 0.5-mile roundtrip hike. There are signs along the path identifying different trees and a sign that details the geological history of the Catskills and Platte Clove.

The falls are located along the Plattekill Creek and on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Fortunately, the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, is easily and safely accessible.

The traditional time to visit the falls would be during either the spring, summer or fall seasons. However, it can also make for an interesting winter destination when the entire waterfall can freeze over. Platte Clove, including the falls, is one of the most popular ice climbing locations in the Catskills.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Center for Conservation and Development Catskill Mountain Scenery Catskill Mountains Catskills Charles Lanman cliff clove creek Devil's Kitchen geological Grand Canyon Greene County history J. Loeffler John Jacob Loeffler Kaaterskill High Peak Loeffler New York Old Mill Falls photographer photographs photography photos pictures Platte Clove Platte Clove Preserve Platte Kill Platte Kill Clove Plattekill Falls Plattekill Mountain river Staten Island stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoscopic view stereoview stereoviews stone Tompkinsville trail trees water waterfall West Saugerties https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/catskills-then-and-now-plattekill-falls Sat, 23 Jan 2021 13:00:00 GMT
New Stereoviews from the E. & H. T. Anthony Company https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/new-stereoviews-from-the-e-h-t-anthony-company The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new Catskills stereoviews by the E. & H. T. Anthony Company. They have all been added to the Anthony gallery, which now contains over 100 of the company’s Catskills works.

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 4193 titled “Ravine, below Haines Fall” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.Ravine, below Haines Fall. (# 4193)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 4192
Title: Ravine, below Haines Fall.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.
Ravine, below Haines Fall. (# 4193)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 4205 titled “View from the top of the Five Cascades, looking down Haines Gorge” in “The Glens of the Catskills” series.View from the top of the Five Cascades, looking down Haines Gorge. (# 4205)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 4205
Title: View from the top of the Five Cascades, looking down Haines Gorge.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.
View from the top of the Five Cascades, looking down Haines Gorge. (# 4205)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 8531 titled “First Glimpse of Mountain House” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.First Glimpse of Mountain House. (# 8531)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 8531
Title: First Glimpse of Mountain House.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

First Glimpse of Mountain House. (# 8531)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 8537 titled “The Mountain House” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.The Mountain House. (# 8537)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 8537
Title: The Mountain House.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.
The Mountain House. (# 8537)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereovie # 9048 titled “View from the Laurel House, Round Top in the distance” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.View from the Laurel House, Round Top in the distance. (# 9048)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 9048
Title: View from the Laurel House, Round Top in the distance.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.
View from the Laurel House, Round Top in the distance. (# 9048)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 9050 titled “The Laurel House and Kauterskill Falls from Prospect Rock” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.The Laurel House and Kauterskill Falls from Prospect Rock. (# 9050)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 9050
Title: The Laurel House and Kauterskill Falls from Prospect Rock.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.
The Laurel House and Kauterskill Falls from Prospect Rock. (# 9050)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 9052 titled “The Lower Kauterskill Fall – 80 Feet High” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.The Lower Kauterskill Fall – 80 Feet High. (# 9052)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 9052
Title: The Lower Kauterskill Fall – 80 Feet High.
The Lower Kauterskill Fall – 80 Feet High. (# 9052)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 9070 titled “South Lake and Stony Clove Notch” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.South Lake and Stony Clove Notch. (# 9070)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 9070
Title: South Lake and Stony Clove Notch.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.
South Lake and Stony Clove Notch. (# 9070)

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountains Catskills E. & H. T. Anthony Edward Anthony Gems of American Scenery Glens of the Catskills Henry T. Anthony New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoviews The Artistic Series Winter in the Catskills https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/new-stereoviews-from-the-e-h-t-anthony-company Sat, 16 Jan 2021 13:00:00 GMT
The “Cats” in Cats-kills https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/the-cats-in-cats-kills Given the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The anthropomorphic cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons.

 

There is much debate as to the origin of the name Catskills, particularly around the “cats.” Theories include that the name derived from the American wildcat (bobcats), or catamounts, that once roamed the area; or the Dutch word “kat” meaning a domestic she cat; or the Dutch word “kater” for tomcat; or a Mohican chief named Cat; or from an Indian word “katsketed” which meant fortification; or the “kasteels,” which were Indian stockades located along the banks of the Catskill Creek; or in honor of the poet Jacob Cats; or the ship named “The Cat” that once sailed up the Hudson River; or a place called Katsbaan near Saugerties where Indians played the game of lacrosse; and so on. For perhaps the most detailed history about the possible origins of the name Catskills, see Alf Evers in chapter 71 of his regional classic The Catskills, From Wilderness to Woodstock.

 

If the origin of “Cats” is quite obscure, what is quite clear is the origin of the term “kill” in Cats-“kills.” The term “kill” means creek, stream or river; and originated from the Dutch word kille meaning “riverbed” or “water channel”. The term is used in historically Dutch-influenced areas in the New York and New Jersey region, including the Catskills.

 

Included here are a number of vintage postcards that utilized cats in promoting the Catskills. The postcards were published by the Kingston News Service, the Eagle Post Card Company, C. W. Hughes, George Greenberg & Son, Albert Hahn and the Hugh C. Leighton Company, amongst others.

 

“Catskill Mountain Line”, “Kingston News Service”, Kingston, cars cat, cats, marketing, mountains, parachute, planeHigh Up in the Catskills, Catskill Mts., N.Y.Given the Cat-skills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, the cats look like they are having the time of their life as they fly a plane named “Catskill Mountain Line” over the towering mountains.

The postcard was published by the Kingston News Service located in Kingston, New York. It was never mailed.

High Up in the Catskills, Catskill Mts., N.Y.

 

Vintage Catskills postcard that shows two cars full of cats as they drive along a dirt country road with balloons that advertise that they are headed for the Catskill Mountains.Catskill MountainsGiven the Cat-skills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, two cars full of cats drive along a dirt country road with balloons that advertise that they are headed for the Catskill Mountains.

The postcard was published by the Eagle Post Card Company located in New York City. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1921.

Catskill Mountains

 

Vintage postcard titled “Motoring in the Catskills, N.Y.” by C. W. Hughes that was used to market the Catskill Mountains region of New York State.Motoring in the Catskills, N.Y.Given the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, two gray cats drive their boss, decked out with a top hat, in a convertible, open-aired vehicle loaded down with suitcases, golf clubs and more.

This postcard was published by C. W. Hughes & Co. located in Mechanicsville, New York. It was never mailed.

Motoring in the Catskills, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard for the Catskills region depicting four cats relaxing on a tree branch.Greetings from the CatskillsGiven the Cat-skills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, four cats lounge on a tree branch under a beautiful blue sky.

The postcard was published by C. W. Hughes & Co. located in Mechanicsville, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Greetings from the Catskills

 

Vintage postcard titled “Greetings from the Catskills” that depict four good-looking cats offering a relaxed invitation to join them in the Catskills.Greetings from the CatskillsGiven the Cat-skills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, four good-looking cats offer a relaxed invitation to join them in the “Kills.”

The vintage postcard was published by George Greenberg & Son located in Catskill, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Greetings from the Catskills

 

Vintage postcard by George Greenberg & Son titled “Greetings from the Catskills” that depict four good-looking cats offering a relaxed invitation to join them in the Catskills.Greetings from the CatskillsGiven the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons.

In this particular vintage postcard, four good-looking cats offer a relaxed invitation for you to join them in the “Kills.” The vintage postcard was published by George Greenberg & Son located in Catskill, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Greetings from the Cats Kills

 

Vintage postcard titled “Greetings from the Catskills” that depict three good-looking cats offering a relaxed invitation to join them in the Catskills.Greetings from the CatskillsGiven the Cat-skills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, three good-looking cats offer a relaxed invitation to join them in the “Kills.”

The vintage postcard was published by the Kingston News Service located in Kingston, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1945.

Greetings from the Catskills

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting four cats enjoying themselves as they go for a ride in a double set of basket swings.High up in the CatskillsGiven the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, four cats look like they are enjoying themselves as they go for a ride in a double set of basket swings.

The postcard was published by C. W. Hughes & Company located at Mechanicsville, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1936.

High Up in the Catskills

 

Vintage Catskills postcard by Albert Hahn that shows five adorable cats loudly sing from a music book about the wonders of the Catskill Mountains.Praising the CatskillsGiven the Cat-skills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, five adorable cats loudly sing from a music book about the wonders of the Catskill Mountains.

The postcard was published by Albert Hahn located in New York City. The Albert Hahn company operated from 1901 to 1919. He published his postcards in Germany, as was common for the era. The postmark on the reverse side shows that this particular postcard was mailed in 1912.

Praising the Catskills

 

Vintage postcard published by the Hugh C. Leighton Company titled “Greetings from the Catskills” depicting a beautiful cat.Greetings from the CatskillsGiven the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons.

In this particular vintage postcard, an elegantly beautiful cat poses for the camera. The postcard was manufactured in Germany and published by the Hugh C. Leighton Company located at Portland, Maine. The postcard was never mailed.

Greetings from the Catskills

 

Vintage postcard by George Greenberg & Son titled “Arrived O.K.” and “Greetings from the Catskills” that depict a cat family in a car following a sign toward the Catskills.Arrived O.K.Given the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons.

In this particular vintage postcard, a cat driving a car follows a road sign towards the Catskills, with the lush green mountains looming in the background. The vintage postcard was published by George Greenberg & Son located in Catskill, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Greetings from the Catskill Mts., N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard titled “Mr. Kaatskill” depicting a well-groomed cat in a human tie and top hat.Mr. KaatskillGiven the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, the dapper Mr. Kaatskill poses his finely groomed self while sharply dressed with a tie and top hat.

The postcard was published by C. W. Hughes & Company located at Mechanicsville, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Mr. Kaatskill

 

Vintage postcard titled “Mr. Kaatskill” depicting a well-groomed cat in a human tie and top hat.Mrs. KaatskillGiven the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, the beautiful Mrs. Kaatskill elegantly poses with a bow on her head.

The postcard was published by C. W. Hughes & Company located at Mechanicsville, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

Mrs. Kaatskill

 

Vintage postcard titled “Mr. Catskill” that was used to market the Catskill Mountains region of New York State.Mr. CatskillGiven the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, the relaxed Mr. Catskill poses with a hat and bowtie.

The postcard was published by George Greenberg located in Catskill, New York. It was never mailed.

Mr. Catskill

 

Vintage postcard titled “Mrs. Catskill” that was used to market the Catskill Mountains region of New York State.Given the Cats-kills name it is not surprising that there is a wide array of historical “cat” related postcards and marketing materials for the region. The cats often depicted tourists as they partook in various vacation activities or were dressed to the nines in high fashion. The cats could be found driving cars, flying planes, going hiking or riding in cat-pulled wagons. In this particular vintage postcard, the beautiful feline Mrs. Catskill hits the town in a bonnet and pearls.

Mrs. Catskill

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) advertising anthropomorphic antique cars cat cats Catskill Mountains Catskills historic mail marketing New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures postcards region sightseeing tourism tourist travel vintage https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/the-cats-in-cats-kills Sat, 09 Jan 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Conrad Otto Bickelmann – Photography from Brooklyn to Tannersville https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/conrad-otto-bickelmann-photography-from-brooklyn-to-tannersville Conrad Otto Bickelmann was born in July 1855 at Bickeburg, Prussia in what is today’s Germany. He was the son of Otto C. and Friederike (Kramer) Bickelmann. He immigrated to the United States in 1872 at the age of 17 and settled at Brooklyn, New York.

 

Conrad O. BickelmannConrad O. BickelmannConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

Although I cannot be certain that it is the same person, there is a record of an Otto Bickelmann, born in Germany, age 17, arriving at the United States on August 22, 1872. The record shows that the ship Nemesis left from Bremen and Southampton and arrived in the United States. Otto was listed with a literacy of “unknown” and an occupation of “Watchman.” There is some evidence that he used his first name Conrad and his middle name Otto interchangeably. For example, in the Brooklyn city directories of the 1880s and 1890s he is often listed as “C. Otto” and occasionally as just “Otto.”

Conrad was married twice. Four years after his arrival in the United States, at the age of 21, he first married Emilie (Brown) Bickelmann, also age 21, at Brooklyn on July 23, 1876. Emilie’s father was named Max and her mother was Christine Klippel. Both her parents were born in Germany. Emilie passed away at the age of 27 on April 15, 1882.

For the 1880 United States census, Conrad, age 25, was located at Brooklyn in Kings County. He was living with his wife Emily, age 25; his son Otto, age 2; and his son, Charles, age 1. Eight years after his arrival in the United States Conrad is listed with an occupation of “Artist,” while Emily was “Keeping House.”

Conrad married for a second time to Henrietta (Lohman) Bickelmann. She was born in August 1870. Henrietta passed away at the age of 90 at Tannersville on March 29, 1961. She is buried at Maplewood Cemetery in Hunter, New York.

Conrad’s son, Herman Gustave Bickelmann, would follow his father into the photography industry. Herman was born on February 17, 1881. He began learning about photography at 14 years of age. By the time of the 1900 United States census, Herman, age 19, was already listed with an occupation of “Photographer.” He moved to Tannersville around 1902. With the 1905 New York State census Herman was listed as living at Tannersville, continuing with an occupation of “Photographer.” He would be listed as either a photographer or proprietor of a photo studio on the 1900, 1905, 1910, 1920 and 1940 US and NY censuses. On the 1930 United States census he was listed with an occupation of “Merchant, retail gifts.” According to his 1918 World War I draft registration card Herman, age 37, was short, with a slender build, and had dark brown eyes and black hair. He married Emma C. (Lohman) Bickelmann. He passed away at the age 62 in November 1943. He is buried at the Maplewood Cemetery in Hunter, New York.

While at Brooklyn, Conrad’s studio was first located at 397 Grand Street. Conrad was first listed as being at this location in the 1878 Brooklyn Directory (he was not listed in 1876; I could not find the 1877 issue). He moved out of the 397 Grand Street location around 1890 or 1891. The photo studio was later located at 497 Grand Street, and at 499 Grand Street, at the corner of Union Avenue in Brooklyn. He remained at the 499 Grand Street address until he left Brooklyn around 1902. These addresses are located in what is known as the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.

 

C. O. Bickelmann Gallery LogoC. O. Bickelmann Gallery LogoConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

C. O. Bickelmann LogoC. O. Bickelmann LogoConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

C. O. Bickelmann LogoC. O. Bickelmann LogoConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

One resident, in 1926, offered his recollections of the businesses in that Williamsburg neighborhood during Bickelmann’s time there. “Herme’s cooperage, with its greasy, ill-smelling barrels; Kat’s creamery, Lochmann’s meat-chopping establishment, Dillon’s bakery, Darling’s fish market, Schumaker’s confectionary, Bickelmann’s photo gallery, Fink’s pharmacy, Babcock’s blue house, Naeher’s crockery store, Killey’s iron works, the Unique Theatre, Vosseler’s drug store, the Grand Hotel, North Side Bank and Lowenstein’s were all on Grand Street.” (“Grand Street Reminiscences of One Who Knew the Thoroughfare From Ferry to Creek.” The Brooklyn Standard Union. April 25, 1926.)

Another resident, in 1938, offered similar recollections of “Old Williamsburg.” “Nearer East River. Now let’s go farther down toward the East River. Remember Blaisdell’s wood works on Kent Ave. – Pat Ralph, the Alderman of the 14th Ward back in 1888 – the big fires, Dick and Meyer’s sugar house, and Weidermann’s barrel factory, both on N. 7th St. near the river – Hathaways’s tobacco store – Levy’s drug store – Darling’s fish store – Fitter’s butcher shop – Bickelmann’s photo studios – the button factory on N. 1st S. – Berry – the Tivoli brewery on N. 1st St. – Grand Central Palace on Grand St. – Karcher’s pork store on Grand St.” (“Old Williamsburg.” Brooklyn Eagle. November 13, 1938.)

 

Male Portrait by C. O. BickelmannMale Portrait by C. O. BickelmannConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

Female Portait by C. O. BickelmannFemale Portait by C. O. BickelmannConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Portraits by C. O. Bickelmann. Author's Collection.

 

In addition to his studio at Brooklyn, Bickelmann was also operating in the Catskill Mountains by the late 1870s, and advertised in the 1882 Van Loan’s Catskill Mountain Guide. “C. O. Bickelmann’s Souvenir Bazaar (Formerly at Laurel House), Now at Tannersville, Where will be found a good assortment of Turned and Carved Wood Ornaments, Fashioned from woods grown on the mountains. In connection therewith will be found a first-class photo-art gallery. Special attention paid to fine group pictures. Ice cream, confectionary and refreshments. Long range rifle on the grounds.”

The Laurel House, where Bickelmann had been operating, was perched near the top of famed Kaaterskill Falls, the highest falls in New York State. The house was constructed as a boarding house in 1852 by Peter Schutt, and later managed by his son Jacob L. Schutt. The house originally had room for 50 visitors but was expanded after the Civil War and again in the early 1880s to accommodate approximately 300 people. The hotel was very popular given its location near the falls, its views of Kaaterskill Clove and its moderate pricing when compared to the more upscale Catskill Mountain House and the Kaaterskill Hotel. The hotel was named for the mountain laurel (kalmia latifolia) that grows and blossoms around the area. The grand hotel operated until 1963, when it was acquired by New York State two years later and its grounds added to the Catskill Forest Preserve. The state intentionally burned the historic structure in March 1967.

After selling his business in Williamsburg, he permanently moved to Tannersville sometime in the early 1900s, possibly around 1902. There he bought a large piece of property and constructed a photography studio as well as a taxidermy building. In addition to his photography interests Bickelmman was also a taxidermist as a hobby.

 

Lake and two Bridge at the Poggenburg, Elka Park, Greene Co., N.Y.Lake and two Bridge at the Poggenburg, Elka Park, Greene Co., N.Y.Conrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Lake and two Bridges at the Poggenburg, Elka Park, Greene Co., N.Y. C. O. Bickelmann. Postmark 1912. Author’s collection.

 

For the 1905 New York census, Conrad, age 49, was located at Tannersville. He was living with his wife, age 34; his son Herman, age 24; and his daughter Edna, age 5. Conrad is listed with an occupation of “Hotel Proprietor.”

Postcards published by Bickelmann would often advertise its photographer as “C. O. Bickelmann at the Rip Van Winkle Bazaar.” Bickelmann’s souvenir shop offered, in addition to his photography, a range of tourist friendly offerings such as ice cream, confectionary, refreshments, soda water and more.

 

Alligator Rock, Catskill Mts., N. Y.Alligator Rock, Catskill Mts., N. Y.Conrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Alligator Rock, Catskill Mts., N. Y. C. O. Bickelmann at the Rip Van Winkle Bazaar. Author’s collection.

 

After Conrad’s passing in 1914, the souvenir store passed on to his son Herman Bickelmann. In 1922 he was advertising for the sale of the business. “Souvenir and Novelty Store Property. For Sale – Established 40 years. Corner center of business section on Main Street, to settle estate. For further information call or write H. G. Bickelmann, Tannersville, N.Y.” (Republican Watchman. 1922.) And in 1970 the Rip Van Winkle Bazaar advertised that it was “Now open for our 45th season.” (Stamford Mirror-Recorder. June 17, 1970.)

After the ownership of Herman Bickelmann, the Rip Van Winkle Bazaar was for a time owned and operated by the Winokur family. Upon the passing of Gerald Winokur in 2013 his obituary noted that his family often spent summers at Tannersville “where his family owned the storied Rip Van Winkle Bazaar, a general store that served generations of Catskill summer residents.”

In 1964 the Rip Van Winkle Bazaar placed an advertisement in the local newspaper announcing its “opening for its 80th season. 80 Years The Largest Souvenir and Gift Shop on the Mountain Top.” The bazaar offered toys, games, sporting goods, jewelry, novelties, souvenirs and more. The business continued to operate as the Rip Van Winkle Bazaar into the early 1970s.

 

Rip Van Winkle BazaarRip Van Winkle BazaarConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

 

Bickelmann’s studio was located at 6023 Main Street in Tannersville. The building is included on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Tannersville Main Street Historic District. As part of the application for inclusion on the National Register the building was described in detail:

 

“Three stories; four bay cross-gabled structure with rear mansard roof; five bay west addition; asphalt shingle roof; wood clapboard siding with wood shingles in gables; north elevation has a front porch at first floor with hipped roof and wood brackets; two one-light storefront windows with two-light transoms and beadboard base; glazed aluminum entrance door; 1/1 aluminum windows with stylized wood shutters; oval multi-light window on east side gable; east elevation has a two-story raised porch with turned wood posts and balustrade on second floor and a contemporary wood porch on its roof; east and west elevations have 1/1 aluminum windows. West addition has a side gabled asphalt roof, a central glazed aluminum door with wood portico and four one-light shop windows. West addition and side gabled section of building built c. 1890. Cross-gable built c. 1900.

When originally constructed, the east building was a dwelling and the west addition was a photo studio. By 1903 the building was expanded with the addition of the cross-gable and the photo studio occupied the entire first floor of the combined structure. The east section of the building was converted into a retail storefront in the 1940s but the west addition continued to be used as a photo studio. The building has undergone a recent renovation.”

 

Vintage postcard depicting Main Street in Tannersville, New York, including the photography studio of C. O. Bickelmann.Main Street, Tannersville, NYTannersville, Greene County

Vintage postcard depicting Main Street in Tannersville, New York. The short building on the right of the photo with the skylights is the studio of Conrad O. Bicklemann (1855-1914), a popular photographer for many years. The studio was later taken over by his son Herman Bickelmann (1881-1943). There is no publisher listed on the postcard. The postmark shows that it was mailed in 1909.
View of Main Street in the village of Tannersville, New York. The short building on the right with the skylights is the photography studio of Conrad O. Bicklemann. The postmark shows that it was mailed in 1909. Author’s collection.

 

Bickelmann published a series of scenic views in a set called “Catskill Mountain Scenery.” Below is a small example of the photographs included within the series.

 

100

Cauterskill Mountain House.

101

Mountain House.

102

Laurel House.

103

Mountain House.

104

Cascade House.

105

Mulford’s Hotel.

106

Campbell’s Hotel.

107

Haines’ Fall House.

108

Rip Van Winkle House.

109

Mountain House.

110

Miles Haines.

111

Clifton House.

112

View of Tannersville from Clum Hill.

113

View of Tannersville from Clum Hill (Mulford’s Hotel in distance).

114

View of Tannersville from Clum Hill.

115

Stony Clove.

116

Cauterskill Falls.

117

The upper Fall, (Cauterskill Falls).

118

Cauterskill Falls in winter.

119

Stairs leading to the Cauterskill Falls.

120

Cauterskill Falls with path leading behind the Falls.

121

View from Tower. (Cauterskill Mountain House)

122

View toward Sugar Loaf Mountain with rising mist from Roggers Piazza.

123

Haines’ Falls.

124

The Cascades. (Haines’ Falls)

125

Fawn’s Leap.

126

Profile Rock.

127

Glen Mary.

128

Scribner’s Saw Mill.

 

Cauterskill Falls in winter by C. O. BickelmannCauterskill Falls in winter by C. O. BickelmannConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Cauterskill Falls in Winter. C. O. Bickelmann from his Catskill Mountain Scenery series. Author’s collection.

 

In 1902 Conrad was assigned one-half of a new patent by Fred H. Crum for a Christmas tree holder. Patent number 703,554, dated July 1, 1902, stated the Crum had “invented certain new and useful Improvements in Christmas-Tree Holders . . .”

A small collection of approximately 60 of Bickelmann’s photographs are held in the archives of the Library of Congress. The collection includes exterior views of houses and cottages, summer resorts and the Bear and Fox Inn. Of the 60 photographs, only 10 have been digitized and are available for viewing on the Library of Congress website. The 10 photographs currently available include:

  • View from Onteora Bear & Fox Inn
  • Birdseye view of Elka Park
  • Hunter Village, Catskill Mtns., N.Y.
  • Tannersville & Haines Falls, Catskill Mts., N.Y.
  • Schoharie Mansion
  • Hunter Village, N.Y.
  • Tannersville, N.Y.
  • Tannersville, Catskill Mountains, N.Y.
  • Kinder Rooke
  • Witchwood

 

Hunter Village, Catskill Mtns., N.Y.Hunter Village, Catskill Mtns., N.Y.Conrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Hunter Village, Catskill Mtns., N.Y.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O. (ca. 1898) Hunter Village, Catskill Mtns., N.Y. Hunter New York United States, ca. 1898. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2007661175/.

 

Hunter Village, N.Y.Hunter Village, N.Y.Conrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

Hunter Village, N.Y.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O. (ca. 1898) Hunter Village, N.Y. Hunter New York United States, ca. 1898. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2007661176/.

 

Tannersville & Haines Falls, Catskill Mts., N.Y.Tannersville & Haines Falls, Catskill Mts., N.Y.Conrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Tannersville & Haines Falls, Catskill Mts., N.Y.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O. (ca. 1898) Tannersville & Haines Falls, Catskill Mts., N.Y. New York Tannersville United States, ca. 1898. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2007661225/.

 

Tannersville, Catskill Mountains, N.Y.Tannersville, Catskill Mountains, N.Y.Conrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Tannersville, Catskill Mountains, N.Y.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O. (ca. 1898) Tannersville, Catskill Mountains, N.Y. New York Tannersville United States, ca. 1898. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2007661227/.

 

View from Onteora Bear & Fox InnView from Onteora Bear & Fox InnConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. View from Onteora Bear & Fox Inn.

The Bear & Fox Inn was the general club house for the private community of Onteora Park in Tannersville, New York. It was constructed in 1887 by architect Dunham Wheeler. It is now a private home.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O. (ca. 1898) View from Onteora Bear & Fox Inn. New York Tannersville United States, ca. 1898. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2007661282/.

 

Schoharie MansionSchoharie MansionConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Schoharie Mansion.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O. (ca. 1898) Schoharie Mansion. New York Tannersville United States, ca. 1898. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2007661281/.

 

Kinder RookeKinder RookeConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Kinder Rooke.

The Kinder Rooke is a summer house in the Catskill Mountains at Onteora Park in Tannersville, New York. The photograph was taken in 1899.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O, photographer. Kinder Rooke. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2017648610/>.

 

WitchwoodWitchwoodConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York. Witchwood.

The rustic home known as Witchwood is located at Onteora Park, the former artist’s colony and today a private community. Witchwood was constructed in 1891. The home takes its name from its original owners, the Woods family, and Wychwood Park in Toronto, the hometown of a frequent visitor to Onteora Park. The photograph was taken by Bickelmann in 1899.

Source: Bickelmann, C. O, photographer. Witchwood. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2017648608/>.

 

    The Catskills, by T. Morris Longstreth, contains several of Bickelmann’s photographs. The book was published four years after his passing in 1918. The photographs include “Natty Bumpo’s View”, offering a panoramic view of the Hudson Valley from Pine Orchard; “Profile Near Palenville,” offering a look at Profile Rock in Kaaterskill Clove; and “Out Windham Way,” offering a panoramic view of the northern Catskills.

The Catskills is one of the best books ever written about that famous region. The travelogue follows the author as he journeys through the Catskill Mountains in 1918. Longstreth takes you to Overlook Mountain, Stony Clove, Phoenicia, Hunter, Slide Mountain, Kaaterskill Falls, the Ashokan Reservoir, Mount Utsayantha and many more places. Along the way Longstreth fishes the mountain streams, sleeps under the stars, lodges at local boarding houses and dairy farms, tramps the backroads, talks to the people and witnesses the many majesties of nature. The book has an easy flow, making the pages turn by effortlessly. Interspersed throughout the book are great pieces of advice which, taken by themselves, are worth the read.

In addition to photographing everyday people of the city and the mountains, Bickelmann was also known to photograph celebrities. One such example is his timeless photograph of the famous Maude Adams (1872-1953), the most popular and highly paid actress of her time. Adams acted in a number of Broadway shows, most notably Peter Pan, and later became a professor of dramatic arts at Stephens College at Columbia, Missouri. She owned a summer home named Caddam Hill at Tannersville. The Bickelmann photograph of Maude Adams is held at the Digital Collection of the New York Public Library.

 

Maude Adams Portrait by C. O. BickelmannMaude Adams Portrait by C. O. BickelmannConrad O. Bickelmann operated a popular photo studio and souvenir shop in the Catskills at the village of Tannersville in Greene County, New York.

Maude Adams.

Source: Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library. Maude Adams Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-d7d7-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

For the 1910 United States census, Conrad, age 55, was located at Tannersville. He was living with his wife Henrietta, age 39; and his daughter Edna, age 10. He is listed as having been married twice, with the current marriage lasting for 11 years. Henrietta is listed as having had one child, that child being alive. Conrad is listed with an occupation of “Photographer.”

Conrad Otto Bickelmann passed away at the age of 58 on April 25, 1914. Upon his passing it was written that he “was formerly one of the leading photographers of the city of Williamsburg, Long Island, which is now a part of Greater New York City. He was an earnest and enthusiastic photographer and kept pace with the advances in photographic business.” (“C. O. Bickelmann.” Snap Shots. Volume 25, Number 5. May 1914.) A private funeral was held at his residence. He is buried at Maplewood Cemetery at Hunter, New York.

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Conrad O. Bickelmann please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you.

 

 

Selection of copyrights held by Conrad O. Bickelmann at the Library of Congress.

 

1898

Bird’s eye view of Elka Park. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43087, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1. 1898.

 

Elka park. no. 100. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57887, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

Hudson valley view, no. 11. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57890, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

Onteora park. no. 1. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57892, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

Schoharie Mansion. no. 101. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57891, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View from High Peak. No. 80. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57888, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View from Thurber’s piazza, Onteora. no. 98. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57893, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Hunter village. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43081, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Hunter village, N.Y. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43086, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Hunter village, Catskill mountains, N.Y. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43085. July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Santa Cruz, Twilight and Sunset Parks. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43082, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

Catskill mountains. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43083, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Tannersville and Haines Falls. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43084, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Tannersville, Catskill mountains. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43080, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of Tannersville, N.Y. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 43079, July 18. 1 copy rec’d July 18, 1898. 1 copy rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

View of the Eastkill valley, Catskill mountains, no. 25. Copyright by C. O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1898, no. 57889, Oct. 1. 2 copies rec’d Oct. 1, 1898.

 

1899

View from Bears’ den. No. 123. Copyright by Conrad O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn. 1899, no. 42829, June 30; 2 copies rec’d June 30, 1899.

 

View from Overlook mountain. Nos. 121,122. Copyright by Conrad O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn. 1899, nos. 42827, 42828, June 30; 2 copies each rec’d June 30, 1899.

 

View from South mountain. no. 124. Copyright by Conrad O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn. 1899, no. 42831, June 30; 2 copies rec’d June 30, 1899.

 

Platt clove, no. 120. Copyright by Conrad O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn. 1899, no. 42830, June 30; 2 copies rec’d June 30, 1899.

 

“Stony (The) clove.” no. 136. Copyright by Conrad O. Bickelmann, Brooklyn. 1899, no. 44981, July 10; 2 copies rec’d July 10, 1899.

 

 

1903

Onteora county fair, 1903. Numbers 3 to 33. H 36317 to H 36347. Bickelmann (Conrad O.), Tannersville, N.Y. 2 c. each Sept. 29, 1903.

 

Onteora county fair, 1903. no. 34. The Romans. H 36348, Sept. 29, 1903.) Bickelmann (Conrad O.), Tannersville, N.Y. 2 c. each Sept. 29, 1903.

 

Onteora county fair, 1903. no. 35. The Mummy. H 36349, Sept. 29, 1903.) Bickelmann (Conrad O.), Tannersville, N.Y. 2 c. each Sept. 29, 1903.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Brooklyn C. O. Bickelmann Catskill Mountains Catskills Conrad O. Bickelmann gallery Grand Street Greene County Herman G. Bickelmann landscapes Main Street photographer photographs photography portraits Rip Van Winkle Bazaar Route 23A shop souvenir store studio Tannersville Williamsburg https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/1/conrad-otto-bickelmann-photography-from-brooklyn-to-tannersville Sat, 02 Jan 2021 13:00:00 GMT
M. H. Bullard – Daguerrean Artist https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/12/m-h-bullard-daguerrean-artist  

M. H. Bullard was a traveling Daguerrean Artist from Massachusetts who visited the village of Delhi in the years 1850 and 1851. His first visit appears to have been in January through February in 1850. During this stay he operated his gallery over the store of James Elwood. Bullard placed the following advertisements in the Delaware Gazette, the local newspaper.  

 

January to February 1850

         “Mr. M. H. Bullard, Daguerrean Artist from Massachusetts, would announce to the citizens of Delhi and vicinity, that he has fitted up a Daguerrean Gallery, for two or three weeks only, over the store of James Elwood, where he is prepared, in clear or cloudy weather, to take likenesses that are un-surpassed for richness, beauty of tone and strength of expression.

         Having availed himself of the late London Process, he is enabled to ensure a likeness not to be surpassed by any of the most celebrated Galleries in the U.S. – Likenesses taken by this late improvement are perfectly life-like and are rendered never-fading.

         Lockets, Velvet Book Cases of the richest quality, always on hand. All are invited to call and examine specimens, whether they intend sitting for pictures or not.”  

         (Delaware Gazette. January 16, 1850.)

 

February 1850

         “Photographic Likenesses. M. H. Bullard would respectfully inform the citizens of Delhi and the surrounding country, that owing to the unprecedented success that has attended him since his arrival in this place, and the numerous applications he is daily receiving from the inhabitants, he has determined to remain a few days longer.

         Having associated with him in the Daguerrean business, Mr. F. L HILLER, they are now able to execute business with the greatest dispatch, and in a style that cannot but please the most fastidious. They will constantly be in attendance at their Daguerrean Gallery over Elwood’s Store, to wait upon any who may favor them with a call, and give them such a likeness, that they may

                  “ * * * see themselves

                  As others see them.

         All are invited to call and examine their specimen.– They will there see pictures of those with whom they are well acquainted, and hence be enabled to judge understandingly of their skill in the Daguerrean Art.

         Remember that their stay will be limited to a few days.”

         (Delaware Gazette. February 20, 1850.)

 

         In May of 1851 M. H. Bullard returned to the village of Delhi. During this stay Bullard operated at rooms at the office of Dr. J. I. Merwin, the village dentist. He later moved locations to the building at the corner of Main Street and Meredith Street, opposite Judson’s Hotel. The stay seems to have been somewhat lengthy for a traveling Daguerrean, with Bullard remaining at Delhi through September 1851. His last advertisements at Delhi announced his intentions to “go West.”

 

May 1851

“Daguerreotypes. The undersigned will again visit Delhi in the course of a few days, to remain for a short time, when he will be happy to wait upon all who my feel disposed to give him a call.” (Delaware Gazette. May 14, 1851.)

 

June to July 1851

         “Daguerreotypes. Mr. M. H. Bullard would respectfully inform his former friends and the public generally, that he has again visited Delhi, and opened a Daguerrean Gallery in the office with Dr. J. I. Merwin, nearly opposite the Bank, where he will be happy to see all those who may favor him with a call, whether they wish pictures or not.

         Gold lockets of the richest quality constantly on hand, and will be sold, including miniatures, as cheap if not cheaper than the Lockets can be bought elsewhere. All those wishing first class picture of themselves or friends, will do well to improve the present opportunity, and that without delay, for his stay is limited to a few weeks.

               Think not these portraits by the sun light made,

                              Shades though they are, will like a shadow fade.

               No! when the lop of flesh in dust shall lie –

                              When Death’s grey film o’er spreads the beaming eye –

               These life-like pictures mocking at decay,

                              Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day.”

               (Delaware Gazette, June 11, 1851.)

 

July to September 1851

         “Improve the Opportunity. The subscriber is returning thanks to the people of this vicinity for their extensive patronage, would say that he has made arrangements to go West, and will have but a few days more to remain in Delhi.

         Those wishing Likenesses taken by him will do well to avail themselves of this opportunity, and that WITH OUT DELAY, as it is hardly possible he will again be able to stop in this place.

         (Delaware Gazette. July 30, 1851.)

 

         After leaving the village of Delhi in September 1851 it’s unclear as to his next destination. In October 1852 he opened “Bullard’s Daguerrean Gallery” at Cooperstown, New York. He placed the following advertisement in the local newspaper.

 

               “BULLARD’S DAGUERREAN GALLERY, Just opened in Dr. Peak’s building, Opposite Comstock & Co.’s Drug Store, where he will take Likeness of individuals and Family Groups, which are not surpassed for depth of tone, clear and life-like expression, and beautiful finish of both plate and picture.

               Having a large size apparatus of the very best manufacture he is enabled to take pictures equally well in clear or cloudy weather, of any size or in any style required.

               For children, a clear day, between 10 and 2 is preferable.

               All are invited to call and examine specimens, whether they wish pictures or not.”

               (The Otsego Democrat. Cooperstown, New York. October 23, 1852.)

 

In March 1853, he was likely at the town of Frankfort in Herkimer County, New York. He placed the following advertisement in the local newspaper. “IN CASE OF DEATH those person who are so unfortunate as not to possess a semblance of the loved and lost, can be waited on by the subscriber at their residences and have likenesses of the deceased taken in all possible perfection. “M. H. BULLARD.” (Herkimer County Democrat. Frankfort, New York. March 16, 1853.)

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer M. H. Bullard please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Bullard's Daguerrean Gallery Cooperstown Daguerrean daguerreotype Delaware County Delhi F. L. Hiller Frankfort gallery James Elwood M. H. Bullard New York photographer photography portraits studio United States https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/12/m-h-bullard-daguerrean-artist Sat, 19 Dec 2020 13:00:00 GMT
Jacob Miles Churchill – Daguerrean Artist https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/12/jacob-miles-churchill-daguerrean-artist Jacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

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         Jacob Miles Churchill was born on May 10, 1799 at Stockbridge, Massachusetts. His parents were Jacob Churchill and Lyllis Reed. The father Jacob had been born at Easton, Massachusetts on November 3, 1744 but later settled at Stockbridge. Jacob Miles was one of ten children in the family. The father Jacob passed away in October 1815. Jacob, the father, and his wife Lyllis are buried at the Stockbridge Cemetery in Massachusetts.

         Jacob Miles is a direct descendent of John Churchill, who arrived at the seaside colony of Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1643. Upon his arrival in the new world John quickly acquired a large land holding in the area and became a prominent farmer and freeman. John married on December 18, 1644 to Hannah Pontus, daughter of William Pontus, a landowner and a citizen of some prominence and influence in the colony, and a member of the Court 1636-1638 inclusive.” Thus began, from John and Hannah, this line of the Churchill family in the United States. For more information regarding the family lineage, see The Churchill Family in America by Gardner Asaph Churchill, Nathaniel Wiley Churchill and Rev. George M. Dodge. 

Jacob Miles Churchill would eventually migrate from the town of Stockbridge near the western border of Massachusetts to the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. It is unclear as to the time of his actual arrival, but he was listed as a resident of Delhi on both the 1830 and 1840 United States censuses. On the 1830 census he was listed as living with one female “over twenty and under thirty” and one female “under five years of age.”

Jacob married Lucinda (Thompson) Churchill. Lucinda was born on May 30, 1800 in Washington County, New York. Together they had three children, Permelia, Charles and Helen.

Permelia C. (Churchill) Foote was born on February 18, 1826. She was first married on May 22, 1849 to Alfred J. Fitch (1823-1854). They had one child together, Helen B. Fitch (1850-1865). After Alfred’s passing at the age of 30 on September 23, 1854, Permelia remarried to Joseph H. Foote, M.D. on May 21, 1856. That ceremony was officiated by Reverend John Little. Joseph H. Foote was a doctor who practiced at North Walton for five years from 1851 to 1856 and thereafter moved to Franklin where he practiced for the remainder of his life. He also ran a popular hotel for 27 years from 1867 to 1894. Permelia and Joseph had two children together, Julia Foote (b. April 8, 1858; d. April 26, 1858); and Stella Foote (b. July 1, 1859). Permelia passed away at the age of 67 on July 24, 1893.

Charles Frederick Churchill was born on May 30, 1837 at Delhi. He was well respected in the community having served his country during the Civil War and having been a long-standing member of several community organizations. He married Harriett Frances Armstrong on June 14, 1876. She had been born on April 25, 1844 at Walton, New York. They had three children together, Nellie (b. July 29, 1871; d. January 3, 1873); Louise, (b. July 25, 1879); and William Wheeler (b. July 3, 1882). Charles Churchill passed away in January 1913. Upon his passing a lengthy newspaper obituary provided details into his notable life.

 

“Death came very suddenly Sunday evening to Mr. Charles F. Churchill. He had been in his usual good health and Sunday evening came up to this office about 6 o’clock and returned home about 7. He sat down to read his paper and almost immediately expired. It is supposed to be from heart difficulty or apoplexy. The end came so suddenly that he could not have suffered much.

Mr. Churchill was born in Delhi in May, 1836. He was a student in Delaware Academy when Bishop Tuttle, Rev. Dr. Nelson Millar and other men of that age were members of the school. After leaving the Academy he learned the printer’s trade in this office and has been employed for long periods in each of the printing offices here. He was also a ready writer and during his life has contributed frequently very readable articles to each of the papers.

Early in the civil war he enlisted in the country’s service. He became a member of the 144th regiment, and serving until the war closed, and was honorably discharged.

When England Post G. A. R. organized he became a member, and at the time of his death held the position of Junior Vice Commander.

He was always public spirited, and among other things was active in the first steps that were taken to establish the Delhi Fire Department. He continued with the organization until his age made it necessary to retire from most the activities, but until last year he had charge of the apparatus, and the general care of the department.

For several years he and his brother-in-law C. F. Armstrong conducted the grocery business in the England store on the corner of Main and Meredith streets, and after the death of Mr. Armstrong with Mr. John Ferguson, until he sold his interest to Mr. J. E. W. Thompson. He again took up the work of printing and was a compositor in the Gazette office until his eyesight failed a few years ago.

Mr. Churchill was a very companionable man, and he made a host of friends not only here but throughout the county.

The funeral was from his residence Tuesday, at 2 P. M., the Rev. Mr. Kittridge officiating. He is survived by his wife, one son and on daughter, both of Delhi.”

                              (Delaware Gazette. January 22, 1913.)

 

Helen Churchill was born on October 1, 1844. She died without reaching her first birthday, passing away on May 15, 1845. The three children of Jacob Churchill, Permelia, Charles and Helen, are buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

On the 1850 United States census Jacob Churchill was living at the village of Delhi. Living in the household was his wife Lucinda, age 49; and their son, Charles, age 13. Jacob was not yet in the photography industry, being listed with a trade occupation. The census writing is challenging to read but the profession ends with “maker.”

         Jacob Churchill, now in his early 50s, sought to begin a new career. He announced his photographic services at Delhi in 1852 with the following newspaper advertisement in the Delaware Gazette. “Daguerrean Gallery. The inhabitants of Delhi and neighboring towns, are respectfully informed that the subscriber has rooms over the store of A. J. Fitch, where he is preparing to take Daguerreotype Likenesses in the latest improvements of the art. The public are invited to call and examine his pictures for themselves. JACOB CHURCHILL.” (Delaware Gazette. April 7, 1852.)

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

         For the next several years after 1852 Churchill worked as a travelling Daguerrean, taking his photographic “car” to various towns. Given that many small, agrarian towns of the region (and across the country) could not support a permanent gallery, itinerant photographers, such as Churchill, would travel from one town to the next in search of business. The car would carry the required equipment such as the camera, tripod and some form of “dark room” where the negative could be processed. The itinerant photographer would likely remain at each location for only a few days but possibly up to a few weeks, depending on demand. Over time formal studios were established in the larger towns and population centers.

By 1854 Churchill was back at the village of Delhi, where he established a permanent gallery. The following advertisement was published in the June 21, 1854 issue of the Delaware Gazette. Churchill was working at rooms over H. England’s Store.

 

“DAGUERREAN GALLERY.

Attend, ye dwellers ‘neath the sun,

Behold the wonders Art hath done,

We talk by lightning, ride by steam,

And point the Sol’s eternal beam.

J. Churchill having taken the rooms formerly occupied by M. R. Wilcox, over H. England’s Store, where he intends establishing a PERMANENT DAGUERREAN GALLERY, would respectfully invite the inhabitants of the village of Delhi and vicinity, to call and examine the superior Daguerreotype Portraits taken by him. Having been a travelling Daguerrean for two years, his experience in the art, combined with great improvements recently adopted by the most celebrated Artists in this country and Europe, is confident that he can render to his patrons such pictures as are unsurpassed for richness and accuracy of likeness.

               He uses none but the very best materials and has obtained and is now using the

London Patent Gilding Process,

by which a transparent coating is secured over the entire picture, preserving it all in its original beauty, unaffected by light, air or age.

               He warrants entire satisfaction in every Picture; no Portrait being allowed to leave which is not artistically correct.

               Likenesses taken equally well in clear or cloudy weather. Price vary according to the size of the Plate and the richness of the Case.

               Paintings, Statuary and Pictures copied.”

               (Delaware Gazette. June 21, 1854.)

 

         In January, 1855 Churchill advertised his services in the Delaware Gazette, the local newspaper. “Daguerreotypes – For a fine and perfect likeness, call at Churchill’s gallery, over Griswold’s hardware store, next to Delaware Bank.” (Delaware Gazette. January 24, 1855.)

Churchill published another, longer advertisement in February, 1855. “DAGUERREAN ROOM. The subscriber has returned once more to the village of Delhi, where he is practicing the art of Daguerreotype, over the store of Griswold & Wright. He flatters himself from his long experience in the business that he can insure to the patrons Pictures which for richness of beauty and clearness, cannot be surpassed. Gentlemen and Ladies and the public in general, are invited to call. Satisfaction given in all cases, or no charge. Instruction given in the art. J. CHURCHILL.” (Delaware Gazette. February 7, 1855.)

         Churchill began his career by offering daguerreotypes but later expanded, as the technology advanced, to offer ambrotypes. The development of the Ambrotype photographic process is often credited to James A. Cutting (1814-1867), an American photographer and inventor. Cutting patented his improvements on the ambrotype process in 1854, and thus attached his name to the process. Ambrotypes would reach their height of popularity in the mid-1850s to the mid-1860s. Ambrotypes were eventually replaced with Cartes de visite and other paper print photographs, both of which were easily available in multiple copies.

As per the Library of Congress “An ambrotype is comprised of an underexposed glass negative placed against a dark background. The dark backing material creates a positive image . . . The invention of wet collodion photography processes in the 1850s allowed the development of two new kinds of photographs--ambrotypes and tintypes. These new formats shared many characteristics with the earlier daguerreotypes but were quicker and cheaper to produce. Primarily used for portraiture, each photo is a unique camera-exposed image and was available in the following standard-sizes. The most common size was the sixth plate.

 

  • Imperial or Mammoth Plate - Larger than 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Whole Plate - 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Half Plate - 4.25 x 5.5 inches
  • Quarter Plate - 3.25 x 4.25 inches
  • Sixth Plate - 2.75 x 3.25 inches
  • Ninth Plate - 2 x 2.5 inches
  • Sixteenth Plate - 1.5 x 1.75 inches.”

 

On the 1855 New York State census, Jacob, age 55, was living with his wife Lucinda, age 54; his daughter, Permelia, age 29; his son Charles, age 18; and his grand-daughter, Helen Fitch, age 5. Permelia’s first husband, Alfred J. Fitch, had passed away in 1854. Jacob’s occupation was listed as “Daguerrean.” The family resided in a “framed” house with a value of $700.

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

In 1856 Churchill advertised the availability of both daguerreotypes as well as ambrotypes at his gallery. He was now operating at rooms over Dr. Fitch’s office. 

 

               “Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes. The subscriber takes this method of informing his friends and inhabitants of this county, that he is now taking Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes in all the beauty of the art. His long experience and practice enables him to offer to the public, pictures which, for richness, beauty and accuracy, cannot be surpassed by any other artist in this county.

               As to the Patented Ambrotype Pictures, he has nothing to say here, but if any Gentleman or Lady will call at his rooms, over Dr. Fitch’s Office, he will soon convince them that they are of short duration. And the gentleman who offers them to the public must be either ignorant of common Philosophy, or that he means to draw from the public funds which he has foolishly spent, (if spent at all.) That Pictures taken on glass can be made to stand is beyond contradiction, and those favoring him with their patronage shall not go away dissatisfied.

               Pictures will be taken at my rooms for a short time, much cheaper than they ever have been before in this county.

               Pictures which have heretofore been sold for $1, will now be sold for 50 cts; $1.25 for 75 cts; $1.50 for $1.

               The public are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens, as he will exhibit none but those of his own taking.

               J. CHURCHILL.”

(Delaware Gazette. December 24, 1856.)

 

In 1856 Jay Gould (1836-1892) published a comprehensive map of Delaware County, including insets with the details of the county’s larger villages. This map listed, amongst the business district, three Daguerreian Artists working at Delhi. In addition to J. Churchill, there was H. England, Jr. and Wm. H. Johnson. This historic map included a prominent logo for J. Churchill. It appears as if the logo may have been an advertisement to be included as part of Churchill’s sponsorship of the map.

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

In addition to the artists of England and Johnson, another early Delhi photographer operating at the same time as Jacob Churchill was E. C. Riggs, “Ambrotype Artist.” Riggs worked out of rooms over the Post Office and later in rooms over Elwood’s Store. Riggs began his business in 1856, noted by several advertisements in local newspapers that can be found for his business.

Two talented photographers working in one small town led to some intense competition between E. C. Riggs and J. Churchill. They would occasionally battle in the local newspapers about each other’s motivations, quality and pricing. In one notable back-and-forth letter / advertisement published in December 1856 in the Delaware Gazette, a local newspaper, E. C. Riggs first wrote:

 

“IMMENSE EXCITEMENT! Ambrotypes at Reduced Prices!!

The subscriber would say to the public that, notwithstanding the TREMENDOUS EXERTIONS of our “up town” Philosopher to the contrary, he is alive and attending to business as usual. And his “ignorance of common philosophy” does not prevent him from selling the most beautiful pictures taken in this county, and at lower prices than they have ever been sold before.

As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false; and I defy the gentleman (?) who takes so much pains to injure me and make himself appear ridiculous, to produce one that has faded in the least. And I would like to have him give satisfaction to his customers, whose pictures I have taken over and finished off after passing through his philosophic hands. I will warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits. I respectfully invite the public to examine both sides – they shall be the judges.

Call in ladies and gentleman, and see who takes the cheapest and best pictures. A poor picture is dear at any price.

My Rooms are over Elwood’s Store.

Office hours are 9 A.M. to 3 ½ P. M.

E. C. Riggs.”

(Delaware Gazette. December 17, 1856.)

 

In response Churchill wrote:

 

“Pictures on Glass. The subscriber invites the attention of the public to his advertisement in another column, and his assertations therein contained, are in every respect true and correct. But it is not his intention to publish here, but to correct some misrepresentations which I see in an advertisement signed E. C. Riggs, in which he states as follows “As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false, and I defy the gentleman to produce one that has faded in the least.” If I am the man to whom he alludes as the “up town philosopher,” and the man who took so much pains to injure him, then I say the gentleman has stated a wicked falsehood, and he could not be ignorant of it. I never said a word about his Ambroytpes fading, for there is not one to be found, probably, that is more than three or four months old. And how does he know whether he asserts the truth or not?

I did say they were of short duration, and this I am able to maintain.

He further says “I warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits.” With what degree of propriety does he warrant his work, and what assurance can he give the public of its duration? Will the few months he has been in business be a sufficient time to test their durability? Let the public judge. Yet he is willing to warrant his work, but is careful not to say how long; he is then willing it shall stand upon its own merits. So am I, but it will not upon its own merits or any other.

If the Patented Ambrotype was of such durability, why did Brady and others of New York give them up? Because they were worthless, and his information is from one of the best men in this town, taken from his own lips.

I now come to is last italicized sentence. “A poor picture is dear at any price.” This is my sentiments exactly; and those who have been so unfortunate as to get one of your Patented Ambrotypes, will probably find out in a short time the truth of this assertion to their sorrow.

Gentlemen and ladies, call at my office and get you a fifty cent picture, and I will make it as durable as the rock of Gibraltar.

Yes, when your flesh in dust shall lie,

When death’s grey film o’er spread your beaming eye,

My life-like   mocking at decay,

Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day.

 

A Splendid Stock just received.

J. CHURCHILL.” (Delaware Gazette. December 24, 1856.)

 

         Churchill advertised his low rates in an 1858 newspaper advertisement. “Ambrotypes for Twenty-Five Cents, Put up in splendid cases and equal to any ever sold in Delaware County. At Churchill’s Gallery.” (Delaware Gazette. September 8, 1858.”

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

           

         In an 1859 newspaper advertisement Churchill promoted his low prices for Ambrotypes. “Look Here. If you will call at Churchill’s Gallery, One door north of the Post Office, you can get a 1-16 size AMBROTYPE PICTURE for 10 cents! And larger sizes, up to ½, in proportion.” (Delaware Gazette. June 15, 1859.)

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

“Ever since Daguerre first invented the art of preserving likenesses, it has been undergoing almost endless improvements, until, at last, it seems as if the inventive genius of man had reached the very acme of perfection in this wonderful art. There is probably nothing which calls to mind early associations so vividly as to look upon the likeness of an absent parent, brother, sister, or friend – nothing more necessary to leave behind us when we shall leave this world for another. Reader, delay not till Death shall have changed your living body into a mass of mouldering clay, but go to Churchill’s gallery, over Yeomann’s Office, and preserve the likeness of your face in all its loveliness and beauty for those who shall come after you.” (Delaware Gazette. September 28, 1859.)

         In an 1860 advertisement Churchill promoted his exhibition of “most beautiful and life-like Pictures.” “GRAND EXHIBITION. THE DUSSELDORF GALLERY OF PAINTINGS in New York has for several years been the resort of all admirers of art, but public attention is now being drawn in another direction. CHURCHILL’S GALLERY, over Yeomans’ Office, abounds with the most beautiful and life-like Pictures, and is daily visited by numbers, who take the opportunity to procure one of his incomparable AMBROTYPES. By means of his SKY-LIGHT he is enabled to produce a better Picture than can be furnished elsewhere. CALL AND SEE.” (Delaware Gazette. April 18, 1860.)

         During the years 1860-1862 the following advertisement was routinely published in the local newspapers:

 

“PHOTOGRAPHS! The subscriber has recently returned from New York with a magnificent SOLAR CAMERA, which, in connexion with his superior side and skylights, renders his Gallery one of the most perfect institutions of the kind in the country.

Photographs, Ambrotypes, Melanotypes, and every desirable style of picture known to the art may be obtained at this Gallery, executed in the most durable and artistic manner.

The subscriber, after an experience of nearly twelve years in the business, feels confident of giving perfect satisfaction to every patron, and at prices which defy competition.

OLD PICTURES faithfully copied and enlarged to life-size if desired.

Call and examine specimens at my rooms over Yeomans’ Office.”

 

         For 1860 United States census Jacob, age 62, was living his wife, Lucinda, age 60; his son, Charles, age 23, who had an occupation of “Job Printer;” and Amos Walters, age 17, from Pennsylvania. Jacob’s occupation was “Artist.” The family’s real estate was valued at $600 and their personal estate was valued at $200.

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

         In 1862 Churchill moved his Ambrotype Gallery to “a new edifice he has erected between Belcher’s grocery and McCourtie’s shoe-shop.” (Delaware Republican. May 24, 1862.)

         For the 1865 New York State census Jacob, age 66, was living with wife, Lucinda, age 64; and his son, Charles, age 26. The family resided in a “framed” house valued at $1,000. Jacob’s occupation remained as “Artist.”

 

J. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJ. Churchill, Daguerrean ArtistJacob Miles Churchill operated a popular Daguerrean and Ambrotype photographic gallery in the 1850s and early 1860s at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

         By circa 1866 Jacob Churchill had left the photography industry and began work as a shoe maker. That year, in February, 1866, a devastating fire broke out at the village of Delhi. Several buildings were destroyed. The fire broke out at the grocery store of Alva Becher, located on the corner of Main Street and the court house square. The fire moved down the street and approached the shoe shop of Jacob Churchill, who was operating out of his old Daguerreian car. The old photographic car was located between the grocery and the Delaware Republican printing office. Given its temporary nature, the car was pulled down in order to save other buildings. In addition to Becher’s store, the buildings occupied by Mrs. Julia Patterson and James Cormack, Jr. were also destroyed. The offices of the Delaware Republican and the Methodist Church were narrowly saved. Jacob Churchill estimated his losses at $100.  

         For the 1870 United States census, Jacob, age 72, was living with his wife Lucinda, age 70; his son, Charles, who had an occupation of “Printer;” Charles’ wife, Hattie Churchill, age 23, with an occupation of “Keeping House;” and Hector St. Clair, age 24, with an occupation of “Stone Cutter.” Jacob’s official occupation was now listed as “Shoe Maker.” The family’s real estate was valued at $2,000, with his personal estate worth $300.

         For the 1875 New York State census, Jacob, age 77, was living with his wife Lucinda, age 75; his son, Charles, age 37, with an occupation of “Printer;” and Charles’ wife, Harriett, age 29. Jacob’s occupation was “Shoe Maker.” The family resided in a “framed” house valued at $900.

         Jacob Churchill passed away at the age of 76 in Delhi on January 14, 1876. Upon his passing it was written that “Mr. Churchill has been for many years a resident of this village, was well known and esteemed by all our citizens as possessed of a kind, cheerful and friendly disposition, as an intelligent, upright and worthy citizen, and as a devout and as devout and consistent christian.” (Delaware Gazette. January 19, 1876.)

Lucinda Churchill, Jacob’s wife, passed away in Delhi on October 15, 1880. Upon her passing it was written that “She needs no eulogy. In this community where she has been so long and well known, she was universally esteemed and loved. By here genial nature, her kind heart, and her broad Christian charity, she gathered around her a large circle of friends, who mourn her loss, and who it is hoped will imitate her virtues. Having lived a pure, devoted Christian life, she died a calm, peaceful, triumphant death.” (Delaware Republican. October 23, 1880.)

Both Jacob and Lucinda are both buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Jacob Miles Churchill please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Ambrotype artist Daguerrean Daguerreotype Delaware County Delhi E. C. Riggs gallery Hannah Pontus Jacob Churchill Jacob Miles Churchill John Churchill Lucinda Churchill Lucinda Thompson New York photographer photography pictures Stockbridge studio village https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/12/jacob-miles-churchill-daguerrean-artist Sat, 12 Dec 2020 13:00:00 GMT
A Look Back in Catskills Photography: Not Yet Invented https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/12/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-not-yet-invented             The following anecdote was published on April 20, 1869 in the Bloomville Mirror. Bloomville is located within the town of Kortright in Delaware County, New York.

 

            “A woman with a child entered a photographic gallery in Newburg, N.Y., the other day, and previous to placing it for a picture the woman subjected the child to a vigorous spanking. The artist interfered, when he was informed that she was only trying to get up a fine color in the child’s face, in order that it might be represented in the picture with blooming cheeks. She was somewhat surprised to learn that the matter of color in the photograph was quite an after consideration; that the machine to take colors just as they stood was not yet invented.”

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) black and white Bloomville Bloomville Mirror Catskill Mountains Catskills color Delaware County Kortright New York photographer photography https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/12/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-not-yet-invented Sat, 05 Dec 2020 13:00:00 GMT
A Look Back in Catskills Photography: Retort Photographic https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-retort-photographic The following photography joke was published in the May 26, 1916 issue of the Catskill Mountain News.

 

“Retort Photographic.

 

            The photographer was drying his plates in the warm sunlight.

            “What are you doing there?” asked a friend.

            “Oh,” was the reply, “just airing my views.”

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountain News Catskill Mountains Catskills joke photographer photography https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-retort-photographic Sat, 28 Nov 2020 13:00:00 GMT
Byron R. Johnson – “First-class” Photographer of Delhi, NY https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/byron-r-johnson-first-class-photographer-of-delhi-ny                Byron R. Johnson operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery LogoByron R. Johnson Art Gallery LogoByron R. Johnson operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. Logo for the Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery. Author's Collection. 

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Byron R. Johnson arrived at the village of Delhi circa 1867. He purchased the photographic gallery of B. F. Gilbert.

Previously, in 1859, Gilbert had purchased the gallery from E. C. Riggs, the “Ambrotype Artist.” The E. C. Riggs gallery had operated for only a few years from 1856 to 1859. Prior to arrival at Delhi Gilbert had previously operated at Hobart and Stamford.

In 1867 the B. F. Gilbert Gallery would be bought by Byron R. Johnson, who had previously operated a gallery for 16 years at San Francisco. In June, 1867, it was noted in the local newspaper that “B. F. Gilbert has associated with him the Photograph business Mr. Byron Johnson, long successful operator in California.” (Delaware Republican. June 23, 1867.)

By around October, 1867 Byron R. Johnson purchased the gallery of B. F. Gilbert, but Gilbert continued to work there. An October 1867 advertisement in the Delaware Gazette for the Johnson gallery noted that “Byron R. Johnson having purchased B. F. Gilbert’s Photograph Gallery in Delhi . . . Mr. B. F. Gilbert is retained in the employ of B. R. Johnson and will be glad to wait on any of his old customers as usual.” (Delaware Gazette. October 2, 1867.)

 

Map of B. R. Johnson Gallery, Delhi, NYMap of B. R. Johnson Gallery, Delhi, NYMap of Main Street in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, including the photography studios of B. R. Johnson and B. F. Gilbert.

Gould, Jay. Map of Delaware Co., New York. Philadelphia: Published by Collins G. Keeney, 1856. Map. https://www.loc.gov/item/2012593655/.
Map of Main Street in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York, including the photographic gallery of B. R. Johnson. 

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York : from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed September 16, 2020. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34
 

 

Johnson came to his gallery with a great deal of experience. As per his advertisements, it was noted that “B. R. Johnson is well and favorably known by all first-class Artists in the United States as an Artist of superior merit, having carried on the most extensive Gallery in San Francisco for the last sixteen years.” (“Now is your Time!” Delaware Gazette. December 11, 1867.)

In addition, “Mr. Johnson has had the advantages that few Artists in this part of the world have had; he has carried on extensive business in this line for the last 17 years in San Francisco, and has been acknowledged to be at the head of his profession by all good judges of the art.” (Bloomville Mirror. February 16, 1869.)

 

Photograph by Byron R. Johnson, from Delhi, New YorkMan in a ChairPhotograph taken by Byron R. Johnson, who operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. Portrait by Byron R. Johnson. Author's Collection.

 

While in the village of Delhi, Johnson resided at “the late residence of Hon. J. H. Graham.”

Johnson’s full advertisements in the local newspapers highlighted the extended offerings available at his new gallery.

 

Delaware Gazette, October 2, 1867. “Now is your Time! Byron R. Johnson having purchased B. F. Gilbert’s Photograph Gallery in Delhi is now prepared to do better work and at shorter notice, than any Gallery in Delaware county, having fitted it up with the latest and most approved style of Instruments, Apparatus, Imperial Grounds, Fancy Chairs, & c. In fact, every thing necessary to make work equal to the first Gallery in the worlds. B. R. Johnson is well and favorably known by all first-class Artists in the United States as an Artist of superior merit, having carried on the most extensive Gallery in San Francisco for the last sixteen years. Persons wishing fine work done in the line of Photography, would do well to call and examine his work of art and satisfy themselves as to his facility and ability for doing fine work, and that his prices are 25 per cent less than New York prices. Photographs taken from the size of a pea to full life size, either Plain, India Ink, Water, Oil or Patelle colors. Old Pictures Copies to all sizes. If you have an Old Picture of a friends or relative ever so indistinct, I can bring it out as perfect as life by the new improved Copying instrument made expressly for such work, You will find the Imperial Card Pictures, Graces and Sun Pearls something entirely new. VIEWS OF DWELLINGS, LANDSCAPE, MACHINERY, & c.. taken at short notice. Visitors can pass off time in viewing our collection of California views, which are free to all for inspection. Attention is called to his large and varied stock of Oval and Square Frames, Also, Mouldings of every size and description. The largest and finest assortment of Albums ever brought to Delaware county. Also, a good assortment of English Steel Engravings, all of which are offered to customers and the trade generally, at prices so low as to exclude competition. INSTRUCTION given in every branch of the art. Instruments, Apparatus and Stock for sale. N.B. Mr. B. F. Gilbert is retained in the employ of B. R. Johnson and will be glad to wait on any of his old customers as usual.”

 

Advertisement for Byron R. Johnson Gallery, Delhi, NYAdvertisement for Byron R. Johnson Gallery, Delhi, NYByron R. Johnson operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

 

Delaware Gazette, December 18, 1867: “We have visited B. R. Johnson’s fine Art Gallery and pronounce it and his pictures the finest we ever saw. Delaware county should be proud of such an establishment.”

 

Delaware Gazette, December 25, 1867: “If you want a fine large size India Ink picture of yourself or friend, go to B. R. Johnson’s Gallery, Delhi.”

 

Delaware Gazette, January 1, 1868: “Go to Johnson’s Gallery of Art if you want the best style picture.”

 

Delaware Gazette, June 3, 1868: “Go to Johnson’s Art Gallery And see his beautiful specimens of new style Picture called SUN PEARLS. Also, life size Photographs, & c., &c. Card Photographs only Two Dollars per dozen.”

 

Delaware Gazette, August 26, 1868. “Cheapest and Best Photographs Are to be had at B. R. Johnson’s Justly Celebrated Gallery, Delhi, N.Y. over Dr. Calhoun’s Drug Store. Mr. Johnson has had the advantages that few Artists in this part of the world have had; he has carried on extensive business in this line for the last 17 years in San Francisco, and has been acknowledged to be at the head of his profession by all good judges of the art. Those wishing Good Work and at Reasonable Rates, should call and see for themselves the best collection of work ever exhibited in this part of the world. All pictures shown by Mr. Johnson are made by him in his gallery. Mr. Johnson would call particular attention to his life-size Portraits from life, and enlarged from old defaced Pictures, and made perfect by the art of the brush. He has the only Patent Copying Instrument in Delaware Co., and claims copying as a specialty. All the old style of Pictures, such as Ambrotypes, Tintypes, Porcelain, & c., made at short notice. Mr. Johnson’s India Ink Portraits, new style Sun Pearls, are the admiration of every person. He has the most extensive assortment of Oval and Square Frames, Picture Nails, Cords and Tassels, Albums, & c. in Delhi. Give him a call before squandering your money on inferior work elsewhere. B. R. JOHNSON.”

 

Advertisement for Byron R. Johnson Gallery, Delhi, NYAdvertisement for Byron R. Johnson Gallery, Delhi, NYByron R. Johnson operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

Delaware Gazette, August 26, 1868. 

 

Bloomville Mirror, March 23, 1869: “Johnson, at his Gallery in Delhi, is now taking some of the best pictures ever made in Delaware county.”

 

Johnson’s time at the village of Delhi did not last long. By early 1869 Johnson was preparing to move to Europe. Johnson advertised for the sale of many of his possessions including a piano, a leather top buggy, harness, saddle, bridle, blanket, household furniture and more. Johnson was preparing to leave by April 1, 1869.

As that April 1st date approached customers were still encouraged to visit the gallery. “Strangers as well as residents are attracted to the show window connected with Johnson’s Photograph Gallery. No better specimens of the art can be found anywhere. Be sure and call before he leaves town.” (Delaware Gazette. March 10, 1869.)

In June 1869 it was noted in the local newspaper that Johnson’s Art Gallery, over Calhoun & Son’s Drug Store, was being managed by proprietors J. M. Arnout, a photographer formerly of Frederick’s, N.Y., and O. E. Bingenheimer, Artist. In an advertisement Arnout and Bingenheimer wrote of the Johnson Gallery that they “RESPECTFULLY ask your attention to their FINE ART GALLERY, well known as the best in the surrounding country.” (Bloomville Mirror. June 29, 1869.)

The ownership of Arnout and Bingenheimer may have been temporary since newspaper advertisements in both October and November of 1869 announced the return of Byron R. Johnson from Europe, including his travels to Rome, Naples and Paris.

 

Delaware Gazette, October 6, 1869: “Photographs Cheaper and Better Than Ever. Byron R. Johnson Has just returned from his course of studies in Europe and brought with him all new Instruments, Apparatus and everything to facilitate the production of FINE PHOTOGRAPHS in every style, tone and shade. Particular attention paid to ENLARGING and REPRODUCING PICTURES. I have in my employ a first class German Artist for the purpose of improving old and defaced Pictures by the aid of his brush in India Ink, Oil and Water Colors. I have reduced my prices so that all, even those of the most limited means may preserve Pictures of their deceased friends at a FIRST CLASS GALLER, and by fine Artists. We show no New York work. Our specimens are made by ourselves and will compare with any work in the world. The public are cautioned against all imposters and peddlers using my name to procure Pictures for copying, as I have no partners or runners for my Gallery. GALLERY OVER Dr. CALHOUN’S DRUG STORE, DELHI. A fine collection of European Views on exhibition, free to the public. INSTRUCTION given in the Art. Also, a large assortment of Albums, Frames, Etc., constantly on hand and for sale at the lowest figure. Delhi, September 27, 1869.”

 

Bloomville Mirror, November 23, 1869: “Photography! B. R. Johnson, Late from Rome, Naples and Paris, form which places he has brought a collection of his study, as well as new and modern Improvements in Photography, which few American Artists possess, has with him the full set of Improved Instruments and working material for producing A SUPERIOR STYLE OF WORK, in fact, everything to advance the Art of Photography, and guarantee Better Work than any Gallery can produce West of New York, and as good as can be made in the world. He has Reduced His Prices, so that those in the most meagre circumstances may procure fine pictures of those most dear to them. At this Gallery, you will not be humbugged, as we show no New York work for ours. All his pictures are made in his Gallery, and by himself. He has in his employ a German Artist for the purpose of improving old and defaced pictures, and by the aid of his brush, in INDIA INK, OIL and WATER COLORS. The public are invited to call and see his collection of European Views, also the Emperor, Empress, and Prince Imperial of France; all original pictures. The public are cautioned against all imposters and peddlers, using his name to procure pictures for copying, as he has no partner or runners for his Gallery. Instruction given in all branches of the arts, also, a large assortment of frames and albums, constantly on hand. Gallery over Dr. Calhoun’s Drug Store, Delhi.”

 

However, by December 1869 Maurice Farrington was the new proprietor of the Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery at Delhi, New York. This would have included the business along with the equipment. The gallery was located over the Calhoun & Sons Drug Store.

 

“The public will be gratified to learn that Maurice Farrington had purchased the picture gallery of Byron R. Johnson in this place, and has taken possession and engaged in business. He has the skill, experience, and every facility for doing the best of work, and will doubtless meet with success. For further particulars respecting his business, see advertising columns.” (“Local and Miscellaneous.” Delaware Republican. December 18, 1869.)

 

Farrington continued to use and operate under the “Johnson Gallery” name for several years. Around 1872-73 Maurice began to use the name “Farrington’s Photograph Gallery,” and other similar names. Maurice Farrington continued to work at his photography business until he passed away in 1914.

Maurice Farrington, in addition to running his photography business, also acquired a drug store business, which would eventually be taken over by his son Frank Farrington. In 1911 Frank Farrington sold “Farrington’s Drug Store” to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries. In addition to operating the drug store, the partnership of Pierre “Pete” Merrill (1880-1975) and William A. Humphries also published photographic postcards of the Delhi area under the name Merrill & Humphries.

Byron R. Johnson was the third in a succession of five photographers to own this Delhi, New York gallery. E. C. Riggs, the “Ambrotype Artist,” operated from 1856 to 1859; he was succeeded by B. F. Gilbert, who operated from 1859 to 1867; West Coast photographer Byron R. Johnson then purchased the gallery, operating from 1867 to 1869; next, Maurice Farrington acquired the gallery in late 1869, and operated for the next 45 years from 1869 to 1914; and, finally, the partnership of Merrill & Humphries operated well into the 20th century.

Small town galleries such as these, through their timeless photographs of the citizens of the community, offer a virtual time capsule into the town’s history. 

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Byron R. Johnson please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) artist B. F. Gilbert B. R. Johnson Benjamin F. Gilbert Byron R. Johnson Calhoun & Sons Catskill Mountains Catskills Delaware County Delhi E. C. Riggs Frank Farrington gallery J. M. Arnout Maurice Farrington Merrill and Humphries O. E. Bingenheimer photographer photographs photography studio https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/byron-r-johnson-first-class-photographer-of-delhi-ny Sat, 21 Nov 2020 13:00:00 GMT
Otto Hillig – New Photographs https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/otto-hillig-new-photographs Otto Hillig can be considered one of the great photographers in Catskills history. Arriving from Germany in the United States as a poor teenage immigrant he took on a series of odd jobs before developing a prosperous photography business at his adopted hometown in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. He operated a well-regarded portrait studio in the village, extensively photographed the landscapes of the region and was considered an earlier pioneer of aerial photography.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new photographs by Otto Hillig. They have all been added to the Otto Hillig gallery, which now contains over 90 of his works.

 

Vintage postcard from photographer Otto Hillig depicting a beautiful country scene including a road, a river, several houses and railroad tracks.Picturesque Scene in Sullivan County, N.Y.Well-known photographer Otto Hillig of Liberty, New York published this vintage postcard titled “Picturesque Scene in Sullivan County, N.Y.” The scene shows a country road, a river with a small cascade, several homes and a double set of railroad tracks. The postcard was never mailed.

Otto Hillig can be considered one of the great photographers in Catskills history. Arriving from Germany in the United States as a poor teenage immigrant he took on a series of odd jobs before developing a prosperous photography business at his adopted hometown in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. He operated a well-regarded portrait studio in the village, extensively photographed the landscapes of the region and was considered an earlier pioneer of aerial photography.
Picturesque Scene in Sullivan County, N.Y.

 

Trees, cows and blue skies are reflected in a calm lake in this beautiful postcard titled “Mirror Picture In Sullivan County, N.Y.” by photographer Otto Hillig.Mirror Picture In Sullivan County, N.Y.Trees, cows and blue skies are reflected in a calm lake in this beautiful postcard titled “Mirror Picture In Sullivan County, N.Y.” by photographer Otto Hillig. The postcard was manufactured in the United States. It was never mailed. Mirror Picture In Sullivan County, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard by Otto Hillig of a beautiful waterfall scene at the hamlet of Ferndale in Sullivan County, New York.Water Falls, Ferndale, N.Y.The hamlet of Ferndale in Sullivan County, New York is the site of this beautiful waterfall scene set amongst the peaceful countryside. The photograph was taken by famous photographer and adventurer Otto Hillig of Liberty, New York. The postcard was manufactured in the United States. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1925.

Otto Hillig can be considered one of the great photographers in Catskills history. Arriving from Germany in the United States as a poor teenage immigrant he took on a series of odd jobs before developing a prosperous photography business at his adopted hometown in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. He operated a well-regarded portrait studio in the village, extensively photographed the landscapes of the region and was considered an earlier pioneer of aerial photography.
Water Falls, Ferndale, N.Y.

 

Well-known photographer Otto Hillig published this vintage postcard of the Hall House located at the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York.Hall House, Liberty, N.Y.Well-known photographer Otto Hillig published this vintage postcard of the Hall House located at the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. The postcard was mailed, although the postmark date is illegible.

The four-story Hall House was constructed between 1885 and 1890 and operated for many years by John Carrier Hall. By 1930, after several changes in ownership, the hotel was known as The Lenape, for the Native Americans that once lived in Sullivan and Delaware Counties. The hotel shut down on November 30, 1956, but reopened again in 1958 under the new ownership. The Frey family then operated the hotel from 1958 to 1970. The hotel was then converted into one-bedroom apartments for senior citizens. For more history on this historic hotel, you can refer to an article by Delbert Van Etten, Liberty Historian, titled “Hall House – The Lenape” in the May 12, 1977 issue of the Liberty Evening News.

Below are a few advertisements from the early 1900s that describe the popular Hall House.

1900 advertisement
“The Hall House, at Liberty, J. C. Hall, proprietor, stands on high ground in the center of the village, in the midst of well shaded and well drained grounds. It is about a quarter of a mile from the depot. There are fifty rooms and the illumination is by electricity. The piazza is broad and the balcony affords a fine view of the village and the surrounding hills. The place furnishes a vegetable garden, spring water and croquet grounds. The amusement room, with the piano, is ample for the accommodation of the guests. References are supplied upon request.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 17, 1900.)

1901 advertisement
An ideal place to spend the summer or any portion of it is at the Hall House. It is situated at Liberty at an elevation of 1,600 feet, which insures freedom from all undue humidity and dampness. Malaria, and asthmatic affections are unknown in the vicinity. The table receives the most painstaking care and is well supplied with the best that can be obtained in the markets. Delightful grounds with plenty of shade surround the house. Rate will be furnished upon application to the proprietor, J. C. Hall.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 16, 1901.)

1902 advertisement
“The Hall House is situated on an eminence at an elevation of 1,600 feet, in the village of Liberty, in the midst of well-shaded grounds. The house has been enlarged, and now consists of fifty fine, airy, pleasant rooms for guests; is lighted by electricity, and is modern in structure and conveniences. The piazza is broad and extensive, and the balcony affords a fine view of the village, and an extended panorama of the surrounding country. The house is conducted in a strictly first-class manner, and there is ample provision made for the amusement of guests. The rates are $8 to $12 a week. J. C. Hall is the proprietor.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 22, 1902.)
Hall House, Liberty, N.Y.

 

Well-known photographer Otto Hillig published this vintage postcard titled “Residence of J. C. Young, Liberty, N.Y.”Residence of J. C. Young, Liberty, N.Y.This vintage postcard titled “Residence of J. C. Young, Liberty, N.Y.” was published by renowned photographer Otto Hillig of Liberty, New York. The postcard was manufactured in Germany. It was never mailed. Residence of J. C. Young, Liberty, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard titled “Indian Spring in Sull. Co., N.Y.” by photographer Otto Hillig.Indian Spring in Sull. Co., N.Y.The Indian Spring in Sullivan County, New York is beautifully depicted in this postcard by famous photographer Otto Hillig of Liberty, New York. The postcard was manufactured in the United States. It was never mailed. Indian Spring in Sull. Co., N.Y.

 

Famous photographer Otto Hillig photographed this beautiful scene at the Trout Preserve in Liberty, New York.Trout Preserve, Liberty, N.Y.Famous photographer Otto Hillig photographed this beautiful scene at the Trout Preserve in Liberty, New York. The wooden bridge reflects brilliantly in the calm waters of the lake. The postcard, manufactured in Germany, was published by Barton & Spooner of Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1915. Trout Preserve, Liberty, N.Y.

 

Photographer Otto Hillig published this scenic postcard depicting the Agloe Lodge along the Beaverkill in Sullivan County, New York.Agloe Lodge on the Beaverkill, Sullivan Co., N.Y.Photographer Otto Hillig published this scenic postcard depicting the Agloe Lodge along the Beaverkill in Sullivan County, New York. Notice the historic covered bridge at the bottom left of the view. The postcard was never mailed.

Agloe was a town that really wasn’t a town. Check out the NY times article titled “Seeking a Town on the Border of Fiction and Reality” for more interesting details.
www.nytimes.com/2014/03/29/nyregion/in-search-of-agloe-ny-a-town-on-the-border-of-fiction-and-reality.html
Agloe Lodge on the Beaverkill, Sullivan Co., N.Y.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) aerial architecture building Catskill Mountains Catskills gallery Hillig's Photo Studio Liberty Main Street New York Otto Hillig photographer photographs photography photos pictures portrait postcards studio Sullivan County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/otto-hillig-new-photographs Wed, 18 Nov 2020 13:00:00 GMT
A Look Back in Catskills Photography: Generous Feller https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-generous-feller          The following newspaper article was published in the January 28, 1862 issue of the Bloomville Mirror.

 

“The question before the meeting is this: If a feller, what is a feller, and his gal, are about to parted for a time, and they propose to exchange daguerreotypes, and for that purpose the feller goes with his gal to the daguerreotype shop, and is to pay for having the ‘pictures too;” and he only has money enough to pay for picture in an ordinary case, and the other in a magnificent case, which picture should he put in the magnificent case, his own ugly mug or hers? Would it be gallant in him to put her mug in the ugly case? Would it be jinerous in to put his mug in the ugly case which she has to keep? That’s the question before the meeting.”  

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Bloomville Mirror daguerreotype gallery history photographer photography studio https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-generous-feller Sat, 14 Nov 2020 13:00:00 GMT
A Look Back in Catskills Photography: Poetic Opening of the Van Kleek Gallery in Delhi https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-poetic-opening-of-the-van-kleek-gallery-in-delhi The following advertisement was published in the May 16, 1865 issue of the Bloomville Mirror to announce the opening of the Van Kleek Gallery at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.

 

            “DID YOU KNOW that VAN KLEEK had opened a Photograph Gallery at Delhi, over Page’s Jewelry Store, and that he takes beautiful Pictures?

 

Reader, just drop in and take a peep

At pictures he makes so very cheap

They look like life and are so neat

His customers think they can’t be beat;

So sit you down, he takes your figure,

As large as life, and a little bigger;

He’ll take it small, if it is your choice,

Your head, and all, except your voice

He’s bound to please, and have no clatter,

So come along, “That’s what’s the matter.”

Don’t forget the place, as I said before,

Look for Van Kleek over Page’s store."

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Delaware County Delhi gallery photographer photography studio Van Kleek village https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/11/a-look-back-in-catskills-photography-poetic-opening-of-the-van-kleek-gallery-in-delhi Sat, 07 Nov 2020 13:00:00 GMT
E. C. Riggs – Delhi, NY Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/e-c-riggs-delhi-ny-photographer E. C. Riggs was an “Ambrotype Artist” at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for four years from 1856 to 1859.

 

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An early photographer at the village of Delhi in Delaware County was E. C. Riggs, “Ambrotype Artist.” Riggs operated in rooms over the Post Office and later in rooms over Elwood’s Store. Riggs began his business in 1856. One of his earliest advertisements was placed in a local newspaper in September 1856.  

 

September 10, 1856, Delaware Gazette, advertisement: “Patent Ambrotypes. Great Attraction! E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype Artist, RESPECTFULLY informs the inhabitants of MEREDITH, DELHI and FRANKLIN, that he is sole proprietor of the Patent Ambrotype in these towns, the genuine Ambrotype can be had of none else in these places.

This new and beautiful process is the invention of Prof. James A. Cutting, of Boston, by whom it is patented in the United States, Great Britain and France. These Pictures are taken on the past plate glass and placed upon a corresponding glass, the two being here metrically sealed together with an indestructible cement – the picture being in the centre, as durable as glass itself.

Mr. R. has taken instruction of the best Artist in the State, and is now putting up likenesses that for richness of tone and life-like expression, are unsurpassed.

These pictures can be had at no other room in these towns, Mr. R. having purchased the exclusive right.

The public are invited to call and satisfy themselves.

Rooms at post office.

Ouleout, September 8, 1856.”

 

Photographer E. C. Riggs operated a photographic “ambrotype” gallery from 1856 to 1859 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype ArtistE. C. Riggs was an “Ambrotype Artist” at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for four years from 1856 to 1859.

 

James A. Cutting (1814-1867), referred to above in the advertisement, was an American photographer and inventor. He is often credited as the inventor of the Ambrotype photographic process. Cutting patented his improvements on the ambrotype process in 1854, and thus attached his name to the process. Ambrotypes would reach their height of popularity in the mid-1850s to the mid-1860s. Ambrotypes were eventually replaced with Cartes de visite and other paper print photographs, both of which were easily available in multiple copies.

 

James Ambrose CuttingJames Ambrose CuttingPatented several inventions associated with improving the Ambrotype photographic process. James Ambrose Cutting (1814-1867). "Boston Aquarial and Zoological Gardens." Ballou's Dollar Monthly Magazine, Volume 16, Number 1, July 1862.
 

 

As per the Library of Congress “An ambrotype is comprised of an underexposed glass negative placed against a dark background. The dark backing material creates a positive image . . . The invention of wet collodion photography processes in the 1850s allowed the development of two new kinds of photographs--ambrotypes and tintypes. These new formats shared many characteristics with the earlier daguerreotypes but were quicker and cheaper to produce. Primarily used for portraiture, each photo is a unique camera-exposed image and was available in the following standard-sizes. The most common size was the sixth plate.

 

  • Imperial or Mammoth Plate - Larger than 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Whole Plate - 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Half Plate - 4.25 x 5.5 inches
  • Quarter Plate - 3.25 x 4.25 inches
  • Sixth Plate - 2.75 x 3.25 inches
  • Ninth Plate - 2 x 2.5 inches
  • Sixteenth Plate - 1.5 x 1.75 inches.”

 

E. C. Riggs would place a number of advertisements in local newspapers over the next several years between 1857 and 1858. Newspapers that published advertisements from the Riggs gallery included the Delaware Gazette, the Bloomville Mirror, the Franklin Visitor and The Star of Delaware. A few examples of his advertisements are included below.

 

January 6, 1857, Delaware Gazette, advertisement: “Gifts for the Holidays. If you want to present a lasting memento to a friend call at the Gallery of E. C. Riggs and get a TRUE LIKENESS. There is real value in such gifts, which is more and more appreciated by all, and now is the time to procure them.”

 

January 15, 1857, Franklin Visitor, advertisement: “E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype Artist, Delhi, N.Y. Rooms over Elwood’s Store.”

 

Photographer E. C. Riggs operated a photographic “ambrotype” gallery from 1856 to 1859 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype ArtistE. C. Riggs was an “Ambrotype Artist” at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for four years from 1856 to 1859.

 

March 18, 1857, Delaware Gazette, advertisement: “LATEST NEWS! Awful Doings in Kansas!! E. C. Riggs, Ambrotypist. WOULD say to his friends and the public, that he is permanently established in this village, and invites the patronage of all who want GOOD PICTURES. A new stock of Cases just received and selling off with a rush. Likenesses inserted in Lockets, & c. Now, when in health, is the time to secure portraits of yourselves or friends. Pictures taken in cloudy weather as well as at any time. Maple Suga, Eggs, & c., taken in exchange for Pictures, at market prices. Rooms over Elwood’s Store.”
 

Photographer E. C. Riggs operated a photographic “ambrotype” gallery from 1856 to 1859 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype ArtistE. C. Riggs was an “Ambrotype Artist” at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for four years from 1856 to 1859.

 

November 17, 1857, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “AMBROTYPES. GOOD Pictures, and reasonable prices can be found at the Gallery of E. C. RIGGS, who is now putting up likenesses in the best styles of the art. Call in if you want a true and lasting likeness.

Heads taken off at short notice, and without endangering the life of the subject in the least – a new thing.

Rooms of Elwood’s Store.

E. C. Riggs.

Delhi, Sept., 1857.”

 

January 19, 1858, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “Ambrotypes at Reduced Prices. THE subscriber, having taken a partner, is now preparing to sell the best kinds of pictures at reduced prices. Call in and get one. Rooms over Elwood’s store. E. C. Riggs.”

 

February 25, 1858, Franklin Visitor, advertisement: “EXCELSIOR AMBROTYPES!! It is a well-established fact that the BEST PICTURES taken in this section of the State can be had at the gallery of E. C. Riggs, in Delhi, and this will account for the constant rush to his rooms, at which excellent likenesses are constantly taken. Call in, if you wish A TRUE AND LASTING LIKENESS. A new assortment of cases, &c. just received and selling off by the dozen and in less quantities. It is the duty of every man, woman and child do secure a portrait NOW, while you may; and always remember to call at the gallery of E. C. RIGGS. Rooms over Elwood’s store.”

 

April 20, 1858, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “Excelsior Ambrotypes! GREAT RUSH AT RIGGS’ GALLERY for these excellent pictures! Now is the time to call if you want a good one. Over Elwood’s store. E. C. RIGGS.”

 

May 25, 1858, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “Terrible Excitement! Civil War in Kansas!! NOTWITHSTANDING the awful doings in Kansas, and in foreign parts, Delhi pursues the even tenor of its way, and RIGGS’ GALLERY is the place to call if you want a GOOD LIKENESS of yourself or friend. Prices moderate and pictures warranted as good as can be found in the county. It will pay to buy the best; so come where you can get them guaranteed durable. Maple Sugar, and Eggs taken in exchange for Ambrotypes. Instruction given in the art. E. C. RIGGS.”

 

September 11, 1858, The Star of Delaware, advertisement: “We call the attention of our readers to two new advertisements, which appear in the Star this week, one from E. C. Riggs, daguerreotypist, and the other from Messrs. Cormack & Bartlett. Those, who desire to have their likenesses taken, will find Mr. Riggs well worthy of their patronage. We visited his rooms a day or two ago, and examined there some pictures, which are quite equal in execution to any that we have seen in the City or elsewhere. We understand that he has just received a new supply of cases and chemical materials, from which he is prepared to furnish his customers either by wholesale or retail.”

 

1858, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “Riggs Ambrotype Gallery, IS THE PLACE to get the BEST of PICTURES, at as cheap a rate, for the size and style, as can be had in this section. A new supply of cases, & c., just received and selling off with a rush. Now is the time to secure a GOOD LIKENESS. Instruction given in the Art. Ambrotype goods at wholesale. E. C. RIGGS.”

 

1858, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “THE subscriber would say to the public that he is selling pictures at REDUCED PRICES – those sold before 75 cents can now be had for 50 cents, & c. He wishes it distinctly understood that he takes no 25 cent pictures – that business is left to others, and those who want such pictures may go elsewhere; but if you want a good durable likeness, of fair size, he will make it as cheap as at any other gallery in this county. The public are respectfully invited to call, whether wanting pictures or not. E. C. RIGGS.”

 

1858, Bloomville Mirror, advertisement: “Great Excitement in Delhi! THE POLICE OF OUR VILLAGE, overhearing an individual saying some suspicious things about “taking heads off,” & c., watched his closely, and saw him enter E. C. RIGGS’ GALLERY, over Elwood’s store, and soon come out again with something in his hand. It proved to be of Riggs’ Excelsior Ambrotypes, done up in good style. He was called a sensible fellow, and went on his way rejoicing. The best pictures in the county are found here., at E. C. RIGGS.”

 

Competition of the 1850s was tough in the small village of Delhi, with photographers E. C. Riggs and J. Churchill occasionally battling in the local newspapers about each other’s motivations, quality and pricing. Competing photographer J. Churchill operated out of rooms over the store of Griswold and Wright and later in rooms over the offices of Dr. Almiron Fitch. He offered ambrotypes, daguerreotypes, and melanotypes. An 1860 advertisement noted that Churchill had been operating for 12 years in the photography business.

In one notable, somewhat nasty, back-and-forth letter (advertisement) published in the Delaware Gazette, a local newspaper, E. C. Riggs first wrote:

 

“IMMENSE EXCITEMENT! Ambrotypes at Reduced Prices!!

The subscriber would say to the public that, notwithstanding the TREMENDOUS EXERTIONS of our “up town” Philosopher to the contrary, he is alive and attending to business as usual. And his “ignorance of common philosophy” does not prevent him from selling the most beautiful pictures taken in this county, and at lower prices than they have ever been sold before.

As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false; and I defy the gentleman (?) who takes so much pains to injure me and make himself appear ridiculous, to produce one that has faded in the least. And I would like to have him give satisfaction to his customers, whose pictures I have taken over and finished off after passing through his philosophic hands. I will warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits. I respectfully invite the public to examine both sides – they shall be the judges.

Call in ladies and gentleman, and see who takes the cheapest and best pictures. A poor picture is dear at any price.

My Rooms are over Elwood’s Store.

Office hours are 9 A.M. to 3 ½ P. M.

E. C. Riggs. (Delaware Gazette. December 17, 1856.)

 

In response photographer J. Churchill wrote:

 

“Pictures on Glass. The subscriber invites the attention of the public to his advertisement in another column, and his assertations therein contained, are in every respect true and correct. But it is not his intention to publish here, but to correct some misrepresentations which I see in an advertisement signed E. C. Riggs, in which he states as follows “As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false, and I defy the gentleman to produce one that has faded in the least.” If I am the man to whom he alludes as the “up town philosopher,” and the man who took so much pains to injure him, then I say the gentleman has stated a wicked falsehood, and he could not be ignorant of it. I never said a word about his Ambroytpes fading, for there is not one to be found, probably, that is more than three or four months old. And how does he know whether he asserts the truth or not?

I did say they were of short duration, and this I am able to maintain.

He further says “I warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits.” With what degree of propriety does he warrant his work, and what assurance can he give the public of its duration? Will the few months he has been in business be a sufficient time to test their durability? Let the public judge. Yet he is willing to warrant his work, but is careful not to say how long; he is then willing it shall stand upon its own merits. So am I, but it will not upon its own merits or any other.

If the Patented Ambrotype was of such durability, why did Brady and others of New York give them up? Because they were worthless, and his information is from one of the best men in this town, taken from his own lips.

I now come to his last italicized sentence. “A poor picture is dear at any price.” This is my sentiments exactly; and those who have been so unfortunate as to get one of your Patented Ambrotypes, will probably find out in a short time the truth of this assertion to their sorrow.

Gentlemen and ladies, call at my office and get you a fifty cent picture, and I will make it as durable as the rock of Gibraltar.

Yes, when your flesh in dust shall lie,

When death’s grey film o’er spread your beaming eye,

My life-like mocking at decay,

Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day.

 

A Splendid Stock just received.

J. CHURCHILL.” (Delaware Gazette. December 24, 1856.)

 

The E. C. Riggs gallery operation seems to have only lasted a few years. In 1859 Riggs would leave the photography business as he sought to engage in a different line of work. He rented out his rooms and sold his equipment, including “his ENTIRE STOCK of GOODS AND APPARATUS used in the Ambrotype business. One ½ Size and one ¼ Size CAMERA, and Shields belonging to them; Cases, Mats, Preservers, Baths, & c.” (The Star of Delaware. January 15, 1859.)

In early 1859 the E. C. Riggs gallery business was bought by B. F. Gilbert, who had previously operated at Hobart and Stamford.

Gilbert advertised the opening of his new gallery in the local newspaper: “New Ambrotype Gallery in Delhi. The subscriber would inform the inhabitants of Delhi and vicinity that he has taken the rooms formerly occupied by E. C. Riggs, where his is prepared to put up pictures in any of the late improved styles, and much superior in clearness of tone and expression to any that has ever been offered in this place. The public are invited to call and examine specimens. Rooms over Elwood’s store. B. F. GILBERT.” (“New Ambrotype Gallery in Delhi.” Bloomville Mirror. February 8, 1859.) Gilbert would later operate in rooms over the Gazette Office in Delhi.

In 1867 the B. F. Gilbert Gallery would be bought by Byron R. Johnson, who had previously operated a gallery for 16 years at San Francisco. By late 1869, with Johnson moving to Europe, the Johnson gallery was then operated by Maurice Farrington.

Farrington continued to use the “Johnson Gallery” name for several years. Around 1872 Maurice began to use the name “Farrington’s Photograph Gallery,” and other similar names. Maurice Farrington, in addition to running his photography business, also acquired a drug store business, which would eventually be taken over by his son Frank Farrington. Maurice Farrington continued to work at his photography business until he passed away in 1914.

In 1911 Frank Farrington sold “Farrington’s Drug Store” to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries. In addition to operating the drug store, the partnership of Pierre “Pete” Merrill (1880-1975) and William A. Humphries also published photographic postcards of the Delhi area under the name Merrill & Humphries.

Little did photographer E. C. Riggs know in 1856 that his “ambrotype” gallery would eventually pass through a succession of five different photographers at the village of Delhi, and survive well into the 20th century.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) ambrotype B. F. Gilbert B. R. Johnson Benjamin F. Gilbert Byron R. Johnson Catskill Mountains Catskills daguerreotype daguerreotypist Delaware County Delhi E. C. Riggs Elwood's store gallery J. Churchill Maurice Farrington Merrill & Humphries New York P. B. Merrill photographer photography studio W. A. Humphries https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/e-c-riggs-delhi-ny-photographer Sat, 31 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: Hanford Mills Museum https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-hanford-mills-museum Route 12, East Meredith, Delaware County

 

The 70-acre Hanford Mills site, located on Kortright Creek in East Meredith, was first established in 1846 and later purchased by David Josiah Hanford in 1860. The mill complex, including a sawmill, gristmill, feed mill, woodworking shop, feed store and hardware store, would grow to become one of the largest industries in the immediate region. In the early 1900s power from the mill would be used to provide electricity to the village of East Meredith. In 1900, due to the growing trade business, the Ulster and Delaware constructed a railroad through the mill’s property, which greatly increased its access to the markets. The mill continued to operate for 121 years but was forced to close its doors in 1967.

 

After the mill shut down it was quickly converted in to a working museum that same year. Today the museum is open to the public, offering numerous educational programs, a nature trail, informative exhibits and tours, blacksmith demonstrations, a historic farmhouse, a working sawmill, the annual winter ice harvests and much more. The museum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an outstanding example of a well-preserved industrial complex” during “the growth of a local industry, using natural resources at hand, and providing goods and services for community consumption as well as export.” Visit the museum website at www.hanfordmills.org for more information.

 

The vintage postcard was published by the Whimsy Hill Studio located at Fly Creek, New York. The postcard was never mailed. My photograph was taken in September 2018.

 

Vintage postcard of the Hanford Mills museum, located on Kortright Creek in East Meredith, that offers numerous educational programs, exhibits, tours and more.Old Mill Museum, East Meredith, N.Y.The 70-acre Hanford Mills site, located on Kortright Creek in East Meredith, was first established in 1846 and later purchased by David Josiah Hanford in 1860. The mill complex, including a sawmill, gristmill, feed mill, woodworking shop, feed store and hardware store, would grow to become one of the largest industries in the immediate region. In the early 1900s power from the mill would be used to provide electricity to the village of East Meredith. In 1900, due to the growing trade business, the Ulster and Delaware constructed a railroad through the mill’s property, which greatly increased its access to the markets. The mill continued to operate for 121 years but was forced to close its doors in 1967.

After the mill shut down it was quickly converted in to a working museum that same year. Today the museum is open to the public, offering numerous educational programs, a nature trail, informative exhibits and tours, blacksmith demonstrations, a historic farmhouse, a working sawmill, the annual winter ice harvests and much more. The museum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an outstanding example of a well-preserved industrial complex” during “the growth of a local industry, using natural resources at hand, and providing goods and services for community consumption as well as export.” Visit the museum website at www.hanfordmills.org for more information.

The postcard was published by the Whimsy Hill Studio located at Fly Creek, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

 

The Hanford Mills museum, located on Kortright Creek in East Meredith, Delaware County offers numerous educational programs throughout the year.Hanford Mills MuseumEast Meredith, Delaware County

The 70 acre Hanford Mills site, located on Kortright Creek in East Meredith, was first established in 1846 and later purchased by David Josiah Hanford in 1860. The mill complex, including a sawmill, gristmill, feed mill, woodworking shop, feed store and hardware store, would grow to become one of the largest industries in the immediate region. In the early 1900s power from the mill would be used to provide electricity to the village of East Meredith. In 1900, due to the growing trade business, the Ulster and Delaware constructed a railroad through the mill’s property, which greatly increased its access to the markets. The mill continued to operate for 121 years but was forced to close its doors in 1967.

After the mill shut down it was quickly converted in to a working museum that same year. Today the museum is open to the public, offering numerous educational programs, a nature trail, informative exhibits and tours, blacksmith demonstrations, a historic farmhouse, a working sawmill, the annual winter ice harvests and much more. The museum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an outstanding example of a well preserved industrial complex” during “the growth of a local industry, using natural resources at hand, and providing goods and services for community consumption as well as export.” Visit the museum website at www.hanfordmills.org for more information.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) blacksmith Catskill Mountains Catskills complex David Josiah Hanford Delaware County East Meredith education electricity exhibits farmhouse feed gristmill Hanford Mills ice harvest industry Kortright Creek local mill museum National Register of Historic Places nature trail programs rail railroad Route 12 rural sawmill shop Then and Now tracks train Ulster and Delaware village website winter wood woodworking https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-hanford-mills-museum Sat, 24 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
In Memory of Frank D. Layman, Hero of South Mountain https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/in-memory-of-frank-d-layman-hero-of-south-mountain The Frank D. Layman monument is located on South Mountain along the blue-marked Escarpment Trail in the North Lake area. It is located a short distance from Kaaterskill Falls and is accessible only by foot. The site offers a commanding view of upper Kaaterskill Clove as it faces towards Twilight Park and the distant Hunter Mountain. Just below the monument is a steep ledge that drops off into the clove.

 

The Layman Monument is dedicated to Frank D. Layman, who lost his life on August 10, 1900 while fighting a fire on South Mountain in the Catskills.Layman's MonumentThe Frank D. Layman monument is located on South Mountain along the blue-marked Escarpment Trail in the North Lake area. It is located a short distance from Kaaterskill Falls and is accessible only by foot. The site offers a commanding view of upper Kaaterskill Clove as it faces towards Twilight Park and the distant Hunter Mountain. Just below the monument is a steep ledge that drops off into the clove.

The inscription on the monument reads: “In memory of Frank D. Layman, of Haines Falls, who lost his life on this spot Aug. 10, 1900. While with others fighting a forest fire which threatened to destroy the homes and business interests of the people of this place. By those grateful for his devoted service this monument is erected.”

The devastating Catskills fire of 1900 in which Frank Layman (1872-1900) lost his life started on August 10th (at around either 10am or 3pm, depending on the source) in Kaaterskill Clove below Kaaterskill Falls in close proximity to the Laurel House, and a little further from the famed Kaaterskill Hotel. Guests of both hotels were the first to smell the smoke. The fire would reach within 300 yards of the grand Laurel House hotel. Some of the hotel patrons left in fear, while others had their trunks packed and were ready to leave with short notice.

Although no one knows specifically how the fire started, the first theory, and the most published, attributed it to the lengthy regional drought that dried the trees and land. One newspaper article stated that it hadn’t rained in nearly 40 days. A second theory was that the fire was accidentally started by “tramps” camping out in the woods. Perhaps it could have a combination of both possibilities.

The fire destroyed several hundred acres of forest land. The hotels were saved. Other fires caused by the dry conditions were also raging at the same time in the Catskills at Cairo Round Top, Black Head Mountain the Plattekill Clove.

Within a few months of Layman’s death, community residents and guests of the nearby hotels raised over $700 to construct a monument to the brave hero, which was erected in 1901 on the spot where his body was found. The plot of land for the monument was donated by George Harding, owner of the Hotel Kaaterskill which had been threatened by the fire.

For more information about Frank D. Layman and the August 1900 fire that took his life, please see my blog post dated October 22, 2020.

 

The inscription on the monument reads: “In memory of Frank D. Layman, of Haines Falls, who lost his life on this spot Aug. 10, 1900. While with others fighting a forest fire which threatened to destroy the homes and business interests of the people of this place. By those grateful for his devoted service this monument is erected.”

 

The Layman Monument is dedicated to Frank D. Layman, who lost his life on August 10, 1900 while fighting a fire on South Mountain in the Catskills.In Memory of Frank D. LaymanThe Frank D. Layman monument is located on South Mountain along the blue-marked Escarpment Trail in the North Lake area. It is located a short distance from Kaaterskill Falls and is accessible only by foot. The site offers a commanding view of upper Kaaterskill Clove as it faces towards Twilight Park and the distant Hunter Mountain. Just below the monument is a steep ledge that drops off into the clove.

The inscription on the monument reads: “In memory of Frank D. Layman, of Haines Falls, who lost his life on this spot Aug. 10, 1900. While with others fighting a forest fire which threatened to destroy the homes and business interests of the people of this place. By those grateful for his devoted service this monument is erected.”

The devastating Catskills fire of 1900 in which Frank Layman (1872-1900) lost his life started on August 10th (at around either 10am or 3pm, depending on the source) in Kaaterskill Clove below Kaaterskill Falls in close proximity to the Laurel House, and a little further from the famed Kaaterskill Hotel. Guests of both hotels were the first to smell the smoke. The fire would reach within 300 yards of the grand Laurel House hotel. Some of the hotel patrons left in fear, while others had their trunks packed and were ready to leave with short notice.

Although no one knows specifically how the fire started, the first theory, and the most published, attributed it to the lengthy regional drought that dried the trees and land. One newspaper article stated that it hadn’t rained in nearly 40 days. A second theory was that the fire was accidentally started by “tramps” camping out in the woods. Perhaps it could have a combination of both possibilities.

The fire destroyed several hundred acres of forest land. The hotels were saved. Other fires caused by the dry conditions were also raging at the same time in the Catskills at Cairo Round Top, Black Head Mountain the Plattekill Clove.

Within a few months of Layman’s death, community residents and guests of the nearby hotels raised over $700 to construct a monument to the brave hero, which was erected in 1901 on the spot where his body was found. The plot of land for the monument was donated by George Harding, owner of the Hotel Kaaterskill which had been threatened by the fire.

For more information about Frank D. Layman and the August 1900 fire that took his life, please see my blog post dated October 22, 2020.

 

Frank D. Layman was the son of Charles “Tollgate” Layman (1846-1913) and Philena [Roe] Layman (1845-1919). On the 1900 United States census Charles was listed with an occupation of “Farmer” and Frank had an occupation of “Laborer (Farm).” As of 1900 Charles and Philena had been married for 30 years. The 1880 United States census showed two siblings, Arthur, age 9, and Effie L., age 5.

 

The devastating Catskills fire of 1900 in which Frank Layman (1872-1900) lost his life started on August 10th (at around either 10am or 3pm, depending on the source) in Kaaterskill Clove below Kaaterskill Falls in close proximity to the Laurel House, and a little further from the famed Kaaterskill Hotel. Guests of both hotels were the first to smell the smoke. The fire would reach within 300 yards of the grand Laurel House hotel. Some of the hotel patrons left in fear, while others had their trunks packed and were ready to leave with short notice.  

 

An initial force of three hundred people from Tannersville and Haines Falls turned out to fight the fire. Among them was a 4-man party that included Oscar Ford, Arthur “Bird” Layman, and 27-year-old Frank Layman, Arthur’s brother and son of Charles Layman of Tannersville. It was reported that volunteers were paid $2 a day to help assist in fighting the fire. At the time Layman was working at Twilight Park, the nearby private residential community.

 

As the fire spread the call went out to the village of Catskill for additional volunteers. Potential firefighters were offered $5 per day. However, “Few cared to go, however, and take the chance of losing their life even for this sum.” (Catskill Daily Mail.)

 

While fighting the fire, according to various newspaper reports, Frank and Oscar were cut off at the bottom of the steep ledge of rocks, with the fire closing in. “There was nothing left but to climb to the top. That was the only way by which they could hope to save their lives. They started on an awful journey up the jagged face of the cliff, their hands and feet cut at almost every step by the sharp stones. The flames were so close that the clothing of the men was scorched, but they struggled on desperately. Ford at last reached the top utterly exhausted. He crawled a few feet into a place of safety and then fell in a dead faint. Layman was only a few feet behind him. The hair was singed from his head and his clothing was on fire. He had just reached the edge of the shelf of rock that meant life to him when he fell back into the flames below. When the fire had passed that section of the forest a searching party found Ford and took him to Haines Falls where he lives. Layman’s charred body was found sometime afterward where he had fallen.” (Catskill’s Wood Burning and Big Hotels Menaced.” The Evening Telegram. August 11, 1900.) The two other men of the party escaped without harm.

 

In a second version of Layman’s and Ford’s struggle, they were trying to get down the ledge, as opposed to up the ledge, as described in the previous article. The four men in Layman’s party “were so busily engaged in fighting flames that they paid little heed to the direction of the wind, which had changed and was blowing the fire toward them. The flames made such headway that Layman and his companions were compelled to flee for their lives. In some way they lost their bearings and brought upon the top of a high ledge with the flames close on them. The three men with Layman succeeded in getting down the ledge, but Layman was burned to death. Frank Layman’s body was burned beyond recognition, with the remains only identifiable by his watch, which had stopped at exactly 4pm.” (“Burned to Death.” Poughkeepsie Eagle-News. August 13, 1900.)

 

Oscar Ford suffered severe burns, and “is delirious. It is feared the shock of his experience has rendered him so.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. August 11, 1900.) Arthur Layman suffered two broken legs from the jump from the ledge.

 

Supporting this down-the-ledge version, another newspaper wrote “Some idea of the fierceness of the fire can be conceived when it is learned that the flames where Layman was fighting the fire leaped fully one hundred and fifty yards, starting another fire which quickly formed a semi-circle hemming in the men on one side while at the other a ledge fully twenty feet high with jagged rocks below stared them in the face if they would escape; and this dangerous leap they took and succeeded in escaping, but Layman, not so fortunate, was overtaken by the flames before he could reach the ledge, and perished.” (Catskill Daily Mail.)

 

Although no one knows specifically how the fire started, the first theory, and the most published, attributed it to the lengthy regional drought that dried the trees and land. One newspaper article stated that it hadn’t rained in nearly 40 days. A second theory was that the fire was accidentally started by “tramps” camping out in the woods. Perhaps it could have been a combination of both possibilities.

 

Interestingly the fire conditions of 1900 in the Catskills were the exact opposite of the year prior. “In 1899 there were no fires in the Catskills, while in the Adirondacks they occurred to a remarkable extent. This year the conditions were reversed, the Catskill woodlands suffering to a considerable degree while the Adirondack fires were few and did little damage.” (Sixth Annual Report of the Forest, Fish and Game Commission of the State of New York. Albany, NY: James B. Lyon, 1901.)

 

The fire destroyed several hundred acres of forest land. The hotels were saved. Other fires caused by the dry conditions were also raging at the same time in the Catskills at Cairo Round Top, Black Head Mountain the Plattekill Clove.

 

Firefighting work on South Mountain included the digging of trenches and back fire. Some reports had the number of firefighting personnel as high as 500 people. By Monday, August 13th, with calm and favorable winds and a timely rain storm, the fire was under control.

 

Within a few months of Layman’s death, community residents and guests of the nearby hotels raised over $700 to construct a monument to the brave hero, which was erected in 1901 on the spot where his body was found. The plot of land for the monument was donated by George Harding, owner of the Hotel Kaaterskill which had been threatened by the fire. The parcel deed stated that the monument was to be built within one year, and that the parcel was “expressly given and intended only for the use and purpose of a site for a monument . . . commemorating the death of one Frank Layman.” (Indenture between Harding and Twilight Park Association, 14 March 1901. Courtesy of Mountaintop Historical Society, Haines Falls, NY.)

 

The National Register of Historic Places states that is believed, although not conclusively, that “the Terns brothers, masons from Haines Falls active during the period, probably designed and built the Layman memorial.”

 

“With stones gathered in the vicinity a huge mound was built, upon which is surmounted a boulder of titanic size. In the mound, in key-stone form, will be placed a marble tablet, 2x10, to commemorate the deed of Layman. The tablet was made by William Mould, of Saugerties.” (“Memorial Tablet for A Hero.” The Argus. July 6, 1901.) “The mound and tablet are situated near the Laurel house and are a fitting appreciation of the gallant service given by Layman in behalf of others.” (“To Erect a Memorial to a Brave Young Man.” The Evening Enterprise. July 8, 1901.)

 

“The monument is pyramidal in shape, four-sided, and batters upward from a base approximately seven feet in diameter to a height of approximately eleven feet on its west facing side. It is constructed of indigenous fieldstone, laid up with mortar in fairly regular courses. The monument is surmounted by three square-shaped capstones, each smaller than that below it. Above the uppermost capstone rests a small boulder, mortared in place. Centered within the monument is a dressed marble tablet, the outside edges of which batter inward as they rise to follow the taper of the monument’s walls.” (“Frank D. Layman Memorial.” National Register of Historic Places.)

 

The Layman Monument is dedicated to Frank D. Layman, who lost his life on August 10, 1900 while fighting a fire on South Mountain in the Catskills.Frank D. Layman MonumentThe Frank D. Layman monument is located on South Mountain along the blue-marked Escarpment Trail in the North Lake area. It is located a short distance from Kaaterskill Falls and is accessible only by foot. The site offers a commanding view of upper Kaaterskill Clove as it faces towards Twilight Park and the distant Hunter Mountain. Just below the monument is a steep ledge that drops off into the clove.

The inscription on the monument reads: “In memory of Frank D. Layman, of Haines Falls, who lost his life on this spot Aug. 10, 1900. While with others fighting a forest fire which threatened to destroy the homes and business interests of the people of this place. By those grateful for his devoted service this monument is erected.”

The devastating Catskills fire of 1900 in which Frank Layman (1872-1900) lost his life started on August 10th (at around either 10am or 3pm, depending on the source) in Kaaterskill Clove below Kaaterskill Falls in close proximity to the Laurel House, and a little further from the famed Kaaterskill Hotel. Guests of both hotels were the first to smell the smoke. The fire would reach within 300 yards of the grand Laurel House hotel. Some of the hotel patrons left in fear, while others had their trunks packed and were ready to leave with short notice.

Although no one knows specifically how the fire started, the first theory, and the most published, attributed it to the lengthy regional drought that dried the trees and land. One newspaper article stated that it hadn’t rained in nearly 40 days. A second theory was that the fire was accidentally started by “tramps” camping out in the woods. Perhaps it could have a combination of both possibilities.

The fire destroyed several hundred acres of forest land. The hotels were saved. Other fires caused by the dry conditions were also raging at the same time in the Catskills at Cairo Round Top, Black Head Mountain the Plattekill Clove.

Within a few months of Layman’s death, community residents and guests of the nearby hotels raised over $700 to construct a monument to the brave hero, which was erected in 1901 on the spot where his body was found. The plot of land for the monument was donated by George Harding, owner of the Hotel Kaaterskill which had been threatened by the fire.

For more information about Frank D. Layman and the August 1900 fire that took his life, please see my blog post dated October 22, 2020.

 

In 1903 the monument was finalized, with over 200 people attending the dedication ceremony. “In August 2000, local residents again honored Layman’s memory with a ceremony, one hundred years after his death on South Mountain, fostering a continued interest in his service to community.” (“Frank D. Layman Memorial.” National Register of Historic Places.)

 

The land immediately surrounding the monument is owned by the town of Hunter, to ensure no conflict with the Catskill Forest Preserve’s mandate of being “forever wild.” In 2009 Daniel Coughlin III, then a Boy Scout working on promotion to Eagle Scout, undertook a restoration project of the monument. Work including restorative masonry work, water bars for erosion management and general landscape work around the monument.

 

The Frank D. Layman Memorial was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 as “a locally significant example of rustic wayside monument design.” The memorial “has come to symbolize the contribution made by Layman and other firefighters, as the same time its aesthetic qualities have provided an expression of local craftsmanship and a strong sense of place.” “The use of indigenous stone lends the monument a rustic character sensitive with its site, as does the cairn-like pylon form, and provides for the memorials distinctive sense of place. Overlooking the Kaaterskill Clove, the understated monument is nonetheless a noteworthy expression of local design with considerable symbolic value.” (“Frank D. Layman Memorial.” National Register of Historic Places.)

 

Frank D. Layman is buried at Maplewood Cemetery (Section 1, Row 9) in the town of Hunter. Also buried at Maplewood is Frank’s mother and father, Charles Layman and Philena [Roe] Layman. The cemetery is located along Route 23A west of the village of Hunter.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Arthur Layman Bird Layman Charles Layman clove Daniel Coughlin Escarpment Trail fire Frank D. Layman Frank D. Layman Memorial Frank Layman George Harding Haines Falls hike hiking Kaaterskill Clove Kaaterskill Falls Kaaterskill Hotel Laurel House Layman's Monument memorial monument National Register of Historic Places Oscar Ford Philena Layman South Mountain Tannersville trail Twilight Park William Mould https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/in-memory-of-frank-d-layman-hero-of-south-mountain Thu, 22 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Twilight Park, Fall Colors https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/twilight-park-fall-colors Twilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River.

 

Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

In these photographs the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.

 

The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) architecture autumn buildings Charles Haines Charles Wingate colors community Elka Park fall Haines Falls Haines Falls House homes Kaaterskill Clove National Register of Historic Places Onteora Park residential Route 23A Santa Cruz Park Twilight Park Twilight Park Historic District https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/twilight-park-fall-colors Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: John Burroughs and His Boyhood Rock https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-john-burroughs-and-his-boyhood-rock Born and raised in Roxbury, John Burroughs (1837-1921) would grow from his humble roots to become a famous author and naturalist. He authored 27 books, that sold over 1 ½ million copies, as well as numerous magazine essays. Burroughs’ most popular writings became generally known as the nature essay. The nature essay relied on Burroughs’ astute observation of his natural surroundings. He took long walks in the woods, collected plant and animal specimens and read voraciously about nature. He would often write not about faraway places that few readers would ever see but about his immediate surroundings. Subjects would include flowers, trees, birds, country living, open fields, barns and barnyards and farm animals. He would write about long hiking trips and fly-fishing. Readers could individually relate to the subjects and his essays resonated with wide audiences. His literary prominence brought him the audience of John Muir, Walt Whitman, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and even President Theodore Roosevelt. While his fame has diminished over the past century since his death, his contribution to the literary arts and environmental conservation has ensured that his legacy will not be forgotten.

 

Burroughs is buried on the family farm where grew up in Roxbury, New York. The location is now protected as part of the John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site.

 

Located adjacent to his grave is a large glacial erratic known to Burroughs and his faithful readers as Boyhood Rock, a treasured location where Burroughs would spend many hours of his youth upon the sandstone rock gazing out over the farm, fields and mountains. It was perhaps his favorite place in the world. As per his last wishes Burroughs is buried in his final resting place only feet away from “the big rock in the pasture”: “Here I climbed at sundown when a boy to rest from work and play, and to listen to the vesper sparrow sing, and here I hope to rest when my work and play are over – when the sun goes down – here by boyhood rock.” (1) 

 

The bronze plaque attached to Boyhood Rock includes a wonderful engraving of Burroughs sitting upon the rock gazing upon the beautiful scenery. The engraving is an interpretation of a nearly life size bronze statue of John Burroughs created in 1918 by well-known sculptor Cartaino di Sciarrino Pietro. The original bronze statue is located at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, having been dedicated on the officially proclaimed “Burroughs Day” in 1918 during a ceremony attended by thousands. The Boyhood Rock plaque also includes a brief excerpt from his famous “Waiting” poem: “I stand amid eternal ways, and what is mine shall know my face.”

 

The postcard, titled “The Tablet on Memorial Rock at John Burroughs Grave, Roxbury, N.Y.,” was published by the Artvue Postcard Company located at 225 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. The postcard was never mailed. My photographs were taken in September 2018.

 

References:

(1)    Barrus, Clara. John Burroughs: Boy and Man. Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1920. Page 47.

 

Vintage postcard depicting the bronze plaque attached to Boyhood Rock at the burial site of famed author John Burroughs at Roxbury in Delaware County, New York.The Tablet on Memorial Rock at John Burroughs Grave, Roxbury, N.Y.Born and raised in Roxbury, John Burroughs (1837-1921) would grow from his humble roots to become a famous author and naturalist. He authored 27 books, that sold over 1 ½ million copies, as well as numerous magazine essays. Burroughs’ most popular writings became generally known as the nature essay. The nature essay relied on Burroughs’ astute observation of his natural surroundings. He took long walks in the woods, collected plant and animal specimens and read voraciously about nature. He would often write not about faraway places that few readers would ever see but about his immediate surroundings. Subjects would include flowers, trees, birds, country living, open fields, barns and barnyards and farm animals. He would write about long hiking trips and fly-fishing. Readers could individually relate to the subjects and his essays resonated with wide audiences. His literary prominence brought him the audience of John Muir, Walt Whitman, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and even President Theodore Roosevelt. While his fame has diminished over the past century since his death, his contribution to the literary arts and environmental conservation has ensured that his legacy will not be forgotten.

Burroughs is buried on the family farm where grew up in Roxbury, New York. The location is now protected as part of the John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site.

Located adjacent to his grave is a large glacial erratic known to Burroughs and his faithful readers as Boyhood Rock, a treasured location where Burroughs would spend many hours of his youth upon the sandstone rock gazing out over the farm, fields and mountains. It was perhaps his favorite place in the world. As per his last wishes Burroughs is buried in his final resting place only feet away from “the big rock in the pasture”: “Here I climbed at sundown when a boy to rest from work and play, and to listen to the vesper sparrow sing, and here I hope to rest when my work and play are over – when the sun goes down – here by boyhood rock.” (1)

The bronze plaque attached to Boyhood Rock includes a wonderful engraving of Burroughs sitting upon the rock gazing upon the beautiful scenery. The engraving is an interpretation of a nearly life size bronze statue of John Burroughs created in 1918 by well-known sculptor Cartaino di Sciarrino Pietro. The original bronze statue is located at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, having been dedicated on the officially proclaimed “Burroughs Day” in 1918 during a ceremony attended by thousands. The Boyhood Rock plaque also includes a brief excerpt from his famous “Waiting” poem: “I stand amid eternal ways, and what is mine shall know my face.”

The postcard was published by the Artvue Postcard Company located at 225 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. The postcard was never mailed.

References:
(1) Barrus, Clara. John Burroughs: Boy and Man. Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1920. Page 47.

 

Boyhood Rock, located at the John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site in Roxbury, is located on the family farm where Burroughs grew up.Eternal WaysBoyhood Rock, John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site, Roxbury, Delaware County

Born and raised in Roxbury, John Burroughs (1837-1921) would grow from his humble roots to become a famous author and naturalist. He authored 27 books, that sold over 1 ½ million copies, as well as numerous magazine essays. Burroughs’ most popular writings became generally known as the nature essay. The nature essay relied on Burroughs’ astute observation of his natural surroundings. He took long walks in the woods, collected plant and animal specimens and read voraciously about nature. He would often write not about faraway places that few readers would ever see but about his immediate surroundings. Subjects would include flowers, trees, birds, country living, open fields, barns and barnyards and farm animals. He would write about long hiking trips and fly-fishing. Readers could individually relate to the subjects and his essays resonated with wide audiences. His literary prominence brought him the audience of John Muir, Walt Whitman, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and even President Theodore Roosevelt. While his fame has diminished over the past century since his death, his contribution to the literary arts and environmental conservation has ensured that his legacy will not be forgotten.

Boyhood Rock, located at the John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site in Roxbury, is located on the family farm where Burroughs grew up. He would spend hours upon the sandstone rock gazing out over the farm, fields and mountains. It was perhaps his favorite place in the world. As per his last wishes Burroughs is buried in his final resting place only feet away from “the big rock in the pasture”: “Here I climbed at sundown when a boy to rest from work and play, and to listen to the vesper sparrow sing, and here I hope to rest when my work and play are over – when the sun goes down – here by boyhood rock.” (1)

The bronze plaque attached to Boyhood Rock includes a wonderful engraving of Burroughs sitting upon the rock gazing upon the beautiful scenery. The engraving is an interpretation of a nearly life size bronze statue of John Burroughs created in 1918 by well known sculptor Cartaino di Sciarrino Pietro. The original bronze statue is located at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, having been dedicated on the officially proclaimed “Burroughs Day” in 1918 during a ceremony attended by thousands. The Boyhood Rock plaque also includes a brief excerpt from his famous “Waiting” poem: “I stand amid eternal ways, and what is mine shall know my face.”

References:
(1) Barrus, Clara. John Burroughs: Boy and Man. Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1920. Page 47.

 

Boyhood Rock, located at the John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site in Roxbury, is located on the family farm where Burroughs grew up.BurroughsBoyhood Rock, John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site, Roxbury, Delaware County

Born and raised in Roxbury, John Burroughs (1837-1921) would grow from his humble roots to become a famous author and naturalist. He authored 27 books, that sold over 1 ½ million copies, as well as numerous magazine essays. Burroughs’ most popular writings became generally known as the nature essay. The nature essay relied on Burroughs’ astute observation of his natural surroundings. He took long walks in the woods, collected plant and animal specimens and read voraciously about nature. He would often write not about faraway places that few readers would ever see but about his immediate surroundings. Subjects would include flowers, trees, birds, country living, open fields, barns and barnyards and farm animals. He would write about long hiking trips and fly-fishing. Readers could individually relate to the subjects and his essays resonated with wide audiences. His literary prominence brought him the audience of John Muir, Walt Whitman, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and even President Theodore Roosevelt. While his fame has diminished over the past century since his death, his contribution to the literary arts and environmental conservation has ensured that his legacy will not be forgotten.

Boyhood Rock, located at the John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site in Roxbury, is located on the family farm where Burroughs grew up. He would spend hours upon the sandstone rock gazing out over the farm, fields and mountains. It was perhaps his favorite place in the world. As per his last wishes Burroughs is buried in his final resting place only feet away from “the big rock in the pasture”: “Here I climbed at sundown when a boy to rest from work and play, and to listen to the vesper sparrow sing, and here I hope to rest when my work and play are over – when the sun goes down – here by boyhood rock.” (1)

The bronze plaque attached to Boyhood Rock includes a wonderful engraving of Burroughs sitting upon the rock gazing upon the beautiful scenery. The engraving is an interpretation of a nearly life size bronze statue of John Burroughs created in 1918 by well known sculptor Cartaino di Sciarrino Pietro. The original bronze statue is located at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, having been dedicated on the officially proclaimed “Burroughs Day” in 1918 during a ceremony attended by thousands. The Boyhood Rock plaque also includes a brief excerpt from his famous “Waiting” poem: “I stand amid eternal ways, and what is mine shall know my face.”

References:
(1) Barrus, Clara. John Burroughs: Boy and Man. Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1920. Page 47.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) animals Artvue Postcard Company author barns birds books Boyhood rock Burroughs Day Cartiano di Sciarrino Pietro ceremony conservation Curtis Burroughs Delaware County essay farm fields flowers fly fishing grave gravesite Henry Ford hike hiking John Burroughs John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site John Muir literature lodge magazine National Register of Historic Places naturalist nature nature essay Ohio Old Clump Mountain pasture plants plaque poem poet rock Roxbury sandstone sculptor sculpture summer Theodore Roosevelt Thomas Edison Toledo Museum of Art trees Waiting Walt Whitman woods https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-john-burroughs-and-his-boyhood-rock Sat, 17 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: Reed Street Historic District, Coxsackie https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-reed-street-historic-district-coxsackie The Reed Street Historic District in Coxsackie is scenically located on the west bank of the Hudson River. The historic district has been known by several different names including Reed’s Landing, Coxsackie Middle Landing, Coxsackie Landing and now simply Coxsackie. Although it is hard to see today the Coxsackie village, like its sister cities of Athens and Catskill, was once a thriving river town, home to a variety of businesses including ship building, brick manufacturer, carriage manufacturer, printing press manufacturer, iron foundry, ice harvesting and a dock area for shipping agricultural products to New York City. Although Coxsackie is not quite the thriving commercial district it once was it still offers wonderful architecture and a glimpse into the history of the Hudson River valley. The small downtown Reed Street area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The building (on the left with the red-and-white awning) at 1 Mansion Street was constructed circa 1840. It was described on the Reed Street Historic District application for the National Register of Historic Places as “Three stories, brick, stone lintels with center block, two rectangular cast-iron storefront columns, modern storefront, commercial.” The building (on the right) at 49-53 Reed Street was constructed circa 1865. It was described as “Three stories, brick, Italianate, six-bay with paired brackets, modernized storefronts, commercial.”

 

The postcard was published by D. B. Smith located at Coxsackie, New York. The postmark shows that the card was mailed in 1915. My photograph was taken 99 years later in July 2014.

 

Vintage postcard of the Reed Street Historic District in Coxsackie which is scenically located on the west bank of the Hudson River.Coxsackie Square, Coxsackie, N.Y.The Reed Street Historic District in Coxsackie is scenically located on the west bank of the Hudson River. The historic district has been known by several different names including Reed’s Landing, Coxsackie Middle Landing, Coxsackie Landing and now simply Coxsackie. Although it is hard to see today the Coxsackie village, like its sister cities of Athens and Catskill, was once a thriving river town, home to a variety of businesses including ship building, brick manufacturer, carriage manufacturer, printing press manufacturer, iron foundry, ice harvesting and a dock area for shipping agricultural products to New York City. Although Coxsackie is not quite the thriving commercial district it once was it still offers wonderful architecture and a glimpse into the history of the Hudson River valley. The small downtown Reed Street area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The postcard was published by D. B. Smith located at Coxsackie, New York. The postmark shows that the card was mailed in 1915.

 

The Reed Street Historic District in Coxsackie is scenically located on the west bank of the Hudson River.One Mansion StreetReed Street Historic District, Coxsackie, Greene County

The Reed Street Historic District in Coxsackie is scenically located on the west bank of the Hudson River. The historic district has been known by several different names including Reed’s Landing, Coxsackie Middle Landing, Coxsackie Landing and now simply Coxsackie. Although it is hard to see today the Coxsackie village, like its sister cities of Athens and Catskill, was once a thriving river town, home to a variety of businesses including ship building, brick manufacturer, carriage manufacturer, printing press manufacturer, iron foundry, ice harvesting and a dock area for shipping agricultural products to New York City. Although Coxsackie is not quite the thriving commercial district it once was it still offers wonderful architecture and a glimpse into the history of the Hudson River valley. The small downtown Reed Street area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) agriculture architecture Athens brick building business carriage Catskill Catskills Then and Now commercial Coxsackie Coxsackie Landing Coxsackie Middle Landing dock Ely Street foundry Greene County Hudson River ice iron National Register of Historic Places printing press Reed Street Reed Street Historic District Reed's Landing river ship town village https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-reed-street-historic-district-coxsackie Sat, 10 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Kaaterskill Clove, Fall Colors https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/kaaterskill-clove-fall-colors Kaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

 

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

 

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.

 

Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) autumn Baston Falls clove colors Escarpment Trail fall Fawn's Leap Five Cascades foliage Haines Falls hike hiking Indian Head Kaaterskill Clove Kaaterskill Falls Kaaterskill High Peak overlook Palenville Poet's Ledge Round Top South Mountain Sunset Rock Twilight Park view https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/kaaterskill-clove-fall-colors Thu, 08 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: Senate House Museum https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-senate-house-museum The Senate House Museum in the historic Stockade District of Kingston was constructed in 1927 to help display the growing historical collection of the adjacent Senate House. The museum contains a large collection of documents, drawings and paintings, including paintings of Kingston native and noted painter John Vanderlyn (1775-1852) as well as those of Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Sully, James Bard and Ammi Phillips. 

 

The cornerstone for the museum was laid on September 10, 1927 in a ceremony attended by over 5,000 people. Judge Alphonso T. Clearwater presided over the ceremonies, a distinguished event that included the attendance of New York State Governor Alfred E. Smith. Following the cornerstone ceremony, a reception and luncheon were held for Governor Smith, members of the legislature and distinguished guests at the nearby Hotel Stuyvesant.

 

The two-story colonial revival structure, constructed of field stone, was designed with the character and architecture to complement the original Senate House. The building was designed by Sullivan P. Jones, the state architect. The Senate House Museum opened on June 14, 1930.

 

“Senate House Museum Opened. Ceremony Brief But Impressive Included Dedication and Raising of Flag of the State of New York.

 

Mayor Edgar J. Dempsey and Judge A. T. Clearwater opened the Senate House Museum this morning in a brief by impressive ceremony consisting of a short dedication and the raising of the flag of the State of New York.

 

While two members of the Kingston police force stood guard, Judge Clearwater officially opened the building saying, “In the name of the state, the Senate House Association and the city of Kingston, Mayor Dempsey and myself declare this building open to the public.” At the same moment, the state’s official flag was raised on the standard in front of the building to its position beside that of the flag of the United States.

 

The judge then conducted the party present in a tour of the museum, explaining the relics and properties of interest. In the lobby of the building a tablet marks the rear wall to the effect – “Erected by the State of New York to commemorate the founding at Kingston of the government of the state on the thirtieth of July, 1777, and the organization of the first legislature on the tenth of September of that year. Cornerstone laid on the tenth of September, 1927, by His Excellency, Governor Alfred E. Smith.

 

The subjects of interest in the building are arranged in periods, each period being given a definite space or room. One section of the lower floor is devoted to the paintings of John Vanderlyn, valued at more than $200,000. Another collection of interest is that of Judge Alton B. Parker, a group of autographs of provincial, colonial and constitutional governors, bequeathed to the museum by Judge Parker.

 

Beginning this morning, the Senate House Museum will be open to the public every day in the year, Sundays and legal holidays excepted. The museum will be opened each day at 10 a.m. until noon, and from 1 o’clock until 4:30 p.m. These regulations comply with the state law in regards to public buildings containing collections of value. Children under 16 years of age will not be admitted to the building unless accompanied by parents or guardians.

 

Many visitors were expected to view the collections this afternoon, a steady stream of onlookers having viewed the contents of the building this morning.” (“Senate House Museum Opened.” The Kingston Daily Freeman. June 14, 1930.)    

 

The Senate House in the historic Stockade District of Kingston was the meeting place of the first New York State Senate in September and October 1777. The elected representatives met in this simple stone house that was constructed in 1676 by Wessel Ten Broek, an immigrant from Westphalia in West Germany. In 1751 the property passed into the hands of Abraham Van Gaasbeek, a local merchant. Van Gaasbeek “offered a room in his house for the use of the first State Senate, which met there on the morning of September 10, 1777.” The patriots adopted a government system that included a governor, a lieutenant governor, senate, assembly and judiciary, a system that is still in place today. Members of the Senate spent little time working there as they had to evacuate Kingston in October as British troops under the command of Major General John Vaughan made their way north from Manhattan, plundering the Hudson Valley. The British attacked Kingston on October 16, 1777, burning over 300 homes, barns and buildings. New York State acquired the property in 1887. The Senate House is one of the oldest public buildings in the United States and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about this historic building check out The Old Senate House, 1777, City of Kingston, N.Y., published in 1883 and authored by Frederick Edward Westbrook.

 

The vintage postcard was published by William O'Reilly, Inc., located in Kingston, New York. The Senate House Museum is the more prominent building on the right, while the original Senate House is in the background on the lower left. The postcard was never mailed. My photograph was taken in the spring of 2016.

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the Senate House Museum located in the historic Stockade District of Kingston, New York.Showing the New York State Museum Building from Fair Street, Kingston, N. Y.The Senate House Museum in the historic Stockade District of Kingston, New York was constructed in 1927 to help display the growing historical collection of the adjacent Senate House. The museum contains a large collection of documents, drawings and paintings, including paintings of Kingston native and noted painter John Vanderlyn (1775-1852) as well as those of Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Sully, James Bard and Ammi Phillips.

The Senate House in the historic Stockade District of Kingston was the meeting place of the first New York State Senate in September and October 1777. The elected representatives met in this simple stone house that was constructed in 1676 and owned by Abraham Van Gaasbeek, a local merchant. The patriots adopted a government system that included a governor, a lieutenant governor, senate, assembly and judiciary, a system that is still in place today. Members of the Senate spent little time working there as they had to evacuate Kingston in October as British troops under the command of Major General John Vaughan made their way north from Manhattan, plundering the Hudson Valley. The British attacked Kingston on October 16, 1777, burning over 300 homes, barns and buildings. New York State acquired the property in 1887. The Senate House is one of the oldest public buildings in the United States and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about this historic building check out The Old Senate House, 1777, City of Kingston, N.Y., published in 1883 and authored by Frederick Edward Westbrook.

The vintage postcard was published by William O'Reilly, Inc., located in Kingston, New York. The Senate House Museum is the more prominent building on the right, while the original Senate House is in the background on the lower left. The postcard was never mailed.

The Senate House Museum in the historic Stockade District of Kingston was constructed in 1927 to help display the growing historical collection of the adjacent Senate House.Senate House MuseumStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The Senate House Museum in the historic Stockade District of Kingston was constructed in 1927 to help display the growing historical collection of the adjacent Senate House. The museum contains a large collection of documents, drawings and paintings, including paintings of Kingston native and noted painter John Vanderlyn (1775-1852) as well as those of Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Sully, James Bard and Ammi Phillips.

The Senate House in the historic Stockade District of Kingston was the meeting place of the first New York State Senate in September and October 1777. The elected representatives met in this simple stone house that was constructed in 1676 and owned by Abraham Van Gaasbeek, a local merchant. The patriots adopted a government system that included a governor, a lieutenant governor, senate, assembly and judiciary, a system that is still in place today. Members of the Senate spent little time working there as they had to evacuate Kingston in October as British troops under the command of Major General John Vaughan made their way north from Manhattan, plundering the Hudson Valley. The British attacked Kingston on October 16, 1777, burning over 300 homes, barns and buildings. New York State acquired the property in 1887. The Senate House is one of the oldest public buildings in the United States and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about this historic building check out The Old Senate House, 1777, City of Kingston, N.Y., published in 1883 and authored by Frederick Edward Westbrook.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) 1777 1927 Abraham Van Gaasbeek Ammi Phillips army assembly British burn burning Catskills Then and Now Frederick Edward Westbrook Gilbert Stuart government governor home house Hudson Valley James Bard John Vanderlyn judiciary Kingston lieutenant governor Major General John Vaughan merchant National Register of Historic Places New York painter painting patriot representative senate Senate House Senate House Museum Stockade District The Old Senate House Thomas Sully troops Ulster County uptown https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/10/catskills-then-and-now-senate-house-museum Sat, 03 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Schuyler S. Cornell – Catskills Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/9/schuyler-s-cornell-catskills-photographer Schuyler S. Cornell (1843-1927) was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.S. S. CornellSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was born on May 5, 1843 in Tioga, New York, located west of Binghamton. His father, Harvey Cornell, was born on December 9, 1810 at Summit in Schoharie County. Harvey began his ministerial life in 1835 at the age of 25 and would continue active preaching for 55 years. His first assignment was as the Baptist pastor at the church at Charlotteville in the town of Summit, Schoharie County, New York. He then served at Barton, Tioga County and then moved to Port Crane, where he organized the Baptist Church. He also preached at Triangle for three years and later at Union Center, where he again organized the Baptist Church. Over his long career Harvey Cornell also preached at Jefferson, Schoharie County; North Chatham, Columbia County; Preston Hollow, Albany County; Greenville, Greene County; and at several places in Broome County.  

The First Baptist Church of Summit where Harvey Cornell preached, located circa one mile from the village of Charlotteville, was established on September 26, 1805. The church was originally called the Baptist Church of Jefferson, then the Baptist Church of Summit, but later changed names to the First Baptist Church of Summit (when a second Baptist church in town was founded). In the decade from 1850 to 1860 the church reached a high membership of 127 people, with an average of 95 people. In the decade from 1860 to 1870 the church had an average membership of 109 people. In 1878 a new meeting house was constructed, a ceremony for which Rev. Harvey Cornell returned to attend. The church, celebrating over two centuries of service, continues to operate today.

In 1900 the Gloversville Daily Leader published an interesting article of how Rev. Harvey Cornell won a free ton of coal.

 

“Harvey Cornell, who lives at No. 141 Court street, is the “central figure” in a “coal strike.” The cause of the “strike” was that Mr. Cornell, who will be ninety years old next month, was the oldest McKinley voter at the recent election. The effect of the “strike” is that Mr. Cornell will burn, not at his own expense, a ton of coal during the coming winter.

The story is this: About the time of the recent industrial parade by the Republicans, a local coal dealer, to encourage longevity, offered a ton of coal to the oldest McKinley voter in the city. Since election there have been many applicants for the coal, but the above named was the winner.

Harvey Cornell was born at Summit, Schoharie county, December 9, 1810. When a boy he moved with his parents to “Chenango Pint.” When he was twenty-five years of age he was ordained to the Baptist ministry. His first charge was near Owego. Several years ago Mr. Cornell was compelled to retire from the ministry on account of poor health. He has lived in this city for thirteen years. Mr. Cornell first voted for William Henry Harrison. He told The Republican reporter how in that campaign the men of several villages came to the city, then “Chenango Pint,” and celebrated. The principal feature of the parade was ten ox team drawing a large wagon on which was a log house. The sides of the house were covered with racoon skins and the hides of other wild animals. A barrel of cider also rode on the wagon, “this is for a while,” said Mr. Cornell.

The aged voter is the father of L. P. Cornell of this city, and is well known to many of our residents.” (“Reward of Longevity.” The Gloversville Daily Leader. December 1, 1900.)

 

Reverend Harvey Cornell died in 1902, with the local newspaper carrying a brief obituary: “The Rev. Harvey Cornell, oldest Baptist minister in New York state died Saturday at the home of a daughter at Port Crane, Broome County, in his ninety-second year. He was born in Schoharie county and preached for 55 years. He voted for William Henry Harrison and was the oldest voter in Broome county at the time of President McKinley’s re-election. S. S. Cornell of Stamford, is one of the surviving sons.” (“Rev. Harvey Cornell.” Hobart Independent. August 16, 1902.) He is buried at Charlotteville, New York.

Other siblings of Schuyler included Emma C. Shear, wife of W. H. Shear, who died in 1916 at age 64 at her home in Port Dickinson; Mrs. A. J. Smith of Binghamton; L. P. Cornell of Gloversville; Harvey Cornell of Oneonta; and Alonzo. D. Cornell of Binghamton.

 

Location of the S. S. Cornell gallery within the village of Stamford, Delaware County, New York. Gallery noted by black box. Map by L. R. Burleigh, 1890, courtesy of the Library of Congress.

 

Charlotteville of the mid-19th century, the time of Schuyler’s upbringing, was home to the well-regarded New York Methodist Conference Seminary, which was established in 1850. The school, designed to train teachers with a Methodist approach, was the first of six seminaries constructed in Schoharie County. The school, located near the center of the village, had 362 students (222 men, 140 women) in its first year, and at its peak had approximately 800 students. The north seminary building burned in 1854, while the south seminary building burned in 1867. The school then purchased and converted a large local hotel to support the seminary, operating there for several years, but eventually closed in 1875.

Charlotteville was located in the Charlotte Valley along the Charlotte River. It was within the town of Summit in Schoharie County; and located 55 miles southwest of Albany, five miles from the Albany & Susquehanna railroad line. The town of Summit was an important producer of potatoes as well as sheep, hay and maple sugar. The hamlet of Charlotteville was home to a number of popular boarding houses, including the Charlotteville House and the Simmon’s Hotel. In 1856 the town of Summit had a population of 1,799 people, including 881 men and 918 women.

As for his early education Schuyler, and his siblings, could have possibly have attended the one room school house at Charlotteville, District # 4. The school was located in the center of the hamlet across the street from Charlotteville #14, a still standing one-room schoolhouse that operated from 1894 to 1951 and operates today as a community center. According to Karen Cuccinello, Summit Town Historian, “A typical school was about 24’ by 30’, had two doors (one for girls and one for boys), cloak room, blackboard, recitation bench, globe, desks, library and woodstove. Less than half the schools had privies/outhouses. The school day was from 9am to 4pm (included two breaks and an hour for lunch) and usually a half day on Saturday. The day often started out with a song and prayer . . . Students could be ages 3-21 but the usual age range was 6 -12. . .  More students went to school in the winter when the farm chores were less. School trustees would try to hire a male teacher for the winter session in order to handle the extra boys. In 1863 male teachers averaged $18 per month, exclusive of board, and women $12.” (Cuccinello, Karen. “Summit One Room Schoolhouses.” Schoharie County One-Room Schoolhouses. 2011. 

On August 13, 1862, at the age of 19, Schuyler enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War for three years, joining Company C, 134th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry led by Captain John Materhagan. Schuyler had the rank of Private. The 134th Regiment was first recruited by Colonel George E. Danforth and was officially called into service on September 22, 1862. Most of the soldiers in the 134th Regiment were from Delaware and Schoharie counties, home of the then 14th Senatorial District. Company C was mostly recruited at Schoharie County.

The unit left New York State under the command of Lieutenant Colonel J. S. DeAgreda on September 25, 1862 and was first sent to Virginia to join the Army of the Potomac. According to later newspaper reports Schuyler saw active service for three years and was involved in several major engagements, including Fredericksburg (Virginia, December 11-15, 1862), Chancellorsville (Virginia, April 30 to May 6, 1863), Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, July 1 to July 3, 1863), and was later sent to serve in Sherman’s Army as they marched through Georgia.

George H. Warner in his 1891 Military Records of Schoharie County Veterans of Four Wars provides some additional details on Schuyler’s military record, although some of it seems to conflict with the details provided in local publications. “Schuyler S. Cornell. Summit – Laborer; single; age 19; enlisted August 13, 1862; served regularly until July 2, 1863; taken sick and sent to Baltimore; contracted small-pox at that place; removed to Louisville, Ky., during the winter of 1863 and 1864; confined in hospital at that place, and on recovery was detailed on detached duty and served till close of the war; Stamford, N.Y.; married. Children, Burr G. Lena.” (Warner, George H. Military Records of Schoharie County Veterans of Four Wars. Albany, N.Y.: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1891.)

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Logo for Photographer Schuyler S. CornellPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Logo for Photographer Schuyler S. CornellPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler’s brother, William, age 22, also enlisted in the Union Army, joining only one day before his brother on August 12, 1862. William also had the rank of Private. According to his Civil War records, William was born on March 5, 1840 at Worcester, New York, was 5 feet, 8 inches tall with brown eyes and dark hair. He had an occupation of Farmer. Schuyler and William fought together through the bloody battles listed above. Through it all, they escaped serious injury. However, during the initial march with Sherman’s Army, William fell sick and was sent to Cincinnati, Ohio for sick leave. Schuyler and William would never see each other again.

After recovering, William was assigned to Company I, 11th Veteran Reserve Corp, his unit being tasked with guarding approximately 833 Confederate prisoners as they were being transported by rail train from Point Lookout, Maryland to the northern rebel prison camp at Elmira, New York. “It was on his way north that he lost his life. The train conveying the prisoners had reached Shohola, Pa., and while waiting for orders there was crashed into by an express train. Some 40 of the prisoners and 17 guards were killed. Word soon reached the boy’s father, Rev. H. Cornell, at that time pastor of a Baptist church at Charlotteville, of the boy’s death. The father, with an older brother, at once went to Shohola, driving through with a hearse to bring the body back. On reaching there he found that the 17 bodies had been buried together in a trench. He obtained permission to uncover the bodies, which was done, but conditions were such that he could not identify the body and they returned. From that time on all members of the family believed that the son’s body remained in its first burial place.

It was during the recent visit to Elmira that Mr. Cornell [Schuyler], while in conversation with a fellow comrade, mentioned that his brother met death in the collision a Shohola, and asked if there had ever been a marker erected to mark the place. Mr. Cornell was much surprised when told that his brother was buried in the national cemetery in Elmira, and the comrade offered to take him to the grave. On his visit he was taken to a large monument on which was inscribed the names of the 17 guards who had lost their lives. The first name on the face being that of William H. Cornell, a few feet away were smaller markers and the graves of all the guards. It was then learned from records kept at the cemetery the bodies were uncovered shorty after they were buried for identification, and were then removed to the cemetery in Elmira.” (“Grave of Brother Found After 50 Years.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. July 26, 1919.)

William H. Cornell and his fellow guards were reinterred at the Woodlawn National Cemetery in Elmira, New York. The Shohola monument at Woodlawn is made of light granite, and is about nine feet high and five feet wide at the base. Two bronze tablets, measuring two feet by four feet, contain the inscriptions and names of the 17 Union soldiers and the 49 Confederate soldiers. The inscription on the Union tablet reads “Erected by the United States to the memory of the following soldiers, privates in the Eleventh Veteran Reserve Corps, comprising the Union guards who were killed with their Confederate prisoners of war in the railroad accident near Shohola, Pa., July 15, 1864, whose unidentified remains, together with those of the Confederate prisoners, have been removed to this cemetery.”

George H. Warner in his 1891 Military Records of Schoharie County Veterans of Four Wars provides some additional details on William’s military record. “William H. Cornell. Summit – Laborer; single; age 22; enlisted August 12, 1862; detailed as guard over Rebel prisoners as far as Tennally Town, Pa., on the night of June 30, 1864; rejoined his regiment on the night of July 1; subsequently detailed as guard at Point Lookout, Md.; killed in a railroad collision at Shohola, Pa., June [July] 15, 1864, while serving as guard over Rebel prisoners en route to Elmira, N.Y.” (Warner, George H. Military Records of Schoharie County Veterans of Four Wars. Albany, N.Y.: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1891.)

The 134th Infantry served in the Atlanta campaign including the battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, Pine Mountain, Golgotha, Kolb’s Farm, Marietta, Chattahoochee River, Peachtree Creek Atlanta, and then Sandersville, Greensboro Savannah, and finally in the Carolinas campaign. With the close of the war the 134th marched to Washington, DC, where it took part in the Grand Review, and was mustered out at Bladensburg, Maryland on June 10, 1865. The 134th had a long and honorable record throughout the Civil War.

Beginning in 1862 the United States government began a pension system for Union soldiers who had served during the war. Under this early system, “Soldiers who were disabled as a result of their service were eligible for pensions; the amount depended on their rank and their injury. Dependents (widows and children) of soldiers who were killed on duty were also eligible.” However, over the years, the eligibility criteria were increasingly loosened, notably with the 1879 Arrears Act, the 1890 Dependent Pension Act and the Act of 1907. With the 1890 act the pension was based on the veteran’s age and time of service. The 1907 act confirmed that criteria, “when old age itself was considered a disability.” (Gorman, Kathleen L. “Civil War Pensions.” Essential Civil War Curriculum. 2012.)

Military records show that Schuyler S. Cornell received government pension benefits for his military service in the Civil War beginning on October 7, 1892. Upon his passing on March 6, 1927, pension benefits were passed on to his widow Permelia, although, given her “invalid” state, the benefits were paid to their daughter Lena Wheeler. Schuyler’s pension benefit rates steadily increased over the years: as of May 6, 1913, the rate was $24 a month; as of May 5, 1918, the rate was $30; as of June 10, 1918, the rate was $40; as of May 1, 1920 the rate was $50; and as of October 21, 1925, the rate was $75.

Once a solider, always a soldier, could have been said S. S. Cornell and other members of the Stamford post of the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.). In 1916, during the height of the Mexican Border War, the entire post volunteered to serve again if necessary. “Veterans Offer Service. Members of John A. Logan Post Stamford Would Again Take Up Arms. At a meeting of John A. Logan Post, G. A. R., held in Stamford on Saturday it was unanimously resolved that all members offer their services as veterans to the country in its present imbroglio with Mexico, to serve in such places and capacity as the U.S. government may deem fitting and proper to achieve the best results in case of war between this country and Mexico. Signed by S. I. More, Com., John Pogue, Adjt., S. S. Cornell, Q. M. – [Stamford Mirror.” (“Veterans Offer Service.” Catskill Mountain News. June 30, 1916.) At the time of this resolution in 1916 Schuyler was 73 years of age, although apparently with plenty of fight left in him.

After the Civil War, in 1866, Schuyler married Permelia (Pamelia) A. Gallup. Permelia was born in 1848 at the hamlet of Charlotteville in Schoharie County, New York. She was the daughter of Samuel B. Gallup (1821-1858) and Orline Vaughn (1822-1912), of Worcester, New York. Samuel and Orline married on November 9, 1842. Permelia was one of four children, including her three brothers John, Seward and Jason. In the 1850 US census Samuel Gallup was listed with the occupation of a Farmer. Samuel died on January 19, 1858.

Samuel Gallup, Schuyler’s father-in-law, was descended from John Gallop who sailed from Plymouth, England on March 20, 1630 and arrived at Nantasket (now Hull) on May 30, 1630. Christobel, John Gallop’s wife, and their children followed in 1633. John Gallop was an early land owner and one of the first harbor pilots in the Boston area. “He owned Gallup’s Island, where he had a snug farm, with a meadow on Long Island, a sheep pasture on Nix Mate, and a house in Boston . . . He was a skillful mariner, well acquainted with the harbor around Boston, and in the habit of making frequent trading expeditions along the coast in his own vessels.” Gallop’s Island, located near Boston, where John Gallop lived, is named in his honor. (Gallup, John D. The Genealogical History of the Gallup Family in the United States. Hartford, Conn.: Hartford Printing Company, 1893.)

Schuyler and his wife Permelia had two children, Burr G. Cornell and Lena Cornell. Burr Cornell graduated from the Stamford Seminary in 1887. That same year, Burr, in partnership with his father, opened a tailor shop in 1887 at their store in the village of Stamford, operating as S. S. Cornell & Son. On the 1892 US Census Burr was listed with an occupation of “Tailor.” Burr later operated a merchant clothing business at Middleburgh, New York. In 1903 Burr G. Cornell moved to Los Angeles, California.

Lena married William H. Wheeler, of Stamford, who was a long serving veterinary at Stamford. He was listed on the 1880 US Census with an occupation of “Veterinary Surgery”, on the 1892 US Census as a “Horse Dealer,” on the 1910 US Census as “Veterinary Surgery,” on the 1920 US Census as “Veterinary,” and on the 1930 US Census as “Doctor – Veterinarian.” Although his earlier education is unclear it is known that William attended the New York Veterinary College, graduating in 1898 with a Veterinary Science degree. He was one of eight students to receive their diplomas that year, with William achieving “the best practical examination, winning a case of instruments.” (“New York College of Veterinary Surgeons.” The Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary Archives. May, 1898. Volume 19, Number 5.) William was often noted in the local newspapers for his work in training successful race horses, often participating at local fairs and tracks. Lena died suddenly at her home on June 5, 1943.

Murphy Hall, a 4-story residence dormitory at the State University at New York (SUNY) at Delhi, is named in honor of Gertrude Wheeler Murphy (1890-1938), Schuyler’s grand-daughter, and daughter of William Wheeler and Lena (Cornell) Wheeler. Gertrude was born on December 26, 1890 at Stamford. She graduated from the Stamford Seminary in 1907 and from Vassar College in 1913. In 1914 Gertrude married Fred P. Murphy (1889-1979), a Cornell University graduate and executive with the Grolier company, a leading distributor of encyclopedias and reference books.

 

Vintage postcard by Bob Wyer of Murphy Hall at the SUNY Agriculture and Technical College located at Delhi, New York.Murphy Hall, State University College, Delhi, New YorkWell-known photographer Bob Wyer took this photograph of the State University of New York Agriculture and Technical College, located at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. The inscription on the reverse side reads “Murphy Hall – A futuristic modern dormitory functionally designed for optimum group living, study and recreating, containing a recreational area, residence office and apartment.”

As per the SUNY Delhi website: “Murphy Hall is the sister building to O'Connor Hall. It is a four-story residence hall with a large lounge in the center of the building. Student rooms are located along the corridors with four common bathrooms and shower facilities per floor. There are three laundry rooms in the building located across from the elevator on the second, third, and fourth floor. Murphy Hall offers mainly triple rooms, with some double rooms, and limited single rooms.”

The school was founded in 1913, originally as a small school focused on farming, but later expanded to general education. In 1941 the school became New York State Agricultural and Technical Institute at Delhi. In 1964 the school became the New York Agricultural and Technical College at Delhi. The school, today with the name SUNY Delhi, continues to operate as part of the State University of New York college system. The postcard was never mailed.
Murphy Hall, SUNY Delhi. Photograph by Bob Wyer. Author's Collection.

 

“Mrs. Murphy was a woman of highest quality and attainment; active in many civic affairs and devoted to the development of Stamford and Delaware county. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy have done much to benefit the people of Delaware county through enumerable philanthropic endeavors. Mr. Murphy has continued the work which both formerly shared and cherished, unselfishly giving of time, effort, and money to the growth of education and the economic development of the region. Mrs. Murphy, until her death in Nov. 1937 [1938], shared with her husband the plans, hopes, and aspirations which have since made a great impact on the entire area, industrially and educationally. The college takes pride in honoring Mrs. Murphy and the Murphy family for the giving of so much for the benefit of so many.” (“Dedicate Tech Buildings Next Week.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. April 26, 1967.)

Gertrude Wheeler Murphy died of a heart attack at her home in Bronxville, New York in November 1938. “Mrs. Murphy is survived by her husband; a daughter, Miss Betty Murphy, a junior at Vassar college; a son, William Joseph Murphy, and her mother, Mrs. W. W. Wheeler, who also was a resident of Kansas City several years. While in Kansas City Mrs. Murphy was an active member of the Vassar club, the Women’s University club and the Woman’s City club. She joined in many educational and civic projects. Gardening was her hobby and her home took several prizes for its plantings and flowers, which she supervised personally.” (“Mrs. Fred P. Murphy.” The Kansas City Times. November 18, 1938.) Gertrude Wheeler Murphy is buried at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Stamford, New York.

Schuyler Cornell moved to the village Stamford in 1876 where he would establish a long-standing and successful photographic business. He constructed a building known as the Cornell block in the central section of the village, where he resided and operated his photo studio. The building was located along Main Street between North Delaware Street and Railroad Avenue. Just across Railroad Avenue from Schuyler’s studio was the popular Churchill Hall, one of the large resort hotels in the village, operated by Dr. S. E. Churchill (1841-1917).

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Graphic Logo for S. S. Cornell, PhotographerSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Logo Stamp for S. S. Cornell, PhotographerSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler occasionally leased out part of his building to other local businesses. For a time in the late 1880s he operated a tailor shop with his son Burr. In 1890 A. J. Chichester rented the store section to conduct a general mercantile business. In 1902 the Stamford National Bank leased the store while its own building was being repaired and improved. In 1911 G. C. Wirtz leased the front store room to “conduct a confectionary store, ice cream parlor and soda fountain during the summer months.” (“From Our Files.” Mirror-Recorder. April 12, 1962.)

The village of Stamford was established in 1870. As of 1880, four years after Schuyler’s arrival, according to W. W. Munsell in his The History of Delaware County, N.Y., Stamford was quite prosperous with 4 churches, a seminary, two hotels, and a newspaper. It had all the businesses you would expect in a thriving town including 4 boot and shoe stores, a foundry, 2 machine shops, 2 drug stores and a book and stationery business. It also had 2 cabinet shops, 1 harness maker, 2 grist mills, a woolen factory, a creamery, a hardware store, 4 dry goods stores, 2 clothing stores, 5 blacksmith shops, 2 flour and feed stores, 4 lawyers, 5 carpenters, 2 meat markets, 2 barbers, 2 painters, 3 milliners, 2 dress makers and 1 cooper.

Stamford, in that era, and with the construction of the Ulster and Delaware railroad in 1872, quickly become a popular resort destination for Catskills tourists. With the nickname “Queen of the Catskills,” by 1900 there were over 50 guest houses, hotels and boarding houses operating in the village. Well known Stamford lodging included Churchill Hall, the Rexmere, The Westholm, the Cold Spring House, Ingleside, the Maple Grove Farm House and the Delaware House, to name just a few of the many popular establishments. The growth of Stamford tourism surely assisted in the popularity of Cornell’s photographic gallery.  

For a time, Cornell also operated a grocery store in the village. The 1880 United States census listed his occupation as “Grocer,” while his wife Permelia was listed as “Keeping House,” and his son Burr, age 11, as “Minding School.” Lena, age 9, did not have an entry under occupation. The History of Delaware County, N.Y., published in 1880 by W. W. Munsell, stated that there were four grocery stores in Stamford at the time, including establishments owned by S. S. Cornell, C. C. Canfield, B. H. Foote and E. M. Hinman. An 1883 advertisement in the Stamford Mirror stated “S. S. Cornell, dealer in Fine Groceries of Every description, Stamford, N.Y.” (Stamford Mirror. October 23, 1883.)

Schuyler, in 1883, placed a large advertisement in the local newspaper highlighting his extensive photographic offerings. “Cornell’s New Photograph Gallery Is now open to the public, and running on full time. I am now prepared to do all kinds of work, both large and small. I have lately added to my Gallery the Lightning Process, By which I am enabled to procure a perfect Photo of Children and Babies in less than one second; so bring your babies along. I have also added a fine line of Goods FOR THE HOLIDAYS! Consisting of Silk, Velvet, and Ebony Frames, Photograph Albums, Stereoscopes and Views. Copying and enlarging old and faded pictures a specialty. Pictures finished in Oil, India Ink, or Water Colors. Agents wanted, to solicit orders for my Copying Department. I will be pleased to have everybody call and look over my Stock, work, and Rooms. S. S. Cornell, Photographer, Main Street, Stamford.” (Stamford Mirror. March 6, 1883.)

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.S. S. CornellSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

1883 Advertisement for Cornell's New Photograph Gallery. Stamford Mirror.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Portrait, Well Dressed ManPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Portrait, Well Dressed Older GentlemanPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Portrait, Well Dressed Older LadyPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.
Portraits by S. S. Cornell. Author's Collection.

 

In 1884 Schuyler again placed a large-sized advertisement in the local newspaper. “Stamford Photograph Gallery. I have remodeled by Photograph Rooms and added new Back grounds, New Accessories, New Instruments, etc., and am now prepared to do a large variety, and better class of work than before. Call and see for yourselves. I also have the best assortment of Photograph Albums Ever in Stamford, and at prices below everybody, also. Stereoscopes and Views. I would thank my friends and neighbors for past patronage and solicit a continuance of the same. S. S. Cornell, Photographer.” (Bloomville Mirror. 1884.)

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.S. S. CornellSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

1884 Advertisement from S. S. Cornell, Photographer. Bloomville Mirror.

 

In 1888 an advertisement for Schuyler’s services offered cabinet photos at $3 per dozen. While in 1897 prices for “Life size Crayons” were $1.25 and “Life size in colors” were $1.50.

In addition to his portrait studio work Cornell also photographed extensively throughout the surrounding western Catskills. Much of his fine work can be seen in his popular series of stereoviews titled “Views of Stamford & Vicinity.” The series contained 50 views and highlighted many of the most popular sites around Stamford including Mount Utsayantha, Churchill Hall, Devasego Falls and many more.

 

 

Views of Stamford & Vicinity

1

Lake Utsayantha, Headwaters of the Delaware

2

Lake Utsayantha, Headwaters of the Delaware

3

Lake Utsayantha, Indian Trail near the Delaware

4

Delaware Valley and Mount Utsayantha from Deacon Churchill’s Hill

5

Stamford Village and Mount Utsayantha from Deacon Churchill’s Hill

6

Stamford Village and Mt. Ball Top from Deacon Churchill’s Hill

7

Kirkner Villa, on Prospect Hill

8

Kirkner Villa, view west from

9

Kirkner Villa, Delaware Valley from

10

Kirkner Villa, Stanley Mills from

11

Churchill Hall, S. E. Churchill, Proprietor

12

Churchill Hall, front view

13

Churchill Hall, rear view

14

Churchill Hall, north view from tower

15

Churchill Hall, eastern view from tower

16

Churchill Hall, Main St. opposite

17

Dr. Churchill’s office and Post Office

18

Rulifson’s Utsayantha Observatory

19

View from Roadway to Mt. Utsayantha

20

View of Mt. Utsayantha from Mt. Harper

21

Valley View Cottage, F. G. Rulifson

22

Cold Spring House, A. L. Churchill, Proprietor

23

Happy Home, Mrs. S. E. Kendall

24

Delaware Street, looking north

25

Delaware Street, Residence of Judge I. H. Maynard

26

Delaware Street residence of Judge Maynard, Frost Scene

27

Stamford Water Works, reservoir of, Wild Cat Glen

28

Stamford Water Works, reservoir from above

29

Stamford Water Works, reservoir Construction Gang, Delaware St.

30

Stamford Water Works, reservoir Construction Gang, Hamilton House

31

View from McDevitt Point, Mount Utsayantha

32

View from McDevitt Point, Mount Utsayantha

33

View from McDevitt Point, Delaware Valley

34

Winter View of Delaware Valley

35

Eagle Nest, residence of E. Z. C. Judson

36

Eagle Nest, residence of E. Z. C. Judson

37

Lake Odell, McKee Family Massacred 1779, by Indians

38

Lake Odell, McKee Family Massacred 1779, by Indians

39

Lake Odell, McKee Family Massacred 1779, by Indians

40

Devasego Falls from North Bank

41

Devasego Falls from below

42

Devasego Falls from below

43

Devasego Falls, Rocks below

44

Devasego Falls, Rocks below Dinner Party

45

View of Roadway to Mount Jefferson

46

View North from Mount Jefferson

47

Brooklyn Heights, Stamford

48

Charlotte Valley, looking west from Mt. Harper

49

Woodbine Cottage, former residence of J. T. Headley

50

Morning Train and Stamford Station

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Home and FamilyPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Ready to RidePhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.Valley ViewPhotographer: S. S. Cornell

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

Stereoviews by photographer S. S. Cornell.

 

His photographic services were continually well received by the public, as routinely highlighted in the local newspapers.

  • 1877, “Mr. S. S. Cornell, our photographer, is doing a good business. He does good work and thereby merits the patronage of all who are in need of work in his line.” (“Home and County News.” The Jeffersonian. December 4, 1877.)
  • 1878, “S. S. Cornell, our photographer, is getting out some very fine pictures. His scenery and backgrounds are something new and tasty.” (“Home and County News.” The Jeffersonian. September 4, 1878.)
  • 1885, “Our excellent artist, S. S. Cornell, is doing some very fine photograph work. No use trusting your work with strangers when we have so good a workman in our midst, and if people want anything in the line of India Ink, Water Color, Crayon or Oil Painting work, Mr. Cornell is prepared to take orders and fill them to the best of satisfaction.” (“Mirror Reflections.” Stamford Mirror. February 10, 1885.)
  • 1888, “Cornell, the photographer, is doing some very fine work in his line now-a-days.” (“Stamford.” Hobart Independent. December 20, 1888.)
  • 1889, “Our village artist, S. S. Cornell, has recently been taking several very fine views of Stamford village and also of the farm lands of D. C. Sharpe, at South Kortright.” (“Stamford.” Hobart Independent.” July 25, 1889.)
  • 1890, “Photographer Cornell is having quite a call for views of Gilboa after the fire. They are fine specimens of photographic art.” (“Stamford.” Hobart Independent. May 22, 1890.)

 

In November 1893 Cornell was advertising his photographs as potential presents during the holiday season:

 

“A Straight Pointer. You can make twelve elegant Christmas Presents to twelve of your relations and best friends for $3.00 by sitting NOW for a dozen of our Fadeless, Waterproof Photos. Something entirely new.

How can you provide twelve as satisfactory presents for twelve persons for the same amount?

Come now while the weather is pleasant and before the Holiday rush, and we will give you the finest work that ever left our establishment, and your worry as to how you will provide presents will be over.

S. S. Cornell, Photographic Studio, 209 Stamford Avenue, Stamford, N.Y.” (Stamford Mirror. November 28, 1893.)

 

In 1897 Cornell advertised his services in the local newspaper. “At Cornell’s Photographic Studio, (209 Stamford Avenue,) You can purchase one dozen Cabinet Size Photos, either Ivoryette or Ivorytype finish, from One Dollar Up. Come Rain or Shine. This offer is good until further notice.” (Stamford Recorder. August 7, 1897.)

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.S. S. CornellSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills.

1897 Advertisement for Cornell's Photographic Studio. Stamford Recorder.

 

In 1901 Schuyler opened a second photographic office at Fleischmanns. He purchased property from J. M. Blish, “a desirable location near the iron bridge in Fleischmanns.” “Stamford Man’s New Venture. Stamford, April 18. (Special) – S. S. Cornell will be a busy man the coming season. He has purchased a building lot at Fleischmann’s and will erect a building for a photograph gallery. He will also have rooms for tonsorial parlors in the same building. The building is to be ready for occupancy June 1.” (“Stamford Man’s New Venture.” Hobart Independent. April 20, 1901.) The building was constructed by John Muir. For a time, the Fleischmanns studio was open on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

A 1905 advertisement highlighted the offerings of the Cornell studio.

 

“Special Holiday Offering. I will make Photos at greatly REDUCED PRICES from now until January 1, 1906.

Come early and be sure of a sitting. Copying and enlarging a specialty in all branches, neatly and promptly done. India Ink, Crayon, Water Color and Pastel; also Hand Painted Ivory Miniatures, Portraits, Watches, Jewelry, etc.

Nothing equals a Fine Portrait as a Christmas or New Year’s Gift.

The largest assortment of POST CARDS in town. One hundred views of Stamford and vicinity, all genuine Photos.

Thanking you for all past favors and hoping for continuance of the same.

I am very respectfully, S. S. Cornell, Photographer, 209 Stamford Ave., Stamford, N.Y.” (The Gilboa Monitor. November 23, 1905.)

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.S. S. CornellSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills. 1905 Advertisement for S. S. Cornell, Photographer. Hobart Independent.

 

Schuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years.S. S. CornellSchuyler S. Cornell was a popular photographer who operated out of the village of Stamford in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He operated a portrait studio on Main Street in the village and was also well known for his landscapes of the surrounding western Catskills. 1906 Advertisement for S. S. Cornell, Photographer. The Jefferson Courier.

 

In 1906 Schuyler and Permelia began a cross country trip in which he planned to stop at many photographic galleries along the way. They stopped to visit his brother Harvey at 144 Court Street, Binghamton, before heading to California to visit their son Burr. They spent the winter in California. “To my Friends and Patrons, I wish to announce that after Jan. 14, I am going to take a vacation during which time my studio will be closed. On my sojourn from home, I expect to visit many of the leading studios of the States, including west of the Rockies, and shall hope to pick up new ideas in Photography, and thereby be able to give you, on my return, of which due notice will be given through the press, many new styles and novelties in the way of portraits. Thanking you for past patronage, and wishing you all a Happy and Prosperous New Year, I am very respectfully, S. S. Cornell, Stamford, N.Y.” (The Gilboa Monitor. January 11, 1906.)

In addition to his business impact on the Stamford village Schuyler was also a prominent and influential civic-minded member of the community. After the Civil War a society of veterans was established with the organization of The Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.). Through Schuyler’s efforts the John A. Logan Post at Stamford was established on April 28, 1888. Logan had fought in the war and was promoted to Major General. “This Post was active for many years. Memorial Days always saw the old soldiers proudly marching in the parades, dressed in what was left of their uniforms, carrying their heads high, as they had a right to do. As the years passed, their numbers became less and less, and finally there were too few to carry on, and the Post had to be given up. They took the remaining money in their treasury ($50), and presented it to the Abigail Harper Chapter D.A.R. of Stamford, New York.” (“The History of Stamford Village.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. 1955-1956.)

Schuyler was made the first commander of the Post. He served in that capacity for many years.  The post organized many civic-minded activities including the decorating of gravesites of veterans for Memorial Day, marching in local parades, and organizing military enlistment drives during the Spanish-American War and World War I.

Taken in its entirety Schuyler had a very prolific photographic career. According to a 1923 newspaper article it was estimated that Schuyler “has a total of about 20,000 negatives, which is a valuable collection and one of very great historical importance.” (“News in Brief From All Around Us.” The Otsego Farmer. May 25, 1923.)

Unfortunately, much of this collection probably did not survive as only weeks after Schuyler’s passing his daughter placed notice in the local newspaper of its impending destruction. “Cornell Negatives. To those having negatives made at the S. S. Cornell studio in past years, I will offer the same for sale for a short time before destroying them. From these you can have pictures made at any place where printing is done. Also picture frames of all sizes and photographic equipment. Mrs. W. H. Wheeler.” (“Cornell Negatives.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. April 20, 1927.)

Schuyler S. Cornell died at the age of 83 on March 6, 1927. In his obituary it was stated that “He came to Stamford in 1876 and established a photographic business and for a time conducted a grocery store. The photographic business, however, was his chosen vocation and in this he was successful. His customers, numbered by the thousands, have extended over a wide area and he was known far and wide as a master craftsman.” (“Death of S. S. Cornell.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. March 9, 1927.)

Leading photographic historians T. K. Treadwell and William C. Darrah (1909-1989) in their Photographers of the United States of America wrote that S. S. Cornell was “One of the more skilled and prolific small-town stereo[view] photogs [photographers].”

For nearly two years before his passing Schuyler had been in poor health, and during the winter of his passing he had been confined to his home. His funeral was held at his home in Stamford with Rev. Peter McKenzie, pastor of the Presbyterian church, officiating. Cornell is interred at the Stamford Cemetery.

His wife Permelia Cornell died a year later on March 10, 1928 at her home on Main Street in Stamford. She had been “an invalid for over four years and had been tenderly cared for by her daughter, Mrs. W. H. Wheeler. She had been in unusually good health recently, however, until Friday evening when she suffered a shock from which she failed to rally.”

“She [Permelia] was a woman who possessed splendid qualities and endeared herself to all those who knew her. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church and always attended until illness prevented her. Though inactive for so long a time she will be greatly missed by a wide circle of friends. She leaves, besides her daughter, one son, who resides in Los Angeles, Cal. The funeral was held Tuesday, at 2 p.m. from her late home, Rev. Peter McKenzie officiating.” (“Mrs. Permelia Cornell.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. March 14, 1928.)

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Burr G. Cornell Catskill Mountains Catskills Charlotteville Civil War Delaware County G. A. R. gallery Gertrude Wheeler Murphy Grand Army of the Republic Harvey Cornell Lena Cornell New York Permelia Cornell photographer photographs photography S. S. Cornell Schuyler S. Cornell soldier Stamford studio veteran Views of Stamford & Vicinity village William H. Wheeler https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/9/schuyler-s-cornell-catskills-photographer Sat, 26 Sep 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills Poll: Shark, Whale or Alligator? https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/9/catskills-poll-shark-whale-or-alligator During the last ice age of 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, receding glaciers left behind many gigantic “erratics” throughout the Catskills. Erratics can be defined as “a piece of rock that differs from the size and type of rock native to the area in which it rests.” Many examples of these rocks and boulders as well as other interesting rock formations can be found around South Mountain and the North-South Lake area. As per 19th century fashion, many of the more noteworthy erratics and formations were named, both as a means of identification but also to promote tourism. Locations such as Druid Rocks, Pudding-Stone Hall, Lemon Squeezer, Elfin Pass, Fairy Spring, Star Rock, Boulder Rock, and The Sphinx enthralled visitors as they hiked through the woods in and around the famed Catskill Mountain House. Many of these funky rocks are still popular hiking destinations today.

 

The glacial erratic seen here was perhaps the most popular and widely known, and has gone by a number of names through the years, depending on the era and which of the great hotels you were staying at.

 

Although history is clear as to which name became the most commonly used, I thought it would be interesting to see what the Catskills community thinks today.

 

Does this glacial erratic look more like Shark’s jaws, a Whale’s mouth or an Alligator? Please respond with your thoughts by adding a comment.

 

The Shark's Jaws

Vintage postcard titled “The Shark’s Jaws” that depicts a glacial erratic in the Catskills; the erratic has also been known as the Whale’s Mouth, but is most popularly known as Alligator Rock.The Shark's Jaws, Catskill Mountains, New YorkDuring the last ice age of 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, receding glaciers left behind many gigantic “erratics” throughout the Catskills. Erratics can be defined as “a piece of rock that differs from the size and type of rock native to the area in which it rests.” Many examples of these rocks and boulders as well as other interesting rock formations can be found around South Mountain and the North-South Lake area. As per 19th century fashion, many of the more noteworthy erratic and formations were named, both as a means of identification but also to promote tourism. Locations such as Druid Rocks, Pudding-Stone Hall, Lemon Squeezer, Elfin Pass, Fairy Spring, Star Rock, Boulder Rock, The Sphinx, and perhaps the most popular and widely known, Alligator Rock, enthralled visitors as they hiked through the woods in and around the famed Catskill Mountain House. Many of these funky rocks are still popular hiking destinations today.

This vintage postcard titled “The Shark’s Jaws” depicts the glacial erratic that has also been known as the Whale’s Mouth but is most popularly known as Alligator Rock. The postcard was published by Curt Teich & Company located at Chicago, Illinois. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1924.

 

Whale's Mouth

Vintage postcard titled “Whales Mouth” that depicts a glacial erratic in the Catskills; the erratic has also been known as the Shark’s Jaw, but is most popularly known as Alligator Rock.Whales Mouth, Catskill MountainsDuring the last ice age of 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, receding glaciers left behind many gigantic “erratics” throughout the Catskills. Erratics can be defined as “a piece of rock that differs from the size and type of rock native to the area in which it rests.” Many examples of these rocks and boulders as well as other interesting rock formations can be found around South Mountain and the North-South Lake area. As per 19th century fashion, many of the more noteworthy erratic and formations were named, both as a means of identification but also to promote tourism. Locations such as Druid Rocks, Pudding-Stone Hall, Lemon Squeezer, Elfin Pass, Fairy Spring, Star Rock, Boulder Rock, The Sphinx, and perhaps the most popular and widely known, Alligator Rock, enthralled visitors as they hiked through the woods in and around the famed Catskill Mountain House. Many of these funky rocks are still popular hiking destinations today.

This vintage postcard titled “Whales Mouth” depicts the glacial erratic that has also been known as the Shark’s Jaw but is most popularly known as Alligator Rock. The postcard was published by the National Art Views Company located in New York City. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1904.

 

Alligator Rock

Alligator Rock, located near South Lake, is a glacial erratic left behind during the last ice age.Catskill Mts., N.Y., Alligator Rock (Near Catskill Mountain House)North-South Lake, Greene County

During the last ice age of 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, receding glaciers left behind many gigantic “erratics” throughout the Catskills. Erratics can be defined as “a piece of rock that differs from the size and type of rock native to the area in which it rests.” Many examples of these rocks and boulders as well as other interesting rock formations can be found around South Mountain and the North-South Lake area. As per 19th century fashion, many of the more noteworthy erratic and formations were named, both as a means of identification but also to promote tourism. Locations such as Druid Rocks, Pudding-Stone Hall, Lemon Squeezer, Elfin Pass, Fairy Spring, Star Rock, Boulder Rock, The Sphinx, and perhaps the most popular and widely known, Alligator Rock, enthralled visitors as they hiked through the woods in and around the famed Catskill Mountain House. Many of these funky rocks are still popular hiking destinations today.

 

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dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Alligator Rock Boulder Rock boulders Catskill Mountain House Druid Rocks Elfin Pass erratic Fairy Spring formations glacier Greene County hiker hiking ice age lake Lemon Squeezer mountain North-South Lake Pudding-Stone Hall rock Shark's Jaws South Lake South Mountain Star Rock stone The Sphinx trail Whales' Mouth https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/9/catskills-poll-shark-whale-or-alligator Sat, 19 Sep 2020 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: Hanford Mills https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2020/9/catskills-then-and-now-hanford-mills Route 12, East Meredith, Delaware County