Photographing Upon Mount Washington

March 20, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

Clough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

 

Photographs from that expedition included the Tip Top House, the Summit House, the Lizzie Bourne Monument, winter closeups of frost, snow and ice, views from Mount Washington and many more. For interesting details about the winter scientific mission upon Mount Washington, one in which Kimball almost died, see the Clough and Kimball 1871 writeup that was included as part of Mount Washington in Winter or The Experiences of a Scientific Expedition Upon the Highest Mountain in New England. For more information about Clough, see In Search of Amos Clough, written by Robert W. Averill and published in 2019.

 

Below is an excerpt from Chapter 9 of the expedition summary at the top of Mount Washington in Winter, with an emphasis on photography. The paragraph was written by both Clough and Kimball. It provides an interesting perspective on the lengths photographers will go through to get “the shot.”

 

“Photographing Upon Mount Washington.

 

As photography has got to be so common in every-day life, and so necessary to the full success of every expedition of importance, its omission on the present occasion would have been a great oversight, and have left the practical results of the expedition but half complete. It is the province of the photographer to bring to the eyes of the public that which is not of a readily accessible character; thus to give those who cannot visit such places a chance to see wonders and beauties, while they enjoy the comforts of home, enduring none of the perils, dangers, or hardships, which are necessary to get at the real.

 

Though the pictures can convey to the mind but a small portion of the real grandeur of the scenes as beheld by the eye, they nevertheless have a fascinating beauty that charms and gives a sense of sublimity to the lover of nature, in her varied forms.

 

The photographer who makes nature his study, with a view to reproduce her various charms, soon becomes an enthusiast, and is ready to brave almost any hardship or danger in order to secure the likeness of a gem or “bit.” A musical waterfall, or thundering cataract, a peaceful vale where the flocks graze in quiet security, the wild mountain crag where the eagle screams its shrill notes, a tropical bower where perpetual summer brings forth rich and continuous verdure, and the barren, desolate mountain peaks of snow and frost towering far above the clouds; they will afford some subject for the Knight of the Camera to “bang away at,” and from which to bear off a trophy that shall delight “the millions,” and fittingly reward the enthusiasm of the true artist . . .”

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Tip-top House, frost two feet thickClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Tip-top House, frost two feet thick." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ac-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Tip-top House, frost two feet thick.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Tip-top House, frost two feet thick." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ac-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Summit House, frost two feet highClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Summit House, frost two feet high." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ae-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Summit House, frost two feet high.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Summit House, frost two feet high." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89ae-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top HouseClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89b8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mt. Adams from edge of Tip Top House." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89b8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Arctic SentinelClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Arctic Sentinel." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89d2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Arctic Sentinel.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Arctic Sentinel." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89d2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

Clough and Kimball were photographers on the scientific expedition to the top of Mount Washington during the winter of 1870-1871.Frost Crown of New EnglandClough and Kimball was a brief, but productive, photographic partnership between Amos Franklin Clough (1833-1872) and Howard Algernon Kimball (1845-1929). The business, located at Concord, New Hampshire, published hundreds of stereoviews, but was perhaps most noted for their series titled “Views taken on the Summit of Mt. Washington during the winter of 1870-71.” Clough and Kimball were part of a six-member scientific team that spent the winter of 1870-71 at the top of Mountain Washington. In addition to Clough and Kimball, other members of the scientific team included C. H. Hitchcock, the state geologist; J. H. Huntington, who was in charge of the observatory on the mountain; S. A. Nelson, observer; Theodore Smith, observer and telegrapher for the Signal Service.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Frost Crown of New England." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89c4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Frost Crown of New England.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Frost Crown of New England." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1871. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-89c4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 


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