American Catskills: Blog https://www.americancatskills.com/blog en-us Copyright (C). All Rights Reserved. 2009-2021. Matthew Jarnich. dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Wed, 28 Jul 2021 01:33:00 GMT Wed, 28 Jul 2021 01:33:00 GMT https://www.americancatskills.com/img/s/v-12/u126062438-o922362058-50.jpg American Catskills: Blog https://www.americancatskills.com/blog 120 80 The Legend of Add Condon: The Halcott Directory https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/the-legend-of-add-condon-the-halcott-directory Richard Lionel De Lisser is one of the greatest photographers in Catskills history. He authored two photographic surveys of the Catskills, one of Greene County and one of Ulster County. Combined they contain over 1,800 photographs, which when combined with the author’s writings, highlighted his rambles in search of the picturesque. Part travelogue, part photo-documentary, both publications vividly capture the essence of late 19th century life in the Catskills.

 

Beginning in the summer and fall of 1893, after completing Picturesque Berkshire, De Lisser moved his travels across the Massachusetts border as he tramped the countryside of the Catskills of Greene County, New York in search of the picturesque. He traveled extensively on his buggy pulled by his faithful companion, his horse known as Cherry-Tree. The culmination of these ramblings was the first of his two photographic Catskills surveys, Picturesque Catskills: Greene County. It was published in 1894 by the aptly named Picturesque Publishing Company. The work contains over 800 black-and-white photographs and illustrations of the people and places of the county.

 

Vintage postcard titled “A Catskill Mountain Directory” that was published by T. H. Sachs of Catskill, New York.A Catskill Mountain DirectoryThis vintage postcard titled “A Catskill Mountain Directory” was published by T. H. Sachs of Catskill, New York. The photograph depicts a young boy by the name of Add Condon and was originally featured in the book Picturesque Catskills: Greene County by Richard Lionel De Lisser. The original caption was the “The Halcott Directory.” In the book Add Condon assisted De Lisser in finding the road to Halcott, the last remaining town to be photographed for the travelogue throughout Greene County.

Add Condon: The Halcott Directory. Author’s collection.

 

While nearing the completion of his photographic tramp through the Catskills of Greene County De Lisser faced an improbable challenge. No one that he met along his journey seemed to know how to get to the geographically isolated town of Halcott, and his comprehensive photographic study of Greene County would not be complete if an entire town was missed. From Lexington, where he was then located, there was an imposing mountain branch that ranged from the north at Lexington to the south near Bushnellsville that blocked easy access to the town of Halcott. This range included 3,530-foot Vly Mountain, Vinegar Hill, Beech Ridge, 3,520-foot Halcott Mountain and 3,090-foot Rose Mountain.

 

In the History of Greene County, New York published by J. B. Beers & Co. in 1884 the isolation of the town of Halcott was described. “The valley of the east branch of the Delaware River includes one township of Greene county, which is isolated from the other towns of that county by a branch from the main ridge of the Catskill Mountains. This branch, which forms the water-shed between the Delaware River and the Schoharie Creek, rises to a height of from ten hundred to eleven hundred feet, and is crossed only by difficult and unfrequented roads. There are no gaps or passages in the hill range, and the isolation is so complete that the principal routes of communication are by the way of Middletown, in Delaware County.” (Page 318.)

 

The History of Greene County, New York also contained the details of the many changes to the control of the Halcott township. “The township was included in Ulster county at the time that county was erected, on the first of November 1683. When Woodstock was formed, in 1787, it included this territory, and on the erection of Windham, March 23d 1798, it became a party of that town, and with it became a party of the new county of Greene on the 25th of March, two years later. In 1813 Windham was divided, and this part was called New Goshen; that was subsequently changed to Lexington, and from Lexington Halcott was taken on the 19th of November 1851.” (Page 318.)

 

The 1856 map by Samuel E. Geil shows the town of Halcott isolated geographically from the rest of Greene County by a range of mountains to the east. The residence of D. Condon is shown on the map on the Lexington side of the mountains, at Condon Hollow, where De Lisser likely began his journey to Halcott. (Geil, Samuel, E. A Balch, Robert Pearsall Smith, and Jones & Hitchcock. Map of Greene County, N.Y.: from actual surveys. [Philad. Philadelphia: E.A. Balch, publisher, 1856] Map. https://www.loc.gov/item/2013593222/.)

 

Phoenicia, NY, 1:62,500 quad, 1900, USGSPhoenicia, NY, 1:62,500 quad, 1900, USGSHistorical Topographic Map Collection

The 1900 regional map from the U.S. Geological Survey provides some further insight as to the challenge of De Lisser’s likely route. Condon Hollow, located to the northwest from West Kill, was the site of a rough road over Beech Ridge. The road traveled through the pass between a 3,120-foot mountain to the north and a 3,240-foot mountain to the south. On the other side of the ridge a traveler such as De Lisser would have picked up a road in Turk Hollow, and then headed southwest along Vly Creek to reach the hamlet of Halcott Center. This route would have been even more challenging with De Lisser’s horse and cart.

 

Today this route is the location of the Condon Hollow Road Trail, a 2.3 mile, yellow-blazed trail managed by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) that extends between Condon Hollow Road and Turk Hollow Road. There is a public lean-to located on the Turk Hollow end of the trail.

 

As for why, given its isolation, Halcott was originally included within Greene County, it was written that “when the Greene county line was drawn at its founding, it was laid out in straight lines and 90 degree angles to take in Halcott, regardless of the fact that the town is hemmed in from the balance of the county by mountains.” (“New Halcott-Westkill Road Being Pushed.” Catskill Mountain News. March 14, 1963.)

 

In the 1960s there were plans to construct a state road through Condon Hollow to Route 42. The “proposed road would run easterly along the present Condon (or Turk) hollow Halcott town road, from the main Halcott valley road at the Methodist church. It would cross the mountain and connect with a town of Lexington road into Westkill, covering a distance of 6 1/2 miles.” (“New Halcott-Westkill Road Being Pushed.” Catskill Mountain News. March 14, 1963.) However, these plans were abandoned “because of the difficulty of securing a right of way through the forest preserve.” (“Survey Begun for New Road Into Halcott.” Catskill Mountain News. December 9, 1965.)

 

Even today the town of Halcott remains relatively isolated from the rest of Greene County. To reach the rest of Greene County from Halcott via paved road one must first drive through a section of either Ulster County or Delaware County. Alternatively, for a route completely within Greene County, there is only the unimproved Halcott Mountain Road, which traverses the pass between Bearpen Mountain and Vly Mountain, thus connecting county Route 3 in the south and county Route 2 in the north. The town of Halcott is most often accessed from the south via the village of Fleischmanns in Delaware County.

 

Fortunately, for Catskills’ photography history, during his travels De Lisser came upon a young Add Condon who was able to direct him over the mountain to the town of Halcott. This fortuitous meeting allowed De Lisser to fully complete his photographic survey of Greene County. And fortunately for us, De Lisser recorded Condon’s name, and immortalized the young boy by including his photograph within Picturesque Catskills: Greene County. De Lisser affectionately described Condon as “the only man in Greene county who knew the road to Halcott.”

 

The postcard was published by T. H. Sachs of Catskill, New York. The postcard was printed in Germany, as was common for the era. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed from East Windham in April 1912, which was five years after the passing of the original photographer Richard Lionel De Lisser. While the postcard shown above is titled “The Catskill Directory,” De Lisser within his book titled the picture “The Halcott Directory.”

 

Although it is not definitive that it is the same person, there was a young Addison Ivan Condon who was born at the town of Lexington on February 5, 1888. This birthdate would make Addison 6-years-old at the time De Lisser arrived at Lexington, which seems to coincide with the apparent age of the boy in the photograph. The 1892 New York State census and the 1900 United States census show the youthful Addison residing at the town of Lexington with his parents, Richard and Martha Condon. The residence of D. Condon, a likely ancestor (possibly grandfather) of Addison, is shown at Condon Hollow in the town of Lexington on an 1856 map of Greene County, New York. This is the only residence on the map in the town of Lexington attributed to a person with the surname of Condon.

 

If this is the same person then we can offer a brief biography. As stated above he was the son of Richard Condon, who worked as a farmer, and Martha (Benjamin) Condon. After he grew up Addison worked as a farmer (1905 New York state census), a laborer in the household of George Van Loan (1910 US census), a farmhand in the household of George Hobbie (1915 US census), a farmer employed by C. S. Whipple (1917 World War 1 registration), as a farm laborer on a dairy farm (1920 US census), a carpenter and private contractor (1940 US census) and later as an employee at the Delaware Farm Cooperative Creamery at Delhi, New York (1942 World War 2 registration).

 

Addison Condon was a veteran of the World War I era, having honorably served as a private from July 1918 to December 1918 with the US Army 335th Guard and Fire Company. Five years later, in 1923, at the age of 35, Addison enlisted with New York National Guard, serving with Company F, 10th Infantry. With his service he was active in the local veteran community, being a member of both the American Legion and the Delaware County Barracks of Veterans of World War One.

 

As for his physical appearance Addison’s World War I draft registration card described him as tall in height and stout in build. He had light brown eyes and dark brown hair. He first married Florence May Divet at the town of Bovina in 1919 and later married Nellie M. Knowles in 1934.

 

Our once young and charming Addison lived until the age of 70, passing away on February 16, 1958. It was believed that Condon’s car skidded off Route 10, about five miles south of Delhi, during a winter snow storm, and he then fell asleep with the car running, ultimately dying of carbon monoxide poisoning. He was survived by his wife and four sons, Clayton (1934-1971), George (who later resided at Plattsburgh), Andrew (who later resided in Florida), all who were serving in the armed forces, and Robert, a student at the Delaware Academy, who later resided at Waverly. Addison Condon (1888-1958) is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi, New York.

 

Halcott photographs by De Lisser, only taken through the helpful assistance of our hero Add Condon, that were featured in Picturesque Catskills: Greene County included:

 

  • Over Beach Ridge to Halcott
  • Near the Schoolhouse – Beach Ridge
  • “The” Road to Halcott
  • The Halcott Directory
  • A Winter Scene in Halcott
  • A Halcott Farmhouse
  • On the Stream
  • The First Snow – Halcott
  • Van’s Bridge – Halcott
  • Winter at Van Valkenburgh Dam
  • “On (Halcott) when the sun was low, All spotless lay the untrodden snow.”
  • “Beneath the gray December clouds”

 

From De Lisser’s Picturesque Catskills: Greene County:

 

“HALCOTT.–From Lexington, after many attempts, I succeeded in finding Halcott. The town is so situated, topographically, that it is a difficult matter to obtain access to it from Greene County. I was unable, after months of constant inquiry, to find a man who had been to Halcott, or who could tell me how to get there. A branch of the Catskill mountain range, some 1,100 feet in height, running north and south, between it and the township of Lexington, forms an almost impassable barrier, over which no good road is practicable, the only one being no more than a wood road, unfrequented and hard to find. The natural outlet of the town is by way of Delaware county, a good road running through the Halcott valley to Griffin’s Corners, and thence to Middletown.

 

Halcott was organized in 1851, being taken from Lexington. The population is about three hundred, and it is in area the smallest town in Greene county, with but little of the land under cultivation, and that principally in the valley of the Bush Kill. The name was given to it by George W. Halcott. For this isolated place I started late in the fall, from Lexington, determined to find it. No one whom I met seemed able to direct me in any manner, knowledge of the locality being shown by a jerk of the thumb over the shoulder, and the words, “Over there!” muttered solemnly; or else announcement of the fact there was such a place, and that I would have to cross Beach Ridge, if I went there, except I went by way of Griffin’s Corners, and as that necessitated a very long drive I pointed Cherry for the mountains, depending upon finding a passage in some way. By dint of numerous inquiries and persistent effort, and after retracing my steps many times, I at last found myself driving along what would be mistaken from a cow-path or lane, leading to some one’s barnyard. Seeing a small boy leaning on the bars of a pasture entrance, I inquired, as I had done of everyone I had met through the day,

 

“Do you know of a place called Halcott?”

 

“Yep!” said my little friend.

 

“Do you know how to get there?” I inquired.

 

“Yep!” said he again.

 

I was so surprised and overjoyed at his answer, that I could not question further, for a few minutes, then, in response to my request, he pointed out the road:

 

“Wa-al, you see that barn over there?”

 

“Yes,” said I.

 

“Wa-al, drive ‘round behind it, and you will see a place that looks like the dry bed of a creek. That’s the road. After you git up a piece it will be better going.”

 

I rewarded him and asked his name.

 

“Add Condon,” he responded.

 

“And what do you do for a living?”

 

“I am a farmer,” said my little hero.

 

I think his name should go on record as that of the only man in Greene county who knew the road to Halcott.

 

I found the road, as he had directed. It proved not a very bad one, after the first half mile had been passed, but I was obliged to walk every step of the way, and lead Cherry, who, I could plainly see, was extremely nervous, a weakness I had never known him guilty of before. This, no doubt, was due to the fact that he had never traveled this road before. If so, it was the only one that he was unacquainted with, I think, in this wide world. I had never seen the poor follow so distressed, so completely “rattled.” He did not know where to find a spring by the wayside, for a drink, nor just where to stop for a rest, or what was ahead of him – things that he had never failed to known on any road over which I had ever driven him before. He followed me with a sad, reproachful look, as if he thought I was taking him out of the world, and the upward course we were taking and the prospect of meeting George Washington again gave him no pleasure. We arrived at the top of the mountain, pretty well tired out, both of us, and after a short rest we traveled through the woods, over the Ridge and down the mountain, on the other side, into the valley, arriving at the centre, near the post-office, at sunset. Like matrimony, wealth, heaven and other desirable things and places, Halcott, is very nice when you get there. I found quarters for myself and faithful old Cherry (who since he had stopped going up and started downward again, had been quite himself). I retired early, for the little I had seen of the valley promised a beautiful harvest of pictures, and I wanted to be up early, to have a full day in which to reap them.

 

On awakening at daybreak, the following morning, I found that five or six inches of snow had fallen during the night, with more still coming, and that all the beautiful bits of landscape and other subjects that I had planned to picture, lay hidden under the white mantle of selfish old Winter, who was so disagreeable about it that I was kept within doors until the following noon, when I managed to secure a few pictures between squalls, and made haste to escape, before I should be snow-bound for the season.”

 

If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the young Add Condon, who lived near Lexington, New York please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Add Condon Addison Condon Beach Ridge Beech Ridge Catskill Mountains Catskills Condon Hollow De Lisser Delaware County Greene County Halcott Halcott Center Halcott Mountain Lexington Martha Condon New York photograph photographer photography Picturesque Catskills: Greene County Picturesque Ulster portrait postcard Richard Condon Richard Lionel De Lisser Turk Hollow Ulster County Vly Creek Westkill https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/the-legend-of-add-condon-the-halcott-directory Sat, 31 Jul 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Lake Minnewaska: A Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/lake-minnewaska-a-study The pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

 

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.

 

Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Lake Minnewaska, Last LightThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Minnewaska MirrorThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Cliff HouseThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.CliffsideThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Minnewaska Cliffs, Last LightThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Waiting for SunsetThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Minnewaska ReflectionThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.
Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve.Lake MinnewaskaThe pristine, beautiful Lake Minnewaska is located high upon the Shawangunk Ridge at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. Once known as Coxing Pond, the 36-acre lake was created during the last ice age by glacial movements that carved small basins in the bedrock. The lake is a ½ mile long and reaches depths up to 72 feet. Recreational activities abound with seasonal swimming, non-motorized boating (with permits), picnicking in open fields and a relaxing 2-mile hiking trail that circles the lake, offering fabulous views of the water, foliage and sheer rock cliffs.

The area around Lake Minnewaska was once home to two prominent mountain hotels, the Cliff House and the Wildmere. Both were owned and operated the Smiley family, the same family that operated the still existing Mohonk Mountain House. The Cliff House opened for business in 1879 and remained in operation until 1972 when it was abandoned. It burned down in 1978. The Wildmere opened for business in 1887 and remained in operation until 1979. It burned down in 1986. While the hotels may no longer exist, their legacy lives on with much of their land now belonging to either the Mohonk Preserve or the Minnewaska State Park Preserve. The Preserves, certainly two gems of the state park system, offers thousands of natural wonderland acres for hikers, rock climbers, photographers, skiers and more.

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) autumn bedrock boat boating Catskills Cliff House cliffs Coxing Pond fall foliage glacier hike hiker hiking hotels Hudson Valley ice age lake Lake Minnewaska Lake Minnewaska State Park Preserve Mohonk Mountain House Mohonk Preserve photograph photographer photography picnic picnicking rock climbers rock climbing rocks Shawangunk Ridge Smiley family state park swim swimming Ulster County water Wildmere https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/lake-minnewaska-a-study Sat, 24 Jul 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Hell Hole Falls: A Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/hell-hole-falls-a-study Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

 

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.Hell Hole FallsHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.Devil's KitchenHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.Where the Devil Once RoamedHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.Where the Devil Once RoamedHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.Hell Hole CreekHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.Hell HoleHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

Hell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove in the northern Catskills.The Road to HellHell Hole Falls is a scenic waterfall located within the dramatic Plattekill Clove of the northern Catskills. The falls are located on Hell Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The devilishly named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an ominous, arched stone wall bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in a section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) arch bridge brook Catskill Mountains Catskills cliffs creek devil Devil's Kitchen Greene County Haines Falls Hell Hole Hell Hole Creek Hell Hole Falls Huckleberry Point Hudson River Hunter Hunter Mountain Kaaterskill High Peak Matthew Jarnich New York Old Mill Falls photographer photographs photography photos pictures pioneer Plattekill Plattekill Clove Plattekill Creek ravines river Route 16 sightseeing stone Tannersville tourism tourist travel water waterfall https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/hell-hole-falls-a-study Sat, 17 Jul 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Lexington House https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/lexington-house The historic Lexington House is pleasantly located on the banks of the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County. The 3-story Lexington House was constructed by Jerome Campbell, a master carpenter, in 1883 and opened to the public on July 4th of that year. It had 30 rooms that accommodated 50 to 60 guests. The hotel was first owned by John P. Van Valkenburgh and his partner Edward Clough. The Van Valkenburgh family were among the earliest settlers in the Lexington township and remained among its most prominent citizens throughout the 19th century. The Lexington House was considered “one of the finest, most popular resorts of the period.”

The long-neglected Lexington House is located on the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County, New York.Lexington HouseThe historic Lexington House is pleasantly located on the banks of the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County. The 3-story Lexington House was constructed by Jerome Campbell, a master carpenter, in 1883 and opened to the public on July 4th of that year. It had 30 rooms that accommodated 50 to 60 guests. The hotel was first owned by John P. Van Valkenburgh and his partner Edward Clough. The Van Valkenburgh family were among the earliest settlers in the Lexington township and remained among its most prominent citizens throughout the 19th century. The Lexington House was considered “one of the finest, most popular resorts of the period.”

In order to provide additional amusements to its patrons the adjacent Schoharie Creek was impounded to create Crystal Lake within the center of the Lexington hamlet, offering fishing, boating, swimming and ice skating to area visitors. The dam was broken by the mid-1960s. Three years after its opening an 1886 advertisement in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle highlighted the benefits of staying at the Lexington House: “Beautifully located on a picturesque eminence overlooking the lake. Table abundantly supplied with fresh vegetables, eggs, butter, pure cream, milk, etc. Boating, bathing, fishing and hunting. Spacious piazza, dancing hall, piano, organ, pool and billiard parlors, etc.; music every day; large roller skating rink on premises. New York mail twice daily. Livery, telegraph office, etc.; easy access; terms very moderate.”

There were five support buildings on the property including the former ice house (c. 1900), the wagon house (c. 1883), the theater/skating rink (c. 1887) and two sheds (c. 1900). The River Theater included a bowling alley and a ballroom while it hosted a variety of performances including opera, melodrama and vaudeville and being home to the Lexington Dramatic Society. In its heyday, the hotel was one of many in the Lexington area that catered to summer tourists, others including the Lexington Hotel, O’Hara House, Morse Inn, Carpathia House, The Mackey, Shady Lawn, The Barnard, Crystal Lake House, Kipp House and others.

The Lexington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an architecturally and historically significant example of late-nineteenth century resort architecture in the Catskill Mountain region.” After the decline of the Catskills tourist business ownership of the Lexington House changed hands several times, being used as a music and arts camp and later as home to a non-profit performing arts program. Although the property seems to be suffering from years of neglect, you can, even with just the exterior views, still gain a small appreciation for the grand boarding houses that once dotted the Lexington landscape.

In order to provide additional amusements to its patrons the adjacent Schoharie Creek was impounded to create Crystal Lake within the center of the Lexington hamlet, offering fishing, boating, swimming and ice skating to area visitors. The dam was broken by the mid-1960s. Three years after its opening an 1886 advertisement in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle highlighted the benefits of staying at the Lexington House: “Beautifully located on a picturesque eminence overlooking the lake. Table abundantly supplied with fresh vegetables, eggs, butter, pure cream, milk, etc. Boating, bathing, fishing and hunting. Spacious piazza, dancing hall, piano, organ, pool and billiard parlors, etc.; music every day; large roller skating rink on premises. New York mail twice daily. Livery, telegraph office, etc.; easy access; terms very moderate.”

The long-neglected Lexington House is located on the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County, New York.Lexington HouseThe historic Lexington House is pleasantly located on the banks of the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County. The 3-story Lexington House was constructed by Jerome Campbell, a master carpenter, in 1883 and opened to the public on July 4th of that year. It had 30 rooms that accommodated 50 to 60 guests. The hotel was first owned by John P. Van Valkenburgh and his partner Edward Clough. The Van Valkenburgh family were among the earliest settlers in the Lexington township and remained among its most prominent citizens throughout the 19th century. The Lexington House was considered “one of the finest, most popular resorts of the period.”

In order to provide additional amusements to its patrons the adjacent Schoharie Creek was impounded to create Crystal Lake within the center of the Lexington hamlet, offering fishing, boating, swimming and ice skating to area visitors. The dam was broken by the mid-1960s. Three years after its opening an 1886 advertisement in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle highlighted the benefits of staying at the Lexington House: “Beautifully located on a picturesque eminence overlooking the lake. Table abundantly supplied with fresh vegetables, eggs, butter, pure cream, milk, etc. Boating, bathing, fishing and hunting. Spacious piazza, dancing hall, piano, organ, pool and billiard parlors, etc.; music every day; large roller skating rink on premises. New York mail twice daily. Livery, telegraph office, etc.; easy access; terms very moderate.”

There were five support buildings on the property including the former ice house (c. 1900), the wagon house (c. 1883), the theater/skating rink (c. 1887) and two sheds (c. 1900). The River Theater included a bowling alley and a ballroom while it hosted a variety of performances including opera, melodrama and vaudeville and being home to the Lexington Dramatic Society. In its heyday, the hotel was one of many in the Lexington area that catered to summer tourists, others including the Lexington Hotel, O’Hara House, Morse Inn, Carpathia House, The Mackey, Shady Lawn, The Barnard, Crystal Lake House, Kipp House and others.

The Lexington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an architecturally and historically significant example of late-nineteenth century resort architecture in the Catskill Mountain region.” After the decline of the Catskills tourist business ownership of the Lexington House changed hands several times, being used as a music and arts camp and later as home to a non-profit performing arts program. Although the property seems to be suffering from years of neglect, you can, even with just the exterior views, still gain a small appreciation for the grand boarding houses that once dotted the Lexington landscape.

There were five support buildings on the property including the former ice house (c. 1900), the wagon house (c. 1883), the theater/skating rink (c. 1887) and two sheds (c. 1900). The River Theater included a bowling alley and a ballroom while it hosted a variety of performances including opera, melodrama and vaudeville and being home to the Lexington Dramatic Society. In its heyday, the hotel was one of many in the Lexington area that catered to summer tourists, others including the Lexington Hotel, O’Hara House, Morse Inn, Carpathia House, The Mackey, Shady Lawn, The Barnard, Crystal Lake House, Kipp House and others.

The long-neglected Lexington House is located on the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County, New York.Lexington HouseThe historic Lexington House is pleasantly located on the banks of the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County. The 3-story Lexington House was constructed by Jerome Campbell, a master carpenter, in 1883 and opened to the public on July 4th of that year. It had 30 rooms that accommodated 50 to 60 guests. The hotel was first owned by John P. Van Valkenburgh and his partner Edward Clough. The Van Valkenburgh family were among the earliest settlers in the Lexington township and remained among its most prominent citizens throughout the 19th century. The Lexington House was considered “one of the finest, most popular resorts of the period.”

In order to provide additional amusements to its patrons the adjacent Schoharie Creek was impounded to create Crystal Lake within the center of the Lexington hamlet, offering fishing, boating, swimming and ice skating to area visitors. The dam was broken by the mid-1960s. Three years after its opening an 1886 advertisement in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle highlighted the benefits of staying at the Lexington House: “Beautifully located on a picturesque eminence overlooking the lake. Table abundantly supplied with fresh vegetables, eggs, butter, pure cream, milk, etc. Boating, bathing, fishing and hunting. Spacious piazza, dancing hall, piano, organ, pool and billiard parlors, etc.; music every day; large roller skating rink on premises. New York mail twice daily. Livery, telegraph office, etc.; easy access; terms very moderate.”

There were five support buildings on the property including the former ice house (c. 1900), the wagon house (c. 1883), the theater/skating rink (c. 1887) and two sheds (c. 1900). The River Theater included a bowling alley and a ballroom while it hosted a variety of performances including opera, melodrama and vaudeville and being home to the Lexington Dramatic Society. In its heyday, the hotel was one of many in the Lexington area that catered to summer tourists, others including the Lexington Hotel, O’Hara House, Morse Inn, Carpathia House, The Mackey, Shady Lawn, The Barnard, Crystal Lake House, Kipp House and others.

The Lexington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an architecturally and historically significant example of late-nineteenth century resort architecture in the Catskill Mountain region.” After the decline of the Catskills tourist business ownership of the Lexington House changed hands several times, being used as a music and arts camp and later as home to a non-profit performing arts program. Although the property seems to be suffering from years of neglect, you can, even with just the exterior views, still gain a small appreciation for the grand boarding houses that once dotted the Lexington landscape.

The Lexington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an architecturally and historically significant example of late-nineteenth century resort architecture in the Catskill Mountain region.” After the decline of the Catskills tourist business ownership of the Lexington House changed hands several times, being used as a music and arts camp and later as home to a non-profit performing arts program. Although the property seems to be suffering from years of neglect, you can, even with just the exterior views, still gain a small appreciation for the grand boarding houses that once dotted the Lexington landscape.

The long-neglected Lexington House is located on the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County, New York.Lexington HouseThe historic Lexington House is pleasantly located on the banks of the Schoharie Creek in the small hamlet of Lexington in Greene County. The 3-story Lexington House was constructed by Jerome Campbell, a master carpenter, in 1883 and opened to the public on July 4th of that year. It had 30 rooms that accommodated 50 to 60 guests. The hotel was first owned by John P. Van Valkenburgh and his partner Edward Clough. The Van Valkenburgh family were among the earliest settlers in the Lexington township and remained among its most prominent citizens throughout the 19th century. The Lexington House was considered “one of the finest, most popular resorts of the period.”

In order to provide additional amusements to its patrons the adjacent Schoharie Creek was impounded to create Crystal Lake within the center of the Lexington hamlet, offering fishing, boating, swimming and ice skating to area visitors. The dam was broken by the mid-1960s. Three years after its opening an 1886 advertisement in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle highlighted the benefits of staying at the Lexington House: “Beautifully located on a picturesque eminence overlooking the lake. Table abundantly supplied with fresh vegetables, eggs, butter, pure cream, milk, etc. Boating, bathing, fishing and hunting. Spacious piazza, dancing hall, piano, organ, pool and billiard parlors, etc.; music every day; large roller skating rink on premises. New York mail twice daily. Livery, telegraph office, etc.; easy access; terms very moderate.”

There were five support buildings on the property including the former ice house (c. 1900), the wagon house (c. 1883), the theater/skating rink (c. 1887) and two sheds (c. 1900). The River Theater included a bowling alley and a ballroom while it hosted a variety of performances including opera, melodrama and vaudeville and being home to the Lexington Dramatic Society. In its heyday, the hotel was one of many in the Lexington area that catered to summer tourists, others including the Lexington Hotel, O’Hara House, Morse Inn, Carpathia House, The Mackey, Shady Lawn, The Barnard, Crystal Lake House, Kipp House and others.

The Lexington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as “an architecturally and historically significant example of late-nineteenth century resort architecture in the Catskill Mountain region.” After the decline of the Catskills tourist business ownership of the Lexington House changed hands several times, being used as a music and arts camp and later as home to a non-profit performing arts program. Although the property seems to be suffering from years of neglect, you can, even with just the exterior views, still gain a small appreciation for the grand boarding houses that once dotted the Lexington landscape.

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) boarding house building camp Camp Lexington Carpathia House Catskill Mountains Catskills Crystal Lake House Edward Clough Greene County hotel house inn J. P. Van Valkenburgh Jerome Campbell Kipp House lake Lexington Lexington Dramatic Society Lexington Hotel Lexington House Matthew Jarnich Morse Inn National Register of Historic Places New York O'Hara House photographer photographs photography photos pictures river River Theater Schoharie Creek Shady Lawn sightseeing The Barnard The Mackey tourism tourist travel https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/lexington-house Sat, 10 Jul 2021 12:00:00 GMT
George S. Young – Photographer of Platte Clove and the Devil’s Kitchen https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/george-s-young-photographer-of-platte-clove-and-the-devil-s-kitchen George S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills. He and his family operated the popular Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction for many years.

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the former Grand Canyon House at wild Platte Clove in Greene County, New York.Indian Head from back of Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y.The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.



Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)
Indian Head from back of Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

George Summerfield Young was born in July 1855 to Samuel Benson Young (1813-1875) and Susan Catharine (Dibbell) Young (1814-1890). His father Samuel was a farmer and also did quarry work. George was one of ten children. His nine siblings included John W. Young (1832-1912); Amos D. Young (b. 1834); William H. Young (1836-1864); Joseph B. Young (1839-1861); Frances E. Young (b. 1841); Sarah R. Young (b. 1845); Sylvia U. Young (1847-1911); Susan C. Young (b. 1852); and Lissa S. Young (1858-1862).

 

Amos Dibbell (1781-1867), George’s grandfather via his mother Susan, was a native from Holland and was a pioneer in Delaware County, New York. The Dibble family were among the early settlers in the town of Kortright. Amos moved to the Platte Clove area circa the year 1834 and was a millwright by trade. He married Charlotte Williams, of Colchester, on February 12, 1809 at Kortright, New York. Charlotte was born on October 25, 1790 at Kortright. Together Amos and Charlotte had nine children (possibly 10, as per 1865 New York State census). As Amos and Charlotte got older, they lived with their daughter Susan and their son-in-law Samuel Young. Amos likely died at Platte Clove, although his burial site is unknown. Upon the passing of Amos and Charlotte the family property at Platte Clove passed to Susan and Samuel.

 

On the 1860 United States census George Young was living in the town of Hunter. The household included his father Samuel, age 48; his mother Susan age 45; and his siblings William, age 24; Benson, age 21; Frances E., age 19; Sarah, age 16; Sylvia, age 13; Susan, age 8; and Lizzie, age 2. His father Samuel was listed with an occupation of “Farmer,” while William and Benson were listed as “Farm laborer,” and Frances and Sarah were listed as “Domestic.” The family real estate was valued at $1,000, and the personal estate was valued at $350.

 

On the 1865 New York State census George Young was living in the town of Hunter. The household included his father Samuel, age 52; his mother Susan, age 50; his sister Sarah, age 21; his sister Sylvia, age 18; his sister Susan, age 13; his grandfather Amos Dibble, age 84; and his grandmother Charlotte, age 74. Samuel was listed with an occupation of “Farmer,” while Amos, even at the age 84, still had his occupation listed as “Millwright.” The family was living in a “framed” house.

 

On the 1870 United State census George S. Young was living in the town of Hunter. The household included his father Samuel, age 56; his mother Susan, age 55; his grandmother, “Sally,” age 80; his sister Sylvia, age 23; and his sister Susan, age 18. Samuel was listed with an occupation of “Farmer & Quarry.” His mother was listed as “Keeping house,” while Sally, Sylvia and Susan were listed with an occupation of “House labor.” The value of the family’s real estate was $500, and the value of the personal estate was $620.

 

On the 1875 New York State census George S. Young, age 19, was living in the First Election District in the town of Hunter. George was living with his mother Susan C. Young, age 60, now widowed, and his grandmother Charlotte Dibbell, age 85. George was reported as single and had no occupation listed. Susan was listed as “Keeping House.”

 

On the 1880 United States census George S. Young, age 24, was reported as living in the town of Hunter. He was living with only his mother Susan C. Young, age 65. George was reported as single and with an occupation of “Farmer.”

 

George S. Young married Ida Jane (Cole) Young around the year 1882 or 1883. Ida was born at Saugerties in May 1866. They had three children together including Willis Harry Young, born December 1883, died 1974; Edna Emily Young, born October 1886, died 1927; and Marion Alice Young, born May 11, 1897, died 1983.

 

In various business and town directories George S. Young is listed with an occupation of farmer. On the 1880 United States Census Young’s occupation was listed as “Farmer.” In the 1890 Hunter town directory and the 1896 Greene County Directory George S. Young was listed as a farmer with 50 acres of land in Platte Clove. On the 1900 United States census Young was again listed with an occupation of “Farmer.” Young later managed a prominent boarding house, worked as a bluestone dealer and as a stone cutter, operated a popular tourist attraction and became a photographer.

 

In 1891 George Young was present at the organization of the Catskill Mountain Road Improvement Society. The first meeting was organized by F. B. Thurber of Onteora Park and was held on October 24, 1891 at Roggen’s Hotel in Tannersville. Thurber addressed “the leading citizens of the town of Hunter and vicinity” saying that “we have undoubtedly improved our roads during the past few years; the new system of working them is better than the old, but the new also has some defects which must be remedied . . . The most competent men should be selected to work the roads, with the assurance that if they do their duty they shall have them year after year. A man cannot afford to put on a road good, permanent work (which would be cheapest in the end), if he is only sure of having that piece of road one year; and perhaps the present system can be further improved upon by contracting out the entire roads of the town to a competent person, who could then afford to procure the necessary machinery, tools and plant to properly work the.” (The Windham Journal. January 21, 1892.)

 

The Young family resided at Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, which is a deep, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his early impressions of the clove in 1844, which was about ten years after Amos Dibbell first arrived there.

 

“Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.” (Lanman, Charles. Letters from a Landscape Painter. Boston: James Munroe and Company, 1845. p. 50.)

 

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

 

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard published by G. S. Young depicts the fearsome Devil’s Kitchen in Platte Clove.Devil's Kitchen in Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the fearsome Devil’s Kitchen in Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
Devil's Kitchen in Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage postcard depicts the towering Bridal Veil Falls at Platte Clove in the northern Catskills.Bridal Veil Falls in Devil's Kitchen, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts the towering Bridal Veil Falls at Platte Clove in the northern Catskills. The postcard was published by Ida J. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
Bridal Veil Falls in the Devil's Kitchen, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard published by I. J. Young and W. H. Young depicts Ghost Falls located within Platte Clove.Ghost Falls, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts Ghost Falls located within Platte Clove. The postcard was published by I. J. & W. H. Young, proprietors of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.


Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)
Ghost Falls, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard depicting that aptly named Ghost Falls in Platte Clove was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House.Top of Ghost Falls, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N. Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts that aptly named Ghost Falls in Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
Top of Ghost Falls, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage postcard by George S. Young depicts the aptly named Ghost Falls in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove.Head of Ghost Falls, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts that aptly named Ghost Falls in Platte Clove. The postcard was published by George S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Head of Ghost Falls, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

At the head of the dramatic Plattekill Clove is Hell Hole Falls, a scenic waterfall. The falls are located on Hell’s Hole Creek which forms on the southeast ridge of Kaaterskill High Peak and flows into the Plattekill Creek for its run to the Hudson River. The diabolically named waterfall begins benignly enough with a series of small cascades but then, upon passing underneath an historic stone arch bridge, begins its hellish fall through the aptly named Devil’s Kitchen in to what seems to be the never-ending abyss below. Stark cliffs, precipitous drops, narrow ravines are all engulfed in this section of the Catskills where regional lore claims the Devil once roamed and early pioneers dared not tread.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the historic stone arch bridge that marks the entrance to the Hell Hole at Platte Clove.Stone Arch, At Entrance to Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the historic stone arch bridge that marks the entrance to the Hell Hole at Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
Stone Arch at Entrance to Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

Stone Arch at Head of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.Stone Arch at Head of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the historic stone arch bridge that marks the entrance to the Hell Hole at Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Stone Arch at Head of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove:

 

“A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

 

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

 

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and made passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

 

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hell Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

 

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

 

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

 

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

 

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

 

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (De Lisser, Richard Lionel. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. p. 76-77.)

 

 

This vintage postcard published by Ida J. Young depicts the beautiful Japanese Falls within Platte Clove.Japanese Falls, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N. Y.This vintage postcard depicts the beautiful Japanese Falls within Platte Clove. The postcard was published by Ida J. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.


Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)
Japanese Falls, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

Vintage postcard by George S. Young depicting Rainbow Falls in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove.Rainbow Falls, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts a beautifully flowing waterfall known as Rainbow Falls located within what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Rainbow Falls, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage postcard by George S. Young depicts Rainbow Falls in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove.The Rainbow, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts Rainbow Falls in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
The Rainbow, Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection. 

 

The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, realizing opportunity from the growing number of vacationers to the northern Catskills, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House in the year 1900. The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at the head of Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard by George S. Young depicts the extremely rugged cliffs of what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove.Mossy Brook, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts a peaceful section of creek in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Mossy Brook, Platte Cove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard by George S. Young depicts a peaceful section of creek known as Mossy Brook in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as PlMossy Brook, at Head of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts a peaceful section of creek known as Mossy Brook in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Massy Brook, At Head of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage postcard depicts the extremely rugged rocks and cliffs of what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove.Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts the extremely rugged rocks and cliffs of what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. The postcard was published by George S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Grand Canyon. Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

The Grand Canyon House was located only 500 feet from the Devil’s Kitchen, which the Young family would make a focal point for their lodgers and for day visitors as well. It would become a very popular tourist destination, attracting travelers from throughout the region.

 

The Young family constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor.

 

“Several generations ago a vacationer among the romantic Catskills had only to pay his dime to be admitted to the Devil’s Kitchen located at the head of Plattekill Clove. There a guide would show him great boulders deep in a gorge draped with ferns and alive with the tinkle and murmur of water. These boulders were the Devil’s saucepans, his tea kettle, and other pieces of kitchenware. Ladders and stairways of wood led from one level to another. The guide would give details of the Devil’s methods of cooking and point out his many ingenious household gadgets. In this way a generation of men and women who had been molded by nineteenth-century romantic thinking and feeling turned the old Devil-beliefs and Devil-fears of their ancestors into pleasant amusement. Vacationers were happy to pay their dimes to spend a half hour of mock horror among the Devil’s pots and pans and to feel superior to the old-timers who had taken such things seriously. Today the Devil’s Kitchen is deserted. Its ladders and stairways have rotted away, and the kitchen utensils have long ago reverted to being simple boulders deposited by glacial power.” (Evers, Alf. The Catskills From Wilderness to Woodstock. Woodstock, NY: The Overlook Press, 1982. p. 233.)

 

Dr. John Dwyer, son of Marion Young and Charles Dwyer, grandson of George S. Young and Ida J. Young, wrote in 1994 of his memories of Platte Clove, the Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen.

 

“My grandfather built several flights of steps and walkways down into this canyon and this trail led eventually to a rock which thrusts itself out into space just above the point where two streams meet. This rocky promontory is called Bridal Veil Point, because of the splendid view which it offers of those falls, where the waters of the small stream drop about eighty feet over the moss and fern-covered rock.

 

At the start of the trail into the Devil’s Kitchen there was a small house, where soft-drinks, souvenirs and postcards were sold and where those who were not guests at the boarding house paid a ten-cent admission charge to see the canyon. In time, inflation took its toll and in the early thirties the admission charge was upped to twenty cents, provoking howls of dismay from Albany to New York City.

 

Over the years the walkways were broadened, the configuration of the steps was changed and a new little house was built at the head of the Canyon (in the early twenties), but the path to Bridal Veil Point remained essentially the same over the years.” (Dwyer, Dr. John. “The Grand Canyon House of Platte Clove.” The Hemlock. Mountain Top Historical Society. 1994.)

 

This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the historic stone arch bridge that marks the entrance to the Hell Hole at Platte Clove.Under the Arch at the Head of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the historic stone arch bridge that marks the entrance to the Hell Hole at the top of what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but today is known as Platte Clove. The wooden walkway in the foreground would have taken walkers over the chasm to begin the descent into the clove. The postcard was published by George S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.



Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)
Under the Arch at the Head of Grand Canyon. Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

Vintage postcard published by the Grand Canyon House depicting a rustic wood bridge crossing over the Hell Hole in Platte Clove (formerly known as the Grand Canyon.)Looking Down Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard shows the rustic wood bridge that crossed over the chasm at the Hell Hole in what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. The postcard was published by the nearby Grand Canyon House and its proprietors, I. J. & W. H. Young. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1933.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.

The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Looking Down Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard published by G. S. Young depicts the wooden pathway leading through the Devil’s Kitchen section of Platte Clove.The Bridge and Trail in Devil's Kitchen, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the wooden pathway leading through the Devil’s Kitchen section of Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
The Bridge and Trail in Devil's Kitchen. Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage postcard depicting a rugged scene within Platte Clove was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House.Scene in Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, NYThis vintage postcard depicts a rugged scene within Platte Clove. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.


Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)
Scene in Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

Devil’s Kitchen “remained popular well into the twentieth century, as motorized vehicles replaced the horse-drawn carriages of the earlier decades as the preferred method of accessing the area. Tour groups from Albany and points south made the journey in buses that traversed the narrow, and at times precipitous grades of Platte Clove Road.” (Krattinger, William E. “Old Platte Clove Post Office.” National Register of Historic Places.)

 

The Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction operated until 1944. The bridges, ladders and walkways of the Devil’s Kitchen were destroyed in 1947 by a mudslide. They were never replaced.

 

George Young’s photographs of Platte Clove and the Devil’s Kitchen remain to this day as some of the best ever taken of that region. His photographs included scenic spots such as Mossy Brook, the stone arch bridge at Hell Hole Falls, Japanese Falls, Ghost Falls, Bridal Veil Falls and Rainbow Falls. Young’s photos show the beauty of idyllic waterfalls, but also the rugged wildness that brought the Devil to mind over a century ago. They offer a glimpse into a section of the Catskills that today is one of the most inaccessible to hikers, and provide lasting images of sites that would likely never be seen otherwise.

 

On the 1900 United States census, around the time that the Grand Canyon House opened, George S. Young, age 45, was living in the First Election District of the town of Hunter. He was living with his wife Ida and their three children Willis, Edna and Marion. The household also included George Rix, a 21-year-old boarder who was working as a farm laborer. George was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

 

The Grand Canyon House, as operated by the Young family, was a popular boarding house for several decades. Although the Young family informally hosted boarders prior, the Grand Canyon House officially opened in 1900. The boarding house originally accommodated about 25 people, but was expanded over the years, reaching accommodations for 50 people by 1908. Operating season was typically from June 1st to October 30th. The Grand Canyon House was known for its delicious and plentiful food, including pure spring water and fresh produce and dairy products, and of course its magnificent views of the Hudson Valley and its proximity to the Devil’s Kitchen section of Platte Clove.

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the former Grand Canyon House at wild Platte Clove in Greene County, New York.Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N. Y.The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)
Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection

 

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the former Grand Canyon House at wild Platte Clove in Greene County, New York.Grand Canyon House on Round Top Mountain, Platte Clove, N. Y.The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

Below is a chronological listing of various advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Propietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; sprint water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)

Grand Canyon House on Round Top Mountain. Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

Dr. John Dwyer, grandson of George S. Young, wrote of his memories of the early beginnings of the Grand Canyon House.

 

“When my great-grandparents acquired the Devil’s Kitchen property, there was already a house there, set back just a few feet northeast of where the Platte Clove Mountain Road now runs. It has served sporadically as an inn, and this practice seems to have continued in an informal sort of way, after my grandparents married. This was the period when boarding houses were multiplying in the Catskills and my grandfather [George Young] decided to try his hand at the promising new business. He has always wanted a house some distance above the road, with fine views of the whole range from Indian Head to Hunter Mountain, as well as down into the Hudson Valley, and he found the ideal location just about a hundred yards up the hill behind the house. The need to expand the capacity of the boarding house gave him the excuse to do what he had always wanted.

 

During the late spring and early summer of 1899 he prepared the house for moving and then brought it up the hill in two sections. The family lived in the house during the moving operations and my mother (who was born in 1897) told me that one of earliest memories was that of her mother cooking huckleberry pies in the kitchen stove and telling her husband in no uncertain terms what she though of the whole enterprise, when the house tilted and the contents of the pies spilled all over the inside of the oven.

 

The house was moved up the hill by rolling it over logs. It was hauled by teams of horses and, as each log was “left behind” on the lower side of the house, it was carried around to the upper end, and the process was repeated until the house reached its final resting place. The house was positioned so that the smaller of the two dining rooms was connected by a bluestone stairway to a room-sized cold cellar, with four bluestone dry walls and a marvelous three tiered “lazy susan” in the middle, made of circular slabs of bluestone, six feet in diameter, each with a square hole in the middle for the five by five wood stake which supported the round slabs. (The whole structure was so perfectly balanced that it could be turned at the touch of a finger.)

 

During the summer following the move, my grandfather built a tower at the west end of the house, the ground floor of which served as an office, while the second floor provided a small room which was connected to the larger room on the same floor where the children often slept.

 

After this work had been completed, the house had nine regular bedrooms and a tower bedroom available for guests, as well as two large dining rooms and a huge living room with a bluestone fireplace. It was probably about this time that the house began to be called “Grand Canyon House,” a reference to the magnificent Canyon described above. However, as the boarding business prospered, there were more potential vacationers than rooms to house them and so my grandfather came on the idea of building a third story on the house, which would provide twelve additional rooms. This work was completed toward the end of the first decade of the new century and the house then took on the form it was to have for as long as it remained standing.” (Dwyer, Dr. John. “The Grand Canyon House of Platte Clove.” The Hemlock. Mountain Top Historical Society. 1994.)

 

In 1901, only a year or two after opening, George S. Young placed a large advertisement for the Grand Canyon House in the Ulster & Delaware Railroad publication titled The Catskills Mountains. The most picturesque Mountain region on the Globe. The Ulster & Delaware provided one of the most comfortable and convenient methods of reaching the northern Catskills. That early advertisement was one of the largest ever placed by the Grand Canyon House, and provided great details on why the resort would become so popular.

 

“Grand Canyon House. Heart of the Catskills. Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y.

 

Open from June 1 to October 30. Altitude, 2,500 feet. House enlarged.

 

TERMS – July and August, $7 to $12 a week. Special terms to families or clubs. Guests will be given a reduction in rate during June, Sept, and Oct.

 

LOCATION – Grand Canyon House is on a commanding height, 2,500 feet above the tide water, and from nearly every room there are magnificent valley, mountain and river views. Seven miles from Tannersville Station on the Kaaterskill R. R.

 

The house is on the same altitude of Hotel Kaaterskill, Beach Catskill Mountain House and the Overlook Mountain House. Its surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The house is of a quiet genteel character.

 

Fiver hundred feet from the Grand Canyon where bold and savage features are combined with the gentle and picturesque in inexhaustible variety, huge masses of rock tumbled in wild confusion and the rushing waters of the Plattekill, contrasted with rich forests, distant views of mountain ranges and the smiling Hudson form an impressive and delightful scene.

 

THE ROOMS – Are all light and comfortable, the owner having rebuilt the house and refurbished rooms. Large easy chairs and rockers for guests in abundance.

 

THE TABLE is strictly first-class in every respect. Abundance of milk, eggs, butter and vegetables from the farm.

 

APPROACHED FROM NEW YORK – West Shore R. R., foot of Franklin St., or West 42nd St., North River, to Kingston; thence via Ulster & Delaware to Tannersville. Take Albany Day Boat to Kingston Point, thence via train to Tannersville. We meet our guests at depot with our own conveyances, if requested, at a trifling charge. No Hebrews need apply. Through parlor car service direct to Tannersville.

 

GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.”

 

George S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Devil’s Kitchen and Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills.Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, CatskillsGeorge S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills. He and his family operated the popular Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction for many years.

Below is a chronological listing of various additional advertisements and newspaper articles that have described the once famous Grand Canyon House.

 

1900 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Heart of Catskills; PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., New York; altitude 2,500 feet; excellent table; large, airy rooms; terms moderate. GEO. S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 1, 1900.)

 

1901 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Open from June 1 to October 30; no Hebrews; fine location; altitude 2,000 feet; rates $7 to $10 per week. GEO. S. YOUNG, Prop. PLATTE CLOVE, Greene Co., N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 12, 1901.)

 

1904 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, with its beautiful canyon and magnificent river view, is under the management of George S. Young.” (The New York Times. June 12, 1904.)

 

1904 newspaper article: “Nature in forming the Grand Canyon here produced one of the most wonderful rock formations in the state and not content with this she produced the cross clove. Both of these places are annually visited by thousands of tourists, who are surprised at the many points of interest in the neighborhood . . . The Grand Canyon House, with its unsurpassed river view and pleasant location, has a number of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 10, 1904.)

 

1906 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House – Elevation 2,000 feet; capacity 40, excellent cuisine. For particulars, apply to GEO. S. YOUNG.” (The Brooklyn Citizen. June 15, 1906.)

 

1907 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House has been having an unusually prosperous season and is catering to a crowd that includes a large number of Brooklynites.” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 18, 1907.)

 

1908 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House is situated on a commanding height, 2,000 feet above the tidewater at Platte Clove. The surroundings cannot be surpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks. The rooms are all light and comfortable and the table is strictly first class in every respect. For amusements, tennis, croquet, and driving, are at the convenience of guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

 

1908 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE, Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. Altitude 2,000 feet. Extensive views of mountain peaks, the Hudson River. Artistic nature is on all sides, with rugged mountains, natural chasms, beautiful waterfalls and delightful scenery. Accommodates 50. All modern improvements. Rates, $8-15. Opens June 15. G. S. Young.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1908.)

 

George S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Devil’s Kitchen and Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills.Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, CatskillsGeorge S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills. He and his family operated the popular Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction for many years.

1908 newspaper article: “Picturesque Platt Clove. Platte Clove, N.Y., June 27 – At the head of the Platterkill Clove, a short distance from High Peak, Platte Clove is one of the most picturesque of the smaller hamlets in the Catskills. A small cottage settlement and several hotels cater to a crowd during July and August that taxes their capacity to the utmost . . . The most attractive of the houses here, the Grand Canyon House, is located on the side of the mountain, overlooking the canyon.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 28, 1908.)

 

1908 newspaper article: “The tourist looking for an outing that he will remember for years will find in the ascent of this Clove, on a cool September or October day some of the most wonderful scenic beauty to be found in America. The ascent can be made through a well known, defined path with little hardship. The writer has, on several occasions, conducted a party of women through this Clove, although it is rough work for the gentler sex, yet he has never seen a party that was not well pleased with the labor they had expended in making the trip. In this section there are a few houses that are noted as autumn resorts: The Mountain Stream Cottage at West Saugerties, the Grand Canyon House, the Platterkill Falls Mountain House and the Twin Mountain House are located here in the heart of the mountains. They are comfortable, and the autumn evenings spent around their open fireplaces are among the most pleasant experiences that a traveler can have.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. September 14, 1908.)

 

1908 newspaper article: “The Platterkill Clove is, without exception, the most beautiful bit of scenery throughout the Catskill Mountains. There is not one of the Cloves that compares with it in wild, rugged, picturesque beauty, and node of them has the wonderful rock formations or beautiful falls found in this section. Boarding houses around Platte Clove this year are enjoying a prosperous season. The Grand Canyon, the most marvelous of the formations throughout the Catskills, is growing in popularity each week. Visitors from a radius of twenty miles are coming in crowds each day to see this beautiful section. The Grand Canyon House is the coziest and most attractive house at Platte Clove, and its season has been an exceedingly prosperous one.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 26, 1908.)

 

1914 newspaper article: “The Grand Canyon House, located so that it overlooks the Hudson Valley and the surrounding country, is the leading house here, and one of the most attractive hotels in the Catskills. The house has been open during the entire month of June and has been busier than usual because it is a favorite place with June guests.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 14, 1914.)

 

1914 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Elevation 2,000 Feet. Exquisite scenery, all amusements, sanitary plumbing. Splendid cuisine. Gas, pure spring water. George S. Young. Platte Clove, N.Y.” (New York Tribune. June 7, 1914.)

 

1915 newspaper article: “Platte Clove, N. Y. June 19. This charming section of the Catskills, at the head of the beautiful Plaaterkill Clove or Grand Canyon, is the most delightful section of the interior Catskills and its pretty summer homes and comfortable boarding houses are well patronized during July and August.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 20, 1915.)

 

1917 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet; unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural falls, chasms, fine drives and pretty walks; GRAND CANYON AND DEVIL’S KITCHEN WITHIN 500 FEET; amusements, tennis, croquet, etc. Rooms are all light and comfortable; sanitary plumbing; gas throughout; splendid cuisine; abundance milk, butter, cream, eggs and vegetables from own farm; spring water on every floor. Terms $10 to $15 per week. Write for Illustrated booklet; references. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Proprietor.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 3, 1917.)

 

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, N.Y. Elevation 2,000 feet. Unsurpassed for health, scenery, natural paths, fine drives. Grand Canyon and Devil’s Kitchen within 500 feet. Sanitary plumbing; splendid cuisine; fresh dairy and farm products. Booklet. Mrs. E. E. Baker.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 18, 1919.)

 

1919 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, New York. Where high-class people can enjoy a vacation which is not surpassed in the Catskill Mts., because the house is situated at an altitude of 2,000 feet, overlooking the Hudson Valley and Grand Canyon. The walk through the famous Devil’s Kitchen is one that should not be missed. All conveniences. Large, airy rooms; own vegetables. Sports and amusements. Running spring water on every floor. Rates, $14 up. Booklet. E. H. Baker, Prop.” (The Chat. June 14, 1919.)

 

1920 advertisement: “Your Country Home. Built on the mountain tops. Picturesquely romantic region, charmingly secluded. Conducted to satisfy your desire for a better vacation. Tennis, croquet, billiards, etc. Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Elka Park, Greene Co., New York. Tannersville Station on West Shore R. R.” (The Nation. Volume 110, No. 2865. May 29, 1920. p. 729.)

 

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Platte Clove, Greene, Co., N.Y. Under old management. Spacious verandas. Amusements. Large, airy rooms, all conveniences and an abundance of good things to eat. Apply for terms.” (The Chat. May 26, 1923.)

 

1923 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House. Located 2,000 feet above tide water, Grand Canyon House at Platte Clove, Greene County, N.Y. offers an ideal place for those who have used up all their vitality during the winter months. E. E. Baker is the proprietor and he saw to it that the house was placed in the center of beautiful surroundings that offer new life to the work out man or woman who much leave the city to recuperate. There are spacious verandas. From the windows the long mountain chain and valley can be observed. There is a large supply of vegetables. Those who want quick action and desire to engage a room without loss of time can telephone to 35-Y-4 Tannersville. The terms are reasonable. The house is easily reached and the finest class of people always spend their summers here. Greene County, it is agreed, is one of the most picturesque spots in New York State and Mr. Baker fixed up his house to harmonize with the surrounding country. Full particulars can be obtained by writing for them. – Adv.” (The Chat. June 9, 1923.)

 

1924 advertisement: “2500 Ft. Elevation – “Always Cool.” Grand Canyon House. Elka Park, Greene County, New York. The most beautiful spot in the Catskills has been selected for Mrs. Ida J. Young’s attractive “Grand Canyon House.” True, it takes five hours to come up from New York, but isn’t it worthwhile to really spend your vacation in Nature’s Own Country, accessible as it is to Haines Falls and Tannersville for fine amusements and stores? Excellent table and rooms; baths and modern improvements; ideal drives and walks; bathing and fishing; accommodates 50; rates $18 and up; Gentiles. MRS. IDA J. YOUNG Proprietor” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 25, 1924.)

 

1929 advertisement: “Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, N.Y. Elka Park P. O. Near Devil’s Kitchen, wildest view in the Catskills. German cooking. H. W. Buschen.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 30, 1929.)

 

1932 advertisement: “GRAND CANYON HOUSE. A Mountain Paradise. All Sports. All Improvements. German Kitchen. $15-$18. H. Buschen. Elka Park. N. Y.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 25, 1932.)

 

George S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Devil’s Kitchen and Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills.Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, CatskillsGeorge S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills. He and his family operated the popular Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction for many years.

George S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Devil’s Kitchen and Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills.Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, CatskillsGeorge S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills. He and his family operated the popular Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction for many years.

George S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Devil’s Kitchen and Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills.Grand Canyon House, Platte Clove, CatskillsGeorge S. Young was a talented photographer and boarding house owner in the rugged Platte Clove section of the northern Catskills. He and his family operated the popular Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction for many years.

On the 1910 United States census George S. Young, age 54, is residing at the town of Hunter. He was living with two of their three children, Edna and Marion. The family must have been doing quite well as the household also contained two servants, Jessie Deda Mater and Fred Hummel, both of whom worked as laborers at a saw mill. Interestingly, George, despite operating the Grand Canyon House and the Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction, was listed with an occupation of “Stone Cutter.” He perhaps learned the trade from his father Samuel, who also did quarry work. George’s daughter Edna was working as a music teacher.

 

In 1918 author T. Morris Longstreth (1886-1975) wrote The Catskills, one of the best books ever written about that famous region. The travelogue follows the author as he journeys through the Catskill Mountains in the spring and early summer of 1917. Longstreth takes you to Overlook Mountain, Stony Clove, Phoenicia, Hunter, Slide Mountain, Kaaterskill Falls, the Ashokan Reservoir, Mount Utsayantha and many more places. Along the way Longstreth fishes the mountain streams, sleeps under the stars, lodges at local boarding houses and dairy farms, tramps the backroads, talks to the people and witnesses the many majesties of nature.

 

Along his 1917 journey Longstreth wrote of his visit to the Platte Clove, his stay at a local inn and the region’s magnificent scenery. Based on his description of the location and of the stairways down to the Devil’s Kitchen, Longstreth likely spent the night and enjoyed his meals at the Grand Canyon House, and perhaps the innkeeper was even Ida J. Young.

 

“Breakfast was no betrayer of the expectations raised by supper. The Good Dame of Plattekill Clove, (as our hostess is registered in heaven,) brought in buckwheat cakes that had to have a cover on them to keep them down, and there was nothing at all inconspicuous about their size . . .

 

There is at the top of the Clove a gorge called by the ambitious inhabitants the Grand Canyon. We visited this, and found that to loiter down it, to really digest the formation and appreciate the trees, is a matter of many hours. At the very top, in the Devil’s Kitchen, as their fancy names it, there is a scene that distresses all artists who have not brought along the means of reproducing it. The road passes over the gorge by a small arch so beautifully rounded and bastioned with rock that it is a little sermon on the value of doing the ordinary well and with an eye to beauty. The brook sings a little lament as it goes through this arch; it is leaving lovely fields and is about to be lost in a series of mad plunges. When we saw it first it had whitened the entire cavern with frost. In the spring it riots down those great stone steps. Our guide, she who keeps the charming Inn near by, said that in great freshets it was master of the gorge, filling it with foam and noise and demolishing the stairways, which they annually rebuild . . .

 

But my memory tells me this: that gorge, unadvertised and not very famous, is the finest miniature of wilderness in the Catskills, and the beauty of its trees, lichened rocks, cascades, and glimpses of the plain will repay a lengthy visit at any season. If one does not go to be awed, he will remain to be charmed. The enjoyment of the Catskills depends on the same point of view. If one visits them as one may visit the Canadian Rockies, in the expectation of having all of one’s big emotions drawn out and played upon, there will be hideous disappointment. There is nothing big about the Catskills. They are as comfortable as home. They were created, not for observation-cars, but for bungalow porches. Yet they are not so little. Indeed, while Brute and I sat that night in the kitchen of the Good Dame’s, listening to her husband tell of the wildcats he had trapped, they seemed very wild and very extensive.” (Longstreth, T. Morris. The Catskills. New York: The Century Co., 1918. Reprinted by Black Dome Press Corp., Hensonville, NY, 2003. p. 40-43.)

 

This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the sheer rock walls of the chasm that has previously been known as the Grand Canyon, today referred by its geographical name of Platte Clove.A Portion of East Wall of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the sheer rock walls of the chasm that has previously been known as the Grand Canyon, today referred by its geographical name of Platte Clove. The postcard was published by Ida J. Young and W. H. Young, proprietors of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

The Grand Canyon House was located in the northern Catskills at Platte Clove, a beautiful 2-mile chasm that has historically been referenced as the Grand Canyon. The Young family, long-time Platte Clove land owners and farmers, turned to the tourist trade with the opening of their Grand Canyon House around 1899 or 1900. They constructed a series of paths with bridges and stairways into the rugged clove for their patrons to enjoy the natural splendor. The name “Grand Canyon” is no longer used in reference to Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
A Portion of East Wall of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection.

 

This vintage postcard by George S. Young depicts the extremely rugged cliffs of what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove.Section of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicts the extremely rugged cliffs of what was historically known as the Grand Canyon, but is today generally referred to as Platte Clove. Looking carefully at the middle of the picture you can see two people resting on an outcropping. The postcard was published by G. S. Young, proprietor of the nearby Grand Canyon House. The postcard was never mailed.

Well-known photographer and guidebook author Richard Lionel De Lisser wrote of his 1894 trip through Platte Clove: “ A trip through the clove, following the bed of the stream, to West Saugerties, in Ulster County, is fully worth the exertion necessary to make it, and is full of interest to the lover of Nature in her barbaric state. There is nothing in the Catskills to equal it – of the kind. My trip was made with an assistance and a guide, with an axe to clear the way of fallen trees and other obstructions. Although not much over a mile, it took us from early morning till late in the evening to make the passage. In the descent, of over 2,000 feet, no less than eighteen large waterfalls are encountered and passed, which vary in height – from twenty-five up to many which are higher – some of them hundreds of feet. There are no paths or roads through; in fact there is little chance for any, the creek occupying about all the space between the mountains on either side.

After a visit to Black Chasm and the Plaaterkill Falls, the next point of interest is the Old Mill Falls, just below the bridge that crosses the stream on the Overlook Mountain road. Then comes Pomeroy Falls. Here the visitor will find a flight of steps that will take him to the foot of the ravine. From there, down the clove, he must do as I did – make the best of the natural opportunities afforded by the depth of the water in the creek, and the fallen trees and rocks in the bed.

I should judge that a foot-path could be made through the entire length of the clove, and at but little expense, that would make it passable for ladies and summer people in general. The place only needs to be known and mad passable, to take precedence over any other of the cloves in the Catskill region.

The next fall below Pomeroy is the Rainbow, the one below that is the Lower Rainbow, or Hell Hole Falls. The stream that enters the creek at this point comes from High Peak, passes under Hello Hole bridge, on the clove wagon road, and falls almost perpendicularly hundreds of feet, over huge rocks and high cliffs, into the wild stream below.

Green Falls comes next. A second view of this falls I have called “The Ghost,” as it suggested to me a Death-head wrapped in a winding-sheet. Looking to one side of the “Ghost,” you can find two other heads, one clearly defined.

Evergreen Falls is named from the quantities of green moss that covers its rocks, and comes next in order. Then comes Rocky Rapids, which is a wild and rather a dangerous spot, quite narrow and in which one is in as much danger from the rocks handing above as from the big boulders in the path.

Gray Rock is a beautiful falls, and would well repay a visit to the clove. The stream from Black Chasm enters the creek just below these falls.

In attempting to cross the stream here I fell in the creek, for about the twentieth time that day, but unfortunately, this time, having in one hand the camera and in the other the lens, and wishing to keep them dry, at any cost, I was obliged to remain as I had fallen, until relieved of them, while the water, which had found convenient passageway through my trousers, spurted out over my collar in playful jets. My guide set to laughing at this, and laughed so long and so hard that we had to sit down and wait for him to get through and afterward to recover from the fatigue caused thereby.


The last falls in Greene county is the Upper Red Falls, so called to distinguish it from the Lower Red Falls, which in Ulster county.” (Richard Lionel De Lisser. Picturesque Catskills. Greene County. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing Company, 1894. Reprinted – Cornwallville, New York: Hope Farm Press, 1983. Pages 76-77.)
Section of Grand Canyon, Platte Clove, N.Y. Author's Collection. 

 

Little remains of the famed Grand Canyon House that catered to so many Catskills tourists. Little else remains of the stairs, ladders and walkways of the once famous Devil’s Kitchen tourist attraction that drew thousands of visitors. However, Young’s legacy lives on with his photographs of Platte Clove and of the Devil’s Kitchen, pictures that beautifully portray what was and is some of the most spectacular scenery in the Catskills region.

 

George Summerfield Young passed away in 1918. His wife Ida Jane (Cole) Young continued to operate the Grand Canyon House for many years after her husband’s death. Ida passed away at Riverdale, New Jersey in 1952.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer George S. Young please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) arch bridge brook Catskill Mountains Catskills cliffs clove creek devil Devil's Chamber Devil's Kitchen George S. Young Grand Canyon House Greene County Hell Hole Hell Hole Creek Hell Hole Falls Huckleberry Point Hudson River Ida J. Young Kaaterskill High Peak Old Mill Falls photographer photographs photography pioneer Platte Clove Plattekill Plattekill Clove Plattekill Creek Plattekill Falls postcards ravines river souvenirs stone tourism tourist tours water waterfall https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/7/george-s-young-photographer-of-platte-clove-and-the-devil-s-kitchen Sat, 03 Jul 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Old Mill Falls, Platte Clove https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/old-mill-falls-platte-clove Old Mill Falls is a charming 15-foot waterfall located on the Plattekill Creek just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls.

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek within the 280-acre Platte Clove Preserve, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls.Old Mill FallsOld Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls. The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way south to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way west to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond. The creek is spanned at this point by a replica king-post bridge along what was once known as the Overlook Road. This former carriage road carried travelers from the mountain top area to Codfish Point, over Plattekill Mountain, past Echo Lake, to the spur trail that would take you to the former Overlook Mountain House and the summit of Overlook Mountain and then on to the hamlet of Meads, which was located north of the village of Woodstock.

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek within the 280-acre Platte Clove Preserve, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls.Autumn Leaves at Old Mill FallsOld Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls. The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way south to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

 

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek within the 280-acre Platte Clove Preserve, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls.Autumn Leaves at Old Mill FallsOld Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls. The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way south to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of Platte Kill Clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek within the 280-acre Platte Clove Preserve, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls.Old Mill FallsPlattekill Clove, Greene County

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls. The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way south to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) bridge brook Catskill Center for Conservation and Development Catskill Mountains Catskills CCCD Charles Lanman cliff clove creek education educational geological Greene County Griswold Hell Hole Falls hike hiker hiking history Huckleberry Point Kaaterskill Falls Kaaterskill High Peak Long Path Matthew Jarnich mill New York Old Mill Falls Overlook Bridge path photographer photographs photography photos pictures Platte Clove Platte Clove Preserve Platte Kill Platte Kill Clove Plattekill Creek Plattekill Falls Plattekill Mountain retreat river Route 16 sightseeing sign stone Tannersville tourism tourist trail travel trees water waterfall West Saugerties https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/old-mill-falls-platte-clove Sat, 26 Jun 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Otto Hillig – New Photographs https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/otto-hillig-new-photographs Otto Hillig can be considered one of the great photographers in Catskills history. Arriving from Germany in the United States as a poor teenage immigrant he took on a series of odd jobs before developing a prosperous photography business at his adopted hometown in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. He operated a well-regarded portrait studio in the village, extensively photographed the landscapes of the region and was considered an earlier pioneer of aerial photography.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new photographs by Otto Hillig. They have all been added to the Otto Hillig gallery, which now contains nearly 100 of his works.

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the Halls Mills Covered Bridge at Claryville in Sullivan County, New York.Claryville, N.Y.Halls Mills Covered Bridge, located near Claryville in Sullivan County, was built in 1912 by David Benton and John Knight. It is 130 feet long and crosses the Neversink River. The bridge is one lane, 18 feet wide and weighs 90 tons. Although the bridge once accommodated vehicular traffic, it has been limited to pedestrian traffic since 1962 when Route 19 was moved. It is not listed on the National Register of Historic Places unlike many of the other covered bridges in the Catskills.

The postcard was published by The New Hillig Studios, located at Liberty, New York. The postcards was manufactured in the genuine Curt Teich style. It was never mailed.
Claryville, N.Y. (Halls Mills Covered Bridge)

 

Vintage postcard from photographer Otto Hillig depicting a well-dressed couple out for a ride in their cow-pulled carriage.On the Speedway in Sullivan Co., N.Y.This vintage postcard shows a well-dressed couple out for a ride in their cow-pulled carriage. The postcard was published by Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. The postcard was manufactured in Germany. The postmark on the reverse side appears to show that it was mailed in 1910.

Otto Hillig can be considered one of the great photographers in Catskills history. Arriving from Germany in the United States as a poor teenage immigrant he took on a series of odd jobs before developing a prosperous photography business at his adopted hometown in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. He operated a well-regarded portrait studio in the village, extensively photographed the landscapes of the region and was considered an earlier pioneer of aerial photography.
On the Speedway in Sullivan Co., N.Y.

 

Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the historic Campbell Inn at Roscoe in Sullivan County, New York.Campbell Inn, Roscoe, N.Y.Vintage Catskills postcard depicting the historic Campbell Inn at Roscoe in Sullivan County, New York. The postcard was published by Otto Hillig who operated out of Liberty, New York. The postcard was never mailed. Campbell Inn, Roscoe, N.Y.

 

This vintage Catskills postcard taken by well-known photographer Otto Hillig depicts the oldest house in Sullivan County, New York.Oldest House in Sullivan County, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the oldest house in Sullivan County, New York. The postcard was published by photographer Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. The postcard was mailed in 1950 from Parksville, New York.

Otto Hillig can be considered one of the great photographers in Catskills history. Arriving from Germany in the United States as a poor teenage immigrant he took on a series of odd jobs before developing a prosperous photography business at his adopted hometown in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. He operated a well-regarded portrait studio in the village, extensively photographed the landscapes of the region and was considered an earlier pioneer of aerial photography.
Oldest House in Sullivan County, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard from photographer Otto Hillis of St. Joseph’s Seraphic Seminary at Callicoon in Sullivan County, New York.St. Joseph's Seraphic Seminary, Callicoon, N.Y.St. Joseph’s Seminary is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. On the application for its inclusion on the National Register St. Joseph’s was described as “a historical educational complex, with significant Romanesque style buildings and early twentieth century landscape elements. On a hill overlooking the Delaware River and the hamlet of Callicoon, it includes the largest native bluestone buildings in the river valley, and visually dominates the immediate geographic area.”

Construction on the main building at St. Joseph’s began in 1901 and was completed in 1910. The The four-story, timber-framed, clapboard-sided seminary barn was constructed in 1906. Holy Cross Chapel, also located on the property, was constructed in 1927. The chapel was described as a “two-story, bluestone, Romanesque style church. The gymnasium was constructed in 1930.

“Architecturally, spiritually and socially, St. Joseph’s had a profound impact on the river valley. Franciscans from the Seminary served as parish priests not only for the Callicoon congregation, but also for churches in the surrounding communities of Cochecton, Lake Huntington, Narrowsburg, Yulan, Pond Eddy, North Branch, Jeffersonville, Youngsville, Hankins, and Long Eddy. The Seminary’s architecture, particularly that of the chapel and the main building, is recognized as distinctive within the valley. Despite the fact that bluestone quarrying was a major industry in the area, these are the only large native stone buildings in the river valley. The Romanesque styling of the chapel is more elaborate and sophisticated than other local church architecture. Given its dominant location on the hillside, with the bell tower visible for several miles, both up and downstream, the Seminary has had an extraordinary visual impact on the valley.”

The seminary closed in the 1970s. In 1979, the Seminary property was sold to the United States Department of Labor and became the Delaware Valley Job Corps Training Center. At the center students between the ages of 16 and 24 received additional education in both academic and technical fields.
St. Joseph’s Seraphic Seminary, Callicoon, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard of the Historic Stone Arch Bridge published by photographer Otto Hillig of Liberty, New York.Hankins, N.Y.The charming Hankins Stone Arch Bridge depicted in this postcard was constructed in 1905 by John B. Inman, a local mason and quarryman, in order to link the hamlet of Hankins to the river community of Long Eddy. The single arch bridge crosses Hankins Creek just north of its confluence with the Delaware River. It is approximately 40 feet long, 15 feet wide and is made of local bluestone and Rosendale cement. The bridge remained a vital creek crossing for local traffic until 1973 when it was abandoned. The bridge, now open to pedestrian traffic only, has been restored and is home to a small roadside park. The historic bridge and the creek it spans are likely named in honor of John Hankins (1803-1847), who established the first permanent settlement here in 1835 with a home, store, sawmill and blacksmith’s shop. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The postcard was published by photographer Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1934.
Hankins, N.Y. (Hankins Stone Arch Bridge)

 

Vintage postcard of Summit Lake in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York.Summit Lake, Liberty, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts Summit Lake in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. The scene includes a family of four in a boat, as the young child paddles the vessel across the lake.

The postcard was published by photographer Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. It was manufactured in the United States. It was never mailed.
Summit Lake, Liberty, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard from photographer Otto Hillig showing the business district in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York.Part of Liberty’s Business Section, Liberty, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts the business district in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. The scene includes a number of businesses, including the Green Building, and an old-fashioned car. The Green Building, originally constructed in 1890, continues to serve as the central point in Liberty village.

The postcard was published by photographer Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. It was manufactured in the United States. It was never mailed.
Part of Liberty’s Business Section, Liberty, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard from photographer Otto Hillig showing North Main Street in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York.North Main Street, Liberty, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts North Main Street in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. The scene includes a number of businesses, including Nichol’s Garage and a variety store, several old-fashioned cars, a group of well-dressed men in suits and a policeman riding a horse in the middle of the street.

The postcard was published by photographer Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. It was manufactured in the United States. It was never mailed.
North Main Street, Liberty, N.Y.

 

Vintage postcard from photographer Otto Hillig showing North Main Street in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York.North Main Street at Liberty House, Liberty, N.Y.This vintage Catskills postcard depicts North Main Street in the village of Liberty in Sullivan County, New York. The scene includes a number of businesses, including a barber shop and a hotel, as well as several old-fashioned cars.

The postcard was published by photographer Otto Hillig located at Liberty, New York. It was manufactured in the United States. It was never mailed.
North Main Street at Liberty House, Liberty, N.Y.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) aerial architecture building Catskill Mountains Catskills gallery Hillig's Photo Studio landscapes Liberty Main Street New York Otto Hillig photographer photographs photography photos pictures portrait postcards studio Sullivan County https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/otto-hillig-new-photographs Sat, 19 Jun 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Three Rare Stereoviews from the E. & H. T. Anthony Company https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/three-rare-stereoviews-from-the-e-h-t-anthony-company The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new Catskills stereoviews by the E. & H. T. Anthony Company. They have all been added to the Anthony gallery, which now contains over 100 of the company’s Catskills works.

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony stereoview # 159 titled “The Kauterskill Fall, 180 ft. High.–Catskill Mountains” in “The Artistic Series.”The Kauterskill Fall, 180 ft. High.–Catskill Mountains. (# 159)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Artistic Series
Stereoview #: 159
Title: The Kauterskill Fall, 180 ft. High.–Catskill Mountains.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

The Kauterskill Fall, 180 ft. High.–Catskill Mountains. (# 159)

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 8548 titled “The Boulder on South Mountain” in the “Glens of the Catskills” series.The Boulder on South Mountain. (# 8548)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 8548
Title: The Boulder on South Mountain.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

The Boulder on South Mountain. (# 8548)

 

Vintage E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. stereoview # 9047 titled “The Laurel House at Kauterskill Falls” from “The Glens of the Catskills” series.The Laurel House at Kauterskill Falls. (# 9047)Publisher: E. & H. T. Anthony & Co.
Series name: The Glens of the Catskills
Stereoview #: 9047
Title: The Laurel House at Kauterskill Falls.

The E. & H. T. Anthony company was the largest 19th-century manufacturer and distributor of cameras and photographic supplies in the United States. The company was founded by Edward Anthony (1818-1888) and his brother Henry T. Anthony (1814-1884). Regionally, the company produced many of the greatest Catskills views of the 19th century. The Catskills stereoviews were incorporated into several series including “The Artistic Series,” “The Glens of the Catskills,” and “Winter in the Catskills.” Each of the photographs demonstrates the enduring beauty of the Catskills, being as equally compelling today as they were 150 years ago.

The Laurel House at Kauterskill Falls. (# 9047)

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountains Catskills E. & H. T. Anthony Edward Anthony Gems of American Scenery Glens of the Catskills Henry T. Anthony New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoviews The Artistic Series Winter in the Catskills https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/three-rare-stereoviews-from-the-e-h-t-anthony-company Sat, 12 Jun 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Burton Hine – Civil War Veteran and Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/burton-hine-civil-war-veteran-and-photographer Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

 

Burton Hine, Photographer.Burton Hine, Photographer.Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Burton Hine was born on October 9, 1842 in Meredith, New York. He was the son of Miles David Hine (1801-1876) and Julia F. (Rich) Hine (1808-1856). Miles and Julia, both born in Connecticut, married at Meredith on December 11, 1826 in a ceremony officiated by Rev. Mr. Fisher, pastor of the Congregational Society of Meredith.

Reverend William Fisher (1775-1840) served at the Meredith church for about 20 years (a different source says 16 years) from 1819 to 1839, presumably presiding over the early spiritual life of Miles and Julia Hine. Rev. Fisher’s father, Lieutenant Jonathan Fisher, died at Morristown, New Jersey while serving during the American Revolution. William was only 1 1/2 years old at the time of his father’s passing. He struggled, “prevented by a want of means,” but “by the labor of his own hands,” succeeded in gaining an education, graduating from Williams College in 1805. “As a preacher, he was warm and animated. He preached the doctrines of grace plainly and pointedly, and yet with much simplicity.” Due to poor health Rev. Fisher left Meredith in the late 1830s to reside with his oldest son at Indiana, where he farmed and continued to preach when his health allowed. Rev. William Fisher passed away on April 19, 1840, leaving behind his wife Rhoda and six children. The Congregational church at Meredith, having been established in 1815, was a long-standing member of the community, eventually becoming associated with the United Presbyterian denomination. For more information on the life and genealogy of Reverend William Fisher reference The Fisher Genealogy by Philip A. Fisher. (Fisher, Philip A. The Fisher Genealogy. Everett, Mass.: Massachusetts Publishing Company, 1898. p. 114, 195-196.)

Miles and Julia had five children including one daughter and four sons, namely Henrietta Rich Hine (1828-1897), Franklin Tracy Hine (1830-1864), Miles Hine jr. (1836-1899), our subject Burton Hine (1842-1905) and James Wilson Hine (1845-1903). Miles Hine, the father, passed away on January 5, 1876 and his wife Julia F. (Rich) Hine passed away on June 4, 1856.

Silas Hine (1764-1841), Burton’s grandfather, “was one of the early settlers of West Meredith, settling there in 1810, and rearing a family of twelve children.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 255.) Silas was born in Connecticut on January 8, 1764 and married Betsey Terrell (1767-1834). Silas passed away at Meredith on March 13, 1841. Betsey passed away at Meredith on February 26, 1834.

Ambrose Hine, Burton’s great-grandfather, was born at Milford, Connecticut, and was baptized on June 26, 1726. He first married Sarah Terrill of Anity, Connecticut, and second married Betsey Ford. Ambrose notably served in the American Revolution, answering the call in 1776 when he joined as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1st Company, 5th Battalion, Wadsworth’s Brigade under Colonel William Douglas. 1st Company was under the leadership of Captain Nathaniel Johnson of Derby, Connecticut. “This battalion was raised June, 1776, to re-inforce [sic] Washington’s Army at New York. It served in the city and on the Brooklyn front. It was at the battle of Long Island Aug. 27th, 1776. Retreated from New York Aug. 29-30th, 1776, was with the militia at Kips Bay, 34th St., East River, at the attack on New York Sept. 15th, 1776, and retreated at the battle of White Plains Oct. 28th, 1776. Time out Dec. 25th, 1776.” (Beach, Joseph Perkins. History of Cheshire, Connecticut from 1694 to 1840. Cheshire, CT: Lady Fenwick Chapter, D. A. R., 1912. p. 189.)

Captain Ambrose Hine then served as a company commander in Lieutenant Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin’s (1732-1788) Regiment at some point in 1777 and 1778. The unit “had been ordered to march to aid the Continental Army on the North River.” (Johnston, Henry P. The Record of Connecticut Men in the Military and Naval Service During the War of the Revolution 1775-1783. Hartford, Ct., 1889.) The unit has also “served with the Main Army at and near Peekskill in the State of New York.” (Collection of the Connecticut Historical Society. Volume 8. Hartford: Connecticut Historical Society, 1901.) Captain Hine also served in the 10th Militia Regiment in 1777, acting as the “Captain of the alarm list south company in the parish of New Cheshire in the 10th regiment in this State.” (Hoadly, Charles, J. The Public Records of the State of Connecticut, From October, 1776, to February, 1778, inclusive. Hartford, CT: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, 1894.)

The historic Ambrose Hine House is located at what is now 118 Cook Road in Prospect, Connecticut. The adjoining lands of the Highland Greens Golf Course were once owned and farmed by Hine. This is where he raised his nine children. Ambrose Hine passed away in 1794.

Looking even further back, the Hine family can trace its American roots to Thomas Hine (1621-1698), who lived at Milford, Connecticut by the year 1646. For more information about Hine family history and genealogy please reference Descendants of Thomas Hine, Milford, Conn. 1640 as written by Hon. Robert C. Hine.

On the 1855 New York State census Burton, age 12, was living at Meredith with his parents. They lived in a frame house valued at $200. His father, who was originally from Connecticut and had resided at Meredith for 38 years, was listed with an occupation of Farmer. Julia was shown as having lived at Meredith for 47 years, or her entire life.

 

Map of the Miles Hine, father of Burton Hine, homestead at Meredith in 1856.Map of the Miles Hine, father of Burton Hine, homestead at Meredith in 1856.Gould, Jay. Map of Delaware Co., New York. Philadelphia: Published by Collins G. Keeney, 1856. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2012593655/>. Map of the Miles Hine, father of Burton Hine, homestead at Meredith in 1856.

Gould, Jay. Map of Delaware Co., New York. Philadelphia: Published by Collins G. Keeney, 1856. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2012593655/>.

 

As for the family farm of Burton’s youth, the 1856 map of Delaware County by Jay Gould (1836-1892) provides some valuable insight as to the top agricultural products of the region and the era. Some leading agricultural products included butter, 4,025,575 lbs.; maple sugar, 313,302 pounds; apples, 239,210 bushels; oats, 416,659 bushels; hay, 103,895 tons; and wool, 136,659 pounds. There were many other products being produced as well including corn, potatoes, buckwheat, barley, turnips, cider, wine, cheese, hemp, hops and honey.

 

Residence of Miles Hine, Town of Meredith, Delaware Co., N. Y.Residence of Miles Hine, Town of Meredith, Delaware Co., N. Y.History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 249. "Residence of Miles Hine, Town of Meredith, Delaware Co., N. Y."

History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 249.

 

For their early education Burton and his siblings would have likely attended the Meredith District School No. 5, which had been founded in 1816. According to an 1855 report on the condition of the district schools, No. 5 was rated as “bad.” District trustees in 1855 included Miles Hine, Elias Warner and David Kemp, all of whom owned nearby farms. The Hine family farm and district school no. 5 were located near present day Route 14 near the intersection with Sunderland Road.

On the 1860 New York State census, Burton, age 17, was living at Meredith. He was listed with an occupation of Farm Laborer while living in the household of the Lewis and Burroughs (Burrows) families. As was customary for the time, with most schooling completed by 16 and sometimes earlier, the census reported that Burton had not attended school in the prior year.

Burton was a distinguished veteran of the Civil War having served for over three years with the famed 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at the age of 18 for three years in Company I on September 16, 1861 at Delhi, New York and mustered into service as a Private on October 21, 1861. Company I, known as the “Delaware Rifles,” was recruited primarily from the towns of Sidney, Kortright, Davenport, Meredith and Delhi in Delaware County, New York. Captain Theophilus L. England commanded Company I, while Colonel Harrison S. Fairchild commanded the 89th Regiment, New York (Foot) Volunteers.

 

Advertisement for the Delaware Riflemen, 89th Regiment, New York InfantryDelaware Riflemen!Captain England, Burton Hine’s company commander, was well respected for his leadership and bravery throughout his service. Theophilus was born on October 2, 1834, the son of Henry England (1807-1902), a dry goods store owner at Delhi. After the Civil War began, in 1861 “Theophilus became inspired by a patriotic zeal and loyalty. He began recruiting volunteers and soon a company of nearly one hundred men was raised.” (Raitt, John E. “Bi-Centennial Corner. In Memory of a Gallant Soldier.” Delaware Republican Express. February 12, 1976.) On February 17, 1863 Theophilus was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.

England died on June 18, 1864 while leading “a gallant charge of the Regiment” at the Battle of Petersburg in Virginia. Colonel Fairchild, Regimental Commander, wrote to LTC England’s father upon his death, stating “I much regret his loss, as he has always sustained me in the command of the Regiment, and was a brave and gallant officer.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England’s body was returned to Delhi, New York to a hero’s welcome, complete with a full honor guard. The funeral ceremony was held at Courthouse Square in the heart of Delhi village, “as none of the churches could have begun to hold the large concourse of people who had assembled to do honor to the gallant dead.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England is buried at Woodland Cemetery at Delhi, New York. When the Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) chapter was established at Delhi on March 11, 1884, it was named in his honor, being known as the England Post, No. 142, G. A. R.

Delaware Gazette, October 30, 1861.
Delaware Riflemen! Advertisement by Captain T. L. England to recruit Delaware County men into the 89th Regiment. Delaware Gazette, October 30, 1861.

 

Captain England, Burton’s company commander, was well respected for his leadership and bravery throughout his service. Theophilus was born on October 2, 1834, the son of Henry England (1807-1902), a dry goods store owner at Delhi. After the Civil War began, in 1861 “Theophilus became inspired by a patriotic zeal and loyalty. He began recruiting volunteers and soon a company of nearly one hundred men was raised.” (Raitt, John E. “Bi-Centennial Corner. In Memory of a Gallant Soldier.” Delaware Republican Express. February 12, 1976.) On February 17, 1863 Theophilus was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.

England died on June 18, 1864 while leading “a gallant charge of the Regiment” at the Battle of Petersburg in Virginia. Colonel Fairchild, Regimental Commander, wrote to LTC England’s father upon his death, stating “I much regret his loss, as he has always sustained me in the command of the Regiment, and was a brave and gallant officer.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England’s body was returned to Delhi, New York to a hero’s welcome, complete with a full honor guard. The funeral ceremony was held at Courthouse Square in the heart of Delhi village, “as none of the churches could have begun to hold the large concourse of people who had assembled to do honor to the gallant dead.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England is buried at Woodland Cemetery at Delhi, New York. When the Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) chapter was established at Delhi on March 11, 1884, it was named in his honor, being known as the England Post, No. 142, G. A. R.

Colonel Harrison Stiles Fairchild (1820-1901), Burton’s regimental commander, mustered into service as commander of the 89th Regiment on December 4, 1861. He brought significant prior military experience to his unit having previously served as Captain in the Rochester Light Guard for ten years from 1844 to 1854, as Colonel of the 54th Regiment of New York Militia from 1854 until the start of the Civil War and was a member of the Board of Military Examiners of the state of New York. For his leadership and bravery Fairchild was promoted to brevet Brigadier General on March 13, 1865. He was present at the surrender of General Lee in northern Virginia. He mustered out of the unit on August 3, 1865 at Richmond, Virginia. After the war he worked in Rochester, New York as a stockbroker, realtor and pension claims agent. Over the years he attended a number of the reunions of the 89th Regiment, where he was always well received. “He was considered a brave and gallant soldier. Although a severe disciplinarian, he was beloved by his men . . . He was described by his friends as dignified and courteous in manner, refined in his feelings and tastes, friendly and kind in disposition, and a staunch Republican.” (Brown. Richard G. “A Civil War Remembrance of Breveted Brigadier General Harrison Stiles Fairchild.” The Friends of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Volume 12, No. 4. Fall 1992.) Fairchild passed away on January 25, 1901 and is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester.

Local newspapers of the time often published the personal letters written by soldiers in the field and sent to their home families and friends. Around June 15, 1864 Burton wrote home to his brother about his experiences, a letter which was published in the Republican & Visitor of Delhi, N.Y. in their July 2, 1864 issue. Two of Burton’s brothers, 19-year-old James W. Hine and Miles jr. Hine, would enlist in August 1864, only two months after this letter.

 

“BEFORE PETERSBURG, June 15, 1864.

Dear Brother:– Having a few leisure moments at present, I will improve them by writing you a few lines, as I presume you are anxious to hear the news. Sunday night of the 19th inst., we left the army of the Potomac and marched to the White House, which our corps took transports and sailed to City Point, then up the Appomattox and landed at Point of Rocks. Early yesterday morning, having drawn our rations, we started towards Petersburg – our regiment taking the advance, and skirmishing all the way – driving the rebels slowly until nearly noon when we came in sight of Petersburg and the fortifications around it. Slowly and cautiously we crept toward them until nearly sundown, when our artillery opened on one of their main forts, and the 3d brigade of Burnham’s division, charged and took the fort, several prisoners and all its guns. This ended yesterday’s fighting with us. The loss on our side was not heavy. Our regiment lost in killed and wounded, two captains and about privates; the majority being wounded. Our company was fortunate and did not lose a man. I, however, was suddenly notified of the arrival of an unwelcome messenger – a musket ball striking the barrel of my gun with a few inches of the lock. No more to-day.

 

Saturday June 18th:– You will see by this date that I have passed over the two preceding days. I will merely state that on Thursday the 16th, our regiment was relieved from the front and sent to the rear for rest; the General acknowledging that the 89th had a hard day yesterday (15th). On the same day we were reinforced by the 2d and 9th army corps. At about midnight we were ordered out on picket again. Loss of the regiment – one killed, five wounded.

 

On the 17th we were relieved from picket by the 5th Ohio Colored Regiment, and marched back to where our division lay. Firing heavy at night. To-day I have sad news to communicate. Our division started on in the advance, early – driving the enemy slowly all the forenoon; our regiment supporting a battalion of heavy artillery. At about 4 o’clock P. M. we charged the rebels, and drove them, but with heavy loss. Our Lieutenant Colonel fell, at the head of his regiment, shot through the head. In losing him we have lost one whose bravery none can dispute. I was within six feet of him, and as he fell, I asked him if he was shot, but no answer – he was dead. We cared for him as well as we could until night, when four others with myself, carried him a mile, to the rear. Of our company, four were wounded, viz: Orderly Dixon, Sergeant Fiebig, John Thompson and William Stott.– How seriously wounded, do not as yet know. We are nearly worn out – having had nothing to eat during the whole day.

 

Truly your brother,

BURTON HINE

Co. I, 89th N. Y. V.”

 

Burton was promoted to Corporal on February 25, 1863. He valiantly fought in many fierce battles including South Mountain (September 14, 1862), Antietam (September 17, 1862), Fredericksburg (December 11-15, 1862), Suffolk (April 11 to May 4, 1863), siege of Charleston (July 18, 1863 to September 7, 1863) and Cold Harbor (May 31 to June 12, 1864). Burton Hine was honorably discharged on October 20, 1864 after having served for 3 years, 1 month and 4 days.

All three of Burton’s brothers also honorably served during the Civil War, including Franklin Tracy Hine, James W. Hine and Miles Hine, Jr. While Burton had served in the 89th Regiment, his three brothers all served in the 144th Regiment.

Franklin Tracy Hine, Burton’s older brother, was born at Meredith on July 27, 1830. He was married to Betsey Ann Maxfield, with whom he had two children, Willis Tracy (b. 1854) and Albert Fulford Hine (b. 1857). He was working as a wagon maker in 1855 and then as a farmer in 1860.

At the age of 32 Franklin enlisted for three years in Company C, 144th Regiment on August 13, 1862 at Meredith and mustered into service on September 27, 1862. The company was led by Captain James Lewis, and the 144th Regiment was led by Colonel Robert S. Hughston. Enlisting as a Sergeant, he was promoted to 1st Sergeant on March 23, 1863, to 2nd Lieutenant on August 30, 1863 and to 1st Lieutenant on November 25, 1864. Franklin was mortally wounded at the Battle of Honey Hill in today’s Beaufort County, South Carolina. The Battle of Honey Hill took place on November 30, 1864 and was the third battle during Sherman’s famous March to the Sea. “This was when we were advancing to the battle of Honey Hill. Soon after we became engaged, 1st Lieut. Frank T. Hine, commanding Co. I, color company, was severely wounded in the knee joint by a musket ball, (afterward died of wound.)” (McKee, James Harvey. Back “In War Times.” History of The 144th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry.” Lieut. Horace E. Bailey, 1903. p. 262.) First Lieutenant Franklin’s leg was amputated and he died of his wounds on December 20, 1864 at the hospital in Beaufort, South Carolina. The Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) post at Franklin, New York (post No. 132) was named in his honor. Franklin Tracy Hine is buried at the Croton Union Cemetery at Treadwell, New York.

James W. Hine, Burton’s younger brother, was born on April 23, 1845. He married Emma E. Barnum in 1869, with whom he had four children, including James Edward (b. 1870), Ruby Elizabeth (b. 1873), Katherine Genevieve (b. 1878) and a daughter with name unknown (b. 1889). At the tender age of 19 he enlisted as a Private in Company C, 144th New York Infantry on August 11, 1864 at Norwich, New York. The unit mustered into service on August 11, 1864. During his service “he was appointed Corresponding Clerk at the headquarters of the Southern Department under Gens. Foster and Gilmore, a position he held until he mustered out in June, 1865.” He was discharged on June 25, 1865 at Hilton Head, South Carolina upon the expiration of his service commitment.

After the war, in 1867 James Hine moved west to Kent County, Michigan. He first worked as a druggist for three years, and then became the owner of the Lowell Journal, a local newspaper. He was a frequent newspaper contributor “under the peculiarly comical title of Jimcrax.” He also served as the Lowell postmaster for about seven years and held several positions in state politics, including being elected representative to the Michigan state senate. He later worked as an editorial writer for the Detroit Journal; and then owned and edited the Tecumseh News for three years.

 

James W. HineJames W. Hine, brother of photographer Burton Hine.James W. Hine was born on April 23, 1845. He married Emma E. Barnum in 1869, with whom he had four children, including James Edward (b. 1870), Ruby Elizabeth (b. 1873), Katherine Genevieve (b. 1878) and a daughter with name unknown (b. 1889). At the tender age of 19 he enlisted as a Private in Company C, 144th New York Infantry on August 11, 1864 at Norwich, New York. The unit mustered into service on August 11, 1864. During his service “he was appointed Corresponding Clerk at the headquarters of the Southern Department under Gens. Foster and Gilmore, a position he held until he mustered out in June, 1865.” He was discharged on June 25, 1865 at Hilton Head, South Carolina upon the expiration of his service commitment.

After the war, in 1867 James Hine moved west to Kent County, Michigan. He first worked as a druggist for three years, and then became the owner of the Lowell Journal, a local newspaper. He was a frequent newspaper contributor “under the peculiarly comical title of Jimcrax.” He also served as the Lowell postmaster for about seven years and held several positions in state politics, including being elected representative to the Michigan state senate. He later worked as an editorial writer for the Detroit Journal; and then owned and edited the Tecumseh News for three years.

In the 1881 publication History of Kent County, Michigan, James W. Hine was positively profiled. “In this brief review, just sufficient notice has been given to convey an idea of what may be accomplished by a man still young. Here we learn how, as a youth, he served in the war for the Union, a little later entered commercial life in a Western village, and more recently conducted a political journal with so much decent ability as to win for himself a substantial recognition at the hands of the political party to which his political faith attaches itself. His continued observance of refined and liberal social principles, and a high standard of journalistic ability, will still bring him great honors in his private and public life.” (History of Kent County, Michigan. Chicago: Chas. C. Chapman & Co., 1881. p. 434-435.)

James W. Hine passed away after a second attack of paralysis on April 4, 1903 at Detroit, Michigan. He left behind his widow and three daughters: Ruby Hine Booth, of Spearfish, South Dakota; Katherine, a teacher of mathematics at Western Reserve college in Ohio; and Helen R., “now at school and living with her sister at Spearfish, South Dakota.” (“Col. Hine Died at Harper.” Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1903.)
Portrait of James W. Hine, brother of photographer Burton Hine. Detroit Free Press, April 5, 1903.

 

In the 1881 publication History of Kent County, Michigan, James W. Hine was positively profiled. “In this brief review, just sufficient notice has been given to convey an idea of what may be accomplished by a man still young. Here we learn how, as a youth, he served in the war for the Union, a little later entered commercial life in a Western village, and more recently conducted a political journal with so much decent ability as to win for himself a substantial recognition at the hands of the political party to which his political faith attaches itself. His continued observance of refined and liberal social principles, and a high standard of journalistic ability, will still bring him great honors in his private and public life.” (History of Kent County, Michigan. Chicago: Chas. C. Chapman & Co., 1881. p. 434-435.)

James W. Hine passed away after a second attack of paralysis on April 4, 1903 at Detroit, Michigan. He left behind his widow and three daughters: Ruby Hine Booth, of Spearfish, South Dakota; Katherine, a teacher of mathematics at Western Reserve college in Ohio; and Helen R., “now at school and living with her sister at Spearfish, South Dakota.” (“Col. Hine Died at Harper.” Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1903.)

Miles Hine, Jr. (1836-1899), Burton’s older brother, was born in Meredith on April 13, 1836. His occupation prior to the war was as a peddler and later manufactured whips. At age 28, Miles Jr., enlisted in Company U, 144th New York Infantry on August 27, 1864 at Meredith and mustered into service on September 3, 1864. Miles was later transferred to Company A, 1st Battalion, 1st New York Engineers on October 6, 1864. Miles mustered out of service on June 25, 1865 at Hilton Head, South Carolina.

Prior to the war Miles married Mary Ellen Stilson on November 17, 1857. They had one child, Julia Alida, who was born in 1859 but passed away at the three years of age on February 10, 1863. Miles was “a prominent citizen of Treadwell . . . Mr. Hine was a veteran of the war for the Union and was held in very high respect. He was successful in business having accumulated a good property as a dealer in whips and used it generously in advancing the interests of his town and of the Baptist church of which he was a devoted member.” (Delaware Gazette. August 30, 1899.) Miles died at the age of 63 on August 25, 1899 at the hamlet of Croton (now Treadwell) in the town of Franklin, Delaware County, New York. He is buried at the Croton Union Cemetery at Treadwell, New York.

Henrietta Rich (Hine) Bush, Burton’s sister, was born in the town of Meredith on April 8, 1828. She married Abram Bush (1823-1902) at age 20 on October 4, 1848. Abram worked as a merchant and tailor. They first lived at Croton, New York but moved to the village of Franklin in 1858. Henrietta passed away at 68 years of age on February 21, 1897. She was a prominent member of the Methodist church. She is buried at Ouleout Cemetery in Franklin, New York.

On the 1865 New York State census Burton, age 22, was residing at Meredith in the household of Isaac and Jenett Brownwell. He was listed an occupation of “Hired Man.”

Within a couple of years after the end of the war, in 1867, Burton opened his own photography gallery at the village of Franklin. “The new photograph rooms of Burton Hine are fitted up neatly, in good style, and have an air of thrift and enterprise about them that means business and success.” (Oneonta Herald. May 29, 1867.) The Delaware Republican wrote that “A new Photograph Gallery has just been opened by Mr. Burton Hine, and judging from his specimens, he is a capital artist.” (Delaware Republican. June 8, 1867.)

The Oneonta Herald wrote on August 21, 1867 that at the village of Franklin “Burton Hine is selling some fine photographs of Rev. Dr. Kerr at 25 cts each. He will send them by mail-prepaid to any address on receipt of price.”

Rev. Dr. George Kerr was the long time and much esteemed principal of the Delaware Literary Institute, a popular secondary school at Franklin that operated from 1835 to 1902. The Institute, located in the heart of the village of Franklin, was for many years considered “one of the most prominent educational institutions of New York State, sending graduates to Harvard, Yale, Mr. Holyoke and Smith.” Dr. Kerr ably led the Institute from 1846 to 1860. In addition to being the principal Kerr was also the instructor for Greek Language and Metaphysics. Newspaper articles with praise for the teaching and leadership of Dr. Kerr were frequent. After leaving the Delaware Literary Institute Dr. Kerr later served as Chair of Philosophy, Mathematics and Astronomy at the State Agricultural College at Ovid in Seneca County and then as principal of the Cooperstown Seminary. When Dr. Kerr decided to leave the Institute after his long service there were several public pronouncements of his impact on the school and the broader community.

 

“Dr. Kerr has been for fifteen years the distinguished and successful Principal of the Delaware Literary Institute at Franklin, and the news of his resignation of that position will be received by the thousands that love him, and have known him as we have, with unmingled regret. No educator in the State has done a nobler work and none will leave more ineffaceable marks of his labors to perpetuate his name. Combining great industry with a dauntless will, and the enthusiasm of the scholar with the very highest conceptions of Learning as a power in the world, he has toiled on there through the years, in that dear sweet village of Franklin, until legions of pupils start with joy at the very sound of his name. His influence for good upon that army of students, human estimates will never measure. It is felt and seen in the high purposes and noble lives of those students as wave after wave has carried them out upon the stormy ocean of real life, and as they do their work in every State of the Union – in the new Territories and on the far-off islands of the sea.” (The Ovid Bee. November 14, 1860.)

 

Delaware Literary Institute in 1869.Delaware Literary Institute in 1869.The Delaware Literary Institute was a popular secondary school at Franklin that operated from 1835 to 1902. The Institute, located in the heart of the village of Franklin, was for many years considered “one of the most prominent educational institutions of New York State, sending graduates to Harvard, Yale, Mr. Holyoke and Smith.”

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York : from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34

Delaware Literary Institute in 1869.

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York : from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34.

 

In 1868 Hine advertised his gallery in the April 29, 1868 issue of the Oneonta Herald. “Just Look at This! I HAVE purchased the entire large stock of negatives taken by N. A. Beers, and am prepared to furnish copies from the same at $2.00 PER DOZEN. All orders by mail or otherwise will receive prompt attention. BURTON HINE. Photographer, Franklin, N.Y. Feb. 9th 1868.”

 

Burton Hine, Photograph Gallery, Franklin, NYBurton Hine, Photograph Gallery, Franklin, NYBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

Oneonta Herald, April 29, 1868.
Just Look at This! Burton Hine advertisement. Oneonta Herald, April 29, 1868.

 

N. A. Beers, an “accomplished photograph artist,” operated his Franklin gallery as the “Beers’ Gallery of Art” since at least 1864, working out of the village post office building. Beers advertised that he had “been connected with some of the best rooms in New York City, and in the country” and that his services included photographs, ambrotypes, ferotypes and “all other sun pictures.”

 

N. A. Beers, photographer advertisementN. A. Beers, photographer advertisementN. A. Beers, an “accomplished photograph artist,” operated his Franklin gallery as the “Beers’ Gallery of Art” since at least 1864, working out of the village post office building. Beers advertised that he had “been connected with some of the best rooms in New York City, and in the country” and that his services included photographs, ambrotypes, ferotypes and “all other sun pictures.”

Bloomville Mirror, December 27, 1864.
N. A. Beers advertisement, “New Photograph Institute!” Bloomville Mirror, December 27, 1864.

 

Interestingly, J. W. Hine, Burton’s brother, was also likely a photographer, perhaps for a relatively brief time, and was possibly was a partner of N. A. Beers. The following advertisement was placed in the Oneonta Herald in their July 3, 1867 issue, which was only three months before J. W. (James) would leave New York for his new home in Michigan.

 

“AVERY’S PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS OF FRANKLIN! LARGE (11 by 14) Views of the Village of Franklin; also Stereoscopic and Card or Album Size of the Episcopal Church, Boarding Hall Institute, Chapel and Presbyterian Church, made to order and sent by mail on receipt of price.

Large View . . . $1.00 each.

Stereoscopic Views . . . 40c each.

Card Views . . . 25c each.

Address N. A. Beers, J. W. Hine, Franklin; A. S. Avery, Morris, N.Y.”

 

Avery's Photographic ViewsAvery's Photographic ViewsBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

J. W. Hine, as included in the advertisement, was the brother of photographer Burton Hine.

Oneonta Herald, July 3, 1867.
Avery’s Photographer Views. Oneonta Herald, July 3, 1867.

 

A devastating fire in the village of Franklin destroyed an entire block of buildings and offices in February 1869. The fire originated from the stove pipe on the upper floor of the Bush Bros’ clothing store located in the center of the block and quickly spread. Photographer Burton Hine lost $600 worth of equipment during the fire, but was fortunately insured for $500. Temporarily after the fire Burton operated in the Kneeland Bros. building.

 

Map of the Franklin business district in 1869.Map of the Franklin business district in 1869.Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34 Map of the Franklin business district in 1869.

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34

 

Burton, of Franklin, married Harriet Adelia Strong, of Meredith, on September 14, 1869 in a ceremony performed by Rev. J. J. Hough. The ceremony took place at Meredith. The officiant, Reverend Joel Jackson Hough (1835-1897), an 1859 graduate of Yale University, served at the First Congregational Church at Franklin from 1867 to 1873. After leaving Franklin Hough served at churches in Danbury, Connecticut; Antwerp, New York; and Berkshire, New York. He received a Doctor of Divinity honorary degree from Whitman College in 1897. Reverend Hough passed away at 62 years of age from diabetes in Berkshire, New York on September 24, 1897.

Burton’s wife Harriet, born July 24, 1846, was the daughter of Lemuel and Harriet M. Strong. The History of Delaware County, N.Y., published in 1880, contained a brief summary about Lemuel Strong, Harriet’s father. “Lemuel Strong, a native of Meredith Square, removed in infancy to the farm where his life was passed, and where his death occurred October 1st, 1879. He held several public offices, but of late years declined every offer of political preferment, choosing rather the round of domestic pleasures and duties, which the care of his large farm brought to him. He married January 6th, 1841, Harriet, daughter of Pearse Mitchell. They have had six children:- Homer, who died in 1850, aged eight years; Hattie B., Sarah A. and Lemuel, jr., who died of diphtheria in 1863, within a few days of each other, aged six, fourteen and eleven years; Chauncey, born April 4th, 1844, and Adelia, born July 24th, 1846, married to Burton Hine, of Walton. Mrs. Strong survives her husband, and resides with her son on the old homestead.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 255.)

Harriet’s mother and Burton’s mother-in-law, Harriet M. Strong, passed away in 1911. “Mrs. Harriet M. Strong died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Burton Hine, in Walton, Dec. 3, aged 94 years. She was the daughter of Pearce [Pierce, 1781-1854] and [Abigail] Nabby Mitchell [1789-1888], who were early settlers on Elk Creek. Her husband, Lemuel Strong of Meredith, died about 20 years ago. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Hine of Walton and one son, Chauncey Strong of Oneonta. Two brothers, Hudson Mitchell of California, and Marshall Mitchell of Delhi and a sister, Mrs. Sarah M. Griswold also of Delhi survive her. Mrs. Strong was in many ways a most remarkable woman and most highly respected. The funeral was held in Walton Wednesday and burial Thursday at Meredith Square.” (Delaware Gazette. December 13, 1911.)

Burton and Harriet Hine had one son Lemuel Strong Hine and one daughter, Hattie Julia (Hine) Lewis. Lemuel Strong Hine was born on December 28, 1874. Lemuel enlisted in the military during the Spanish-American War. He served from May 1, 1898 to February 25, 1899 as a Corporal with Company F, 1st NY Infantry. He was first stationed at the Presidio in California and then in Honolulu, Hawaii. For his civilian career Lemuel worked as a successful plumber. According to his World War I draft card, Lemuel was of medium height, medium build and had light brown hair. In 1901 Lemuel married Lillian Gilbert (1879-1964), daughter of William and Catherine White Gilbert. Lemuel passed away from a heart attack at 65 years of age on January 14, 1940 and is buried at Walton Cemetery.

Hattie Julia (Hine) Lewis was born in 1870. She married Harry Knowles Lewis (1872-1925). Harry worked as a farmer, as superintendent with the Borden Milk Company and as an instructor at the State School of Agriculture at Delhi. He was well liked at the school, “where his faithful and efficient services were highly prized.” (Stamford Mirror-Recorder. July 29, 1925.) Harry passed away in 1925 following a nervous breakdown and an attempted suicide by slashing his throat. In 1928, three years after his passing, at the graduation ceremony for the state school at Delhi, alumni presented a bronze tablet to his memory. Hattie Lewis passed away in 1948 is buried at Walton Cemetery.

In 1870 Burton worked together with several other photographers to advertise their copying and retouching services. The following advertisement was featured in an 1870 issue of the Bloomville Mirror. “FOR THE HOLIDAYS. IF You want the finest retouched photograph of yourself, or one copied from the smallest or poorest picture possible, into a splendid portrait of any size, in oil or water colors, or India Ink, don’t ask [sp?], but inquire particulars of B. Fitch & Co. Delhi; S. B. Champion, Bloomville; E. Gage, Photographer, Walton; E. O. Covill, Stamford; W. S. Foote, Hobart, B. Hine, Franklin; O Friot [sp?], Oneonta; Wheeler, Unadilla; C. C. Williams, Margaretville. They will take orders and give all information required, or you can send orders direct by mail or express to Geo. H. Johnson, 1288 Broadway, New York. The beautiful porcelain pictures of all styles, frames and fittings furnished at New York prices.”

In addition to his photography business in 1870 Burton became the sole agent for the sale of the Weed Sewing Machine at the village of Franklin. Other local agents included McMurdy & Bro. at Hobart, N. O. Flint at Delhi, Dr. Geo. Parsons at Walton and J. I. Strong at Meredith. The machine was marketed in Delaware County as a “F. F., or Family Favorite!” Local advertisements highlighted the many prizes won by the Weed sewing machine, which was first patented by Theodore E. Weed in 1854. The Weed Sewing Machine Company operated from 1863 to 1891.

On the 1870 United States census Burton, age 27, was residing in the town of Franklin with his wife Harriet, age 23. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Photographer.” Their personal estate was valued at $1,500.

 

Burton Hine, 1870 United States CensusBurton Hine, Photographer, 1870 United States CensusBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer. Burton Hine, 1870 United States Census.

 

Burton and Harriet moved from Franklin to Walton several years after their marriage in 1871.

The 31st Annual Fair of the Delaware County Agricultural Society took place at Walton on September 26-28, 1871. In Class No. 20, Burton Hine was awarded a premium for “best exhibition photographs.”

 

Map of the Walton business district in 1869.Map of the Walton business district in 1869.Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34 Map of the Walton business district in 1869.

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34

 

Burton placed the following advertisement in the Delaware Republican, a local newspaper, in 1872. “Hine’s Photograph Gallery! Walton, N.Y., IS turning out Pictures equal to any Gallery in the State – All of the Latest New York styles of pictures at the Lowest Prices. He has also a large Stock of Oval, Black Walnut Rosewood and Rustic Frames, Stereoscopes, Picture Cord and Picture Nails. Pictures of all kinds framed to order from a well-selected stock of Black Walnut, Rosewood, Gilt and Rustic Mouldings. At Prices which Defy Competition. Walton, August 19, 1872. 640m3 BURTON HINE.”

 

Hine's Photograph Gallery, Walton, NYHine's Photograph Gallery, Walton, NYBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

Delaware Republican, 1872.
“Hine's Photograph Gallery!” advertisement. Delaware Republican, 1872.

 

Hine was widely known for publishing his popular series of stereoviews titled “Views in and about Walton.” A number of these stereoviews are viewable as part of the digital collections of the New York Public Library.

 

Delaware Street, looking west."Delaware Street, looking west." Burton Hine, Photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "Delaware Street, looking west" is from his "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Delaware Street, looking west." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc0-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Delaware Street, looking west."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Delaware Street, looking west." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc0-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

"East Brook and Pine Hill." Burton Hine, photographer"East Brook and Pine Hill." Burton Hine, photographerThis Burton Hine stereoview titled "East Brook and Pine Hill" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "East Brook and Pine Hill." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"East Brook and Pine Hill."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "East Brook and Pine Hill." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

"Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." Burton Hine, photographer."Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." Burton Hine, photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "Group portrait of women sitting on grass in front of a house" was from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddb8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddb8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

North Street, looking south from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographer.North Street, looking south from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "“North Street, looking south from Fitch Street" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking south from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbe-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
“North Street, looking south from Fitch Street.”

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking south from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbe-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

On the 1875 New York State census Burton, age 33, was residing at the village of Walton. The household included his wife Addie, age 27, their daughter Hattie, age 3 1/2 and their son Lemuel S., age 5 months. Burton’s occupation was listed as “Photographer.”

 

Burton Hine, 1875 New York State CensusBurton Hine, Photographer, 1875 New York State CensusBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer. Burton Hine, 1875 New York State Census.

 

Sometime between 1875, at the time of the New York census, and circa 1877 Burton gave up his photography business. In 1877-79 Burton Hine was serving as a constable and deputy sheriff for Delaware County. In executing his official enforcement responsibilities, Hine faced numerous challenges, as seen in the following newspaper articles.

 

“Deputy Sheriff Hine commenced selling at auction the goods in the Empire Store, lately occupied by Simpson and Russell, last Thursday. The goods sold low, as a general thing less than the appraisal, but the sales last week amounted to more than $3,000. No sale Monday and Tuesday, but it began again Wednesday forenoon.– Walton Chronicle.” (Delaware Gazette. May 23, 1877.)

 

“On Monday, Deputy-Sheriff Hine attempted to levy on the goods and chattels of J. Wilbur, at the steam mill. Wilbur objected, claiming the property belonged to his wife, and held on to a belt which Hine had hold of. Hine struck Wilbur with the belt. Wilbur swore out a warrant against the sheriff, and had him arrested from assault and battery. Hine waived an examination, and gave bail to appear before the Grand Jury. G. O. Mead and N. G. Eells, were his bondsmen.-Walton Chronicle Jan. 2” (“Delaware County.” Stamford Mirror. January 7, 1879.)

 

In 1879 Burton again changed careers, this time becoming a farmer. “Burton Hine has bought the Duffie farm, late Wm. Weissmer’s; possession to be had Dec. 15th. This farm lies on the river, about three miles below this village, and contains thirty acres of land with good buildings. Consideration $2,250 for the farm, and $350 for personal property on the farm. Mr. Duffie moves into the house which Mr. Hine leaves in this village.” (The Herald. Hancock, NY. December 11, 1879.)

On the 1880 United States census Burton, age 37, was residing in the town of Walton. The household included his wife H. Adelia, age 34; their daughter Hattie J., age 10; and their son Lemuel S., age 5. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

In addition to his business impact on the Walton village Burton Hine was also a prominent and influential civic-minded member of the community. After the Civil War a society of veterans was established with the organization of The Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.). In Delaware County the group operated as the England Post, No. 142, G. A. R. The veterans group conducted a number of reunions around Delaware County beginning in 1880 and taking place annually over the succeeding years. In 1881 Burton was chosen Chairman “for the purpose of initiating a general reunion of Delaware County soldiers during the coming summer.” (Delaware Gazette. March 30, 1881.) The 1883 reunion was held at Windsor, Broome County; the 1884 reunion was held at Unadilla, Otsego County; the 1885 reunion was held at Delhi, Delaware County; and the 1886 reunion was held at Guilford, Chenango County. In 1888 Burton was appointed as Aid-de-camp on the staff of General N. M. Curtiss, Department Commander of the G. A. R.

In 1882 Burton, along with Lewis Marvin, both of Walton, were delegates to the Republican County convention held at Kiff’s Hotel on September 12. They met “for the purpose of electing State and Congressional delegations.” (The Delaware Republican. 1882.) In 1883 Burton served as an Inspector of Election for the town of Walton. As a Walton farmer Burton was active in the Delaware County Milk Producers’ Association, and had served as Secretary. He was elected vice-president of the Walton Farmers’ and Dairymen’s Association at the time of the group’s founding.

In 1883 Burton expanded his land holdings with the purchase of another farm. “Burton Hine has bought of Mrs. John Andrews, her farm of forty-two acres, on Bob’s Brook, town of Walton, for $550. Immediate possession given of the farm, but Mrs. Andrews retains possession of the house and garden until fall.” (Stamford Mirror. May 1, 1883.) Bob’s Brook Road is located off of Route 10, southwest from the village of Walton.

 

"Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street.""Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street." Burton Hine, Photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mead? Street, Walton, looking west from North Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mead? Street, Walton, looking west from North Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

North Street, looking north from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographerNorth Street, looking north from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographerThis Burton Hine stereoview titled "North Street, looking north from Fitch Street" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking north from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbc-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"North Street, looking north from Fitch Street."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking north from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbc-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

"Townsend Street, looking north." Burton Hine, photographer"Townsend Street, looking north." Burton Hine, photographerThis Burton Hine stereoview titled "Townsend Street, looking north" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Townsend Street, looking north." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddba-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Townsend Street, looking north."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Townsend Street, looking north." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddba-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

On the 1892 New York State census Burton, age 50, was residing in the town of Walton. The household included his wife Adelia H, their daughter Hattie, age 22, and their son Lemuel, age 18. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

On the 1900 United States census Burton, age 58, was residing in the won of Walton. The household included his wife H. Adelia, age 54. The census shows that Burton was born in October 1842 and that Harriet was born in July 1846. The census also shows that H. Adelia had two children, both then living. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

Burton Hine passed away at the age of 62 on April 13, 1905. He had been in poor health for several months before his passing. He was the last of his family of four brothers and one sister to pass away. Upon his passing he left behind his wife Harriet and two children, Lemuel S. Hine of Hamden, New York and Mrs. Harry K. Lewis of Hamden, New York. Harriet Adelia Hine passed away on October 16, 1928. Both Burton and Harriet are buried at Walton Cemetery.

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Burton Hine please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) 89th Regiment A. S. Avery Ambrose Hine Burton Hine Civil War constable Delaware County farmer Franklin T. Hine gallery George Kerr Harriet Adelia Hine Harrison S. Fairchild Hattie Julia (Hine) Lewis James W. Hine Lemuel Strong Hine Meredith Miles Hine N. A. Beers New York photographer photography sheriff Silas Hine soldier Theophilus L. England Views in and about Walton Walton https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/6/burton-hine-civil-war-veteran-and-photographer Sat, 05 Jun 2021 12:00:00 GMT
On the Road Again: Ultimate Road Trip # 9 https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/on-the-road-again-ultimate-road-trip-9 The latest iteration of the Ultimate Road Trip music mix series was made live in the fall of 2020. In October of that year, I took a fantastic 4-day weekend to the Catskills, lodging in the Tannersville area. The autumn colors that season were the best that they had been in many years. Coupled with near perfect weather, I had an extremely productive trip with photography shoots at Sunset Rock, Notch Lake, Pratt Rock, Dolan Lake, Old Mill Falls, Platte Clove and Hunter Mountain, as well as other random locations along the way.

 

Although I am still working my way through the photographs from that trip, I have included a few that have been processed thus far.

 

 

1.  Guaranteed – Eddie Vedder

2.  Society – Eddie Vedder

3.  Sedona – Houndmouth

4.  Downbound Train – The Smithereens

5.  Something Big – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

6.  Into the Black – Chromatics

7.  Daylight – Mandolin Orange

8.  And It’s Still Alright – Nathaniel Rateliff

9.  Tecumseh Valley – Jason Isbell & Elizabeth Cook

10. Pancho and Lefty – Jason Isbell & Elizabeth Cook

11. Life’s for the Living – Passenger

12. By and By – Caamp

13. Mad World – Michael Andrews

14. Bright Beginnings – Joe Pug

15. Amarillo by Morning – Josiah and the Bonnevilles

 

 

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek within the 280-acre Platte Clove Preserve, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls.Old Mill FallsOld Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls. The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way south to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
Old Mill Falls

 

Old Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek within the 280-acre Platte Clove Preserve, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls.Autumn Leaves at Old Mill FallsOld Mill Falls, located on the Plattekill Creek, is a charming 15-foot waterfall located just upstream from the top of Plattekill Falls. The stone wall remnants of an old mill, thus the name of the falls, are located on both sides of the creek just below the falls. The Long Path crosses the Plattekill Creek just upstream from Old Mill Falls as the 358-mile trail makes its way south to Indian Head Mountain, Twin Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and beyond.

Old Mill Falls are located on the Platte Clove Preserve, which is owned by the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (CCCD), a regional conservation and advocacy group founded in 1969. The 280-acre area was donated in 1975 by the Griswold family. The CCCD maintains an artist retreat at the Preserve, which you pass at the beginning of the hike to Plattekill Falls. Artists, painters, writers, composers and, yes, photographers can apply for short-term summer residencies here, surrounded by the beauty that is Platte Clove.

Platte Clove, also known as Platte Kill Clove, is a deep, dark, heavily wooded, historic, wildly rugged and wonderfully scenic mountain pass through the northern Catskills. Charles Lanman, a noted American writer and artist who spent much time in the clove, described his impressions in 1844: “Plauterkill Clove is an eddy of the great and tumultuous world, and in itself a world of unwritten poetry, whose primitive loveliness has not yet been disfigured by the influences of mammon, and God grant that it may continue so forever. It is endeared to my heart for being a favourite haunt for solitude, and for having been consecrated by a brotherhood of friends to the pure religion of nature; and they always enter there as into a holy sanctuary.”

With Plattekill Mountain encroaching from the south and Kaaterskill High Peak looming to the north, a narrow and winding two-lane road precipitously crosses the eastern portion of the clove, rising over 1,400 feet from West Saugerties in only 2.1 miles. There are no guardrails despite the nearly vertical cliffs along much of the drive. The climb is so dangerously steep that it is closed in the winter from November 15th to April 15th as the town provides no maintenance.

Platte Clove is home to, depending on who’s counting, over 18 waterfalls, many of which are only reachable with extreme caution and effort and is not recommended. There are fatalities in the clove area just about every year. Old Mill Falls and the clove’s showpiece waterfall, the beautiful Plattekill Falls, are easily and safely accessible.
Old Mill Falls

 

Rich fall colors of the autumn season can be seen throughout Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Kaaterskill Clove, Fall ColorsKaaterskill Clove is a deep gorge that cuts through the northern Catskills Mountains, with the village of Palenville located at the base of the Clove and the village of Haines Falls located at its head. The clove is formed by Kaaterskill and Lake Creeks, with the gorge cutting as deep as 2,500 feet in places.

South Mountain forms the north wall of the clove. Prospect Mountain, located west of Lake Creek, looms over the upper part of the Clove near Bastion Falls. Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top Mountain form the south wall of the clove, with the Long Path traversing much of its length. The south wall is also home to the Wildcat Ravine, Buttermilk Ravine and Santa Cruz Ravine. The south wall, at its head, culminates at Twilight Park, a private residential community that offers magnificent views of the entire clove. The entire length of the Clove is traversed by Route 23A.

The splendid colors of autumn can be seen throughout the clove with its numerous hiking trails that offer access to overlooks with outstanding views. Notable examples include the Escarpment trail that takes the hiker along the north wall to viewpoints such as Inspiration Point and Sunset Rock, the viewpoints at Palenville Overlook and Indian Head near the entrance of the clove, as well as Poet’s Ledge on the south wall. The clove is also home to countless other scenic wonders such as Moore’s Bridge Falls, Fawn’s Leap, Bastion Falls, the Five Cascades and Kaaterskill Falls.
Kaaterskill Clove

 

The private residential community of Twilight Park at Haines Falls in the northern Catskills are set at the head of Kaaterskill Clove amidst brilliant autumn colors.Twilight Park, Fall ColorsTwilight Park is a private residential community located at the head of Kaaterskill Clove near the village of Haines Falls in the northern Catskills. It offers dramatic views of Kaaterskill Clove, Haines Falls and the Hudson River. Charles Wingate, a journalist and civil/sanitary engineer, founded the park on land purchased from Charles Haines, owner of the Haines Falls House, in August 1887, with construction beginning soon thereafter. By 1888 there were 5 cottages; by 1889 there were 15 cottages; by 1890 there were 26 cottages; and by 1892 there were 49 cottages, 3 inns and 300 residents. In 1935 the adjacent Santa Cruz Park was incorporated into Twilight Park. Haines Falls, a beautiful 150-foot waterfall, is located on the west end of the property. Today Twilight Park is one of three remaining private communities in the area, the other two being Onteora Park and Elka Park. The Twilight Park Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In this photograph the homes at Twilight Park can be seen sitting on their lofty perch amidst a wall of autumn colors. You can visit the community’s website at www.twilightpark.com for more information about its history, the annual art show or the occasional real estate that becomes available for purchase.
Twilight Park, Fall Colors

 

Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville, New York at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove in the northern Catskills.Gloria Dei Church at Entrance to Kaaterskill CloveThe Gloria Dei Church located in Palenville at the entrance to Kaaterskill Clove had its cornerstone laid on July 30, 1879. Bishop William Croswell Doane wrote on that date: “I laid the Corner Stone of the Gloria Dei Church, Palenville. I am glad the march of the Church’s empire is taking its way into the Catskills, as it has into the Adirondacks. It was a glorious afternoon; the drive both ways was a delight every second of the time, and every inch of the way. A goodly company had gathered. The Boy Choir of St. Luke’s Church, Brooklyn, added great beauty and fervor to the scene and the service, by their presence in the surpliced procession, and their very sweet singing. There were present the Rev. Mr. Young, the Missionary, and Messrs. Stewart, Weeks and Grubbe of the Diocese, Abercrombie of New Jersey (to whom we owed the presence of the choir). I made the address, and desire here again to recall my sense of the power of lay influence and interest to advance the Church. In the Catskills, as in the Adirondacks, it is a “beloved physician” who has done the work; and much as Mr. Weeks has done, by constant active interest and service, Dr. Chubb is the founder of the work here. After the corner stone laying we went, such of us as could get it, into a little building beautiful with laurel and evergreen and field daisies, where the congregation have worshipped through the summer. I commend the ingenious economy of this idea, which combines cheapness with beauty and convenience; for nothing was used in its construction, but the timbers and boards, which are to go into the future Church. I confirmed five persons, and one afterward in private. (“The Bishop’s Address.” Journal of the Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Albany . . . Albany, NY: Van Benthuysen Printing House, 1878.)

Despite the cornerstone being laid six years prior, due to the lack of funds, construction was not fully completed until 1885. In the intervening years the church building was used in its unfinished condition. The completed church building was consecrated on September 16, 1885. At the first service, “a large congregation, composed of residents, summer visitors, and friends from neighboring parishes, filled the church to its utmost capacity. The opening Psalm xxiv, was chanted antiphonally by the bishop, clergy and choir. The instrument of donation was read by the warden, Dr. C. H. Chubb, and the sentence of consecrations by the rector. After Morning Prayer, the bishop proceeded to the celebration of the Holy Communion, preaching from Genesis xxviii, 18, 19. The indications of real growth in the knowledge of Church principles, and an increasing appreciation of her services among the residents of this neighborhood, are very encouraging.” (“Albany.” The Churchman. October 10. 1885.)

The building was designed by architect W. H. Day. The church was built of Catskill mountain bluestone and was designed at 28’ by 50’ outside, with walls 13 feet high and 2 feet thick. The church had a capacity of 135 people. The building and its grounds were a gift to the community. The Gloria Dei Church, with the Episcopal denomination, continues to serve the public today.
Gloria Dei Church, Palenville

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Pratt RockThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.
Pratt Rock

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Tools of the TradeThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

The sculptures pictured here honor of the working man with a “sinewy, vigorous arm, grasping a hammer and a beam-knife, used by tanners in their work.” (Biography of Zadock Pratt. p. 111.) Adjacent is a hand holding a scroll that reads “Bureau of Statistics 1844.” While serving in the House of Representatives Zadock Pratt introduced legislation that established the Bureau of Statistics.
Rock Carvings at Pratt Rock

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) album ballad band best Catskill Mountains Catskills country digital drive favorite freedom great greatest listen lyrics mix music musician photographer photography place playlist road road trip singer song soundtrack story travel trip ultimate ultimate road trip https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/on-the-road-again-ultimate-road-trip-9 Sat, 29 May 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Pratt Rock: A Study https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/pratt-rock-a-study The 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer. The carvings were created by itinerant stone cutters from circa 1843 to circa 1871. The carvings and inscriptions have historically, and continue to be, routinely whitewashed in order to make them more visible from the trail below.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Pratt RockThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

 

As for the early beginnings of the carvings, there are several different versions of local legends. In a common version of the story an itinerant traveler was walking home when he encountered Zadock Pratt. The traveler inquired about a meal and lodging for the night. Pratt, of the belief that one should earn their keep, asked of the traveler’s skills and what he could offer in return. Upon learning that he was a stonecutter Pratt asked the gentleman to carve a horse on the nearby cliff side. The horse thus became the first image to be carved on the rocks.

 

An 1887 newspaper article tells a tale close to the popular understanding, although with a few additional interesting details.

 

“One day a sort of tramp called on him and asked for half a dollar to help him on his journey to his home on the other side of the Hudson River. He was asked his business. He said he was a sculptor. Pratt asked if he could cut a profile on a rock. He said he could and Pratt set him at work on a ‘big rock’ on the spot where one road leads to Windham and the other to Lexington. After he had cut off the outer part to get a solid place for Pratt’s bust, John Brandow came along and said the rock was on his land and he did not want Pratt’s face on it to haunt him as he passed. Brandow did not like Pratt. The sculptor quit work and reported to Pratt. He had not anticipated any objection, as the rock stood on a corner of the road, and I think, near his own land. Pratt felt rather taken aback by the rebuff but said he had rocks enough nearer home and now he’d have some sculpture work done, if the man could do it. He started the tramp at it, at first more for fun than anything else, to see what the fellow could do. Then the work commenced where the legend, or history of his life is recorded . . . the man chiseled a long time to do the work, got well paid for it and went on his journey. I am not sure that this one man did all the work.” (“Editor Relates Pratt’s Rock History in Issue of 1887.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. July 16, 1958.)  

 

A second version of the story tells that Zadock Pratt sought out the most skilled sculptor he could find, in order to make his sculpture ideas a reality.

 

Regardless of the carving’s origins, it is doubtful that the sculptures were the work of one man, but were instead the off-and-on work of several stonecutters over the 28 years from 1843, when the park was established, to 1871, when Zadock Pratt passed away. One newspaper account records that several of the stone seats along the path were carved by Pat Furey (or Fuhrer), a Hobart man. (“Sculptures On Cliff Above Prattsville Village Reveal Most Interesting History.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. March 27, 1930.) The Zadock Pratt Museum states that other possible itinerant stonecutters that worked on Pratt Rock could include Andrew Pearse, John Fair, Charles Kissock (who had a stone cutting business in Windham), E. Brevier, and I. H. Vermilyea.

 

Pratt Rock Park was established as a public park in 1843 with Zadock Pratt’s donation of 20 acres of land. “Pratt Rock Park is typical of parks or “pleasure grounds,” which were established throughout the country during the mid and late Nineteenth century. In general, pleasure grounds like Pratt’s park, were established or sponsored by the local social and/or economic elite who fostered a concern for the general population. This type of park was generally intended to serve the whole population of a community. The emphasis of the park was focused on passive activity such as walking, picnicking and most notably the enjoyment of the views and vistas either planned or natural.”

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Pratt RockThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

In the comprehensive Biography of Zadock Pratt there was a detailed description of Pratt Rock and its sculptures.

 

“There is one feature in connection with Prattsville which is truly unique, and deserves to be dwelt upon with some care and particularity; and that is, the sculptured rocks, on a lofty eminence just at the eastern section of the village. As the traveller enters the valley and nears the village, he is struck with beholding on his right hand, some three hundred feet or more above the level of the road, a colossal bust of Colonel Pratt, and other sculptures, well meriting the attention as historic records. He is impelled by the novelty of the occurrence, in such a place, to make an early visit to this locality; so, passing by the many other attractive spots in the vicinity, he retraces his steps from the hotel, and seeks the place which he has just passed. He finds the hill-side steep, and rather toilsome to ascend; but a meandering walk leads him gradually upward till he reaches the base of the overhanging, nearly perpendicular argillaceous rock on which the sculpture is carved. As he approaches, the objects stand out more and more distinctly. The artist has cut the bust in profile, about twenty feet above the base of the rocks, and a shelving canopy both protects it from the trickling water from above and also adds to its general effect. Underneath, in deep-cut letters, is the inscription, ‘ZADOCK PRATT, BORN OCT. 30TH, 1790.’ Near to this, but not quite so high up, is a massive scroll, pointing out an illustrious act of Colonel Pratt’s public life; it is a scroll neatly cut, partly unrolled, containing the words, ‘BUREAU OF STATISTICS, 1844.’ A sinewy, vigorous arm, grasping a hammer and a beam-knife, used by tanners in their work, form neat appendages underneath and at the side of this remarkable sculpture. A little to the side of this last sculpture, the artist has carved upon the rocks a representation – very well done, by the way – of the Prattsville tannery, which is the largest in the world; and he has put on record the noteworthy fact that Colonel Pratt, within twenty years, has tanned here, with hemlock bark, one million sides of sole leather. One other tablet, containing the names of Colonel Pratt’s son and daughter, completes these interesting sculptures.” (Biography of Zadock Pratt. pp. 110-111.)

 

As for the geology of Pratt Rock the informational kiosk at the beginning of the trails offers some insightful details.

 

“The carvings are cut into gray sandstone which was formed about 360 million years ago, when the Catskill Mountains as we know them today did not exist. The sandstones are now high above sea level because of uplift of the region. The rock layering is essentially horizontal and the rocks are undeformed – the same altitude as when they were deposited. Streams have been able to erode deep valleys and it is to this erosion process that the Catskill Mountains owe their existence. Since their formation, the Catskills have been modified by both continental and valley glaciers which covered the region from 2 million to 10 thousand years ago. As well as leaving behind distinctive deposits, the continental glaciers, hundreds or thousands of feet thick, contained boulders and pebble which scratched the underlying rock as they moved along. Some of these scratches, or glacial striations, can be seen on top of the ledges at Pratt’s Rocks, and they show the direction of glacier ice movement from north to south.”

 

Zadock Pratt (1790-1871), the namesake of Prattsville and Pratt Rock Park, was a man of many talents. The son of a tanner who had moved to Greene County in 1802, Pratt began his career as a humble saddler and harness maker but went on to found one of the largest and most prosperous leather tanneries in the world in the Catskills, thereby founding the hamlet of Prattsville. In 1814 Pratt enlisted in the US Army and served during the war of 1812 as a cavalry sergeant under Captain Stone. Pratt also served in the New York State Militia for many years, eventually rising to Captain in the 5th Regiment of New York state artillery and was then promoted to the rank of Colonel, leading the 116th Infantry Regiment. Pratt held “numerous local, state and national elected offices, including Justice of the Peace (Town of Windham, 1824), member of the New York State Senate (1830), and Presidential Elector (1836 and 1852).” In 1843 he founded the Prattsville Bank, which operated until 1852, and in 1848 he received an honorary degree from Union College. Being well regarded in the community Zadock was elected twice to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, first in 1836 and then again in 1842. Pratt died at 80 years of age in 1871 and is buried at the Benham Cemetery in Prattsville.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Mount Rushmore of the EastThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.
A landscape view of the carvings at Pratt Rock. Although perhaps a bit overstated the carvings at Pratt Rock have been termed “Mount Rushmore of the East.”

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Zadock PrattThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.


The sculpture seen in this photograph represents Zadock Pratt (1790-1871), the namesake of Prattsville and Pratt Rock Park, and a man of many talents. The son of a tanner who had moved to Greene County in 1802, Pratt began his career as a humble saddler and harness maker but went on to found one of the largest and most prosperous leather tanneries in the world in the Catskills, thereby founding the hamlet of Prattsville. In 1814 Pratt enlisted in the US Army and served during the war of 1812 as a cavalry sergeant under Captain Stone. Pratt also served in the New York State Militia for many years, eventually rising to Captain in the 5th Regiment of New York state artillery and was then promoted to the rank of Colonel, leading the 116th Infantry Regiment. Pratt held “numerous local, state and national elected offices, including Justice of the Peace (Town of Windham, 1824), member of the New York State Senate (1830), and Presidential Elector (1836 and 1852).” In 1843 he founded the Prattsville Bank, which operated until 1852, and in 1848 he received an honorary degree from Union College. Being well regarded in the community Zadock was elected twice to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, first in 1836 and then again in 1842. Pratt died at 80 years of age in 1871 and is buried at the Benham Cemetery in Prattsville.
Zadock Pratt, a prominent tannery owner and founder of Prattsville.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Honorable G. W. PrattThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

The sculpture seen in this photograph depicts Colonel George W. Pratt, son of Zadock Pratt. George Watson Pratt (1830-1862) was born in 1830 at Prattsville. Pratt was first educated at Prattsville, but completed his education in Germany, where he received a degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Upon graduation he traveled extensively in Egypt, Israel, Turkey and Russia. He returned to the United States in 1855, when he married Anna Tibbits and worked as a leather manufacturer in Kingston, New York. Pratt was elected to the New York State Senate in 1858 and 1859. Pratt served as Colonel of the 20th New York State Militia, also known as the Ulster Guard, during the Civil War. At the second battle of Manassas in Virginia on August 30, 1862 he was shot in the left shoulder and the spine. He died nearly two weeks later at the age of 32 on September 11, 1862 at Albany, New York. He is buried at Albany Rural Cemetery.

The carvings dedicated to George W. Pratt at Pratt Rock were one of the earliest Civil War monuments. The inscription reads:

Hon G. W. Pratt, Ph.D
Col XX Regt., N.Y.S.M., Ulster Co., Born Apr. 18, 1830
Wounded Aug. 30, In the 2nd Battle of
Manassas, Va. Died at Albany, N.Y. Sep. 11th.
Good Brave Honorable 1862.
George Watson Pratt (1830-1862), son of Zadock Pratt was born in 1830 at Prattsville. Pratt was first educated at Prattsville, but completed his education in Germany, where he received a degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Upon graduation he traveled extensively in Egypt, Israel, Turkey and Russia. He returned to the United States in 1855, when he married Anna Tibbits and worked as a leather manufacturer in Kingston, New York. Pratt was elected to the New York State Senate in 1858 and 1859. Pratt served as Colonel of the 20th New York State Militia, also known as the Ulster Guard, during the Civil War. At the second battle of Manassas in Virginia on August 30, 1862 he was shot in the left shoulder and the spine. He died nearly two weeks later at the age of 32 on September 11, 1862 at Albany, New York. He is buried at Albany Rural Cemetery.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Colonel George W. PrattThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

The sculpture seen in this photograph depicts Colonel George W. Pratt, son of Zadock Pratt. George Watson Pratt (1830-1862) was born in 1830 at Prattsville. Pratt was first educated at Prattsville, but completed his education in Germany, where he received a degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Upon graduation he traveled extensively in Egypt, Israel, Turkey and Russia. He returned to the United States in 1855, when he married Anna Tibbits and worked as a leather manufacturer in Kingston, New York. Pratt was elected to the New York State Senate in 1858 and 1859. Pratt served as Colonel of the 20th New York State Militia, also known as the Ulster Guard, during the Civil War. At the second battle of Manassas in Virginia on August 30, 1862 he was shot in the left shoulder and the spine. He died nearly two weeks later at the age of 32 on September 11, 1862 at Albany, New York. He is buried at Albany Rural Cemetery.

The carvings dedicated to George W. Pratt at Pratt Rock were one of the earliest Civil War monuments. The inscription reads:

Hon G. W. Pratt, Ph.D
Col XX Regt., N.Y.S.M., Ulster Co., Born Apr. 18, 1830
Wounded Aug. 30, In the 2nd Battle of
Manassas, Va. Died at Albany, N.Y. Sep. 11th.
Good Brave Honorable 1862.
The carvings dedicated to George W. Pratt at Pratt Rock were one of the earliest Civil War monuments. The inscription reads:

 

Hon G. W. Pratt, Ph.D

Col XX Regt., N.Y.S.M., Ulster Co., Born Apr. 18, 1830

Wounded Aug. 30, In the 2nd Battle of

Manassas, Va. Died at Albany, N.Y. Sep. 11th.

Good Brave Honorable 1862.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.BobThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.


The horse represents Zadock Pratt’s loved of equines. It is reported that Pratt owned over a thousand horses in his lifetime. The horse depicted here was named Bob, and was ridden by Zadock Pratt while serving as a cavalry sergeant under the command of Captain Stone in 1814. The carving “stands out against the side of the cliff in bold relief. The image is 12 feet from head to tail, and more than six feet from flowing mane to front hoof. The left hind foot and the right front foot are lifted, as though the charger were about to swing into action. Gracefully arched neck and flowing mane and tail emphasize the beauty of the image.” (“Catskill Memorial to Hero of Revolution.” The Binghamton Press. July 8, 1830.)

At the beginning of the hike to Pratt Rock there is a stone monument that was erected in memory of Zadock Pratt’s horses and dogs, including his beloved horse Bob from the War of 1812. The monument inscription reads “Of over one thousand horses owned and worn out in service of Z. Pratt, the following were favorites . . . Bob, a sorrel, aged twenty-four years; Bogue, a bay, aged eighteen years; Prince, a gray, aged thirty years . . . Carlo, a scotch terrier and Newfoundland, aged twelve years; Rough, an Irish Canadian mastiff, aged eleven years; Mingo, a half English terrier, aged ten years.”
The horse represents Zadock Pratt’s loved of equines. It is reported that Pratt owned over a thousand horses in his lifetime. The horse depicted here was named Bob, and was ridden by Zadock Pratt while serving as a cavalry sergeant under the command of Captain Stone in 1814. The carving “stands out against the side of the cliff in bold relief. The image is 12 feet from head to tail, and more than six feet from flowing mane to front hoof. The left hind foot and the right front foot are lifted, as though the charger were about to swing into action. Gracefully arched neck and flowing mane and tail emphasize the beauty of the image.” (“Catskill Memorial to Hero of Revolution.” The Binghamton Press. July 8, 1830.)

 

At the beginning of the hike to Pratt Rock there is a stone monument that was erected in memory of Zadock Pratt’s horses and dogs, including his beloved horse Bob from the War of 1812. The monument inscription reads “Of over one thousand horses owned and worn out in service of Z. Pratt, the following were favorites . . . Bob, a sorrel, aged twenty-four years; Bogue, a bay, aged eighteen years; Prince, a gray, aged thirty years . . . Carlo, a scotch terrier and Newfoundland, aged twelve years; Rough, an Irish Canadian mastiff, aged eleven years; Mingo, a half English terrier, aged ten years.”  

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.HemlockThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

The hemlock tree represents the source of Zadock Pratt’s wealth, as it provided the tannic acid required in the leather tanning process.

The hemlock tree represents the source of Zadock Pratt’s wealth, as it provided the tannic acid required in the leather tanning process.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.In MemoryThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.


The wreath contains the names of Zadock Pratt’s children, George W. Pratt and Julia H. Pratt. Although no longer visible this carving once contained the following verse: “Let virtue be your greatest care, and study your delight, So will your days be ever fair, and peacefully your nights.” The verse was removed sometime after the death of George Pratt.
The wreath contains the names of Zadock Pratt’s children, George W. Pratt and Julia H. Pratt. Although no longer visible this carving once contained the following verse: “Let virtue be your greatest care, and study your delight, So will your days be ever fair, and peacefully your nights.” The verse was removed sometime after the death of George Pratt.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Coat of ArmsThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.


The Pratt family coat of arms, which includes a hemlock tree and the saying: “Do well and doubt not.” The date inscribed under the coat of arms indicates that this carving was likely created in 1857.

The Pratt family coat of arms, which includes a hemlock tree and the saying: “Do well and doubt not.” The date inscribed under the coat of arms indicates that this carving was likely created in 1857.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Tools of the TradeThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

The sculptures pictured here honor of the working man with a “sinewy, vigorous arm, grasping a hammer and a beam-knife, used by tanners in their work.” (Biography of Zadock Pratt. p. 111.) Adjacent is a hand holding a scroll that reads “Bureau of Statistics 1844.” While serving in the House of Representatives Zadock Pratt introduced legislation that established the Bureau of Statistics.
In honor of the working man there is a “sinewy, vigorous arm, grasping a hammer and a beam-knife, used by tanners in their work.” (Biography of Zadock Pratt. p. 111.) Adjacent is a hand holding a scroll that reads “Bureau of Statistics 1844.” While serving in the House of Representatives Zadock Pratt introduced legislation that established the Bureau of Statistics.

 

Pratt Rock Park, located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York, is known for its Zadock Pratt carvings and its beautiful views of the Schoharie Valley.Pratt RockThe 20-acre Pratt Rock Park is located just south of the village of Prattsville in Greene County, New York. The park is perhaps best known for the stone carvings depicting the life of Zadock Pratt, a local 19th century tannery owner and founder of Prattsville. Carvings include a bust of Zadock Pratt, a bust of George Pratt (Zadock’s son), a horse, a hemlock tree, a scroll, the tannery, the Pratt family coat of arms, a wreath in honor of two of Pratt’s children and an arm raising a hammer.

In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.
In addition to the historic carvings Pratt Rock is also home to a wonderful overlook that offers views of the beautiful Schoharie Valley. The scene includes the Schoharie Creek, local farms, public playing fields and distant mountains. The overlook is easily accessible with an estimated 1.5-mile roundtrip hike along an unmarked but easily followed trail.

 

In 1858 an early visitor to Pratt Rock described the scene from the viewpoint. “The scenery around Prattsville is surprisingly beautiful. I would like to give you a pen sketch of the glorious panorama that was spread before me as I stood on the summit of “Pratt’s Rock,” and saw the mighty wall of mountains that circled us on every side, and the Schoharie winding along the valley like a silver thread, sparkling in the sunlight, and throwing its joyous murmurs in the air . . .” (“Letters from Wm. H. Burleigh.” Franklin Visitor. September 29, 1858.)

 

Pratt Rock Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, being considered “historically significant for its association with Zadock Pratt, founder and benefactor of the hamlet of Prattsville, industrialist, statesman, inventor, banker, and philanthropist.” The park is open to the public year-round. There is no admission fee.

 

For more information about Zadock Pratt and the local region be sure to visit the Zadock Pratt Museum in the nearby hamlet of Prattsville. The museum is located in the Zadock Pratt House, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The museum website can be found at www.zadockprattmuseum.org.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Andrew Pearse art Catskill Mountains Catskills Charles Kissock cliff George W. Pratt Greene County hemlock hike hiking John Fair leather park photographer photographs photography photos picnic Pratt Rock Pratt Rock Park Pratt's Rock Prattsville road trip sculpture tannery tourism tourist trail Zadock Pratt https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/pratt-rock-a-study Sat, 22 May 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/mountain-echoes-through-the-catskills Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills is a beautiful pictorial depiction of the Catskills region. It contains 12 different color illustrations from throughout the northern Catskills in and around the former Catskill Mountain House.

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Mountain Echoes Through the CatskillsThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

Illustrations included within Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills show locations such as Leeds Bridge, Sleepy Hollow and the Rip van Winkle House, Sunset Rock, North Mountain, Stony Clove, South Lake and Kaaterskill Falls.

 

Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There is no published date but is likely from the late 1800s.

 

An identically titled book was first published by the Obpacher Brothers around the year 1888. The cover was different than the Wolf and Company book, but several of the illustrations were the same. The Obpacher book is noted for having six illustrations. In addition to the illustrations the Obpacher book contained poems by Washington Irving, Tennyson, Byron and others. An advertisement in the August 1, 1888 issue of The American Bookseller advertised the line of books published by the Obpacher Brothers. There were two version of Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills available in the Obpacher “70 cent series.” They were described as “Each containing 16 pages. Color. Size 6 3/4 x 5 inches. Upright and oblong.”

 

The Obpacher Brothers company was founded in 1867 by brothers Johann and Joseph Obpacher. They published a range of products including books, postcards, art prints and greeting cards for Christmas, Easter, Valentine’s Day, birthdays, etc. Printing operations were based in Munich, Germany, but the company also operated offices at Berlin, Paris, London, New York and Chicago. They continued operations for over a century until they closed their doors in 1988.

 

In addition to the Catskills, other Obpacher Brothers location publications included “The Seabound Isle, Mount Desert,” “Nature’s Haunts in the White and Franconia Mountains,” “Along the Banks of the St. Lawrence River,” and “On the Borders of the Ocean, Newport.” Each of these were also part of the 1888 “70 cent series.”

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Leed's BridgeThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Leeds Bridge

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Rip Van Winkle StaircaseThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Rip Van Winkle's Staircase

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Rip van Winkle HouseThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Rip Van Winkle House

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Sunset RockThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Sunset Rock

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.North MountainThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

North Mountain

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.The Mountain HouseThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Mountain House

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Stony CloveThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Stony Clove

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Round Top Mountain and South LakeThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Round Top Mountain and South Lake

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Catskill FallsThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Catskill Falls

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Through Sleepy HollowThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Through Sleepy Hollow

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Old MillThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Old Mill

 

The beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Stony Clove BrookThe beautiful pictorial book titled Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills was published by Wolf and Company located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Stony Clove Brook

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist book Catskill Mountains Catskills illustrations Johann Obpacher Joseph Obpacher Kaaterskill Falls Leeds Bridge Mountain Echoes Through the Catskills North Mountain Obpacher Brothers paintings pictures Rip van Winkle House Round Top Sleepy Hollow South Lake Stony Clove Sunset Rock tourism tourist Wolf and Company https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/mountain-echoes-through-the-catskills Sat, 15 May 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Lorenzo Short – Rondout’s “Boss” Photographer (Part 2) https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/lorenzo-short-rondout-s-boss-photographer-part-2 Introduction

 

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

 

Continued from last week . . .

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Lorenzo Short logo.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Lorenzo Short logo.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

 

Photography

 

By 1873 Lorenzo had switched professions from farming to photography, a career which he would continue for the remainder of his life. That year Lorenzo opened a gallery in the Rondout section of Kingston.

 

Rondout, previously known as the Strand, Kingston Landing and Bolton, is located near the mouth of the Rondout Creek as it completes its journey to the Hudson River. Its prime geographic location helped establish Rondout as a thriving industrial and trading transportation center. With the opening of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Rondout in 1828 Rondout developed as primary shipping point for coal from northeastern Pennsylvania, timber, agricultural products and bluestone from the Catskill Mountains, cement from Rosendale and bricks manufactured at local factories. Rondout quickly gained a reputation as one of the busiest places on the Hudson River between New York and Albany. With its rapid growth Rondout was incorporated as a village in 1849, and for several decades remained distinct for the neighboring village of Kingston. In 1872 the two villages merged to form the city that we know today.

 

Although much of the industry is long gone, Rondout of the 21st century retains a certain charm and is a popular destination for visitors to the city of Kingston. It is home to two popular museums, the Trolley Museum of New York and the Hudson River Maritime Museum. Visitors can take a trolley ride, embark on a Hudson River boat cruise, dock their boats at the riverfront marina, visit the nearby Rondout Lighthouse, stroll along the waterfront park, or stop in any number of restaurants of boutique shops. Maintaining its industrial and architectural legacy The Rondout – West Strand Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

It is possible that in establishing his operation Short had either previously been associated with or acquired the interest of photographer W. T. Ostrander. The Kingston City Directory for 1872-3 listed Ostrander as a photographer working at “Division, opp Mill.” The following year, the Kingston, Ellenville and Saugerties Directory for 1873-74 then listed photographer Lorenzo Short as working at the same “Division, opp Mill” address.

 

In those early years, circa 1873, as a way of introduction, Short placed an advertisement in the Kingston city directory announcing his arrival. “New City Gallery! No. 33 Division Street, opposite Mill, Rondout, N.Y. Lorenzo Short, Photography, in all its branches, From the Bon Ton Tintype to the various sizes of Carte De Visite, the Rembrant Shadow Pictures, & c. Special attention given to out-door work. Views of Buildings, Steamboats, Landscapes, etc. etc.,– size from 8x10 to 18x22. Large assortment of FRAMES in stock. Frames made to order. Photographs colored in Oil, Ink, Crayon or Water Colors.” (Lant, J. H. Kingston, Ellenville and Saugerties Directory for 1873-4. Kingston, N.Y.: J. H. Lant, 1873.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Advertisement for Lorenzo Short.Kingston, Ellenville and Saugerties Directory for 1873-4.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Advertisement for Lorenzo Short. Kingston, Ellenville and Saugerties Directory for 1873-4.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Advertisement for L. Short.Kingston City Directory for the Years 1877-8.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Advertisement for L. Short. Kingston City Directory for the Years 1877-8.

 

In April 1878 Lorenzo Short went to work for another Kingston photographer, D. J. Auchmoody. The reasons are unclear as to why Short would have closed his own studio, only to go to work for a competing photographer. Short must have had a positive reputation however since Auchmoody placed an advertisement in the local newspaper announcing Short’s arrival at the Auchmoody studio. “Notice to the Public. I have secured the services of Mr. Lorenzo Short in my Photographic department. Those wishing Mr. Short or myself to photography them can be served by calling at 29 Union avenue. I would state that I am taking photographs at a low price, and of as good quality, as can be obtained in the city. D. J. AUCHMOODY.” (“Notice to the Public.” The Daily Freeman. April 29, 1878.)

 

David J. Auchmoody was born in New Paltz in 1848. He began his career as a teacher in the town of Esopus before moving into the photographic field. He operated a gallery at Kingston for many years. After leaving the photography business he worked in the insurance busines and became a prominent member of a number of fraternal organizations. He passed away in 1907 at his home in Kingston after a short illness.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Advertisement for D. J. Auchmoody.Kingston and Rondout Village Directory and Ulster County Business Directory for 1869-70.

David J. Auchmoody was born in New Paltz in 1848. He began his career as a teacher in the town of Esopus before moving into the photographic field. He operated a gallery at Kingston for many years. After leaving the photography business he worked in the insurance busines and became a prominent member of a number of fraternal organizations. He passed away in 1907 at his home in Kingston after a short illness.

Advertisement for D. J. Auchmoody. Kingston and Rondout Village Directory and Ulster County Business Directory for 1869-70.

 

By the early 1880s Short had again opened his own studio. In 1881 he placed a number of advertisements in the Kingston Daily Freeman, the local newspaper.

 

June 28, 1881. “The Place to Get Your “Phiz” Indelibly Stamped. The place to get your photographs is at the establishment of L. Short, on The Strand. The building is situated near Crosby, Sahler & Co’s corner and is easy of access. The climbing of one pair of stairs brings the visitor into a neat and cozy parlor or waiting room which is adorned by some of the artist’s best work. Another ascent brings the visitor into a specially appointed operating skylight room where river, lake, ocean, field, landscape or parlor scenes can be supplied. Short is a very gentlemanly operator and thoroughly understands his business, as is attested by the myriad of specimens broadcast about this county.”

 

July 16, 1881. “An Innovation in Photography. L. Short, the photographer on The Strand, has made an innovation in the style of taking photographs, tin types, etc., by introducing the ever-popular hammock into his skylight room. To have pictures taken while sitting in a hammock is a very good mode for lovers, for the reason that being raised at each end, the weight in the center naturally concentrates or draws together, and the subjects can get just as close together as possible.”

 

October 18, 1881. “A Fine Crayon Picture. L. Short, the photographer on The Strand, has on exhibition in the jewelry window of D. A. Ainley, on Union avenue, a well-executed and large crayon picture of Mr. E. B. Newkirk. The portrait reflects credit upon the artist, and is a perfect likeness of its original.”

 

December 22, 1881. “THE HOLIDAY SEASON. Is specially devoted to reunions of families and friends, and what presents can be more appropriate than a good picture? I have a large assortment of frames and cases, and am fully prepared to do the finest work, either singly or in families or groups. Call and examine my work. L. SHORT, Photographer, The Strand.”

 

In 1884 Lorenzo Short was listed as plaintiff in a court case versus the defendant Frank Pidgeon, Jr. Short claimed non-payment for photographic services rendered to Pidgeon.

 

“Friday, Feb. 15. – This morning in court the case of Lorenzo Short vs. Frank Pidgeon, Jr., was moved as a short cause. Affidavits were read regarding the points in the case, G. R. Adams appearing for the plaintiff and John W. Searing for the defendant. As appeared from the affidavits, the action was brought by plaintiff, a photographer in Kingston city, for taking 60 photographic views of the trestle work on the West Shore Railroad, which the defendant Pidgeon as contractor had ordered, and which were worth, as claimed, $120, the defense being that some of the work was unskillfully done. That the whole work was not worth more than $90. The defense objected to 12 views at Blue Point, while the photographer claimed that trestle was a low trestle, and the views therefore could not be taken well without going into the river, which he claimed he was not authorized to do. The defendant also claimed that the plaintiff had agreed to settle for $100, and that he sent him a check for that amount but the plaintiff returned the check. Upon the check being returned Pidgeon wrote a letter to Short which was read in court. The following is the main portion of it:

 

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter returning my check which in view of your bargain, and the fact that you agreed to take $100 in settlement of your account, on account of the poor quality of a portion of your work, surprised me very much. I do not understand it except on the ground that some shyster lawyer may have gotten your claim on spec. At all events, either settle this tomorrow or you can sue and be damned. I shall have ample time to take care of it this winter, though we prefer to pay you what is reasonable, etc., etc.

 

No settlement was made, the plaintiff claiming he had never agreed to take $100, and that he had already commenced the action when the letter was written by Mr. Pidgeon. The case was set down for next week Friday for trial.” (“Court Proceedings.” Kingston Daily Freeman. February 15, 1884.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Advertisement for Lorenzo Short.Breed Publishing Co.’s Fourth Annual Directory of the City of Kingston for the Years 1890-91.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Advertisement for Lorenzo Short. Breed Publishing Co.’s Fourth Annual Directory of the City of Kingston for the Years 1890-91.

 

In 1892 George F. Bacon published the wonderfully detailed Kingston and Rondout: Their Representative Business Men, and Points of Interest. The publication contained a detailed overview of the Lorenzo Short business.

 

“L. SHORT. Instantaneous Photographic Artist. No. 161 Strand, Rondout, N.Y. – Photography is a beautifully simple act in theory, but like many other things that look simple enough “on paper,” as the saying is, its practice calls for long experience and a high degree of expertness, that is if really good work is to be done. There are but few intelligent people who cannot tell a really good photographic portrait when they see it, and therefore when we advise our readers to call at the studio of Mr. L. Short, which is located on the third floor of No. 161 Strand, and inspect the large collection of specimens of his work there exhibited, we feel that those who do so will need no argument to convince them, that the gentleman referred to, is one of the most artistic photographers in this section. He is a native of Woodstock, Ulster County, and is well known throughout this town. The undertaking of which he is the proprietor was established in 1874 by himself, and the rooms occupied by Short cove an area of some 2,000 square feet, and are appropriately fitted up for the particular purpose for which they are intended to be used; the convenience and comfort of patrons, and the production of uniformly first-class work, being the governing consideration. Mr. Short is prepared to furnish instantaneous photographs of all sizes and styles in a faithful and artistic manner. A specialty is made of crayon work. He employs one competent assistant, and uses the most improved apparatus obtainable, leaving nothing to chance but putting himself in a position to guarantee complete satisfaction by neglecting no means to attain results beyond reasonable criticism. His prices are moderate and every caller is assured prompt and courteous attention.” (Bacon, Geo. F. Kingston and Rondout: Their Representative Business Men, and Points of Interest. Newark, N. J.: Mercantile Publishing Company, 1892. p. 69.)

 

In addition to his portrait gallery Short was also manager for the Empire View Company, which took beautiful views from throughout the region. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Snyder were tenants of Belle Short’s home for over 15 years, as well as being close friends. In a 1953 article they offered some details of the Short operation. As part of the business Lorenzo “used to have men completely equipped with photographic equipment, horse and buggy etc., who used to go all over taking pictures for the post card people. At one time they had eight such teams on the road.” (Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 4, 1953.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Country Road.[Country Road]; Empire View Co. (active about 1890); Kingston, New York, United States; about 1860–1870; Albumen silver print; 19 × 24.1 cm (7 1/2 × 9 1/2 in.); 84.XP.715.35; No Copyright - United States (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/)

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Country Road. Empire View Company. Kingston, New York. J. Paul Getty Museum.

 

The Empire View Company operated with branches at Rondout and Elmira, New York and at Cochranton, Pennsylvania. Short managed the Rondout branch. Various newspaper articles and sources reported the Empire View Company of Rondout as operating in New York, Connecticut, Vermont, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Specific locations included Carmel, NY; Shokan, NY; Greendale; NY; Buskirks Bridge, NY; Wilton, CT; Cold River, VT; Bethel, VT; Red Hook, NY; Conway, MA; Honesdale, PA; and Lee, MA, among many other places.

 

Other competing firms of itinerant photographers included the Keystone View Company of Allentown, Pennsylvania and the Northern Survey Company of Albany, New York. Walter Richard Wheeler, architectural historian, wrote about the background and methods of the Northern Survey Company, much of which was likely equally applicable to the Empire View Company.

 

“. . . crews of field technicians transporting equipment and portable laboratories throughout the countryside in search of clients . . . They provided views of buildings – frequently with people assembled in front of them – pasted to cabinet cards . . . Teams of field representatives canvassed targeted regions during the warm weather months. Subjects were selected on specific requests from clients, but a large amount of speculative work was undertaken as well . . . It was the job of salesmen, not necessarily the same individuals who had executed the field photography, to close the deal once prints were made . . . No public advertising, except word of mouth and the distribution of handbills, was undertaken . . . Although the principal subjects were houses, usually with family members posed in front of them, other types of photographs were taken. Public buildings, particularly schools and students and prominent businesses and institutions were also documented . . . Itinerant field photography came to an abrupt end in 190, when introduction of the Brownie camera put photography into the hands of the masses for the first time. Coupled with an economic downturn in the late 1890s, these two factors spelled the end of itinerant view companies.” (Wheeler, Walter Richard. “Itinerant Farm Survey Photographs – The Northern Survey Company.” The Society of Hudson Valley Vernacular Architecture. Vol. 20, No. 4-6. April-June 2017. pp. 9-15.)

 

As part of this operation of the Empire View Company, in 1896, Short placed a help wanted advertisement in The World, a New York City based newspaper. “PHOTOGRAPHER, professional or amateur; single preferred; salary; horses & wagon; references required; one who can ride a bicycle preferred. L. Short. Rondout, N.Y.” (The World. August 9, 1896.) One year later, in 1897, Short was looking for a manager. “WANTED – Immediately, photographic operator; one who can take charge of a gallery; send samples and reference with application. L. Short, Station R, Kingston, N.Y.” (New York Journal and Advertiser. October 10, 1897.) In 1898, Short was continuing to look for help, this time for a “view photographer.” “VIEW PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED: salary, horse & wagon; single preferred; references required. Address L. Short, 9 East Strand, Rondout, N.Y.” (The World. March 20, 1898.)

 

One of the people who responded to Short’s advertisements was R. M. Adkins, a photographer whose “artistic work has placed him in the front rank of photographers in northern New York.” (“Local Notes.” Ticonderoga Sentinel. April 25, 1895.). In 1894 Adkins could be found at Bolton Landing, New York where he had purchased the studio of Julius Thatcher, which was located near the Sagamore bridge. Adkins then worked for several months for Short and the Empire View Company in 1895. After his time on the Rondout Adkins became associated with Gilman’s studio at Ticonderoga. While working for Short he could be found at Red Hook, New York, where his photographic work was described in the local newspaper.

 

“Mr. R. M. Adkins, representing the Empire View Co., of Rondout, returned to this village Wednesday evening after having spent 4 days at the N.Y. M. E. Conference. While there he photographed the Bishop and members of the conference for one of the secretaries for the purpose of making a copyrighted reproduction. While here Mr. Adkins photographed our school and did some other photograph work, samples of which have been delivered and speak for themselves. He left Thursday morning for a trip north, but will return in the near future, notice of which will appear in our columns.” (“Home and Vicinity.” Red Hook Journal. April 12, 1895.)

 

The Snyder’s also recollected that the Short “photo studio was open seven days a week and Sunday was their busiest, for the folks would stop in after church to “have pictures taken in their best ‘bib and tucker.’” (Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 4, 1953.)

 

Lorenzo placed an advertisement in the local newspaper in 1897. “Boss Photograph Gallery, Lorenzo Short, photographer. Union avenue. One door above Mansion House, Rondout, N.Y. All kinds of pictures taken in the latest style. Stereopticon views and picture frames.” (Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 20, 1952.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Portrait of young man. Lorenzo Short, photographer.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Portrait of young man. Lorenzo Short, photographer. Author’s collection.

 

On December 16, 1899 Lorenzo Short acquired the uptown gallery of George D. Jopson (1866-1935), “one of the best known photographers in Kingston in the Gay Nineties.” (Van Deusen, H. L. “At Century’s Turn.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 5, 1943.) The gallery was located on North Front Street in the Stockade District of Kingston. With this acquisition Short was then operating two studios, the other being located in the Rondout section of Kingston. Upon leaving the photography business Jopson returned to “his old business of conducting dramatic biblical cantatas during the winter seasons, and conducting a first-class studio in the Catskills during the summer season.” (The St. Louis & Canadian Photographer. Vol. 24, no. 9. September 1900.) Jopson later worked as a photographer at Saugerties.

 

Alf Evers in his encyclopedic Woodstock: History of an American Town wrote of Short and his work in the hamlet of Wittenberg, near Woodstock. “In Wittenberg in the 1890s Lorenzo Short set up as a photographer. He left town from time to work as in itinerant [photographer] and opened a studio in Rondout. Short took photographs of school children posed against their schoolhouse each June . . . Such photographs by the 1890s were an indispensable part of the annual school ritual. Crayon enlargements of family photographs hung in most Woodstock parlors.” (Evers, Alf. Woodstock: History of an American Town. New York: The Overlook Press, 1987. p. 365.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Portrait of young man, standing, in suit. Lorenzo Short, photographer.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Portrait of young man, standing, in suit. Lorenzo Short, photographer. Author’s collection.

 

In 1905 Lorenzo was arrested “on the charge of taking photographs on Sunday.” He refused to plead guilty, and instead “demanded a jury trial and the case was set down for trial on Friday, January 5. Andrew Cook represented the defendant.” (“Photographer Short to Have a Jury Trial January 5.” Kingston Daily Freeman. December 2, 1905.)

 

Tragedy struck the Short family in 1906 when the family home was totally destroyed by fire. “About 8 o’clock Saturday night a fire broke out in the house of Lorenzo Short in Sleightsburgh, and the house was totally destroyed, with all its contents, consisting of the furniture of Mrs. M. F. Kenney and library of her husband, supposed to be worth $2,000, and also the furniture of Richard H. Kuehn, who occupied the upper part. The building was a large two-story brick house, with an English basement, on Third avenue. The Port Ewen fire department was notified by telephone, and within fifteen minutes was on the ground with its apparatus. The fire had obtained considerable headway, and the smoke was so dense in the building that it was impossible to check the blaze. An adjoining house belonging to Mrs. George DuBois, and a barn, both within twenty feet of the burning building, were saved by the efforts of the firemen. There was no insurance on Mrs. Kenney’s property. Her loss is about $3,000, including the library. The house was valued at $2,500, on which there was an insurance of $1,500. Mr. Kuehn had a loss of $1,500 and an insurance of $600. The fire originated on the second floor, and is supposed to have started from a stove. The persons who occupied the house were not in the house at the time the fire broke out.” (“House of Lorenzo Short Totally Destroyed.” Kingston Daily Freeman. October 29, 1906.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Portrait of two women. Lorenzo Short, photographer, 9 East Strand.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Portrait of two women. Lorenzo Short, photographer, 9 East Strand. Author’s collection.

 

For over a decade, so popular was Short, he operated two galleries, one at Rondout and the other in the historic Stockade District of “uptown” Kingston. In 1913 Short sought to exit his Stockade District gallery. “For Sale: Old established business at Kingston, N.Y. Located in the heart of the business section. Very low rent. Write for further particulars. The price will suit. Address L. Short, 329 Wall Street, Kingston, N.Y.” (Snap-Shots. Vol. 24, No. 6. June 1913.) By the next year Short was operating at a single location, his familiar studio at 9 East Strand in the Rondout section of Kingston.

 

Although his studio would continue to be listed in the Kingston city directories until his passing in 1928, the 1920 United States census and the 1925 New York State census both reported Lorenzo’s occupation as “retired.” Beginning in 1900 his daughter Belle’s occupation was listed in various census reports as “photographer.”

 

Upon Lorenzo’s retirement the studio was taken over by Belle Short, his daughter. Belle “had grown up in the business and had worked with her father for some time before his death.” (“One of the Oldest Area Firms To Close Soon; Began 1873.” Kingston Daily Freeman. February 20, 1952.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York."Every Member of the Family.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Rhinebeck Gazette. July 30, 1921.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Every Member of the Family.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Rhinebeck Gazette. July 30, 1921.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York."Have Us Photograph Them.” Advertisement for Short Photographer.Rhinebeck Gazette. April 15, 1922.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Have Us Photograph Them.” Advertisement for Short Photographer. Rhinebeck Gazette. April 15, 1922.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“Childish Fancies.” Advertisement for Short Photographer.Rhinebeck Gazette. April 22, 1922.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Childish Fancies.” Advertisement for Short Photographer. Rhinebeck Gazette. April 22, 1922.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“Someone, Somewhere, Wants Your Photograph.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. October 21, 1926.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Someone, Somewhere, Wants Your Photograph.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. October 21, 1926.

 

With her new ownership Belle placed advertisements in the local newspaper stating that “we wish to announce to our many friends and patrons that the business owned for my years by Lorenzo Short and known as Short’s Studio, will be continued under the management of Miss Belle Short.” (“Announcement.” Kingston Daily Freeman. August 16, 1928.) Belle Short proved to be just as popular a photographer as her father.

 

Sophie Miller, of the Kingston Daily Freeman, wrote a long-running popular column titled “Do You Remember” that offered historic, and often personal, memories of the city of Kingston. Reminiscing about Short’s Studio, Miller wrote: “I remember going there often as a little girl. In the later years Belle Short had it on the Strand, on the top floor, over Alcon’s general store. She took pictures by daylight in her sky-light studio. She had good cameras and turned out fine pictures. She had a camera that took “Pin-pons.” They were very small pictures, somewhat larger than the stamp-pictures that are advertised. Miss Short’s little pictures were excellent with each picture posed by daylight. As I remember there were four poses for each set and the set cost less than a $1 or around that. I think one received four or five of each picture. I liked them very much, but of course it was a lot of work for very little money.” (Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 20, 1952.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“We Catch Baby Smiles.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. November 5, 1931.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“We Catch Baby Smiles.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. November 5, 1931.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“Christmas Greeting Cards.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. October 10, 1939.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Christmas Greeting Cards.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. October 10, 1939.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“Your Photograph!” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. November 20, 1947.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Your Photograph!” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. November 20, 1947.

 

In 1953 Sophie Miller again wrote of her memories of Belle Short. “I remember those days, when Miss Short’s front room with all the antique like chairs were filled with waiting customers. She also was noted for her ‘pin-pone’ pictures. You have a choice of four poses, and received some five of each or 20 pictures. They were about twice the size of stamps or perhaps larger, but made professional and cost about $1 a set. I used to go in for those little pictures in a big way. They were made so well by Miss Short that they could be enlarged. Miss Short had a lot of patience with children and her motto for years was “Short’s Studio – We catch Baby’s Smiles”. She had all sorts of toys and fur rabbits to give to the babies to play with when she took their picture. Miss Short’s studio was by daylight, not artificial light and she had the upper floor or skylight apartment in Alcon’s building. She knew just how to handle the various screens to work the daylight for her convenience. Years ago, when Eva Ginsberg and I were little girls we used to come to Miss Short’s studio where she received many ladies’ magazines and in those days each one contained at least one page of cut out dolls and dresses. Miss Short let us have these pages. We looked forward to them each month as the various magazines would come out. I remember Miss Short fondly with pleasant memories and I am sure many folks to likewise now that she has left our city.” (Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 4, 1953.)

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“When Shopping Downtown.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. April 8, 1948.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.
“When Shopping Downtown.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. April 8, 1948.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“This Christmas.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. November 11, 1948.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“This Christmas.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. November 11, 1948.
 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“This Christmas.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Kingston Daily Freeman. November 18, 1948.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“This Christmas.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. November 18, 1948.
 

In 1966 Sophie Miller yet again wrote of her experiences with Belle Short at the studio. “I remember Miss Bell Short, daughter of photographer Lorenzo Short, when she had a skylight studio on the Strand. Sundays was a busy day for her as often bridal parties came there to have their pictures taken. She also liked to take pictures of small children, all this by daylight, the only photographer, who did it at the time, I understand. She had backdrops, antique pieces of furniture, and even a big toy dog which children like to sit on. She moved everything easily as it was all on wheels. The skylight could be controlled by shades and she also used a soft light, which I think was electric. Her cameras were old, but sharp, and kind to a person’s features. She had a novelty miniature pictures, four different poses, and twenty pictures all for $1. Her pictures never seemed to fade. She retired, went to Detroit and died there many years ago. She also did developing for stores and delivered them. My father’s store was her last stop on the Broadway hill, so here she waited for the bus, as she had no car. She was an independent proud professional woman, and when I was little I loved just to visit with her, because she let me cut out paper dolls from her many magazines. She saved them for me.” (Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. December 3, 1966.)

 

Belle Short operated the Rondout gallery for several decades, eventually shutting the doors in March 1952. At the time of its closing the gallery was one of the oldest businesses in Rondout. She afterwards moved to Detroit, Michigan to live with her sister, Mrs. Richard H. Kuehn. She passed away in Detroit, Michigan at 84 years of age in 1960. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend George P. Werner, were held at the Jenson & Deegan Funeral Home. She was buried at Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston, New York.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.“Going Out of Business.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

“Going Out of Business.” Advertisement for Short’s Studio. Kingston Daily Freeman. February 20, 1952.

 

The below table summarizes the changing locations of the Lorenzo Short studio. For 58 years, from 1894 to 1952, the studio operated at 9 East Strand in the Rondout section of Kingston. For 13 years, from 1900 to 1913, Short operated at two studio locations, one in the Rondout neighborhood and the other in the uptown Stockade District.

 

City Directory

Studio Location

1873-1874

Division opp Mill

1877-1878

18 Union Avenue

1878-1880

Working for D. J. Auchmoody

1883-1893

161 Strand

1894-1899

9 E Strand

1900-1901

9 East Strand and 31 North Front

1901-1902

329 Wall

1902-1913

9 E. Strand and 329 Wall

1914-1928

9 E Strand

1929

No entry

1930-1952

Short’s Studio, 9 E Strand

 

Legacy

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle, successfully operated their photograph studio at Kingston for 79 years from 1873 to 1952. Lorenzo was “for many years a highly respected citizen of this city . . . Mr. Short was engaged in business in this city for fifty years, conducting a photograph studio. Through his genial disposition and obliging manner he built up a large business.” (“Local Death Record.” Kingston Daily Freeman. July 17, 1928.)

 

Lorenzo Short passed away following a long illness at Kingston, New York on July 17, 1928. Services were held at his home at 7 St. James Court. The funeral, officiated by Reverend A. A. Vradenburg, pastor of the Clinton Avenue M. E. Church, “was largely attended by many relatives and friends. The floral tributes were many and beautiful, testifying to the high esteem in which he was held in the community.” (“Local Death Record.” Kingston Daily Freeman. July 20, 1928.)

 

Lorenzo was survived by his wife, three daughters, Belle Short, at Kingston; Mrs. R. H. Kuehn and Mrs. A. J. Kohler, both of Detroit, Michigan; and three sons, Myron Short, of Kingston; Clyde Short and Philip Short, of Flint, Michigan. Lorenzo Short is buried at the family plot in Montrepose Cemetery at Kingston.

 

Mary E. (Antus) Short, Lorenzo’s wife passed away after a brief illness on February 14, 1936. Upon her passing it was written that “she had been a resident of this city a great many years and by her fine Christian character had endeared herself to a very large circle of friends. She was a loving and devoted wife and mother and was always ready to lend a helping hand to any one in need.” (“Local Death Record.” Kingston Daily Freeman. February 15, 1936.) She is buried at Montrepose Cemetery at Kingston, New York.

 

Additional Information or Comments

 

If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Lorenzo Short please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you.

 

Selected Reference and Bibliography

 

“A Fine Crayon Picture.” Kingston Daily Freeman. October 18, 1881.

 

“An Innovation in Photography.” Kingston Daily Freeman. July 16, 1881.

 

“Announcement.” Kingston Daily Freeman. August 16, 1928.

 

Bacon, Geo. F. Kingston and Rondout: Their Representative Business Men, and Points of Interest. Newark, N. J.: Mercantile Publishing Company, 1892.

 

Balderston, Marion. “The Real ‘Welcome’ Passengers.” Huntington Library Quarterly, vol. 26, no. 1, 1962, pp. 31–56. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3816843. Accessed 12 Mar. 2021.

 

Beers, F. W. County Atlas of Ulster, New York. Map. [ca 1:24000]. New York: Walker & Jewett, 1875.

 

“The Captivity of Short and Miller.” Olde Ulster. Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1906. pp. 339-343.

 

Clearwater, Alphonso T. The History of Ulster County, New York. Kingston, NY: W. J. Van Deusen, 1907.

 

“Court Proceedings.” Kingston Daily Freeman. February 15, 1884.

 

Darrach, Henry. Voyage of William Penn in Ship “Welcome” 1682. Philadelphia, PA: Annual Meeting of the Welcome Society, 1917.

 

“David J. Auchmoody.” Amsterdam Evening Recorder. January 12, 1907.

 

“The Days of Tory Rule.” Kingston Daily Freeman. April 1, 1886.

 

Evers, Alf. Woodstock: History of an American Town. New York: The Overlook Press, 1987.

 

Ferris, Jean Leon Gerome, Artist. The landing of William Penn / J.L.G. Ferris. Cleveland, Ohio: The Foundation Press, Inc., July 28. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2004669764/>.

 

“For Sale.” Kingston Daily Freeman. May 20, 1920.

 

“For Sale.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 17, 1921.

 

French, J. H, et al. Map of Ulster Co., New York: from actual surveys. Philadelphia: Taintor, Dawson & Co., publishers, 1858. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2013593238/>.

 

“The Holiday Season.” Kingston Daily Freeman. December 22, 1881.

 

“Home and Vicinity.” Red Hook Journal. April 12, 1895.

 

“House of Lorenzo Short Totally Destroyed.” Kingston Daily Freeman. October 29, 1906.

 

Kingston City Directory. Various publishers. 1873-1952.

 

Lant, J. H. Kingston, Ellenville and Saugerties Directory for 1873-4. Kingston, N.Y.: J. H. Lant, 1873.

 

“Local Death Record.” Kingston Daily Freeman. July 17, 1928.

 

“Local Death Record.” Kingston Daily Freeman. July 20, 1928.

 

“Local Death Record.” Kingston Daily Freeman. February 15, 1936.

 

“Local Notes.” Ticonderoga Sentinel. April 25, 1895.

 

Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 20, 1952.

 

Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 4, 1953.

 

Miller, Sophie. “Do You Remember.” Kingston Daily Freeman. December 3, 1966.

 

New York Journal and Advertiser. October 10, 1897.

 

New York State Census. 1855. 1875. 1905. 1915. 1925.

 

“Notice to the Public.” The Daily Freeman. April 29, 1878.

 

“One of the Oldest Area Firms To Close Soon; Began 1873.” Kingston Daily Freeman. February 20, 1952.

 

“Photographer Short to Have a Jury Trial January 5.” Kingston Daily Freeman. December 2, 1905.

 

Rockwell, Rev. Charles. The Catskill Mountains and the Region Around. New York: Taintor Brothers & Co., 1867.

 

Short, Sharon. Short Families of Clark Co., WI. 1976.

 

Smith, Anita M. “HEARSAY AND HISTORY.” New York History, vol. 17, no. 1, 1936, pp. 59–69. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/23137378. Accessed 6 Mar. 2021.

 

Snap-Shots: A Monthly Magazine for Photographers. Vol. 24, No. 6. June 1913.

 

“The Place to Get Your “Phiz” Indelibly Stamped.” Kingston Daily Freeman. June 28, 1881.

 

The St. Louis & Canadian Photographer. Vol. 24, no. 9. September 1900.)

 

Sylvester, Nathaniel Bartlett. History of Ulster County, New York. Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1880.

 

United States Census. 1850. 1860. 1870. 1880. 1900. 1910. 1920.

 

United States Geological Survey. Bearsville, NY. Map. [1:24000]. 2019.

 

Van Deusen, H. L. “At Century’s Turn.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 5, 1943.

 

Vaux, George. “THE EMBARKATION, VOYAGE, AND ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP ‘WELCOME," 1682.” Bulletin of Friends Historical Association, vol. 21, no. 2, 1932, pp. 59–62. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41943903. Accessed 13 Mar. 2021.

 

Wheeler, Walter Richard. “Itinerant Farm Survey Photographs – The Northern Survey Company.” The Society of Hudson Valley Vernacular Architecture. Vol. 20, No. 4-6. April-June 2017. pp. 9-15.

 

The World. August 9, 1896.

 

The World. March 20, 1898.

 

Websites:

Ancestry. www.ancestry.com.

Family Search. www.familysearch.org.

Find A Grave. www.findagrave.com.

Hathitrust Digital Library. www.hathitrust.org.

HRVH Historical Newspapers. news.hrvh.org.

Internet Archive. www.archive.org.

Newspapers.com. www.newspapers.com.

New York Public Library, Digital Collections. www.digitalcollections.nypl.org.

NYS Historic Newspapers. www.nyshistoricnewspapers.org.

Old Fulton New York Post Cards. www.fultonhistory.com.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist Belle Short cabinet cards cartes de visite D. J. Auchmoody Empire View Co. Empire View Company gallery George D. Jopson Hudson Valley Kingston Lorenzo Short photographer photography Rondout stereoviews Stockade District studio Wittenberg Woodstock https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/lorenzo-short-rondout-s-boss-photographer-part-2 Sat, 08 May 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Lorenzo Short – Rondout’s “Boss” Photographer (Part 1) https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/lorenzo-short-rondout-s-boss-photographer-part-1 Introduction

 

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

 

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Lorenzo Short logo.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Lorenzo Short, succeeded by his daughter Belle Short, operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York.Lorenzo Short logo.Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

 

Welcome

 

Lorenzo Short was born on November 24, 1847 to parents Peter Short (1792-1853) and Rebecca (Lane) Short (1818-1902). Peter was a veteran of the War of 1812. Peter’s first marriage was to Polly (Winne) Short (1803-1832). Together Peter and Polly had seven children, i.e., Lorenzo’s half-siblings, including Cornelius Short (1821-1899); Washington Short (b 1822); David P. Short (b 1824); James Short (b 1826); Hannah Short (b 1827); Sarah Short (b 1829); and Elizabeth Ann Short (1832-1925). Polly passed away on November 28, 1832.

 

Peter remarried seven years later on November 4, 1839 to Rebecca (Lane) Short, daughter of William Gilbert Lane (1787-1860) and Hannah (Soule) Lane. Rebecca was born in the town of Olive in Ulster County, New York. As per the 1850 United States census Peter was working as a “farmer.” Together Peter and Rebecca had six children, including Lorenzo, our subject. Lorenzo’s five siblings included William Sherman Short (b 1840); Mahala Short (1842-1917); Phebe Catharine Short (b 1845); Margaret Short (b 1850); and Adaline Short (b 1852). Lorenzo grew up in the town of Woodstock in Ulster County, New York. Rebecca passed away in 1902 and is buried at Woodstock Cemetery.

 

Peter Short, Lorenzo’s father, passed away in 1853, when Lorenzo was still at the very young age of five. Based on the 1855 New York State census and the 1860 United States census William Short, Lorenzo’s older brother, then age 15 and 20, respectively, presumably took on much more of the family responsibility on the family farm. The 1855 census listed William with an occupation of “farmer”; and the 1860 census listed him with an occupation of “farm laborer.”

 

The 1860 United States census reported Rebecca Short as the head of household, while residing in the town of Woodstock with her six children. As for the family home, the 1860 agricultural census for the town of Woodstock showed that Rebecca Short, Lorenzo’s mother, maintained a 75-acre farm, comprised of 50 acres of improved land and 25 acres of unimproved land. The farm was valued at $1,200, the livestock was valued at $500 and the equipment was valued at $50. The farm was home to three horses, five milk cows, two working oxen, two cattle and nine swine. The farm produced 20 bushels of rye and 20 bushels of Indian corn.

 

Map of Yankeetown, located in the town of Woodstock in Ulster County, New YorkYankeetown, New YorkFrench, J. H, et al. Map of Ulster Co., New York: from actual surveys. Philadelphia: Taintor, Dawson & Co., publishers, 1858. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2013593238/>.

Map of Yankeetown, home to the Short family farm near Woodstock, Ulster County, New York.


Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Map of Yankeetown, town of Woodstock, Ulster County, New York. 1858. Yankeetown was home to the Short family farm.

French, J. H, et al. Map of Ulster Co., New York: from actual surveys. Philadelphia: Taintor, Dawson & Co., publishers, 1858. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2013593238/>.

 

The Short family in America can be traced back to Adam Short, Sr. at Sussex, England. After Adam’s passing, his widow Miriam (Ingram) Short emigrated to the United States with her three children Ann (1663-1731), Miriam (b 1664) and Adam Short, Jr. (b 1666). The family departed from Deal, England in late August aboard the Quaker vessel named Welcome. Also aboard was Isaac Ingram (b. c. 1640-1682), Miriam’s (the senior) brother, who was from Gatton, Surrey, just north of the Sussex border, and the famous William Penn (1644-1718), Quaker leader and founder of Pennsylvania. The Welcome was the first of many ships transporting Quakers out of England to the New World in order to escape religious persecution.

 

As for the trans-Atlantic journey of William Penn and the Short family, Henry Darrach wrote in 1917 of the accommodations and some of the likely dangers.

 

“The passengers were about 102 and not all of Penn’s company. As the passenger list was full, others who desired to sail were compelled to wait for later boats, which numbered about 21 vessels.

 

The passengers must have been closely packed, like sardines, the poor cooking and odors of stuffy cabins must have rendered life unendurable, but blessed are those who do not expect much for they will not be disappointed.

 

While escaping the dangers of the sea and the capture by Spanish privateers, an epidemic of small-pox carried away about one-third of the original number. It must have been heart-rending to see the ones they loved sewed up in sail-cloth, weighted at the feet and slid down the gangplank. There must have been great anxiety for the remaining ones, if the officers should be stricken there would be not one to sail the vessel and all might be lost. During the trying voyage Penn attended the sick and dying, giving comfort and consolation to the entire company.” (Darrach, Henry. Voyage of William Penn in Ship “Welcome” 1682. Philadelphia, PA: Annual Meeting of the Welcome Society, 1917. p. 4.)

 

After a journey of 57 days the Welcome landed at the mouth of the Delaware River at New Castle, Delaware on October 27, 1682. The mother Miriam (Ingram) Short and her brother Isaac Ingram, were two of 30 people who passed away from small pox during the voyage. Miriam died several days before Isaac, for he, upon having contracted the small pox, drafted a will aboard the Welcome, leaving much of his estate and goods to his nieces and nephew, Ann, Miriam (the daughter) and Adam. Both Miriam and Isaac were buried at sea.

 

The landing of William Penn.The landing of William Penn.Ferris, Jean Leon Gerome, Artist. The landing of William Penn / J.L.G. Ferris. Cleveland, Ohio: The Foundation Press, Inc., July 28. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2004669764/>.

Ferris, Jean Leon Gerome, Artist. The landing of William Penn / J.L.G. Ferris. Cleveland, Ohio: The Foundation Press, Inc., July 28. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2004669764/>.

 

The seven ancestral generations of the Short family in America, traced over 250 years from Adam Short, Sr. to Lorenzo Short, include:

 

1st generation: great-great-great-great-grandparents: Adam Short, Sr. (b 1622) and Miriam (Ingram) Short (1642-1682).

 

2nd generation, great-great-great-grandparents: Adam Short, Jr. (b 1666), first married circa 1700 to unknown woman, who was likely the mother of his children, married a second time circa 1712 to Martha (Metcalf) Short. He lived at New Castle county, Delaware.

 

3rd generation: great-great-grandparents: Henry Short (b 1700) and Gepje (Winne) Short (b 1704). Henry, who was born at New Castle, Delaware, migrated to Kington, N.Y. sometime before 1724. Henry and Gepje were married on November 6, 1724 at the Old Dutch Church in Kingston, New York.

 

4th generation, great-grandparents: Peter Hendrick Short (1732-1806) and Annatje (Bakker) Short (1737-1820). Peter H. Short was one of the earliest settlers of Woodstock. The family 69-acre farm was located close to the junction of Ohayo Mountain Road and Broadview Road. Peter Hendrick Short is buried at the Zena Community Ground in Ulster County, New York.

 

5th generation, grandparents: David Short, Sr. (1768-1851) and Sarah (Edwards) Short (1771-1838). David was a farmer, was active in lumbering, manufactured maple sugar and kept a tavern near Woodstock. David Short, Sr. died in 1851 at Wittenburg in Ulster County, New York.

 

6th generation, parents: Peter Short (1792-1853) and Rebecca (Lane) Short (1818-1902).

 

7th generation: Lorenzo Short (1847-1928).

 

For more information about the Short family genealogy, see Sharon Short in her Short Families of Clark Co., WI as researched in 1976.

 

Peter Hendrick Short, Lorenzo’s great-grandfather, honorably served during the American Revolution. In the later stages of the War, in a widely told story, he, then a civilian, and his son-in-law Peter Miller were captured at Katsbaan, near Woodstock, on June 18, 1780 by British Tories as they were returning from church. They were held captive and marched through New York State, on to Niagara, later to be transferred to Montreal, Canada. Although there are multiple versions of the story, it seems that a year after capture both Short and Miller escaped, with the help of an Indian by the name of Joe De Witt that they had helped many years prior. Short and Miller returned to Woodstock, where they lived as neighbors to several of their prior tory enemies and captors.

 

Alf Evers wrote of the incident that “because of its human interest the story of the capture of Short and Miller is Woodstock’s most popular Revolutionary incident – and likely to remain so . . . The capture of Short and Miller as the last recorded episode of the violence that marked Revolutionary days in Woodstock. The war was moving on toward its end, and deep discouragement was overtaking Woodstock tories.”

 

New York State would later place, in the 1930s, an historical marker at the spot where Short and Miller were captured. For more information about the fascinating story of Short and Miller, see

  • “The Captivity of Short and Miller.” Olde Ulster. Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1906. pp. 339-343.
  • “The Days of Tory Rule.” Kingston Daily Freeman. April 1, 1886.
  • Evers, Alf. Woodstock: History of an American Town. New York: The Overlook Press, 1987. pp. 72-75.
  • Smith, Anita M. “HEARSAY AND HISTORY.” New York History, vol. 17, no. 1, 1936, pp. 59–69. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/23137378. Accessed 6 Mar. 2021.)
  • Rockwell, Rev. Charles. The Catskill Mountains and the Region Around. New York: Taintor Brothers & Co., 1867.

 

Family

 

In 1871 Lorenzo married Mary E. Antus. She was born in March 1854, the daughter of Phillip Ira Antus (1823-1894), a farmer, and Isabella (Cunningham) Antus (1821-1869). Mary grew up on a farm in the town of Greenville in Greene County, New York. Phillip’s property consisted of 125 acres, of which 50 acres were improved and 75 acres were unimproved. As of 1860 the farm was home to two horses, three milk cows, two cattle, six sheep and one swine. The farm produced 25 bushels of rye, 50 bushels of Indian corn, 25 bushels of oats and 20 pounds of wool. After the passing of Isabella, Phillip remarried to Caroline Weaver (1837-1909). Both of Mary’s parents, Phillip and Isabella, are buried at Freehold Cemetery in Greene County.

 

Lorenzo and Mary were married for 57 years, until his passing in 1928. The 1900 United States census listed Mary as having had thirteen children, of which only seven were living. The seven children of Lorenzo and Mary Short included:

 

Isabelle “Belle” Short (b. January 1875), of Kingston, New York. She took over her father’s photography business in the Rondout upon his retirement and passing. She operated the studio until 1952.

Catherine or Kathryn (Kate) Short (b. June 1877). She married George Wendell Phillips in 1922. Only a year later she passed away in 1923 at the home of her father. George passed away only several days later.

 

Hazel E. (Short) Kuehn (b. February 1883), who married Richard H. Kuehn (1881-1952). Richard for many years operated a men’s furnishing store at 34 Broadway in Kingston. They later moved to Detroit, Michigan. Hazel (Short) Kuehn passed away at Moline, Illinois in February 1961. Both Richard and Hazel are buried at Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston.

 

Myron Short (b. October 1885), of Kingston, New York. Myron, having joined in 1909, was a long-standing member of Local 255, Painters Union for 51 years. He had also served as president of the union. Mryon married Carolyn M. Schnur in 1910. Carolyn worked in a shirt factory at the time of her marriage. Myron passed away at 74 years of age after a brief illness in September 1960. Funeral services, officiated by Rev. Dr. Clyde Herbert Snell of the Clinton Avenue Methodist Church, were held at the Jenson & Deegan Funeral Home. Myron Short is buried at St. Peter’s Cemetery in Kingston.

 

Edna L. (Short) Kohler (b. October 1, 1888), who married Augustus J. Kohler (b. 1889) on September 24, 1913. They later moved to Flint, Michigan. She passed away from bronchial pneumonia in 1938. Both Edna and Augustus are buried at Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston.

 

Clyde Vivian Short (b. August 5, 1892), of Flint, Michigan. He first worked for the Buick Motor Company and then worked for 30 years as an accountant for the Veit and Davison Lumber Company. He honorably served in the US Army during World War 1 as part of Company M, Development Battalion #6, 160 Depot Brigade. He was married to Mabelle Irene Stambaugh Short on November 25, 1925 at Elm Hall, Michigan. Maybelle graduated from Central Michigan College and worked in the public schools of Flint, Michigan, including as a school principal at the time of her marriage. Clyde passed away after a short illness on April 24, 1950. He is buried at Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston.

 

Philip Stanley Short (b. March 1894), of Cleveland, Ohio and Albany, New York. The 1915 United States census listed his occupation as “machinist.” In September 1930 he married Florence Antus at Genesee County, Michigan. At the time of the marriage Philip was employed as “body worker,” presumably at a car manufacturing plant.

 

Yankeetown and the Family Farm

 

The Short family were among the early settlers of the town of Woodstock. Alphonso T. Clearwater, author of The History of Ulster County, New York, wrote in 1907 about the arrival of Peter Short in 1784. “The region [Woodstock] was settled just previous to the Revolution. Philip Bonesteel, the first settler of record, came in 1770 and made his “clearing” about one mile below the present Woodstock village, on what is known as the old Hudler farm. He was followed six years later by Edward Short, who located in the region since known as “Yankeetown.” Next came Peter Short, in 1784, and four years later, Jacob DuBois, Ephriam Van Keuren and Philip Shultis.” (Clearwater, Alphonso T. The History of Ulster County, New York. Kingston, NY: W. J. Van Deusen, 1907. p. 403.)

 

In 1987 Alf Evers, Woodstock town historian and author of Woodstock: History of an American Town, placed the arrival of Peter Short to 1770, 14 years prior to the date written by Clearwater.

 

“Woodstock was indeed in an unhappy state as the Revolution ended, unloved by its neighbors, its pre-War settlers gone, without a town government, with squatters moving into empty cabins and skimpily tilling clearings in the hope of snatching a crop or two before they were discovered. Of all the leases and lease agreements entered into by tenants and Robert Livingston or his son Judge Robert R. in pre-War times only one survived the turmoil of the Revolution. And it should come as no surprise to learn that this was the lease (dated 1770) of Peter Short. Here as elsewhere Short behaved as if bent on asserting a claim to be Woodstock’s oldest and most active and alert settler – he continued to make appearances in Woodstock history until a few years before his death . . .” (Evers, Alf. Woodstock: History of an American Town. New York: The Overlook Press, 1987. p. 80-81.)

 

On the 1870 United States census Lorenzo, age 21, was residing in the town of Woodstock. Also living in the household were his mother Rebecca Short, age 53, who was listed with an occupation of “keeping house”; his sister Adaline Short, age 17, who was listed with an occupation of “at home”; and his sister Cathrine Short, age 25, who was listed with an occupation of “paper box maker for lozenges.” Rebecca’s real estate was valued at $1,500 and her personal estate was valued at $800. Lorenzo was listed with an occupation of farmer.

 

Map of Yankeetown, located in the town of Woodstock in Ulster County, New YorkWoodstock, NY Map, 1875.Beers, F. W. County Atlas of Ulster, New York. Map. [ca 1:24000]. New York: Walker & Jewett, 1875.

Map of Yankeetown, home to the Short family farm near Woodstock, Ulster County, New York.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Map of the town of Woodstock, 1875. Yankeetown, located in the southeast section of the town of Woodstock, Ulster County, New York, was home to the Short family farm.  

Beers, F. W. County Atlas of Ulster, New York. Map. [ca 1:24000]. New York: Walker & Jewett, 1875.

 

Map of Yankeetown, located in the town of Woodstock in Ulster County, New YorkBeers, F. W. County Atlas of Ulster, New York. Map. [ca 1:24000]. New York: Walker & Jewett, 1875.

Map of Yankeetown, home to the Short family farm near Woodstock, Ulster County, New York.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Map of Yankeetown, town of Woodstock, Ulster County, New York. 1875. Yankeetown was home to the Short family farm.

Beers, F. W. County Atlas of Ulster, New York. Map. [ca 1:24000]. New York: Walker & Jewett, 1875.

 

In 1870 the agricultural census for the town of Woodstock showed that Lorenzo operated a 90-acre farm that included 80 acres of improved land and 10 acres of woodland. As compared to ten years earlier in 1860 the family farm had increased in size by 15 acres, from 75 acres to 90 acres, and the amount of improved land had increased by 30 acres, from 50 acres to 80 acres. The farm included three horses, two milk cows, six sheep and two swine. The property produced 20 bushels of Indian corn, 10 bushels of oats and 16 bushels of buckwheat. The farm was valued at $1,600 and all farm equipment was valued at $25.

 

For additional insight as the outputs of farms located within of the town of Woodstock below is a summary of some its major agricultural products in 1875: Apples, 21,625 bushels; Potatoes, 12,868 bushels; Oats, 8,360 bushels; Indian corn, 6,962 bushels; Buckwheat, 6,329 bushels; Rye, 6,066 bushels; Winter wheat, 50 bushels; Beans, 21 bushels; Pork made, 91,291 pounds; Butter made, 79,425 pounds; Honey, 3,325 pounds; Maple sugar, 815 pounds; Maple syrup, 242 pounds; Milk sold in market, 2,150 gallons; Cider made, 918 barrels; Hay produced, 4,614 tons.

 

The Short family farm, located near the Little Beaverkill, was considered prime acreage for farming. Alf Evers wrote: “Most prosperous of all the farms [in the town of Woodstock] were those with ample acreage of lowland along the Sawkill and Beaverkill. Here the descendants of early settlers were in possession of the best farmland. The most valuable farms belonged to Lashers, Van Ettens, Vandebogarts, Riseleys, Shorts and a very few others. (Evers, Alf. Woodstock: History of an American Town. New York: The Overlook Press, 1987. p. 358.)

 

The family farm was located in a section of the town of Woodstock then known as Yankeetown. According to an 1858 map of Ulster County by J. H. French, Yankeetown neighbors of the Short family to the east included several members of the Happy family, several of them with their own farms; and neighbors to the west included those with family surnames such as Gulnack, Elting, Cutler, Shultis, Sagendorf, Sickler, Stone, Gardner and Peilman, among others. Also to the east of the Short family farm was the local one-room schoolhouse, district #4, where Lorenzo Short likely received his early education. Several saw mills were in operation along the Little Beaverkill or its tributaries. According to Nathaniel Bartlett Sylvester one of the sawmills in operation along a tributary to the Little Beaverkill was operated by the Short family, although which member of the Short family was not identified.

 

In 1874 the South Woodstock Methodist Episcopal Church was constructed adjacent to the schoolhouse. Construction of the church cost $1,525. Presiding officers at the time of incorporation in 1873 included Samuel Cutler and Alfred Gulnack and the trustees included Samuel Cutler, William Shultis, Alfred Gulnack, William Short and David Sagendorf. The pastor in these early days was Reverend C. H. Reynolds.

 

The Yankeetown hamlet, later known as South Woodstock, and now known as Wittenberg, is located southwest from Bearsville near the junction of Route 40 and Route 45. Mount Tobias, at 2,540 feet, is located to the north and Ticetonyk Mountain, at 2,500 feet, is located to the south. The Esopus Creek is located generally to the west, with the hamlet of Mount Tremper situated to the northwest. Today, located within the Wittenberg hamlet is the popular New York state Kenneth L. Wilson Campground and Yankeetown Pond.

 

Bearsville, NY, 1:24,000 quad, 2019, USGSBearsville, NY, 1:24,000 quad, 2019, USGSBearsville, NY, 1:24,000 quad, 2019, USGS.

Map of Yankeetown, home to the Short family farm near Woodstock, Ulster County, New York.

Lorenzo Short operated one of the longest running photographic studios in the history of Kingston, New York. Short began his career as a farmer, but upon switching careers around 1873, he opened his studio in the Rondout section of the Kingston. He operated the studio until his passing in 1928, and it was afterwards managed by his daughter Belle until she closed the doors in 1952.

Modern map of the Yankeetown section of the town of Woodstock. 2019. Yankeetown was home to the Short family farm.

United States Geological Survey. Bearsville, NY. Map. [1:24000]. 2019.

 

Although Lorenzo had long moved on to his photographic trade, in 1920, some 47 years after opening his Rondout gallery, he showed some of his farming skills in raising rabbits for sale. “FOR SALE – Raise rabbits in your backyard. The only way to solve the meat question. I furnish thoroughbred, healthy breeding stock: Flemish Giants, Rufus Reds, New Zealands. Lorenzo Short, 7 St. James Court, Kingston, N.Y.” (“For Sale.” Kingston Daily Freeman. May 20, 1920.) In a second advertisement Short announced that he was selling rabbit meat. “FOR SALE – Rabbit meat, either on the hoof or dressed. 30c per pound, live weight. Makes a fine thanksgiving dinner. L. Short, 7 St. James Court.” (“For Sale.” Kingston Daily Freeman. November 17, 1921.)

 

Continued next week . . .

 

Additional Information or Comments

 

If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Lorenzo Short please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist Belle Short cabinet cards cartes de visite D. J. Auchmoody Empire View Co. Empire View Company gallery George D. Jopson Hudson Valley Kingston Lorenzo Short photographer photography Rondout stereoviews Stockade District studio Wittenberg Woodstock https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/5/lorenzo-short-rondout-s-boss-photographer-part-1 Sat, 01 May 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Stamford Stereoviews by William F. Spencer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/stamford-stereoviews-by-william-f-spencer W. F. Spencer was a popular photographer in Delaware County, New York from circa 1859 to 1886. He operated at several locations in the area including Stamford, Gilboa and Prattsville. Despite his photographic success he was perhaps more popularly known locally as a jeweler and watchmaker.

 

I have recently acquired four rare stereoviews that were published by William F. Spencer. The photographs depict scenes from in and around the village of Stamford in Delaware County.

 

Stereoview by photographer W. F. Spencer of Stamford, New York.Lake SceneW. F. Spencer was a popular photographer in Delaware County, New York from circa 1859 to 1886. He operated at several locations in the area including Stamford, Gilboa and Prattsville. Despite his photographic success he was perhaps more popularly known locally as a jeweler and watchmaker. Stereoview by photographer W. F. Spencer of Stamford, New York.Village HomeW. F. Spencer was a popular photographer in Delaware County, New York from circa 1859 to 1886. He operated at several locations in the area including Stamford, Gilboa and Prattsville. Despite his photographic success he was perhaps more popularly known locally as a jeweler and watchmaker. Stereoview by photographer W. F. Spencer of Stamford, New York.Three WomenW. F. Spencer was a popular photographer in Delaware County, New York from circa 1859 to 1886. He operated at several locations in the area including Stamford, Gilboa and Prattsville. Despite his photographic success he was perhaps more popularly known locally as a jeweler and watchmaker. Stereoview by photographer W. F. Spencer of Stamford, New York.Village StreetW. F. Spencer was a popular photographer in Delaware County, New York from circa 1859 to 1886. He operated at several locations in the area including Stamford, Gilboa and Prattsville. Despite his photographic success he was perhaps more popularly known locally as a jeweler and watchmaker.

 

 

 

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) ambrotype ambrotypist Augusta Spencer Bloomville Caroline Spencer Catskill Mountains Catskills Delaware County Devasego Falls Devasego Inn Eliza Spencer Frances Spencer gallery Gilboa Greene County Heartbreak Hotel Henry Lemily Jefferson Jefferson House jeweler Kingston L. D. Jones landscapes photographer photography portraits Prattsville scenery Stamford stereoviews studio watchmaker Whedon Spencer William F. Spencer Windham https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/stamford-stereoviews-by-william-f-spencer Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Catskills, Then and Now: Devil’s Tombstone https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/catskills-then-and-now-devil-s-tombstone The Devil’s Tombstone in the town of Hunter, Greene County is an extremely large sandstone boulder that legend states is the burial site of the Devil. The boulder is located in the heart of Stony Clove at the popular Devil’s Tombstone Campground, one of the oldest campgrounds in the Catskills and New York State. The enormous boulder has also historically been known as Pulpit Rock, the Devil’s Stool, the Devil’s Seat and Picnic Rock.

 

Alf Evers in his 1972 classic The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock described the Devil’s Tombstone:

 

“The Tombstone is a slab of sandstone almost six feet wide and perhaps seven feet high with a rudely rounded top. It was set on end many thousands of years ago by water and ice power and has much the look of a conventional tombstone of gigantic size. It stands within what is known officially as the Devil’s Tombstone Camping Site of the New York State Department of Conservation. As far back as the 1860s the Tombstone was photographed for viewing in a parlor stereoscope. This earliest known photograph shows the stone with a mountain wagon and team beside it and some roughly dressed men cooking nearby. The men were probably fisherman – for the trout streams in the neighborhood were once famous, and Charles Lanman reported that he and his party caught seven hundred during their overnight stay.

 

There is unfortunately no inscription on the Tombstone giving the Devil’s dates of birth and death and other pertinent information. But campers at the site are sometimes brought to rapt attention as they see a slanting beam of late afternoon sunlight illuminating the face of the Tombstone. Then for a few moments the rough surface of the stone seems to pulse with meaning as ancient scratched and eroded pits appear to arrange themselves into the symbols of a forgotten language which might very well, could they be translated, give the world the details of the Devil’s death amid the scenic splendor of the Catskill Mountains. But until a translator comes along, it will be necessary to take the Tombstone and the great event it commemorates on faith.” (Evers, Alf. The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock. Woodstock, NY: The Overlook Press, 1972. p. 233-234.)

 

For more information on the folklore of the Devil in the Catskills, look no further than The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock by Alf Evers, where an entire chapter details the Devil’s mischievous doings.

 

The plaque on Devil’s Tombstone reads: “This tablet commemorates the one hundredth anniversary of New York State’s Forest Preserve. The surrounding mountains, streams and woodlands remain a legacy from the past. Protected by the Constitution of New York State they represent a heritage for future generations. Erected by the Environmental Conservation Department, State of New York.” The Catskills Forest Preserve was created in 1985, and required the land to be “forever kept as wild forest lands”.

 

The stereoview titled “Picnic Rock, Stony Clove” was published by John Jacob Loeffler, one of the greatest Catskills photographers in history. It was published circa the 1870s-1880s and is one of the earliest known photographs of the Devil’s Tombstone. The vintage postcard was published in the early 1900s by the Souvenir Post Card Company of New York. The rock inscriptions seen in the photograph include the years 1898 and 1906. The postcard was never mailed. My photograph was taken in the summer of 2017 over 140 years after Loeffler’s stereoview.

 

Picnic Rock, Stony ClovePicnic Rock, Stony Clove

The Devil’s Tombstone in the town of Hunter, Greene County is an extremely large sandstone boulder that legend states is the burial site of the Devil.Devil's Tombstone, Stony Clove Notch, Catskill Mts., N.Y.The Devil’s Tombstone in the town of Hunter, Greene County is an extremely large sandstone boulder that legend states is the burial site of the Devil. The boulder is located at the popular Devil’s Tombstone Campground, one of the oldest campgrounds in the Catskills and New York State. Alf Evers in his 1972 classic The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock describes the Tombstone:

“The Tombstone is a slab of sandstone almost six feet wide and perhaps seven feet high with a rudely rounded top. It was set on end many thousands of years ago by water and ice power and has much the look of a conventional tombstone of gigantic size. It stands within what is known officially as the Devil’s Tombstone Camping Site of the New York State Department of Conservation. As far back as the 1860s the Tombstone was photographed for viewing in a parlor stereoscope. This earliest known photograph shows the stone with a mountain wagon and team beside it and some roughly dressed men cooking nearby. The men were probably fisherman – for the trout streams in the neighborhood were once famous, and Charles Lanman reported that he and his party caught seven hundred during their overnight stay.

There is unfortunately no inscription on the Tombstone giving the Devil’s dates of birth and death and other pertinent information. But campers at the site are sometimes brought to rapt attention as they see a slanting beam of late afternoon sunlight illuminating the face of the Tombstone. Then for a few moments the rough surface of the stone seems to pulse with meaning as ancient scratched and eroded pits appear to arrange themselves into the symbols of a forgotten language which might very well, could they be translated, give the world the details of the Devil’s death amid the scenic splendor of the Catskill Mountains. But until a translator comes along, it will be necessary to take the Tombstone and the great event it commemorates on faith.” (Evers, Alf. The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock. Woodstock, NY: The Overlook Press, 1972. p. 233-234.)

For more information on the folklore of the Devil in the Catskills, look no further than The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock by Alf Evers, where an entire chapter details the Devil’s mischievous doings.

The plaque on Devil’s Tombstone reads: “This tablet commemorates the one hundredth anniversary of New York State’s Forest Preserve. The surrounding mountains, streams and woodlands remain a legacy from the past. Protected by the Constitution of New York State they represent a heritage for future generations. Erected by the Environmental Conservation Department, State of New York.” The Catskills Forest Preserve was created in 1985, and required the land to be “forever kept as wild forest lands”.

The Devil’s Tombstone in the town of Hunter, Greene County is an extremely large sandstone boulder that legend states is the burial site of the Devil.Devil's TombstoneHunter, Greene County

The Devil’s Tombstone in the town of Hunter, Greene County is an extremely large sandstone boulder that legend states is the burial site of the Devil. The boulder is located at the popular Devil’s Tombstone Campground, one of the oldest campgrounds in the Catskills and New York State. Alf Evers in his 1972 classic The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock describes the Tombstone:

“The Tombstone is a slab of sandstone almost six feet wide and perhaps seven feet high with a rudely rounded top. It was set on end many thousands of years ago by water and ice power and has much the look of a conventional tombstone of gigantic size. It stands within what is known officially as the Devil’s Tombstone Camping Site of the New York State Department of Conservation. As far back as the 1860s the Tombstone was photographed for viewing in a parlor stereoscope. This earliest known photograph shows the stone with a mountain wagon and team beside it and some roughly dressed men cooking nearby. The men were probably fisherman – for the trout streams in the neighborhood were once famous, and Charles Lanman reported that he and his party caught seven hundred during their overnight stay.

There is unfortunately no inscription on the Tombstone giving the Devil’s dates of birth and death and other pertinent information. But campers at the site are sometimes brought to rapt attention as they see a slanting beam of late afternoon sunlight illuminating the face of the Tombstone. Then for a few moments the rough surface of the stone seems to pulse with meaning as ancient scratched and eroded pits appear to arrange themselves into the symbols of a forgotten language which might very well, could they be translated, give the world the details of the Devil’s death amid the scenic splendor of the Catskill Mountains. But until a translator comes along, it will be necessary to take the Tombstone and the great event it commemorates on faith.” (Evers, Alf. The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock. Woodstock, NY: The Overlook Press, 1972. p. 233-234.)

For more information on the folklore of the Devil in the Catskills, look no further than The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock by Alf Evers, where an entire chapter details the Devil’s mischievous doings.

The plaque on Devil’s Tombstone reads: “This tablet commemorates the one hundredth anniversary of New York State’s Forest Preserve. The surrounding mountains, streams and woodlands remain a legacy from the past. Protected by the Constitution of New York State they represent a heritage for future generations. Erected by the Environmental Conservation Department, State of New York.” The Catskills Forest Preserve was created in 1985, and required the land to be “forever kept as wild forest lands”.

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Then and Now 1885 1985 Alf Evers boulder burial camp camper campground camping Catskill Forest Preserve Catskills Charles Lanman DEC Department of Conservation Devil Devil's Seat Devil's Stool Devil's Tombstone Devil's Tombstone Campground faith forever wild grave Greene County Hunter Hunter Mountain Notch Lake Picnic Rock Pulpit Rock rock sandstone stone Stony Clove tablet The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock tombstone https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/catskills-then-and-now-devil-s-tombstone Sat, 17 Apr 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Murals of Kingston, New York: Midtown https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/murals-of-kingston-new-york-midtown The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspects of the festival are the beautiful, and often large-scale, murals seen throughout the city.

 

Included in this post is a sampling of murals that can be found in, or close to, the midtown section of Kingston.

 

The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston.Anos de SoledadMidtown, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this front section of the mural is “a portrait of Nina Gualinga, the environmental & indigenous rights activist and Hija del Primer Levantamiento - from a photograph taken by Marc Silver during his documentation of traditional ayahuasca medicine in the Ecuadorian Amazon. It also depicts images of migration, local Kingston natural landscapes . . .” A side section of the mural (seen separately) depicts “an Inca Inti gold piece over #coal and #marble, which were natural resources mined from the area to build cities and capitals. Traditional medicine, modern technology, wellness and health divided by years of solitude.”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston.IncaMidtown, Kingston, Ulster County

This side section of a larger mural was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this section of the mural depicts “an Inca Inti gold piece over #coal and #marble, which were natural resources mined from the area to build cities and capitals. Traditional medicine, modern technology, wellness and health divided by years of solitude.”

The front section of the mural is the large scale, incredibly vibrant art piece titled Anos de Soledad. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this front section of the mural is “a portrait of Nina Gualinga, the environmental & indigenous rights activist and Hija del Primer Levantamiento - from a photograph taken by Marc Silver during his documentation of traditional ayahuasca medicine in the Ecuadorian Amazon. It also depicts images of migration, local Kingston natural landscapes . . .”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.

Anos de Soledad

The large scale, incredibly vibrant mural titled Anos de Soledad was created by artists Mata Ruda, Nanook and Lunar New Year in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According the artist’s (Nanook) website, this front section of the mural is “a portrait of Nina Gualinga, the environmental & indigenous rights activist and Hija del Primer Levantamiento - from a photograph taken by Marc Silver during his documentation of traditional ayahuasca medicine in the Ecuadorian Amazon. It also depicts images of migration, local Kingston natural landscapes . . .” A side section of the mural (seen separately) depicts “an Inca Inti gold piece over #coal and #marble, which were natural resources mined from the area to build cities and capitals. Traditional medicine, modern technology, wellness and health divided by years of solitude.”

 

The midtown mural titled “Ain’t I a Woman?”, in honor of Sojourner Truth”, was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artists Jess X. Chen and Chip Thomas.Ain't I A WomanKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “Ain’t I a Woman?” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artists Jess X. Chen and Chip Thomas. The mural honors the well known speech by the same name that was delivered by Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), a 19th century abolitionist and women’s rights activist, at the 1851 Ohio Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. Sojourner Truth was born into slavery south of Kingston in the village of Swartekill (near today’s Rifton). She gained her freedom in 1827 with New York’s abolition of slavery. Through her faith, lectures, and preaching, Truth would become one of the most vocal and prominent leaders of the national abolition and civil rights movement. In 2014 the Smithsonian Institute named Sojourner Truth one of the “100 Most Significant Americans of All Time.”

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Ain’t I a Woman

The midtown mural titled Ain’t I a Woman? was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artists Jess X. Chen and Chip Thomas. The mural honors the well-known speech by the same name that was delivered by Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), a 19th century abolitionist and women’s rights activist, at the 1851 Ohio Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. Sojourner Truth was born into slavery south of Kingston in the village of Swartekill (near today’s Rifton). She gained her freedom in 1827 with New York’s abolition of slavery. Through her faith, lectures, and preaching, Truth would become one of the most vocal and prominent leaders of the national abolition and civil rights movement. In 2014 the Smithsonian Institute named Sojourner Truth one of the “100 Most Significant Americans of All Time.”

 

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone, painted by Eugene Stetz, Jr., adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston.FishboneKingston, Ulster County

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Eugene Stetz, Jr. in 2016 as part of the 7th annual O+ festival in Kingston. Stetz is a High Falls resident and artist who works in various mediums such as illustration, sculpture and large-scale murals. For more information about Eugene Stetz visit his website at www.stetzism.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.

Fishbone

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Eugene Stetz, Jr. in 2016 as part of the 7th annual O+ festival in Kingston. Stetz is a High Falls resident and artist who works in various mediums such as illustration, sculpture and large-scale murals. For more information about Eugene Stetz visit his website at www.stetzism.com.

 

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone, painted by Eugene Stetz, Jr., adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston.Fishbone, photobombKingston, Ulster County

The vibrant and imaginative mural known as Fishbone adorns the side of People’s Place in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Eugene Stetz, Jr. in 2016 as part of the 7th annual O+ festival in Kingston. Stetz is a High Falls resident and artist who works in various mediums such as illustration, sculpture and large-scale murals. For more information about Eugene Stetz visit his website at www.stetzism.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Fishbone, Photobomb

 

Touching mural in Kingston, Ulster County that honors four friends that tragically died in a 2015 car accident in nearby Saugerties.FriendsKingston, Ulster County

This touching midtown mural honors four friends that tragically died in a 2015 car accident in nearby Saugerties. According to newspaper reports, “Meredith McSpirit, the 19-year-old driver of the car, was the only survivor of the crash, in which the vehicle she was driving went down a 110-foot embankment, hit a house and landed on its roof on Dock Street in the village of Saugerties.” (Pineiro-Zucker, Diane. Daily Freeman. www.dailyfreeman.com. August 27, 2015).

Clockwise from the top are Adam (Jeff) McQueen (1993-2015), Kaireem Meeks Jr. (age 24), Dante Crump (1993-2015) and Jonte Clark (1989-2015). Jalani Crooks, artist and Kingston native, painted the mural in honor of his high school friends during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Friends

This touching midtown mural honors four friends that tragically died in a 2015 car accident in nearby Saugerties. According to newspaper reports, “Meredith McSpirit, the 19-year-old driver of the car, was the only survivor of the crash, in which the vehicle she was driving went down a 110-foot embankment, hit a house and landed on its roof on Dock Street in the village of Saugerties.” (Pineiro-Zucker, Diane. Daily Freeman. www.dailyfreeman.com. August 27, 2015).

 

Clockwise from the top are Adam (Jeff) McQueen (1993-2015), Kaireem Meeks Jr. (age 24), Dante Crump (1993-2015) and Jonte Clark (1989-2015). Jalani Crooks, artist and Kingston native, painted the mural in honor of his high school friends during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

 

The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known artist Lady Pink.Native Americans Discover ColumbusKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known graffiti and mural artist Lady Pink. Her real name is Sandra Fabara and she is popularly known as the “first lady of graffiti.” Starting out in the New York City sub-culture of subway graffiti artist of the early 1980s, she eventually turned to legal art, and now several of her pieces are within the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known artist Lady Pink.Native Americans Discover ColumbusKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “Native Americans Discover Columbus” was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well known graffiti and mural artist Lady Pink. Her real name is Sandra Fabara and she is popularly known as the “first lady of graffiti.” Starting out in the New York City sub-culture of subway graffiti artist of the early 1980s, she eventually turned to legal art, and now several of her pieces are within the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Native Americans Discover Columbus

The midtown mural titled Native Americans Discover Columbus was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by well-known graffiti and mural artist Lady Pink. Her real name is Sandra Fabara and she is popularly known as the “first lady of graffiti.” Starting out in the New York City sub-culture of subway graffiti artist of the early 1980s, she eventually turned to legal art, and now several of her pieces are within the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

 

The historically focused mural titled Pretty Nose adorns the side of the Keegan Ales building in midtown Kingston.Pretty NoseKingston, Ulster County

The historically focused mural titled “Pretty Nose” adorns the side of the Keegan Ales building in midtown Kingston. The mural depicts a Native American woman of the Arapaho tribe known as Pretty Nose. The original photo, the basis of the mural, was taken circa 1878 at Fort Keogh, Montana. The mural was created by artist Lmnopi in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Pretty Nose

The historically focused mural titled Pretty Nose adorns the side of the Keegan Ales building in midtown Kingston. The mural depicts a Native American woman of the Arapaho tribe known as Pretty Nose. The original photo, the basis of the mural, was taken circa 1878 at Fort Keogh, Montana. The mural was created by artist Lmnopi in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston.

 

The mural titled “M’YMCA” adorns the YMCA building in Kingston, New York; and was created by Woodstock artist Julia Santos Solomon.M'YMCAKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “M’YMCA” adorns the YMCA building in the midtown section of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by Woodstock artist Julia Santos Solomon in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According to the artist, the M’YMCA project “is an urban initiative to bring the people of Midtown Kingston together to create a portrait of the neighborhood” in order “to celebrate the rich diversity of its residents, its history and heritage.” For more information about the artist visit her website at www.juliasantossolomon.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
M’YMCA

The mural titled M’YMCA adorns the YMCA building in the midtown section of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by Woodstock artist Julia Santos Solomon in 2014 as part of the 5th annual O+ festival in Kingston. According to the artist, the M’YMCA project “is an urban initiative to bring the people of Midtown Kingston together to create a portrait of the neighborhood” in order “to celebrate the rich diversity of its residents, its history and heritage.” For more information about the artist visit her website at www.juliasantossolomon.com.

 

The three-story mural titled “O Wind, Take Me To My Country” was created by artists Jess X. Chen and Jia Sung as part of the 2016 O+ festival in Kingston.O Wind, Take Me To My CountryKingston, Ulster County

The three-story mural titled “O Wind, Take Me To My Country” was created by artists Jess X. Chen and Jia Sung as part of the 2016 O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American poet, and contains the following inscription: “In solidarity with our mothers & sisters & bird friends who have been migrating across borders.”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
O Wind, Take Me To My Country

The three-story mural titled O Wind, Take Me To My Country was created by artists Jess X. Chen and Jia Sung as part of the 2016 O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American poet, and contains the following inscription: “In solidarity with our mothers & sisters & bird friends who have been migrating across borders.”

 

The Stockade District mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo.SWAKKingston, Ulster County

The midtown mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. It is one half of the “SWAK” mural pair, with the other SWAK version being located in the Stockade district of Kingston.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
SWAK

The midtown mural titled SWAK was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. It is one half of the “SWAK” mural pair, with the other SWAK version being located in the Stockade district of Kingston.

 

Mural in Kingston, New York with man playing the saxophone with the words “If the thunder don’t get you, the lightning will.”Thunder and LightningKingston, Ulster County

This catchy street art is located in Kingston, New York. It includes the words “If the thunder don’t get you, the lightning will.”

Thunder and Lightning

This catchy street art is located in midtown Kingston, New York. It includes the words “If the thunder don’t get you, the lightning will.”

 

Mural of the Atlantic Sturgeon at Keegan Ales in Kingston, Ulster County created by Will Lytle, artist and owner of Thorneater Comics.Atlantic SturgeonKingston, Ulster County

As the title implies, the mural depicts the Atlantic Sturgeon, a bony, somewhat prehistoric looking fish that is considered to be one of the oldest fish species in the world, perhaps even predating the dinosaurs. The ancient looking fish mural is located at Keegan Ales in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Will Lytle, artist and owner of Thorneater Comics, during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Atlantic Sturgeon

As the title implies, the mural depicts the Atlantic Sturgeon, a bony, somewhat prehistoric looking fish that is considered to be one of the oldest fish species in the world, perhaps even predating the dinosaurs. The ancient looking fish mural is located at Keegan Ales in midtown Kingston. The mural was created by Will Lytle, artist and owner of Thorneater Comics, during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival.

 

The midtown Kingston mural known as Justice, appropriately located on the side wall of a legal practice, depicts Lady Justice, the scales of justice and a city skyline.JusticeKingston, Ulster County

The midtown Kingston mural known as Justice, appropriately located on the side wall of a legal practice, depicts Lady Justice, the scales of justice and a city skyline. The mural was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by artist George Loizou, the son of the owners of Dietz Stadium in Kingston.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
Justice

The midtown Kingston mural known as Justice, appropriately located on the side wall of a legal practice, depicts Lady Justice, the scales of justice and a city skyline. The mural was created during the 2016 and 7th annual O+ Festival by artist George Loizou, the son of the owners of Dietz Stadium in Kingston.

 

The mural titled “Moving Mountains” was created by Brooklyn street artist Vince Ballentine in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.Moving MountainsKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “Moving Mountains was created by Brooklyn street artist Vince Ballentine in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival. The mural seeks “to honor indigenous heritage and generational wisdom.”

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Moving Mountains

The mural titled Moving Mountains was created by Brooklyn street artist Vince Ballentine in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival. The mural seeks “to honor indigenous heritage and generational wisdom.”

 

The mural titled “Flight Sequence was created by artist Justin Suarez and is located on the side of The Anchor bar and restaurant in midtown Kingston, New York.Flight SequenceKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “Flight Sequence” is located o the side of the Anchor bar and restaurant in midtown Kingston, New York. The mural depicts the flight sequence of the barn owl during its nocturnal hunt. The mural was created by Rochester based artist Justin “Mr. PRVRT” Suarez in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. For more information about the artist visit his website at www.mrprvrt.com.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Flight Sequence

The mural titled Flight Sequence is located on the side of the Anchor bar and restaurant in midtown Kingston, New York. The mural depicts the flight sequence of the barn owl during its nocturnal hunt. The mural was created by Rochester based artist Justin “Mr. PRVRT” Suarez in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival. For more information about the artist visit his website at www.mrprvrt.com.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist Catskill Mountains Catskills festival Hudson Valley Kingston medicine murals New York O positive O+ Festival paintings Stockade District street art https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/murals-of-kingston-new-york-midtown Sat, 10 Apr 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Maurice Farrington – Delhi Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/maurice-farrington-delhi-photographer Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

 

Logo for photographer Maurice Farrington of Delhi, New YorkFarrington LogoMaurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Maurice Farrington was born on July 17, 1837 on the Farrington homestead at East Delhi in Delaware County, New York. The family homestead was eventually taken over by Zenas Farrington, Maurice’s brother, where “he [Zenas] took charge of the home farm, which he bought in 1865, and has since carried on a thriving business in general agriculture, of late years making a specialty of dairying, keeping a valuable herd of Guernsey cows, and making a superior article of butter, which finds a ready market in New York City.” (The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, New York. Boston: Biographical Review Publishing Company, 1895. p. 364-366.)

 

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.
Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

Maurice Farrington was the grandson of March Farrington (1762-1849), an early pioneer, veteran of the American Revolution and the War of 1812, and farmer. “. . . March Farrington, who was of English antecedents, was born in this State in October, 1762. He had an honorable record as a soldier in the Revolution and the War of 1812, and as a pioneer of Delaware County. On first arriving in this region, having followed a route marked by blazed trees, he located his home in that part of the town of Meredith now known as Meredith Square; and, when he built his humble log cabin, his nearest neighbor was in Delhi, some six miles away. He and his family subsisted mainly for a time on the game and fish to be found in the vicinity. He subsequently removed to Delhi, where he and his cherished wife spent their declining years, she passing to her eternal rest November 10, 1841, in the seventy-eight year of her age, having been born April 17, 1764, and he dying April 1, 1849. Her maiden name was Betsey Colton; and by her and her husband five children were reared – Morris L., Paulina, Betsy Ann, Florella, and Polly. (The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, New York. Boston: Biographical Review Publishing Company, 1895. Pages 364-366.)

As an undoubted patriot March enlisted to serve his country during the American Revolution at the tender age of 13. “With patriotic fire burning in his veins, early in the spring of 1776 [he] enlisted in Col. Sergent’s regiment for a period of one year. He was only thirteen years of age, so thus the only course open to him was to enlist as a drummer boy. In this he was successful, serving out the full years’ service.” (“Bi-Centennial Corner.” Republican Express. October 23, 1975.) March joined the same unit, the 16th Continental Infantry, as his father, then Captain Thomas Farrington. March was stationed near the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775 where his father was leading his unit.

 

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.
Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

“Colonel Thomas Farrington [Maurice’s great grandfather] was a lieutenant in Israel Putnam’s company during the early days of the War for Independence. Coming from Massachusetts, he had already served the province from 1755 until the time of the reduction of Canada advancing in the service from Private to Captain. At the beginning of hostilities with the mother country, he was desirous of entering the service and applied for any officer vacancy in the Continental army. Receiving a commission, he hurried to the Boston area. At the Battle of Bunker Hill he was in command of the Putnam company and continued in the service until the close of the war. On Jan. 1, 1777, he received his commission as Lieutenant Colonel, thus carrying the title of Colonel from that time on.” (“Bi-Centennial Corner.” Republican Express. October 23, 1975.) For more information on Thomas Farrington see the article titled “Bi-Centennial Corner” in the October 23, 1975 issue of the Republican Express.

Unfortunately, which the article above does not mention, is that the story of Thomas Farrington took a downward turn with his commission in January 1777 as a Lieutenant Colonel of the 5th Massachusetts Regiment. Only five months later from May 15 to May 17, 1777 he was court-martialed for “behaving in a Scandalous, & infamous Manner, such as is unbecoming an Officer & Gentle Man, by receiving & passing Counterfeit Money, Knowing it by such.” (“To George Washington from Major General William Heath, 19 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

Abigail Adams in a letter dated May 6, 1777 to her husband, and future President, John Adams wrote of the accusations against Thomas Farrington.

 

“I must add a little more. A most Horrid plot has been discovered of a Bank of villans counterfeiting to a Great amount, no person scarcly but what has more or less of these Bills. I am unlucky enough to have about 5 pounds LM of it, but this is not the worst of it. One Col. Farrington who has been concerned in the plot, was taken sick, and has confessd not only the Counterfeiting, but as they had engaged and inlisted nearly 2 thousand Men who upon the Troops comeing to Boston were to fall upon the people and make a General Havock. How much mercifull God than man, in this providentially bringing to light these Horrid plots and Schemes. I doubt not Heaven will still continue to favour us, unless our iniquities prevent.” (“Abigail Adams to John Adams, 6 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

 

Major General Heath in a May 19, 1777 letter to General George Washington wrote of the court martial against Farrington.

 

 “Saturday last the General Court Martial appointed for the Tryal of Lieut. Colonel Farrington of Colo. Putnams Regiment (charged with behaving in a scandalous and infamous manner) gave in their Judgement that He was guilty of the Charge alleged against him & have adjudged him to be discharged from the Army – Incapable to serve in the Continental Service and ordered him to be published in the News Papers. I have approved the Judgment which has this Day been put in execution – Immediately upon his being discharged from his Arrest the Council ordered him under close confinement.” (“To George Washington from Major General William Heath, 19 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

 

General, and future President, George Washington spared no mercy with his thoughts on the actions of Thomas Farrington, believing that he should be sentenced to death. In a May 23, 1777 letter to Major General William Heath, George Washington wrote:

 

“The conduct of those who desert & receive double Bounties, deserves severe punishment, the practice has prevailed to a great & scandalous degree, and the desertions after they have come into the Field, have been truly vexatious. However, I have heard nothing of such malignity or of so fatal a tendency, as the conduct of Lieutt Colo. Farrington. You say, you hope the Army will get rid of him. Will not the World too? I hope the State has provided Laws against such Offenders, for I can not conceive, that any Crime should be punished with more severity or more certain death, than what this Man has been Guilty of. Money is the sinews of War. That in which we are engaged is just One, and we have no means of carrying it on, but by the Continental or State Notes. Whoever attempts to destroy their credit, particularly that of those, emitted by the United States, is a flagitious Offender & should forfeit his life, to satisfie the demands of public justice. In the case before us, the enormity of the crime, is aggravated in a peculiar manner by the post, Farrington held.” (“From George Washington to Major General William Heath, 23 May 1777,” Founders Online, National Archives.)

 

On May 26, 1777, Thomas Farrington was “cashiered” from the Continental Army. His military career had ended in disgrace.

Interestingly, in several sources the positive aspects of Farrrington’s service were discussed, with no mention of how his military career had ended. For example, in The History of Delaware County, New York it was noted that “This gentleman was a lieutenant in Israel Putnam’s company, and commanded the company at Bunker Hill; he continued in the service as lieutenant colonel to the close of the war.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. Page 150.) This was not true; Thomas was dishonorably discharged from the military in 1777, and did not serve throughout the war. Perhaps the stories told in the community and passed on within the family from generation to generation only included Thomas Farrington’s heroic actions, while leaving out the fact that that he was court-martialed from the Continental Army and was reviled by none other than General and President George Washington.

Ever the patriot, in 1780, now at the age of 18, March Farrington again enlisted in the Continental Army, this time for three years, serving in the Massachusetts State line. He served in the company commanded by Captain John Abbot and later the unit of Captain John Williams. He served for 2 years, 9 months before being discharged at the end of the American Revolution. Around 1792 March followed his father to the remote lands of Delaware County, New York.

March Farrington, at the age of 50, again enlisted as a Private on July 18, 1812 for a period of five years, through July 18, 1817. He joined the 25th Infantry company commanded by Captain Henry Devanworth. The unit marched to Greenbush, then on to Fort Niagara, and later to the western frontier. He fought at the Battle of Chippawa on July 5, 1814 at what is now Ontario, Canada. He was discharged as a musician on March 27, 1815 “being incapable of performing the duties of a soldier in consequence of a lameness of the left hip.” (United State Congressional Serial Set. Volume 409.) March Farrington is buried at the Frisbee Family Cemetery in Delhi, near the Delaware County Historical Association.

Maurice Farrington, the photographer, was the son of Morris Lamb Farrington (1793-1882) and Ruth Frisbee (1797-1876). Morris Lamb Farrington was born on February 7, 1793, son of March Farrington and Betsey (Colton) Farrington. Morris served in the War of 1812, with the rank of Corporal in the New York Militia under both Captain F. P. Foot’s and Captain H. R. Phelps. Morris enlisted on August 24, 1812 and was discharged six months later on February 24, 1813. For his service he was awarded some bounty lands, listed as “11972 80 50.” His later occupation was as a farmer.

 

Views In and About Delhi, N.Y. Maurice Farrington, Photographer. Author’s collection.Views In and About Delhi, N.Y. by Maurice FarringtonViews In and About Delhi, N.Y. Maurice Farrington, Photographer. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.
Views In and About Delhi, N.Y. Maurice Farrington, Photographer. Author’s collection.

 

“Morris L. Farrington was but two years old when he came with his parents to this county, and at that early day educational advantages were here very limited. He began early to assist in the labors of the farm, growing more and more useful each year, remaining with his parents until he attained his majority, and afterward taking care of them in their latter years. In 1830 he bought the farm which is now included in the homestead of his son Zenas, of which he cleared a large portion, further improving it by erecting the present substantial set of frame buildings. Here he spent a long period of useful activity, loving to the venerable age of ninety years. He was a very intelligent man, taking part in the management of local affairs, and serving in many of the minor offices of the town. He married Ruth Frisbie, the daughter of Judge Gideon Frisbie, one of the original settlers of Delhi, and the first Judge of Delaware County, the first circuit of the county being held in his house. Judge Frisbie came here on horseback, long ere the time of public highways, and was for many years one of the most prominent men in this section of the county.” (The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, New York. Boston: Biographical Review Publishing Company, 1895. Pages 364-366.)

Morris married Ruth Frisbee on January 31, 1827 in Delhi, New York. She was the daughter of Judge Gideon Frisbee (1758-1828) and Huldah (Kidder) Frisbee (1756-1804). Together Morris and Ruth had five children, two of them dying at a young age, including Anzolette (1828-1872); Zenas (1831-1902); Maurice (Morris) (1837-1914); Alida (1839-1841); and Elizabeth (1840-1842).

Maurice’s mother, Ruth (Frisbee) Farrington, passed away in Delhi on March 28, 1876. Upon Ruth’s passing it was written that “Though invalid for some years she was always cheerful, and making those around her feel that they were not living in vain. The needy and afflicted always found in her a kind and sympathizing friend on whom they could rely for aid and consolation. She has gone to receive the reward for the blessings and kindnesses bestowed on others here.” (Delaware Gazette. April 5, 1876.)

Maurice’s father, Morris Lamb Farrington, passed away at Delhi on October 12, 1882. Upon his passing it was written that “Mr. Farrington was at the time of his death, perhaps the oldest resident of the town, and has always been one of its most respected, intelligent and upright citizens . . . About two years since a paralytic stroke nearly prostrated his mental and physical powers, memory failed and he has since been visibly approaching the end of earth, having lost the intelligent and comprehensive grasp of affairs for which he had up to that time always been distinguished. Now has disappeared from view one our most ancient and worthy landmarks – an interesting relic of the past and an exemplary, respected and aged patriarch and pioneer has taken his departure. ‘Take him all and all, we shall never look on his like again.’” (“Obituary.” Delaware Gazette. October 18, 1882.)

Both Morris Lamb Farrington and his wife Ruth (Frisbee) Farrington are both buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi, New York.

Maurice Farrington married Frances Eliza Thompson of Meredith in 1872. Frances was born in Delhi on April 24, 1849.  She was the daughter of Nathaniel R. and Caroline C. (Whitlock) Thompson. Together Maurice and Frances had had two children, Frank Maurice Farrington and Pauline Farrington.

Frank Maurice Farrington was born on December 28, 1872 at Delhi. Frank married Elizabeth Alexander Gallagher (1878-1955) of Marietta, Ohio. Frank was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church for 68 years and for a time served as trustee. During World War I Frank “served as executive in the entertainment division of the Army YMCA at Camp Lee, Va. and as YMCA secretary of various military camps. His services as lecturer at school assemblies and luncheon clubs took him to communities throughout the state.

Mr. Farrington was a charter member of the Delhi Kiwanis Club, and always took an active part in such local activities as Old Home Week and the Automobile Shows which were formerly held in the Delhi Opera House. For several years he conducted a drug store in the building now occupied by the Elm Tree Restaurant.

After selling his business to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries, Mr. Farrington devoted his time to writing books, stories and articles for trade magazines. He was considered an authority on Abraham Lincoln. In later years he engaged in the antique business with his wife.

He is survived by his wife and one sister, Miss Pauline Farrington of Delhi. An only daughter, Mrs. Virginia Wilson, died in 1951.” (Frank Farrington, Life-Long Delhi Resident, Dies.” The Delaware Republican Express. February 24, 1955.)

Frank passed away at the Delaware Sanitorium on February 21, 1955 where he had been a patient for 8 months. Funeral services were held at the McCall Funeral Home with services conducted by Rev. T. Howard Akland, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church. He is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

Pauline Farrington was born at Delhi on August 3, 1876 at Delhi, New York. As a youth she attended the Delaware Academy. For 14 years from 1905 to 1918 she worked as a music teacher at the New York Institution for the Blind in New York City. She then served as librarian from 1918 to 1948 at the Cannon Free Public Library in Delhi. Upon her retirement from the library, The Stamford Mirror-Recorder, the local newspaper wrote of contributions to the community.

 

“The retirement of Miss Pauline Farrington as Librarian at the Cannon Free Library cannot fail to leave a vacuum in the cultural life of Delhi. Her withdrawal from service terminates a period of thirty years faithful attendance at this institution, she having been the only librarian since the inception of the library. She was ever courteous and kindly toward the patrons of the institution, and has done much in guiding the reading habits of both young and old. Any book not immediately available she would get from the State Library, and no one was ever greeted with aught but a smile. Miss Farrington is withdrawing to enable her to do some of the things she has wanted to do and not be so confined, after a long period of fine service. The Library has been efficiently staffed, and while her pleasant and kindly smile will be missed, her influence will be indelibly stamped upon it. She was a keen student of books, and not at all averse to some of the modern trends. Her resignation is and will be a great loss to the patrons of the library.” (“Librarian Leaves Excellent Record.” Stamford Mirror-Recorder. August 12, 1948.)  

 

Always committed to her Second Presbyterian Church, Pauline served as the organist, was a Sunday School teacher, a member of the Ladies’ Aid and the Missionary Society. She died after a brief illness at the age of 88 on December 24, 1964. Funeral services were held at the R. J. McCall Funeral Home at Delhi in a service officiate by the Rev. Cameron B. Reed. There were no close survivors. She is buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

In his youth Maurice would have seen the work and galleries of professional photographers plying their trade at the village of Delhi. There was J. Churchill who operated out of rooms over the store of Griswold and Wright and later in rooms over the offices of Dr. Almiron Fitch. In 1855 Churchill announced that he “has returned once more to the village of Delhi, where he is practicing the art of Daguerreotypes . . . He flatters himself from his long experience in the business that he can ensure to his patrons Pictures which for richness of beauty and clearness, cannot be surpassed. Gentlemen and Ladies and the public in general, are invited to call. Satisfaction given in all cases, or no charge. Instructions given in the art.” (Delaware Gazette. September 10, 1856.) He offered ambrotypes, daguerreotypes, and melanotypes. An 1860 advertisement noted that Churchill had been operating for 12 years in the photography business.

Another early Delhi photographer was E. C. Riggs, “Ambrotype Artist,” who operated in rooms over the Post Office and later in rooms over Elwood’s Store. Riggs began his business in 1856, noted by several advertisements in local newspapers that can be found for his business. The operation seems to have only lasted a few years. In 1859 Riggs would leave the photography business as he sought to engage in a different line of work. He rented out his rooms and sold his equipment, including “his ENTIRE STOCK of GOODS AND APPARATUS used in the Ambrotype business. One ½ Size and one ¼ Size CAMERA, and Shields belonging to them; Cases, Mats, Preservers, Baths, & c.” (The Star of Delaware. January 15, 1859.)

 

Photographer E. C. Riggs operated a photographic “ambrotype” gallery from 1856 to 1859 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York.E. C. Riggs, Ambrotype ArtistE. C. Riggs was an “Ambrotype Artist” at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for four years from 1856 to 1859. E. C. Riggs advertisement. Delaware Gazette. September 10, 1856.

 

Photographer competition of the 1850s was tough in the small village of Delhi, with E. C. Riggs and J. Churchill occasionally battling in the local newspapers about each other’s motivations, quality and pricing. In one notable back-and-forth letter / advertisement published in the Delaware Gazette, a local newspaper, E. C. Riggs first wrote:

 

“IMMENSE EXCITEMENT! Ambrotypes at Reduced Prices!!

The subscriber would say to the public that, notwithstanding the TREMENDOUS EXERTIONS of our “up town” Philosopher to the contrary, he is alive and attending to business as usual. And his “ignorance of common philosophy” does not prevent him from selling the most beautiful pictures taken in this county, and at lower prices than they have ever been sold before.

As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false; and I defy the gentleman (?) who takes so much pains to injure me and make himself appear ridiculous, to produce one that has faded in the least. And I would like to have him give satisfaction to his customers, whose pictures I have taken over and finished off after passing through his philosophic hands. I will warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits. I respectfully invite the public to examine both sides – they shall be the judges.

Call in ladies and gentleman, and see who takes the cheapest and best pictures. A poor picture is dear at any price.

My Rooms are over Elwood’s Store.

Office hours are 9 A.M. to 3 ½ P. M.

E. C. Riggs. (Delaware Gazette. December 17, 1856.)

 

In response Churchill wrote:

 

“Pictures on Glass. The subscriber invites the attention of the public to his advertisement in another column, and his assertations therein contained, are in every respect true and correct. But it is not his intention to publish here, but to correct some misrepresentations which I see in an advertisement signed E. C. Riggs, in which he states as follows “As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false, and I defy the gentleman to produce one that has faded in the least.” If I am the man to whom he alludes as the “up town philosopher,” and the man who took so much pains to injure him, then I say the gentleman has stated a wicked falsehood, and he could not be ignorant of it. I never said a word about his Ambroytpes fading, for there is not one to be found, probably, that is more than three or four months old. And how does he know whether he asserts the truth or not?

I did say they were of short duration, and this I am able to maintain.

He further says “I warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits.” With what degree of propriety does he warrant his work, and what assurance can he give the public of its duration? Will the few months he has been in business be a sufficient time to test their durability? Let the public judge. Yet he is willing to warrant his work, but is careful not to say how long; he is then willing it shall stand upon its own merits. So am I, but it will not upon its own merits or any other.

If the Patented Ambrotype was of such durability, why did Brady and others of New York give them up? Because they were worthless, and his information is from one of the best men in this town, taken from his own lips.

I now come to is last italicized sentence. “A poor picture is dear at any price.” This is my sentiments exactly; and those who have been so unfortunate as to get one of your Patented Ambrotypes, will probably find out in a short time the truth of this assertion to their sorrow.

Gentlemen and ladies, call at my office and get you a fifty cent picture, and I will make it as durable as the rock of Gibraltar.

Yes, when your flesh in dust shall lie,

When death’s grey film o’er spread your beaming eye,

My life-like   mocking at decay,

Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day.

 

A Splendid Stock just received.

J. CHURCHILL.” (Delaware Gazette. December 24, 1856.)

 

In 1859 the E. C. Riggs gallery business was bought by B. F. Gilbert, who had previously operated at Hobart and Stamford. “New Ambrotype Gallery in Delhi. The subscriber would inform the inhabitants of Delhi and vicinity that he has taken the rooms formerly occupied by E. C. Riggs, where his is prepared to put up pictures in any of the late improved styles, and much superior in clearness of tone and expression to any that has ever been offered in this place. The public are invited to call and examine specimens. Rooms over Elwood’s store. B. F. GILBERT.” (“New Ambrotype Gallery in Delhi.” Bloomville Mirror. February 8, 1859.) Gilbert would later operate in rooms over the Gazette Office in Delhi.

On the 1855 New York State census, Gilbert, age 26, was listed as being at the town of Andes. His occupation was listed as “Merchant.” Also listed on the census was his wife Jane Gilbert, age 26; and their son Cortlandt Gilbert, at only 2 months old. On the 1860 US census Gilbert, age 30, was listed as living at Delhi with an occupation of “Artist.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 30; Cortland T. Gilbert, age 5; and Leland Gilbert, age 4.

On the 1865 census, Gilbert, age 36, was listed at being at the town of Delhi. He had the profession of “Photographer.” Also listed were Jane Gilbert, age 36; Cortland T. Gilbert, age 10; and Leland Gilbert, age 9. On the 1870 US census Gilbert, age 42, continued at Delhi, now with the occupation of “Photographer.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 40; Courtni Gilbert, age 15; David Gilbert, age 14; and John, age 4.

On the 1875 US census Gilbert, age 45, appears to be listed twice. First, he was listed at the town of Andes as a “Boarder” with an occupation of “Artist.” No family was listed. Second, Gilbert, age 46, was listed as residing in the village of Cobleskill in Schoharie County. He had an occupation of “Photographer.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 45; Cortland Gilbert, age 20; and Jennie Gilbert, age 9. By the 1880 US census Gilbert, age 50, was residing at Albany County, with the occupation of “Photographer.” Also listed was Jane Gilbert, age 49; Cortland T. Gilbert, age 25; David L. Gilbert, age 24; and Jennie Gilbert, age 13.

B. F. Gilbert operated at the village of Delhi, off and on, from c. 1859 to c. 1873. He operated at a number of locations including “Rooms over Elwood’s store,” “Rooms over the Gazette Office,” “at his old stand opposite the Republican Office,” “over the millinery store of Mrs. E. F. Hutson,” “opposite Mrs. Hutson’s Millinery store,” “on the ground floor, opposite Mendel & Bros’ Store” and “in the Utilitarian Building.”

In 1868 there was a Benjamin F. Gilbert of Delhi who declared bankruptcy. Although it is not clear that this is the same person, it is likely, and would perhaps explain why, a year earlier he sold his photograph gallery to Byron R. Johnson. In 1873 it was reported that “B. F. Gilbert has sold out his interest in the Photograph business to Maurice Farrington.” (Delaware Gazette. November 19, 1873.) By 1875 Gilbert was operating at Cobleskill in Schoharie County.

On the 1855 New York State census Maurice was listed with a profession of “Farmer.” No occupation was listed for him on either the 1860 US census or the 1865 New York State census. The 1870 US census, the 1875 New York State census and the 1880 US census had his occupation listed as “Photographer.”

In the early 1860s Maurice moved to Michigan where he resided for approximately five years. Zenas Farrington, Maurice’s brother, had also moved to Michigan, where he spent one year working as a farm laborer. Maurice served during the Civil War for the state of Michigan. After the Civil War Maurice returned to his hometown of Delhi, where he would stay for the remainder of his life.

Maurice began his career as a photographer soon after the Civil War. In 1867 the Bloomville Mirror, a local newspaper noted: “Maurice Farrington, a photographist; a good looking bach of thirty; prides himself much on his jet-black flowing beard and beautiful mustache.” (Bloomville Mirror. October 22, 1867.)

In June, 1867, it was noted that “B. F. Gilbert has associated with him the Photograph business Mr. Byron Johnson, long successful operator in California.” (Delaware Republican. June 23, 1867.) Around October, 1867 Byron R. Johnson purchased the gallery of B. F. Gilbert. An October 1867 advertisement in the Delaware Gazette for the Johnson gallery noted that “Byron R. Johnson having purchased B. F. Gilbert’s Photograph Gallery in Delhi . . . Mr. B. F. Gilbert is retained in the employ of B. R. Johnson and will be glad to wait on any of his old customers as usual.” (Delaware Gazette. October 2, 1867.)

Johnson came to his gallery with a great deal of experience. “B. R. Johnson is well and favorably known by all first-class Artists in the United States as an Artist of superior merit, having carried on the most extensive Gallery in San Francisco for the last sixteen years.” (“Now is your Time!” Delaware Gazette. December 11, 1867.) “Mr. Johnson has had the advantages that few Artists in this part of the world have had; he has carried on extensive business in this line for the last 17 years in San Francisco, and has been acknowledged to be at the head of his profession by all good judges of the art.” (Bloomville Mirror. February 16, 1869.)

 

Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery LogoByron R. Johnson Art Gallery LogoByron R. Johnson operated a photographic gallery from 1867 to 1869 at the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York. Logo for the Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery. Author's collection. 

 

Johnson’s full advertisements in the local newspapers highlighted the extended offerings available at his new gallery.

 

Delaware Gazette, October, 1867. “Now is your Time! Byron R. Johnson having purchased B. F. Gilbert’s Photograph Gallery in Delhi is now prepared to do better work and at shorter notice, than any Gallery in Delaware county, having fitted it up with the latest and most approved style of Instruments, Apparatus, Imperial Grounds, Fancy Chairs, & c. In fact, every thing necessary to make work equal to the first Gallery in the worlds. B. R. Johnson is well and favorably known by all first-class Artists in the United States as an Artist of superior merit, having carried on the most extensive Gallery in San Francisco for the last sixteen years. Persons wishing fine work done in the line of Photography, would do well to call and examine his work of art and satisfy themselves as to his facility and ability for doing fine work, and that his prices are 25 per cent less than New York prices. Photographs taken from the size of a pea to full life size, either Plain, India Ink, Water, Oil or Patelle colors. Old Pictures Copies to all sizes. If you have an Old Picture of a friends or relative ever so indistinct, I can bring it out as perfect as life by the new improved Copying instrument made expressly for such work, You will find the Imperial Card Pictures, Graces and Sun Pearls something entirely new. VIEWS OF DWELLINGS, LANDSCAPE, MACHINERY, & c.. taken at short notice. Visitors can pass off time in viewing our collection of California views, which are free to all for inspection. Attention is called to his large and varied stock of Oval and Square Frames, Also, Mouldings of every size and description. The largest and finest assortment of Albums ever brought to Delaware county. Also, a good assortment of English Steel Engravings, all of which are offered to customers and the trade generally, at prices so low as to exclude competition. INSTRUCTION given in every branch of the art. Instruments, Apparatus and Stock for sale. N.B. Mr. B. F. Gilbert is retained in the employ of B. R. Johnson and will be glad to wait on any of his old customers as usual.” (Delaware Gazette. October 2, 1867.)

 

Bloomville Mirror, February, 1869. “Cheapest and Best Photographs Are to be had at B. R. Johnson’s Justly Celebrated Gallery, Delhi, N.Y. over Dr. Calhoun’s Drug Store. Mr. Johnson has had the advantages that few Artists in this part of the world have had; he has carried on extensive business in this line for the last 17 years in San Francisco, and has been acknowledged to be at the head of his profession by all good judges of the art. Those wishing Good Work and at Reasonable Rates, should call and see for themselves the best collection of work ever exhibited in this part of the world. All pictures shown by Mr. Johnson are made by him in his gallery. Mr. Johnson would call particular attention to his life-size Portraits from life, and enlarged from old defaced Pictures, and made perfect by the art of the brush. He has the only Patent Copying Instrument in Delaware Co., and claims copying as a specialty. All the old style of Pictures, such as Ambrotypes, Tintypes, Porcelain, & c., made at short notice. Mr. Johnson’s India Ink Portraits, new style Sun Pearls, are the admiration of every person. He has the most extensive assortment of Oval and Square Frames, Picture Nails, Cords and Tassels, Albums, & c. in Delhi. Give him a call before squandering your money on inferior work elsewhere. B. R. JOHNSON.”  (Bloomville Mirror. February 16, 1869.)

 

His work was quickly well received by the Delhi public. “We have visited B. R. Johnson’s fine Art Gallery and pronounce it and his pictures the finest we ever saw. Delaware county should be proud of such an establishment.” (Delaware Gazette. December 18, 1867.) Also, “Go to Johnson’s Gallery of Art if you want the best style picture.” (Delaware Gazette. January 1, 1868.)

Johnson’s time at the village of Delhi did not last long. By early 1869 Johnson was preparing to move to Europe. Johnson advertised for sale many of his possessions including a piano, a leather top buggy, harness, saddle, bridle, blanket, household furniture and more.

In September 1869 it was noted in the local newspaper that Johnson’s Art Gallery, over Calhoun & Son’s Drug Store, was being managed by proprietors I. M. Arnout, a photographer formerly of Frederick’s, N.Y., and O. Bingenheimer, Artist.

 

Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. By Farrington’s. Printed in Germany. Postmark 1909. Author’s collection.Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y.Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. By Farrington’s. Printed in Germany. Postmark 1909. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.
Watauga Falls, Delhi, N.Y. By Farrington’s. Printed in Germany. Postmark 1909. Author’s collection.

 

However, by December 1869 Maurice Farrington was the new proprietor of the Byron R. Johnson Art Gallery at Delhi, New York. This would have included the business along with the equipment. “The public will be gratified to learn that Maurice Farrington had purchased the picture gallery of Byron R. Johnson in this place, and has taken possession and engaged in business. He has the skill, experience, and every facility for doing the best of work, and will doubtless meet with success. For further particulars respecting his business, see advertising columns.” (“Local and Miscellaneous.” Delaware Republican. December 18, 1869.) The gallery was located over the Calhoun & Sons Drug Store.

 

Maurice Farrington, Johnson Gallery advertisement.Maurice Farrington, Johnson Gallery advertisement.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

 

Over the next two years local newspapers carried a number of advertisements from proprietor Maurice Farrington for the Johnson Gallery.

 

“Prepare for the Holidays! Go to the Well Known Johnson Gallery And have your orders for a Photograph, Sun Pearl, or India Ink Picture, For less money than in any other Gallery west of New York. All work guaranteed. Maurice Farrington, Proprietor.” (Bloomville Mirror. December 21, 1869.)

 

“‘Procrastination is the thief of time.’ Then don’t delay, but go at once to the celebrated Johnson Gallery opposite White’s brick building, Delhi, and sit for one of those Life size solar Photographs which can be had no where else in this vicinity, as there is not another solar instrument in Delaware County. At the same time bring along that old picture of a lost friend, no matter how badly it is faded, and have it copied and enlarged. It can only be properly done by means of the Solar Camera.” (Delaware Republican. February 5, 1870.)

 

“Just Received at the Johnson Gallery, A Large stock of Picture Frames, comprising a complete assortment of new and elegant patterns. A stock of stereoscopic views constantly on hand, consisting of views from nearly all parts of the known world. The best and cheapest, Photographs, Sun Pearls, & c., & c., to be had in Delaware county, taken at the Johnson Gallery. Call and see. MAURICE FARRINGTON, Proprietor.” (Delaware Gazette. April 20, 1870.)

 

“All in pursuit of picture frames of any kind, either oval, square or rustic, will find it in their interest to call at the old Johnson Gallery, where they can make their selections from a New Stock, consisting of a large assortment of new and elegant patterns. If you don’t happen to have a picture that needs framing, just step in and sit for one, when you will see the propriety of having it put up in a handsome frame. You will also find a new stock of Stereoscopic Views of places of interest, such as Rocky Mountain and Lake Superior Scenery, Holy Land Views, & c.” (Delaware Republican. May 28, 1870.)

 

“It is scarcely necessary to mention a fact so well known to this community as the one at the Johnson Gallery, as has always been the case, is turning out the finest work in the line of Photographs of all kinds, to be had short of first class city galleries, and at prices astonishingly low. Persons wishing large work either plain, or finished in India Ink, will find it to their interest to call and examine the work now on exhibition before allowing themselves to be deceived with work done in fifth rate city galleries which would be dear at any price.” (Delaware Republican. October 1, 1870.)

 

“Don’t you know that the place to get your Pictures is at the old Johnson Gallery, now owned and occupied by Maurice Farrington? If you don’t just ask one our thousand and one customers, (to whom we tender our thanks for their very liberal patronage,) and they will tell you that we are turning out New Styles of Works Which Have Never Been Equalled in Delaware Co. That we have the BEST GALLERY and FACILITIES for doing Good Work, unequalled in this vicinity, is a fact that is UNDISPUTED! We have only instrument within a Hundred Miles of Delhi, that will make a Cabinet Photograph, or anything larger. Our instruments for Copying and Enlarging are of superior make, and have all the Latest Improvements. The Porcelain Picture, the finest ever made, can be had of us, and no where else in town, We have an enormous Stock of Frames of all kinds, which will be sold Cheap. Stereoscopes and views in large quantities, which will be sold in large lots at WHOLESALE RATES. Also a stock of Prang’s Celebrated Chromos, and some Large Views along the Line of the PACIFIC R.R. Give us a call, and you can’t fail to be suited. Rooms over CALHOUN & SON’S DRUG STORE. Fourth door East of Edgerton House, Delhi, N.Y.” (Delaware Republican.)

 

“Call at the Johnson Gallery if you are in want of anything in the picture line, where you will find a general assortment of frames, stereoscopes and views, brackets, &c. A novelty in the decoration line is the wall pocket, made of black walnut, handsomely carved. Likewise bear in mind that it is the gallery for first class work of all kinds.” (Delaware Republican. November 12, 1870.)

 

“That the pictures made at the Johnson Gallery in this village are far superior to anything of the kind made elsewhere in this vicinity is a fact which none who have visited the Gallery will be disposed to deny. The reason is simply this: that in Photography, as in everything else, the best is always found to be the cheapest in the end. None but the best materials are used. The instruments, of which the Gallery contains a complete set, are of all the best make known in Europe or America. The light is such that by means of screens and curtains it can easily be adapted to any complexion, and furthermore, there is not a modern invention which is of least assistance in furnishing first class work but will be found in use there.” (Delaware Republican.)

 

“Look at this Change of Programme. Maurice Farrington has purchased the well-known Picture Gallery of Byron R. Johnson, in Delhi, and is pleased to announce to Everybody and their friends, that he his prepared, by his Extended Experience, an Excellent Suite of Rooms, and all the Modern Improvements in Apparatus, to execute all kinds of work, from Life-Size Photographs, to the SMALLEST LOCKET, in Better Style, and at Cheaper Rates, than can be had in any Gallery West of New York. Particular attention will be given to Copying and Enlarging pictures of deceased friends; a class of work which can not be done successfully in ANY OTHER GALLERY IN DELAWARE COUNTY. Do not allow the only picture you have a lost friend, to be sent to New York by irresponsible parties, and risk its loss, when you can get better work here, and Twenty-five Per Cent. Cheaper. Call and Examine our Work, you will be convinced that we can accomplish all we advertise. A large assortment of Frames and Albums always on hand. Also, Rang’s Chromos for sale. Remember the place. Fourth door above the Edgerton House, Over Calhoun & Son’s Drug Store.” (The Delaware Republican. January 21, 1871.)

 

Maurice Farrington continued to use the “Johnson Gallery” name for several years. Around 1872 Maurice began to use the name “Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” Over the following years he would run countless advertisements with the new gallery name in the local newspapers, of which the below are just a few.

 

1872: “Farrington’s (formerly Johnson’s Photograph Gallery), continues to be THE Gallery of Delaware County. No slop shop work turned out – nothing but the best quality of pictures, notwithstanding the “rush.” And what is still more important, customers who sit and pay for pictures, always get them, and that without delay. He challenges a comparison of work with any other gallery in the county.” (Delaware Republican. February 17, 1872.)

 

1872: “A new stock of Stereoscopic views can be found at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, consisting of Anthony’s Yosemite, Wilson’s Scotch, Bierstadt’s Niagara, and a variety of American and foreign, by less celebrated artists. Also a stock of Delhi views constantly on hand.” (Delaware Republican. May 11, 1872.)

 

1873: “A few reasons why you should patronize Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, over Calhoun’s Drug Store. His rooms and light are decidedly superior to any others in this vicinity. His Instruments are of the very best manufacture. His chemicals are the best in the market, and warranted pure. Pictures made with cheap chemicals invariably fade. Especial care is taken in washing and finishing prints to make them permanent. Pictures not thoroughly washing and carefully finished, never last long. His prices are as low as good work can be afforded. Very cheap work is generally poor work, and to say the least, the merit of cheapness is a questionable one in pictures.” (Delaware Republican. February 15, 1873.)

 

1873: “A fine assortment of picture frames of all kinds may be seen at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, also pictures of various kinds to fit said frames. Good-looking folks can have their pictures taken cheap for cash; those that don’t look quite so well, same price. Give him a call at his rooms over Calhoun’s Drug Store, (opposite Mitchell & Hunt’s), and leave your measure for a Photograph. You’re sure of a fit every time.” (Delaware Republican. August 30, 1873.)

 

1873: “A new stock of FRAMES, BRACKETS, WALL POCKETS, & c., just received at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” (Delaware Gazette. December 31, 1873.)

 

1873: “A fine assortment of picture frames of all kinds may be seen at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery, also pictures of various kinds to fit said frames. Good-looking folks can have their pictures taken cheap for cash; those that don’t look quite so well, same price. Give him a call at his rooms over Calhoun’s Drug Store, (opposite Mitchell & Hunt’s), and leave your measure for a Photograph. You’re sure of a fit every time.” (Delaware Republican. August 30, 1873.)

 

1874: “The most beautiful crosses in mats and Illuminated Texts ever seen in Delhi, are on exhibition at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” (Delaware Gazette. December 16, 1874.)

 

1879: “The cheapest place in Delaware County to buy Picture Frames, is at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery.” (Delaware Republican. May 17, 1879.)

 

1879: “Farrington’s Fresh Supply of Holiday Goods, Picture Frames, Nick Nacks and everything in stock are offered at Bed Rock Prices! Photographs in attractive styles. Pictures of All Kinds Taken, Way Down! Your Inspection Is Invited.” (Delaware Republican. November, 29, 1879.)

 

Farrington’s advertisement. Delaware Republican. December 13, 1879.Farrington’s advertisement. Delaware Republican. December 13, 1879.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Farrington’s advertisement. Delaware Republican. December 13, 1879.

 

1881: “Don’t forget to call at Farrington’s Photograph Gallery before you make your Christmas purchases. It will pay you.” (Delaware Gazette. December 21, 1881.)

 

1882: “Keep it in mind that Farrington has on exhibition and for sale at his photograph gallery the finest Holiday Goods in town. He has engravings that will be a joy forever to the possessor, Christmas Cards of all grades, Frames and Albums by the gross, Books for all sizes and ages, besides a thousand other articles suitable for holiday presents. Call and look them over.” (Delaware Gazette. December 13, 1882.)

 

1885: “Farrington has an enormous stock of Cabinet Frames of all grades, from a 15 cent velvet to the most elegant bronze and plush.” (Delaware Gazette. December 9, 1885.)

 

1887: “It is pretty evident from the superior finish of Farrington’s Photos, that his retoucher is not excelled anywhere, and yet his prices are low enough for the hardest of times – Cabinets only 3.00 per doz.” (Delaware Gazette. May 18, 1887.)

 

1887: “Farrington has on exhibition a fine life size photograph of the late Dr. Ira Wilcox, made upon what is known as “Permanent Bromide Paper.” “Permanent Bromide” photographs are of quite recent introduction, but their superiority, especially in permanence, having no tendency to fade, and the fact that they are comparatively inexpensive, would indicate that they will supersede all other styles of large photographs. Mr. Farrington is prepared to furnish large Bromide prints at moderate prices.” (Delaware Gazette. May 25, 1887.)

 

1887: “Call at Farrington’s Gallery and examine some of the finest specimens of the Photography to be seen this side of New York. Also remember that his prices are lowest. Large work furnished at figures that will astonish you.” (Delaware Republican. 1887.)

 

1887: “For the next 30 days parties sitting for cabinet photographs at Farrington’s gallery and ordering not less than a dozen, will have one framed in a fine silk plush cabinet frame without extra charge. All work of the finest quality while prices are the lowest in this vicinity.” (Delaware Republican. July 16, 1887.)

 

1888: “Farrington, the leading photographer of Delaware county, has just received a fresh stock of Photo Albums and Frames which will be sold at prices below those at which the same quality of goods have ever before been offered in Delhi.” (Delaware Gazette. October 24, 1888.)

 

~1889: “Farrington’s large operating room with its broad sky light and wide side light is just the place for babies’ pictures. He catches them “Quicker’n a wink.” (Delaware Republican. ~1886-1889.)

 

1891: “Hello, George! Where did you get that splendid Photo?”

“At Farrington’s.”

“Why, some one said his work was cheap.”

“Oh, well that’s the old cry of ‘stale fish,’ always resorted to by the man that’s undersold. Fact is, Farrington always has made the finest work to be had in town, and is doing it to-day.” (Delaware Gazette. September 9, 1891.)

 

Portrait of a Young Lady by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Portrait of a Young Lady. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

 

Portrait of a Young Lady, Seated by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady, Seated by Maurice FarringtonPortrait of a Young Lady, Seated. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.
Portrait of a Young Lady, Seated. Maurice Farrington, Delhi, N.Y. Author’s collection.

 

In the 1880s Maurice broadened his businesses to include being a “Bookseller” and subscription agent. He would act as the agent for the sale of certain books at the village of Delhi. Also, one advertisement stated that Maurice represented over 2,500 newspapers and magazines. “Subscription agent. The undersigned has a list of abut 2500 newspaper and Magazines, for which he will receive subscriptions at or below the publisher’s price. Those wishing to subscribe or to renew will find it to their advantage to apply for terms to M. Farrington, Photographer and Bookseller, Delhi, N.Y.” (Delaware Gazette. December 2, 1885.) In addition, Farrington was Delhi agent for the firm of J. B. Alden, “the noted Publisher of cheap, standard literature, 393 Pearl Street, New York.” (Delaware Republican. December 19, 1886.)

 

Maurice Farrington. 1875 United States Census.Maurice Farrington. 1875 United States Census.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Maurice Farrington. 1875 United States Census.

 

Maurice Farrington. 1880 United States Census.Maurice Farrington. 1880 United States Census.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Maurice Farrington. 1880 United States Census.

 

Around 1886 Maurice Farrington, in addition to his photography business, entered the drug store business. “Dr. John Calhoun has sold the stock of goods in his drug store and rented his store to Maurice Farrington for a term of five years. The doctor will keep his office in the store and assist in conducting the business.” (Delaware Republican. ~1886.)

According to W. W. Munsell in his History of Delaware County, N.Y., John Calhoun was an influential member of the Delhi community. “DR. JOHN CALHOUN was born in 1819, in Scotland, and in 1834 came to America, settling at Bovina with his parents. In 1841 he commenced the study of medicine at Andes with Dr. Peake; in 1844 was admitted, and practiced there two years, then in Bovina until 1865, when he was elected sheriff of the county of Delaware. At the expiration of his term of office in 1868, he resumed his practice and opened a drug store in Delhi, the firm name being J. Calhoun & Son. The son, J. D. Calhoun, died suddenly on Christmas, 1878. Mr. Calhoun married Jane Davis, of Andes, in 1845. He has been prominent in the history of the county.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 167.) Dr. John Calhoun died on April 20, 1893, leaving behind his wife and daughter.

 

Frank Farrington, son of photographer Maurice FarringtonFrank Farrington, son of photographer Maurice FarringtonMaurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi. Frank Farrington holding Profitable Storekeeping. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

By 1891 Maurice had been occupying the Dr. Calhoun Drug Store for quite some time. That year he purchased the building from J. S. Page for $3,500. His son, Frank Farrington, helped his father manage the drug store, later purchasing the business from him. Frank would later author in 1914 a book titled Making a Drug Store Pay about his experiences managing the drug store with his father. Below is a small excerpt of his experiences.

 

“I hadn’t really any time to think whether I wanted to be a druggist or not. I was not asked. And anyway I don’t remember that I cared particularly. There was no money to send me to college, and I didn’t see why I couldn’t have a pretty good time working at the drug business – for my father.

Father did not stay in the store. He had other work. A nice old physician [Calhoun] who was also a druggist because he had been in the business when the pharmacy law was first passed, made the store his office, and he and I ran or tried to run the business – except the buying, which was done by my father, with our recommendations.

You know what kind of a store this was – old-fashioned front with small panes of glass – wooden steps and platform clear across the front, making a first-class place for idlers to idle – dingy paint and paper inside – showcases on one side with tops that lifted up to give entrance – showcases on the other side that had been nickel-plated in their day – prescription desk that was possessed of a pair of scales sensitive to a grain or two (sometimes, depending upon the weather) – weights that weighted what they were marked, more or less – running water only in the cellar. Reached by a trap-door through the floor back of the counter.

There was no awning. It wasn’t needed, because there was nothing in the windows that the sunlight would injure, and then, anyway, awnings cost money, and that store had not had any money spent upon it in many a moon.

The inventory showed a stock of about $1,500, much of which was as unsalable as last year’s birds’ nests.

For a few years we hung on without creating any great commotion in local business circles. There were three other drug stores; and the population of the town was (and is) less than 2,000. Some days we did as much as three dollars in cash receipts. We didn’t do any credit business, and it was big day when the sales ran up to fifteen dollars . . . .

It was not long after this that my father’s financial affairs assumed a stormy aspect, and since the plan was for me to take the business as soon as I could swing it, it was then decided that the sooner I took it, the better. It was turned over to me for an inventory of about $2,000, and I assumed obligations of my father’s to the amount paid for the business.” (Farrington, Frank. Making a Drug Store Pay. New York: The Ronald Press Company, 1914. Pages 8-9.)

 

Frank would eventually sell the drug store business to P. B. Merrill and W. A. Humphries. The partnership of Pierre “Pete” Merrill (1880-1975) and William A. Humphries took over the drug store on May 2, 1911. Humphries was a graduate of the Albany College of Pharmacy while Merrill graduated from the Buffalo College of Pharmacy. Both of them had worked at Farrington’s Drug Store for several years before taking over the business. In 1928 the partnership dissolved as Humphries began work at an insurance company, with Merrill continuing as the sole proprietor. Merrill continued to operate the store for decades, eventually selling the business in 1956 to Marc Guy, but continued to assist at the store until the 1960s.

 

Vintage postcard by Merrill and Humphries of the Delaware River below Sherwood’s Bridge in Delhi, New York.Below Sherwood’s Bridge, Delhi, N.Y.Sherwood’s Bridge crosses the West Branch of the Delaware River on Sherwood Road in the town of Delhi, New York. According to the history of the county “The first church in the town of Delhi stood just below Sherwood’s bridge on the opposite side of the river, and was built in 1811.”

The postcard was published by Merrill & Humphries of Delhi, New York. The postmark on the reverse side shows that it was mailed in 1919.
Below Sherwood's Bridge, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1919. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.

 

Vintage postcard depicting a scenic spot along the Delaware River in Delhi, New York published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries.Delaware River, Delhi, N.Y.This vintage postcard depicting a scenic spot along the Delaware River in Delhi, New York was published by the partnership of Merrill & Humphries. The postmark on the reverse side shows that the postcard was mailed in 1922. Delaware River, Delhi, N.Y. Postmark 1922. Published by Merrill & Humphries. Author’s collection.
 

In 1890 the staff of the Delaware Gazette, the local newspaper, praised Farrington’s recent photographic work. “A few days ago a photograph of J. A. Parshall was placed over the door heading into the composing room of the Gazette, through which for nearly fifty-two years he had daily passed to and from his accustomed labor. The photograph was taken by Mr. Farrington, and is conceded by those who have seen it to be one of his best.” (Delaware Gazette. July 2, 1890.)

Many years, including 1906 and 1908, Maurice would travel to New York City to attend the annual convention of the New York State Photographers’ Association.

The Delaware County Historical Association maintains a collection of photos and negatives and other materials related to Maurice and his son Frank. In addition, the New York Heritage website (www.nyheritage.org) maintains the Farrington Photograph Collection, which contains 73 photographs from the Farrington family, some possibly taken by Maurice, but many more likely taken by Frank Farrington or others in the family. Occasionally some of Maurice Farrington’s work can be found available for purchase on eBay.

 

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York.Maurice Farrington was a skilled photographer who operated a prestigious gallery in the village of Delhi in Delaware County, New York for nearly 50 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later owned and operated Farrington’s Drug Store at Delhi.

Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.
Farrington Drug Store, Main Street, Delhi, New York. Delaware County Historical Association, Farrington Photograph Collection.

 

Edward S. Frisbee in his genealogy study of the Frisbee family wrote glowingly of Maurice and his contributions to the village and the Delhi community at large. “After establishing himself in business in the village, he lived for several years on the homestead at East Delhi, and was a great power for good in that neighborhood, especially among the young people. Gifted with a fine tenor voice and having a good knowledge of music, he was an acceptable conductor of singing schools in various parts of the county. He was a zealous worker in the union Sunday School at East Delhi, taught the Bible class, and to the great joy of the children, introduced the first Christmas tree in that section. The influence of his work still lives there, and his memory is precious to those who were associated with him.

In his early years he joined the Second Presbyterian Church, of this village, was active in its work, and at his death he had been an elder of the Church for more than twenty years. He was one of the founders of the Zeta Phi, a literary society which was long maintained and in which he was prominent as one of its most active workers. He was one of the oldest members of the Delhi Lodge of Freemasons, his connection with it dating from 1868. He was Master of the Lodge in 1883-84, and for more than ten years previous to his death he was its Historian.

Sterling integrity, faithfulness to his friends, and loyalty to his Church were conspicuous traits in Mr. Farrington’s character, and the quiet strength of his noble life remains as a benediction to his friends.” (Frisbee, Edward S. The Frisbee-Frisbie Genealogy. Rutland, Vermont: The Tuttle Company, 1926. p. 442-443.)

In 1912 Maurice “had an unfortunate fall after which he was quite lame, but as soon as he was able he went to his studio and continued to do so until last week.” (Delaware Gazette.” October 28, 1914.) In 1914 he was again in poor health. “For the past two years he had been in feeble health, the result of a fall which, though disabling, did not entirely prevent attention to his business. A few days ago he had an attack of acute indigestion from which he was not able to rally.” (Frisbee, Edward S. The Frisbee-Frisbie Genealogy. Rutland, Vermont: The Tuttle Company, 1926. p. 442-443.)

Maurice Farrington died at 77 years of age on October 26, 1914 at Delhi, New York. Upon his passing he was described as “one of Delhi’s oldest and best citizens.” (Delaware Gazette. October 28, 1914.) Frances E. Farrington passed away in 1922. They are, along with their two children Frank and Pauline, buried at Woodland Cemetery in Delhi.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Maurice Farrington please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) B. F. Gilbert B. R. Johnson Benjamin F. Gilbert Byron R. Johnson Civil War Delaware County Delhi drug store E. C. Riggs Farrington's Drug Store Frances E. Farrington Frank Farrington gallery John Calhoun March Farrington Maurice Farrington Merrill and Humphries Morris L. Farrington Pauline Farrington photographer photography Ruth Frisbee studio Thomas Farrington veteran Zenas Farrington https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/4/maurice-farrington-delhi-photographer Sat, 03 Apr 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Murals of Kingston, New York: Stockade District https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/murals-of-kingston-new-york-stockade-district The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspects of the festival are the beautiful, and often large-scale, murals seen throughout the city.

 

Included in this post is a sampling of murals that can be found in, or close to, the historic Stockade District of Kingston. The streets are laid out today just as they were in 1658 when the village was formed. The district contains a mix of architecturally appealing buildings from across the 17th, 18th, 19th centuries, including stone houses, storefronts, office buildings, apartment buildings and former warehouses. The murals provide an interesting contrast of modern-vs-historic. The Stockade District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The large scale mural titled Pronkstilleven was created by Gaia, a Baltimore based artist and muralist, in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston.PronkstillevenStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale, and visually stunning mural titled Pronkstilleven was created by Gaia, a Baltimore based artist and muralist, in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts John Vanderlyn, Kingston-born painter, and Sojourner Truth, abolitionist and women’s rights activist. The title is a Dutch word meaning “ornate or ostentatious, still life” and also describes a 17th century Dutch style of painting. Gaia created the impressive work on the side of the historic Stuyvesant Building in the Stockade District of Kingston. Gaia is familiar to the Kingston art community and fans of the O+ festival as the creator of the popular and equally impressive Artemis Emerging From the Quarry during the 2013 O+ Festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Pronkstilleven

The large scale, and visually stunning mural titled Pronkstilleven was created by Gaia, a Baltimore based artist and muralist, in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival in Kingston. The mural depicts John Vanderlyn, Kingston-born painter, and Sojourner Truth, abolitionist and women’s rights activist. The title is a Dutch word meaning “ornate or ostentatious, still life” and also describes a 17th century Dutch style of painting. Gaia created the impressive work on the side of the historic Stuyvesant Building in the Stockade District of Kingston. Gaia is familiar to the Kingston art community and fans of the O+ festival as the creator of the popular and equally impressive Artemis Emerging from the Quarry during the 2013 O+ Festival.

 

This interesting mural titled The Eye of Your Storm was created in 2015 by painter Kathleen Griffin in collaboration with government physicist Christos Kapetnakos.The Eye of Your StormStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

This interesting mural titled The Eye of Your Storm was created in 2015 by painter Kathleen Griffin in collaboration with government physicist Christos Kapetnakos. The mathematical formulas detail now de-classified aspects of the government’s 1980s-era “Star Wars” project. Merging space-related wind turbulence formulas with earth-bound tornados creates a dynamic and stark contrast. Visit Kathleen’s website at www.kathleen-griffin.com for more information on the artist and this interesting piece.
The Eye of Your Storm

This interesting mural titled The Eye of Your Storm was created in 2015 by painter Kathleen Griffin in collaboration with government physicist Christos Kapetnakos. The mathematical formulas detail now de-classified aspects of the government’s 1980s-era “Star Wars” project. Merging space-related wind turbulence formulas with earth-bound tornados creates a dynamic and stark contrast. Visit Kathleen’s website at www.kathleen-griffin.com for more information on the artist and this interesting piece.

 

The large scale mural titled Know Thyself was created by artist and Baltimore resident Ernest Shaw, Jr. in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival.Know ThyselfStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale mural titled Know Thyself was created by artist and Baltimore resident Ernest Shaw, Jr. in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival. Shaw has created murals throughout Baltimore, participated in Baltimore’s Open Walls project, and works as a teacher at the Maryland Academy of Technology & Health Sciences.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Know Thyself

The large-scale mural titled Know Thyself was created by artist and Baltimore resident Ernest Shaw, Jr. in 2015 as part of the 6th annual O+ festival. Shaw has created murals throughout Baltimore, participated in Baltimore’s Open Walls project, and works as a teacher at the Maryland Academy of Technology & Health Sciences.

 

Artemis Emerging From the Quarry street art mural painted by Gaia of Baltimore in the Stockade District of Kingston during the annual O+ festival.Artemis Emerging from the QuarryStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

This 6-story outdoor street art mural titled Artemis Emerging from the Quarry depicts the Greek goddess Artemis as she emerges from a stone quarry with her outstretched arms over New York City. In Greek mythology Artemis, daughter of Zeus and twin sister of Apollo, was the goddess of the wilderness, the hunt and wild animals; and fertility. The mural was painted by the emerging Baltimore artist Gaia and took nearly a week to complete. The mural is not without controversy, however, with some locals feeling that it is out of place for Kingston’s historic district.

The Artemis mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013, 4th annual O+ festival, a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Artemis Emerging from the Quarry

This 6-story outdoor street art mural titled Artemis Emerging from the Quarry depicts the Greek goddess Artemis as she emerges from a stone quarry with her outstretched arms over New York City. In Greek mythology Artemis, daughter of Zeus and twin sister of Apollo, was the goddess of the wilderness, the hunt and wild animals; and fertility. The mural was painted by the emerging Baltimore artist Gaia and took nearly a week to complete. The mural is not without controversy, however, with some locals feeling that it is out of place for Kingston’s historic district. The Artemis mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013, 4th annual O+ festival.

 

The Stockade District mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo.SWAKKingston, Ulster County

The Stockade District mural titled “SWAK” was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. The mural is the first of a pair, the second SWAK mural being located in midtown Kingston.

The O+ festival in Kingston is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large scale murals seen throughout the city.
SWAK

The Stockade District mural titled SWAK was created during the 2015 and 6th annual O+ Festival by artist and graphic designer Keith Carollo. The mural is the first of a pair, the second SWAK mural being located in midtown Kingston.

 

Carousel mural painted by Kimberly Kae in the Stockade District of Kingston during the annual O+ festival.CarouselStockade District, Kingston

This engaging Carousel mural, located in the Stockade District of Kingston, was painted by Artist Kimberly Kae of Ulster Park in collaboration with her husband Matt DiFrancesco. Kimberly received her Bachelor in Fine Arts in Painting from the University of Washington and trained in Italy for three years. She currently owns her own company, Murorosso, which provides custom interior murals and backdrops for homes and businesses.

This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013 and 4th annual O+ festival, a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Bilancia

This engaging carousel mural titled Bilancia was painted by Artist Kimberly Kae of Ulster Park in collaboration with her husband Matt DiFrancesco. Kimberly received her Bachelor in Fine Arts in Painting from the University of Washington and trained in Italy for three years. She currently owns her own company, Murorosso, which provides custom interior murals and backdrops for homes and businesses. This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2013 and 4th annual O+ festival.

 

The BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) building in the Stockade District of Kingston first operated as a vaudeville and movie house and today serves as home to a dance venue and concert theater.SomewhereStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) building was constructed in the late 1800s, first operating as Cohen’s Vaudeville Theater. The building “originally served as a vaudeville and movie house for Kingston residents and tourists who came up the Hudson River by ferry. The building has gone through a number of changes, but its historical features and ornaments remain largely intact, including the awe-inspiring proscenium arch which still bears the marking “RKT” (Reade’s Kingston Theatre) at its crest.” By 1918 the building was home to Keeney’s Theater, and in 1926 it was sold again to the Walter Reade movie chain, which expanded the space to 2,500 seats and renamed it the Kingston Theater. During the 1960s, Reade sold all of its theaters, with sales contracts stating that the buildings could not be used as any sort of entertainment venue for 10 years. The building became a Standard Furniture show room until the 1980's and was then abandoned until 2001. Today the BSP building serves as home to a dance venue and concert theater for a range of performers and musicians.
Somewhere

Created by artist Erika DeVries, the pink-and-white neon sign Somewhere is based off her 6-year-old son’s handwriting. This edition of the sign was located at the BSP building in the Stockade District, an historic building constructed in the late-1800s which long served as a theater, became a furniture show room before today operating as a dance venue and concert theater.

 

This fading ghost sign for Standard Furniture is located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York.After Dinner, Wash the DishesStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

This fading ghost sign in the Stockade District of Kingston offers a testament to the businesses of yesteryear. It advertised the business of Standard Furniture, which operated out of the BSP building on Wall Street for many years. Standard Furniture was founded in 1901 by Abraham I. Feinberg, who started by selling home furnishings door to door. By 1907, with an established loyal following, Feinberg has opened his first store located in Albany. The Kingston store, the company’s second branch, opened in 1939. Standard Furniture was once one of the top ranking furniture organizations in the country.

The BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) building, where Standard Furniture once operated, was constructed in the late 1800s, first operating as Cohen’s Vaudeville Theater. The building “originally served as a vaudeville and movie house for Kingston residents and tourists who came up the Hudson River by ferry. The building has gone through a number of changes, but its historical features and ornaments remain largely intact, including the awe-inspiring proscenium arch which still bears the marking “RKT” (Reade’s Kingston Theatre) at its crest.” By 1918 the building was home to Keeney’s Theater, and in 1926 it was sold again to the Walter Reade movie chain, which expanded the space to 2,500 seats and renamed it the Kingston Theater. During the 1960s, Reade sold all of its theaters, with sales contracts stating that the buildings could not be used as any sort of entertainment venue for 10 years. The building became a Standard Furniture show room until the 1980's and was then abandoned until 2001. Today the BSP building serves as home to a dance venue and concert theater for a range of performers and musicians.
After Dinner, Wash the Dishes

 

The large scale mural known as “Matt” adorns the side of brick building in the Stockade District of historic Kingston. It was created in 2014 by Nils Westergaard, a well known street artist and film mMattStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale mural known as “Matt” adorns the side of brick building in the Stockade District of historic Kingston. It was created in 2014 by Nils Westergaard, a well known street artist and film maker from Virginia.

This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2014 and 5th annual O+ festival, a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.

Matt

The large-scale mural known as Matt adorns the side of brick building in the Stockade District of historic Kingston. It was created in 2014 by Nils Westergaard, a well-known street artist and film maker from Virginia. This particular mural was painted in conjunction with the 2014 and 5th annual O+ festival.

 

Kingston, New York mural on a brick wall with a silhouette of a young man holding a sign saying “Your Slogan Here.”Your Slogan HereKingston, Ulster County

Your Slogan Here

 

The mural titled “Between Realms We Grow Roots” was created by artists Jia Sung and Sarula Bao in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.Between Realms We Grow RootsKingston, Ulster County

The mural titled “Between Realms We Grow Roots” was created by artists Jia Sung and Sarula Bao in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Between Realms We Grow Roots

The mural titled Between Realms We Grow Roots was created by artists Jia Sung and Sarula Bao in Kingston, New York in conjunction with the 2017 O+ festival.

 

“Vignettes of Home is a small, yet colorful mural by local artist Jane Bloodgood-Abrams located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York.Vignettes of HomeKingston, Ulster County

“Vignettes of Home” is a small, yet colorful mural located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by local artist Jane Bloodgood-Abrams in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event features many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music. The first Kingston O+ festival took place in 2010. The most visible aspect of the festival is the large-scale murals seen throughout the city.
Vignettes of Home

Vignettes of Home is a small, yet colorful mural located in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York. The mural was created by local artist Jane Bloodgood-Abrams in conjunction with the 2017 and 8th annual O+ festival.

 

Located in Kingston, New York, this outdoor art tribute to the civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. features his famous quote: “What are you doing for others?”What Are You Doing For Others?Stockade District, Kingston

“An individual has not begun to live until he can rise above the narrow horizons of his particular individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity. Every person must decide, at some point, whether they will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness. This is the judgment: Life's most persistent and urgent question is, ’What are you doing for others?’”

This famous quote was part of a speech called “Conquering Self-Centeredness” given by the influential civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on August 11, 1957 at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. This outdoor art display dedicated to that famous quote was located in the historic Stockade District of Kingston.
What Are You Doing for Others?

This famous quote was part of a speech called “Conquering Self-Centeredness” given by the influential civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on August 11, 1957 at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. This outdoor art display dedicated to that famous quote was located in the historic Stockade District of Kingston.

 

“An individual has not begun to live until he can rise above the narrow horizons of his particular individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity. Every person must decide, at some point, whether they will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness. This is the judgment: Life's most persistent and urgent question is, ’What are you doing for others?’”

 

The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, was created in 2014 by Kingston native Matthew Pleva.The Hobgoblin of Old Dutch ChurchPeace Park, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church was created in 2014 by Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate Matthew Pleva. The 50 x 28 mural, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.
The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, was created in 2014 by Kingston native Matthew Pleva.The Hobgoblin of Old Dutch ChurchPeace Park, Stockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

The large scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church was created in 2014 by Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate Matthew Pleva. The 50 x 28 mural, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.
The Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church

The large-scale Hobgoblin of Old Dutch Church was created in 2014 by Kingston native and SUNY Purchase graduate Matthew Pleva. The 50 x 28 mural, which overlooks Peace Park in the Stockade District of Kingston, features several icons of the Kingston landscape including the Old Dutch Church and Jansen House as well the famed hobgoblin of Kingston lore. Visit Matthew’s website at www.matthewpleva.com for more information about this amazing artist or visit him at his store, The Art Riot.

 

Street scene on Fair Street in the historic Stockade District of Kingston, New York.Street SceneStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County Street Scene

 

An untitled mural by artists Geddes Paulsen and Raudiel Sanudo in the Stockade District of Kingston, New York; created for the 2011 O+ festival.Title UnknownStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

Although the title of this mural is unknown and is tucked away off the street, it will still not escape attention from any Kingston visitor who stumbles upon it. The mural was created by artists Geddes Paulsen and Raudiel Sanudo in 2011 as part of the 2nd annual O+ festival.

The O+ festival is a 3-day event where artists and musicians exchange their participation for basic health care, dental and wellness services. Billed as “The Art of Medicine for the Medicine of Art”, the growing Kingston event featured many forms of art media including paint, sculpture, dance, performance art and music.
Title Unknown

Although the title of this mural is unknown and is tucked away off the street, it will still not escape attention from any Kingston visitor who stumbles upon it. The mural was created by artists Geddes Paulsen and Raudiel Sanudo in 2011 as part of the 2nd annual O+ festival.

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) art artist Catskill Mountains Catskills festival Hudson Valley Kingston medicine murals New York O positive O+ Festival paintings Stockade District street art https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/murals-of-kingston-new-york-stockade-district Sat, 27 Mar 2021 12:00:00 GMT
Photographing Upon Mount Washington https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/photographing-upon-mount-washington Clough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

 

Photographs from that expedition included the Tip Top House, the Summit House, the Lizzie Bourne Monument, winter closeups of frost, snow and ice, views from Mount Washington and many more. For interesting details about the winter scientific mission upon Mount Washington, one in which Kimball almost died, see the Clough and Kimball 1871 writeup that was included as part of Mount Washington in Winter or The Experiences of a Scientific Expedition Upon the Highest Mountain in New England. For more information about Clough, see In Search of Amos Clough, written by Robert W. Averill and published in 2019.

 

Below is an excerpt from Chapter 9 of the expedition summary at the top of Mount Washington in Winter, with an emphasis on photography. The paragraph was written by both Clough and Kimball. It provides an interesting perspective on the lengths photographers will go through to get “the shot.”

 

“Photographing Upon Mount Washington.

 

As photography has got to be so common in every-day life, and so necessary to the full success of every expedition of importance, its omission on the present occasion would have been a great oversight, and have left the practical results of the expedition but half complete. It is the province of the photographer to bring to the eyes of the public that which is not of a readily accessible character; thus to give those who cannot visit such places a chance to see wonders and beauties, while they enjoy the comforts of home, enduring none of the perils, dangers, or hardships, which are necessary to get at the real.

 

Though the pictures can convey to the mind but a small portion of the real grandeur of the scenes as beheld by the eye, they nevertheless have a fascinating beauty that charms and gives a sense of sublimity to the lover of nature, in her varied forms.

 

The photographer who makes nature his study, with a view to reproduce her various charms, soon becomes an enthusiast, and is ready to brave almost any hardship or danger in order to secure the likeness of a gem or “bit.” A musical waterfall, or thundering cataract, a peaceful vale where the flocks graze in quiet security, the wild mountain crag where the eagle screams its shrill notes, a tropical bower where perpetual summer brings forth rich and continuous verdure, and the barren, desolate mountain peaks of snow and frost towering far above the clouds; they will afford some subject for the Knight of the Camera to “bang away at,” and from which to bear off a trophy that shall delight “the millions,” and fittingly reward the enthusiasm of the true artist . . .”

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Tip-top House, frost two feet thickClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Tip-top House, frost two feet thick." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ac-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Tip-top House, frost two feet thick.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Tip-top House, frost two feet thick." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ac-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Summit House, frost two feet highClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Summit House, frost two feet high." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ae-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Summit House, frost two feet high.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Summit House, frost two feet high." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ae-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top HouseClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89b8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89b8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Arctic SentinelClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Arctic Sentinel." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89d2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Arctic Sentinel.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Arctic Sentinel." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89d2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Frost Crown of New EnglandClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Frost Crown of New England." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89c4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Frost Crown of New England.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Frost Crown of New England." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89c4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) A. F. Clough Amos Clough C. H. Hitchcock Clough and Kimball Concord H. A. Kimball Howard A. Kimball ice J. H. Huntington Lizzie Bourne Monument Mount Washington New England New Hampshire photographer photography pictures S. A. Nelson snow stereoviews Summit House Theodore Smith Tip Top House winter https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/photographing-upon-mount-washington Sat, 20 Mar 2021 12:00:00 GMT
John Jacob Loeffler – Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/john-jacob-loeffler-scenery-of-lake-mohonk-and-vicinity John Jacob Loeffler is one of the great Catskills photographers of all time. He made hundreds of stereoviews of the Catskills throughout the 1870s and 1880s. The photographs, part of the series titled Catskill Mountain Scenery, demonstrate his skill and vision as well as the timeless beauty of the Catskills, being equally compelling today at they were 150 years ago.

 

In addition to his Catskills work, Loeffler photographed and published a stunning series of photographs under the title “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity.” The series includes photographs of the Mohonk House, Lake Mohonk, Sky Top, Peterskill Falls, Eagle Rock, The Traps, Pinnacle Rocks, Rosendale Bridge, High Falls and much more.

 

Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity

First Series

1

View from Sky-Top.

2

View from Thurston Rock.

3

House from Sky-Top Path.

4

House from Sky-Top Path.

5

House from Sky-Top Path.

6

House from Pine Bluff.

7

Rear of House.

8

The Great Crevice.

9

From the Great Crevice.

10

Pine Bluff, looking South.

11

Pine Bluff, looking North.

12

Rock Scene.

13

View from House Verandah.

14

The Labyrinth.

15

The Labyrinth.

16

The Boat Landing.

17

The Boat Landing.

18

The Boat Landing.

19

The Boat Landing.

20

View from Labyrinth.

21

View from Labyrinth.

22

View from Labyrinth.

23

Sky-Top, from the Bridge.

24

Sky-Top, from the East.

25

Sky-Top, from Woodlawn Drive.

26

Sky-Top, across Lake.

27

Cave Rock.

28

The Summer Houses.

29

The Summer Houses.

30

Undercliff Bridge.

31

Tower upon Sky-Top.

 

Second Series

32

The West Shore.

33

The Bridge.

34

The Bridge.

35

Sentinel Rock.

36

The Lake, from Eagle Cliff.

37

Sky-Top, from Eagle Cliff.

38

View from Cope’s Lookout.

39

The old Man of the Mountain.

40

The old Man of the Mountain.

41

The Traps, and Gertrude’s nose.

42

Pinnacle Rock.

43

The Clove, from Pinnacle Rock.

44

The Gate of the Winds.

45

Entrance to Cave of Aeolus.

46

Near Gate of the Winds.

47

Rocks at Eagle Cliff.

48

Rocks at Eagle Cliff.

49

Rocks at Eagle Cliff.

50

The Well.

51

Cliffs, near Pinnacle Rock.

52

The Icicles.

53

The Icicles.

54

Upper Falls of Peterskill.

55

Upper Falls of Peterskill.

56

Upper Falls of Peterskill.

57

Lower Falls of Peterskill.

58

High Falls.

59

High Falls.

60

High Falls.

61

Rosendale Bridge.

62

Rosendale Bridge.

 

The famous Mohonk House resort, located near the village of New Paltz, was established in 1869 and continues to be a treasured destination today for those seeking the beauty of the Shawangunk Mountains region. Visit the Mohonk House website at www.mohonk.com for more information about accommodations, activities and history. Having stayed at the resort I can confirm that it is every bit as beautiful as the pictures make it out to be.

 

I have recently acquired a number of new photographs by John Jacob Loeffler from his “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series. They have all been added to the Loeffler gallery, which now contains over 100 of his works.

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “House from Sky-Top Path” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; First Series, # 3.House from Sky-Top Path. (1st Series, # 3)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 3
Title: House from Sky-Top Path.
House from Sky-Top Path

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The Great Crevice” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; First Series, # 8.The Great Crevice. (1st Series, # 8)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 8.
Title: The Great Crevice.
The Great Crevice

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “From the Great Crevice” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; First Series, # 9.From the Great Crevice. (1st Series, # 9)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 9.
Title: From the Great Crevice.
From the Great Crevice

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Pine Bluff, looking North” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk” series; First Series, # 11.Pine Bluff, looking North. (1st Series, # 11)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 11.
Title: Pine Bluff, looking North.
Pine Bluff, looking North

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The West Shore” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; Second Series, # 32.The West Shore. (2nd Series, # 32)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: 1st Series, No. 32.
Title: The West Shore.
The West Shore

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “The Bridge” from the “Scenery of Mohonk Lake and Vicinity” series; no series listed, # 20.The Bridge. (No series listed, # 20)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Mohonk Lake and Vicinity
Catalog #: No series listed, # 20.
Title: The Bridge.
The Bridge

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler untitled stereoview from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; no series listed, no number listed.Lake Minnewaska. (No series listed; no number listed)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Mohonk Lake and Vicinity
Catalog #: No series listed, no number listed.
Title: None; utilizing Lake Minnewaska based on inscription on front left.
Lake Minnewaska

 

Vintage John Jacob Loeffler stereoview titled “Peterskill Falls” from the “Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity” series; no series listed, no number listed.Peterskill Falls. (No series listed; no number listed)Photographer: John Jacob Loeffler
Series name: Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity
Catalog #: No series listed, no number listed. Hand-written note on reverse side states “Peterskill Falls 8/15, 1882.” Based on that hand-written title this stereoview is likely 2nd Series, number 54, 55, 56 or 57.
Title: Peterskill Falls.
Peterskill Falls

 

]]>
dalencon99@gmail.com (American Catskills) Catskill Mountain Scenery Catskill Mountains Catskills J. Loeffler John Jacob Loeffler Lake Mohonk Loeffler Mohonk House New York photographer photographs photography photos pictures Scenery of Lake Mohonk and Vicinity Staten Island stereo view stereograph stereoscopic stereoscopic view stereoview Tompkinsville https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/john-jacob-loeffler-scenery-of-lake-mohonk-and-vicinity Sat, 13 Mar 2021 13:00:00 GMT
Henry B. Aldrich – Village of Catskill, New York Photographer https://www.americancatskills.com/blog/2021/3/henry-b-aldrich-village-of-catskill-new-york-photographer                Henry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Henry B. Aldrich was originally from the state of Massachusetts. He was born on July 12, 1833 to Daniel Aldrich and Polly Stockwell. He was descended from “Daniel Aldrich, of the old and original stock of Rhode Island Quakers.” (“Real Business.” The Billboard. September 28, 1901.) He was of English ancestry.

On the 1855 Massachusetts State Census Henry B. Aldrich, age 23, was listed as living at Clarksburg in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. He was living with his wife Laura, age 25, and his daughter Mary, age 2. Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Laborer.” His wife was Laura Louise Gray (Grey). She was born in 1832, although some census calculations and other resources sometimes provide alternative years. She was of Irish and French ancestry.

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1855 Massachusetts State Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Laborer.” 1855 Massachusetts State Census.

 

On the 1860 United States Census Aldrich, age 27, was listed as living at Adams in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. He was living with his wife Laura, age 30; his daughter Mary, age 6; and his son Joseph, age 4. His owned real estate was valued at $400 and his personal estate was valued at $300. Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Ambrotype Artist.”

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1860 United States Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Ambrotype Artist.” 1860 United States Census.

 

As per the Library of Congress “An ambrotype is comprised of an underexposed glass negative placed against a dark background. The dark backing material creates a positive image . . . The invention of wet collodion photography processes in the 1850s allowed the development of two new kinds of photographs--ambrotypes and tintypes. These new formats shared many characteristics with the earlier daguerreotypes but were quicker and cheaper to produce. Primarily used for portraiture, each photo is a unique camera-exposed image and was available in the following standard-sizes. The most common size was the sixth plate.

 

  • Imperial or Mammoth Plate - Larger than 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Whole Plate - 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Half Plate - 4.25 x 5.5 inches
  • Quarter Plate - 3.25 x 4.25 inches
  • Sixth Plate - 2.75 x 3.25 inches
  • Ninth Plate - 2 x 2.5 inches
  • Sixteenth Plate - 1.5 x 1.75 inches.”

 

James A. Cutting (1814-1867) was an American photographer and inventor who is often credited as the inventor of the Ambrotype photographic process. Cutting patented his improvements on the ambrotype process in 1854, and thus attached his name to the process. Ambrotypes would reach their height of popularity in the mid-1850s to the mid-1860s. Ambrotypes were eventually replaced with Cartes de visite and other paper print photographs, both of which were easily available in multiple copies.

The 1860 publication of the New England Business Directory by Adams, Sampson, & Co. listed “Mrs. H. B. Aldrich” as working at North Adams, Adams, Massachusetts. There was no street address given. She was listed under the industry category of “Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes, and Photographs.” She was one of 143 photographers listed in the directory as working in the state of Massachusetts.

In 1864 The New York State Business Directory by Adams, Sampson & Co. listed H. B. Aldrich as operating as a photographer at the village of Catskill. Aldrich was the only photographer listed in the guide as operating as a photographer in the village of Catskill.

In July, 1865 the partnership of J. N. Gilmore and Aldrich opened a gallery at No. 2. First Street in Troy, New York. The gallery was located across the street from the Troy House. They published a series of advertisements in The Troy Daily Times.

 

               “Fine Art Gallery! No. 2 First Street, Opposite Troy House.

               Gilmore & Aldrich,

Would most respectfully call the attention of the citizens of Troy and vicinity to the fact that they have purchased this finely located Gallery, and remodeled, refitted and furnished it in the most modern style. They have spared neither time, labor, nor expense, in making this one of the finest Galleries in the State. It is in point of elegance and artistic arrangement, unsurpassed. We shall make all kinds of sun pictures known to the Photographic world, from the largest life-size to the smallest miniatures. Also the celebrated Visiting or Wedding Card Pictures.

Particular attention paid to copying and enlarging old and faded pictures, which we re-touch in oil, water colors or ink, making them as life-like as if taken from the original.

We have just received a new and elegant stock of Goods, consisting of the latest patterns of FRAMES and CASES, PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, and in fact, everything which can be found in any first-class Gallery; and as our motto is “Small Profits and Quick Sales,” you will do well to call on GILMORE & ALDRICH before going elsewhere.

Please give us a call, whether wishing pictures or not. Remember the place, No. 2 First st., opposite the Troy House.” (The Troy Daily Times. July 1, 1865.)

 

On July 22, 1865, the Troy Daily Times provided a flattering portrayal of the new Gilmore & Aldrich partnership. “PHOTOGRAPHIC. – Messrs. Gilimore [sic] & Aldrich, formerly of Geneva, N.Y., have thoroughly refitted the gallery at the junction of First and River streets, New and elegant carpets and furniture, handsome and conveniently arranged toilet rooms, and, in fact, every desirable improvement, has been added, rendering the rooms among the finest in the city. Messrs. G. & A. are both practical artists, and enjoy the benefit of long experience in the art. They are now producing accurate and handsomely finished pictures from the size of a three cent piece to life size. They have taken the rooms with the intention of building up a large, first-class business on the strength of their superior pictures. A first-class gallery has long been needed in the lower part of the city, and we bespeak for them success, if they continue to turn out work equal to that produced by them since they have taken the rooms.”

The partnership placed a new advertisement in several July and August 1865 issues of the Troy Daily Times. “Photographs, AMBROTYPES, and all other Sun Pictures, made and finished in the highest style of the art, at GILMOUR & ALDRICH’S new Fine Art Gallery, No. 1 First st. Also a large stock of Frames, Photograph Albums, & c.; and as our motto is “Small Profits and Quick Sales,” you will do well to call on us before going elsewhere.”

In August 1865 it was reported that H. B. Aldrich, after only a few months working together, had bought out his partner J. N. Gilmore and would continue operating as a sole proprietorship at Troy, New York. “H. B. Aldrich WOULD RESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE to the public of Troy and vicinity the fact that he has purchased the interest of J. N. Gilmore, in the firm of Gilmore & Aldrich, No. 2 First street, and is now prepared to furnish all kinds of sun pictures known to the photographic world, finished in the finest style of the art. This is the place to get your old and faded pictures copies, enlarged and made as good as new.” (Troy Daily Times. August 25, 1865.)

Unfortunately, only a few weeks after buying out his partner, tragedy struck the business. “H. B. Aldrich’s new Photograph Gallery in Troy, (formerly Aldrich & Gillmore,) took fire, it is asserted by the Troy Times, from combustion of chemicals, last Sunday, and the proprietor’s loss is put down at $2,000.– The Times does not place him among the insured. He was formerly engaged in the same business in Penniman’s Row in this village.” (Geneva Daily Gazette. September 8, 1865.)

It was believed the “combustion of chemicals” at Aldrich’s Gallery started the fire. “The upper part of the buildings on the corner of River and First streets was smoking briskly, and before the firemen could get around there was a lively blaze that threatened a bad fire. The sky-light of the photograph gallery made a complete chimney, up which the flames leaped for twenty feet above the roof. But we never saw our steamers make such short work of a formidable fire. In ten minutes it had changed from a first-class conflagration to a mere charred attic. Our entire department was out – No. 5 came up from the Nail Factory, and the Roy steamer and Oswald Hose from West Troy – streets were crowded with spectators, and nearly everybody seemed to get a wetting. There were three buildings damaged by the fire and water. They have each been on fire several times before. On this occasion the combustion of chemicals in Aldrich’s gallery, started the ball in motion. He loses about $2000. L. C. Everett, second story, dealer in photographic materials, loss not large. Frank Hartsfield & Co., hoop skirts, loss $1000. Wm. Johnson, clothing dealer, loss $3000; insured; Jacob Sinshimer, cigar dealer, loss $500; insured; Peter Baltimore, barber, loss $300. If all these parties had had as good friends as Mr. Baltimore, their loss would have been slight. His customers, including the B. G. club, broke open the doors, rushed in and took out nearly every article of value, removing it to his new base over Young & Benson’s store.” (Troy Daily Times. August 28, 1865.)

Possibly as a result of the Troy fire, Aldrich moved to the village of Catskill where he opened a new photographic gallery. The gallery was located in the building once occupied by Granby and Van Hoesen. His wife operated a millinery shop on the first floor of the building. Imprints on the back of Aldrich’s later portraits had his location as “Opposite The Tanners Bank, Catskill, N.Y.” and “Over Van Loan’s Bookstore, Catskill, N.Y.” Below is one of his early Catskill advertisements, placed in a December 1865 issue of the local newspaper.

 

“New Photograph Gallery. H. B. Aldrich Has fitted up a new PICTURE GALLERY, in Catskill, over the Millinery Store opposite the Tanners’ Bank, and has spared neither time, labor nor expense in making it One of the Finest Galleries in the State.

It is furnished in the most modern style, and in point of elegance and artistic arrangement is unsurpassed.

I shall make all kinds of PICTURES known to the art, from the largest life size to the smallest Miniature.

Particular attention is paid to Copying and Enlarging old and faded Pictures, which I will retouch in Oil, Water Colors, or India Ink, making them as life-like as if taken from life.

My Stock and Instruments are all new and of the best quality, and with a superior Light, I flatter myself I shall be able to please.

A LARGE AND SELECT STOCK OF ALBUMS,

Which I will sell at cost,

Please call and examine work and prices.

Catskill, Dec. 8, 1865.”

 

Mrs. Henry B. AldrichMrs. Henry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Mrs. H. B. Aldrich, “Fashionable Millinery.” Windham Journal. 1866.

 

In 1867 The New York State Business Directory by Sampson, Davenport & Co. listed “H. P. [sic] Aldrich” operating as a “Photographist” at the village of Catskill. There was also listed a W. B. Waldron operating at Catskill as a Photographist.

 

Portrait of unknown man by photographer Henry B. AldrichPortrait of unknown man by photographer Henry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Portrait of Unknown Young Man by H. B. Aldrich. Author’s collection.

 

In 1870 The New York State Business Directory by Sampson, Davenport, & Co. listed H. B. Aldrich as operating as a “Photographist” at the village of Catskill. Aldrich was the only photographer listed in the guide as operating as a photographer in the village of Catskill. After Aldrich’s career change from photography to the livery industry in 1871, the 1874 directory shows that Aldrich was replaced at Catskill with two new “photographists,” Frank Allen and C. E. Van Gorden.

On the 1870 United States Census Henry B. Aldrich, age 36, was listed as living in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York. He was living with his wife Laura, age 38, who had an occupation of “Keeping House”; his daughter Mary, age 16; his son Joseph, age 14; Lizzie Gray, age 15, who was born in Michigan; and Mary Walters, age 18, who was born in New York. The Aldrich family real estate was valued at $4,000 and their personal estate was valued at $2,000. The Aldrich family must have been doing quite well as Mary Walters was listed with an occupation of “Domestic Servant.” Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Photographer.”

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1870 United States Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Photographer.” 1870 United States Census.

 

In the summer of 1871 Aldrich left the photography business and began a partnership with Edward Cargill in the livery business. He would continue with this line of work until his passing. In one of the first announcements of the new partnership, it was advertised “Cargill & Aldrich’s New Livery Stables! In New Brick Building, Opposite the Catskill House, Main Street, Catskill. This is the most extensive Livery in town, and can furnish Rigs in all styles. Headquarters of the Omnibus Line. Order Slate in the Office. June 9, 1871.” (The Catskill Recorder. August 11, 1871.)

In order to procure the best horses for his livery business Aldrich often searched in far-ranging places. He was noted for searching across the west, including Indiana and around Galena, Kansas, where his son Joseph had moved. He also traveled to Canada to look for the best stock.

 

“Western Horses! THE UNDERSIGNED have just returned from Indiana with a large selection of excellent Work Horses, which they offer for sale at reasonable rates. CARGILL & ALDRICH. Catskill, April, 2, 1872.” (The Catskill Recorder. April 12, 1872.)

 

“H. B. Aldrich has arrived from Canada with a carload of extra-large draft horses, matched pairs weighing from 2400 to 3200. May be seen at Cargill & Aldrich’s stable, this village. Those intending to buy this Spring would do well to call early and get the benefit of a liberal discount.” (The Catskill Recorder. April 20, 1888.)

 

“H. B. Aldrich arrived from the West yesterday with a carload of extra-fine road, coach and farm horses, among them some well-matched pairs, selected with care.” (The Catskill Recorder. June 15, 1888.)

 

“Horses! Horses! Horses! The Third Carload of Horses For the Spring Trade has arrived from the west. These Horses are note sent here by Western dealers, but are carefully selected by Mr. H. B. Aldrich, and are suitable for all classes of work. We guarantee each horse to be as represented or money refunded. Early buyers get best bargains. No trouble to show. CARGILL & ALDRICH, Livery, Sale and Exchange Stables, Opposite Opera House, Main Street, Catskill, N.Y.” (The Catskill Recorder. June 7, 1889.)

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. August 11, 1871.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. April 12, 1872.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. April 22, 1877.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. April 27, 1877.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. December 7, 1883.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. July 20, 1888.

 

Cargill & AldrichCargill & AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890. Cargill & Aldrich advertisement. The Catskill Recorder. May 10, 1889.

 

Edward Cargill, Henry’s partner, was a longtime livery operator at Catskill. He had previously partnered with Samuel Mallory. After Henry’s passing Cargill partnered with Wilbur Brown from 1890 to 1893. Wilbur had previously operated with the Selleck & Brown confectionary and ice cream firm for 22 years, and as a partner for 15 of those years. After Brown left the firm Cargill continued to operate as a sole proprietor.

The Cargill & Aldrich livery stable was located on the site now occupied by the Greene County Court House. “The lower floor was occupied as an office and for the storage of carriages. There was an entrance on Bridge street for the horses, who went up a ramp to the second floor where they were quartered.” (Greene County Examiner-Recorder. March 6, 1947.)

In 1945 the Greene County Examiner-Recorder offered a detailed and interesting article on the livery trade at the village of Catskill.

 

“‘Thanks for the buggy ride.” That was an expression quite common a half century ago, but is now obsolete, along with the livery horse and buggy.

That, of course, was before the advent of the automobile which put liverymen out of business. At one time there were several livery stables in Catskill village where a horse and buggy could be rented for a reasonable price and many a young man would hire one and take his girl for a ride. When he drove up to her home after a drive often she would say: “Thanks for the buggy ride.”

Only a comparatively few young men owned their own rigs, but would hire one from the livery . . .

One could not cover as much ground in an hour with a horse and buggy as he can today with an auto. It was a good horse that could cover the ground between Catskill and Cairo in an hour and there were few who could do it. The trip usually took from an hour and a quarter to an hour and a half.

Often Catskillians would take a drive up Windham Mountains, through Hunter and Haines Falls and down the Clove Road, a trip which took a good half day with a livery horse and buggy.

It was the custom to drive to Cairo and have dinner or supper at Walters’ or Jennings’ hotel, or go to Coxsackie and eat at Cummings’ Eagle Hotel.

Most of the livery horsed were gentle animals, not given much to speed, but safe for anybody to drive. Once in a great while a liveryman would get stuck with a balky horse, that would stop on the road and refuse to go any further until he was good and ready . . .

On the occasion of some dances, such as the Rip Van Winkle Club annual ball and other like events, young men would engage from the livery a carriage, team and driver to take him and his girl or, if married, himself and wife to the affair and return later to convey them home. Often a couple of young men would hire a rig between them and ride in style to the ball.

The local liveries had some swell turnouts and their horses were always kept slick and looking in the pink of perfection. In those days not so many local residents owned horses and carriages as they do automobiles today, hence the liveries did an excellent business.

But the auto came and gradually forced the livery stables to the wall, until they all disappeared.”

(“Backward Glimpses.” Greene County Examiner-Recorder. August 23, 1945.)

 

On the 1875 New York State Census, Aldrich, age 40, was listed as living in the town of Catskill in Greene County, New York. Interestingly his last name, and the last names of his family, were all spelled “Aldridge” on this census. He is listed as living with his wife Laura, age 38; his daughter Mary, age 19; his son Joseph E., age 17; and Josephine Dixon, age 23. Josephine was listed with an occupation of “Domestic Servant.” Aldrich was listed with an occupation of “Proprietor of Livery Stable.”

 

Henry B. AldrichHenry B. AldrichHenry B. Aldrich was a popular photographer in the village of Catskill in Greene County, New York in the mid-1860s through the summer of 1871. Aldrich would then partner with Edward Cargill in the livery trade at Catskill until his passing in 1890.

1875 New York State Census.
Henry B. Aldrich, “Proprietor of Livery Stable.” 1875 New York State Census.

 

Mary Aldrich, the Aldrich’s daughter, was born in 1854 and moved to Catskill with her family in her childhood years. She attended school at the Moravian school in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and at St. Agnes School in Albany, New York. On September 14, 1875 Mary Aldrich married Samuel N. Andrews of Little Falls, New York. Given the likely prominence of the Aldrich family in Catskill there was a lengthy write-up of the wedding in the local newspaper.

 

“The Wedding. A large and fashionable party assembled at the Presbyterian church on Tuesday, at the marriage of Miss Minnie E., daughter of our townsman H. B. Aldrich, Esq., to Mr. Samuel N. Andrews, of Little Falls, N.Y. Rev. Dr. Howard officiated. Miss Mary Olmstead presided at the organ, and rendered the Wedding Mach and other choice gems of music. Messrs. Charles Gregory, of New York, and J. E. Aldrich acted as ushers.

The bride was beautifully and richly attired in white silk, en train, point lace, orange blossoms and flowing white veil. The four bridesmaids – Misses Moffatt, Fox, Browne and Bacon (daughter of Judge Bacon) – were dressed in exquisite taste and made a charming picture. A costume of pale pink was very much admired, as was also one of the light blue trimmed with tulle and natural flowers. They were attended by Messrs. Brainard, Champney, Wiswell and Morgan.

After the ceremony the bridal party and invited guests attended the reception at the residence of the bride’s parents, on Summit Avenue, where a bountiful collation was spread. The parlors were tastefully decorated with bouquets and vases of rare flowers presented by friends of the bride. The presents were numerous and valuable, both of American and European manufacture, aggregating a value of several thousand dollars. Among them may be noted one set solid silver service; one elegant cream-spoon from Chas. Gregory; a set of sterling silver spoons, of splendid design, from Mrs. D. Harris, of 49 West 25th st., New York; silver fruit-dish, of unique design from Hon. G. A. Harding and wife; gold watch and chain, more silver service, etc. etc.; silver cake-basket from Mrs. L. J. Clark, silver table ware, and jewelry, etc., of all designs. At the reception there were many elegant toilets, that of Mrs. D. Harris, peach silk and Parisian lace, being much admired. The wedded pair left town at 6 P.M., on a tour to Niagara and the Thousand Islands.” (The Catskill Recorder. September 17, 1875.)

 

In 1880 Mary Aldrich and family moved to Galena, Kansas, where she would remain for the rest of her life. Only two years after their arrival, Samuel N. Andrews, Mary’s husband and Henry B. Aldrich’s son-in-law, was killed in 1882 at Kansas as a result of a tragic hunting accident.

              

“Accidentally Killed. For the following particulars of the sad death of S. N. Andrews, son-in-law of H. B. Aldrich of this village, we are indebted to the Short Creek (Kansas) Republican:

“On Tuesday morning S. N. Andrews, in company of J. E. Aldrich of this city, Hank Gray and several other gentlemen of Carterville and Carthage, started for a few days’ hunt. All went well and the party were enjoying the sport to their heart’s content until Wednesday at about 11 o’clock, when the distressing accident above-mentioned occurred.

“The party were on Elm Creek, a small stream about 10 miles West of Baxter. They had become separated, so that at the time of the accident the deceased and Mr. Gray were alone together. According to Mr. Gray’s statement, they were kneeling down awaiting an opportunity to fire at some ducks that were flying overhead. Mr. Andrews said: ‘Hank, you take the right and I’ll take the left.’ Just then some ducks came along and Mr. Gray turned and fired at them. Immediately following the report of his gun, that of Mr. Andrew’s was heard. Mr. Gray turned, to see Mr. Andrews falling, his brains flying in every direction. He hastened to him and found him dead. The charge from the gun had torn away the entire skull immediately above the left eye. Death was instantaneous. He had the gun resting against his knee, and the supposition is that in raising it it was accidentally discharged, with the result mentioned. His companions were summoned and the sad party started homeward with the remains, arriving at the residence of Mr. Aldrich at 6 o’clock in the evening. The wife, who had but a few moments before been notified of the sad occurrence, was almost crazed at the sight of all that remained of him who, but a few short hours before, had parted from her in the full enjoyment of life and health.

“The occurrence is one of the saddest that ever befell us and casts a deep gloom o’er the heart of every citizen of Galena. Mr. Andrews was among the first to locate on the Creek, and remained until a few months ago, when he moved to Carterville, where he was largely interested in mining and other business.

“The hunting party was made up of Carthage, Webb City and Carterville gentlemen. They came through this city and were joined by J. E. Aldrich. Mrs. Andrews accompanies her husband thus far, and was to remain here until his return from the hunt.

“The parents and the relatives of the deceased, residing in New York, have been notified and the remains will be kept until Sunday, awaiting their arrival.” (The Catskill Recorder. November 24, 1882.)

 

After the passing of her first husband Samuel N. Andrews, Mary Aldrich remarried to Edward E. Sapp on December 24, 1885. Edward (1858-1930) was been born on July 12, 1858 at Jackson, Michigan to Rev. Reison and Margaret Ferry Sapp. His father was a minister at the Methodist Episcopal Church at Grand Rapids. Edward was educated in the schools of Grand Rapids, Michigan. He moved from Michigan to Kansas in March, 1877, and resided at Galena, Kansas since January 1884. He was admitted to the bar in 1883. Edward would become extremely successful as a lawyer, city attorney, judge, a director in local mining companies and “one of the large capitalists and leading citizens of Galena.” “His professional standing, either at the bar or on the bench, cannot be assailed. He served his fellow citizens for many years in high positions, with the justice, fairness and dignity which reflects upon him the greatest credit, both as an upright exponent of the law and as a man of high personal aims and character.” (Allison, Nathaniel Thompson. History of Cherokee County, Kansas, and Representative Citizens. Chicago, IL: Biographical Publishing Company, 1904. p. 461-462.)