Burton Hine – Civil War Veteran and Photographer

June 05, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

 

Burton Hine, Photographer.Burton Hine, Photographer.Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

 

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Burton Hine was born on October 9, 1842 in Meredith, New York. He was the son of Miles David Hine (1801-1876) and Julia F. (Rich) Hine (1808-1856). Miles and Julia, both born in Connecticut, married at Meredith on December 11, 1826 in a ceremony officiated by Rev. Mr. Fisher, pastor of the Congregational Society of Meredith.

Reverend William Fisher (1775-1840) served at the Meredith church for about 20 years (a different source says 16 years) from 1819 to 1839, presumably presiding over the early spiritual life of Miles and Julia Hine. Rev. Fisher’s father, Lieutenant Jonathan Fisher, died at Morristown, New Jersey while serving during the American Revolution. William was only 1 1/2 years old at the time of his father’s passing. He struggled, “prevented by a want of means,” but “by the labor of his own hands,” succeeded in gaining an education, graduating from Williams College in 1805. “As a preacher, he was warm and animated. He preached the doctrines of grace plainly and pointedly, and yet with much simplicity.” Due to poor health Rev. Fisher left Meredith in the late 1830s to reside with his oldest son at Indiana, where he farmed and continued to preach when his health allowed. Rev. William Fisher passed away on April 19, 1840, leaving behind his wife Rhoda and six children. The Congregational church at Meredith, having been established in 1815, was a long-standing member of the community, eventually becoming associated with the United Presbyterian denomination. For more information on the life and genealogy of Reverend William Fisher reference The Fisher Genealogy by Philip A. Fisher. (Fisher, Philip A. The Fisher Genealogy. Everett, Mass.: Massachusetts Publishing Company, 1898. p. 114, 195-196.)

Miles and Julia had five children including one daughter and four sons, namely Henrietta Rich Hine (1828-1897), Franklin Tracy Hine (1830-1864), Miles Hine jr. (1836-1899), our subject Burton Hine (1842-1905) and James Wilson Hine (1845-1903). Miles Hine, the father, passed away on January 5, 1876 and his wife Julia F. (Rich) Hine passed away on June 4, 1856.

Silas Hine (1764-1841), Burton’s grandfather, “was one of the early settlers of West Meredith, settling there in 1810, and rearing a family of twelve children.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 255.) Silas was born in Connecticut on January 8, 1764 and married Betsey Terrell (1767-1834). Silas passed away at Meredith on March 13, 1841. Betsey passed away at Meredith on February 26, 1834.

Ambrose Hine, Burton’s great-grandfather, was born at Milford, Connecticut, and was baptized on June 26, 1726. He first married Sarah Terrill of Anity, Connecticut, and second married Betsey Ford. Ambrose notably served in the American Revolution, answering the call in 1776 when he joined as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1st Company, 5th Battalion, Wadsworth’s Brigade under Colonel William Douglas. 1st Company was under the leadership of Captain Nathaniel Johnson of Derby, Connecticut. “This battalion was raised June, 1776, to re-inforce [sic] Washington’s Army at New York. It served in the city and on the Brooklyn front. It was at the battle of Long Island Aug. 27th, 1776. Retreated from New York Aug. 29-30th, 1776, was with the militia at Kips Bay, 34th St., East River, at the attack on New York Sept. 15th, 1776, and retreated at the battle of White Plains Oct. 28th, 1776. Time out Dec. 25th, 1776.” (Beach, Joseph Perkins. History of Cheshire, Connecticut from 1694 to 1840. Cheshire, CT: Lady Fenwick Chapter, D. A. R., 1912. p. 189.)

Captain Ambrose Hine then served as a company commander in Lieutenant Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin’s (1732-1788) Regiment at some point in 1777 and 1778. The unit “had been ordered to march to aid the Continental Army on the North River.” (Johnston, Henry P. The Record of Connecticut Men in the Military and Naval Service During the War of the Revolution 1775-1783. Hartford, Ct., 1889.) The unit has also “served with the Main Army at and near Peekskill in the State of New York.” (Collection of the Connecticut Historical Society. Volume 8. Hartford: Connecticut Historical Society, 1901.) Captain Hine also served in the 10th Militia Regiment in 1777, acting as the “Captain of the alarm list south company in the parish of New Cheshire in the 10th regiment in this State.” (Hoadly, Charles, J. The Public Records of the State of Connecticut, From October, 1776, to February, 1778, inclusive. Hartford, CT: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, 1894.)

The historic Ambrose Hine House is located at what is now 118 Cook Road in Prospect, Connecticut. The adjoining lands of the Highland Greens Golf Course were once owned and farmed by Hine. This is where he raised his nine children. Ambrose Hine passed away in 1794.

Looking even further back, the Hine family can trace its American roots to Thomas Hine (1621-1698), who lived at Milford, Connecticut by the year 1646. For more information about Hine family history and genealogy please reference Descendants of Thomas Hine, Milford, Conn. 1640 as written by Hon. Robert C. Hine.

On the 1855 New York State census Burton, age 12, was living at Meredith with his parents. They lived in a frame house valued at $200. His father, who was originally from Connecticut and had resided at Meredith for 38 years, was listed with an occupation of Farmer. Julia was shown as having lived at Meredith for 47 years, or her entire life.

 

Map of the Miles Hine, father of Burton Hine, homestead at Meredith in 1856.Map of the Miles Hine, father of Burton Hine, homestead at Meredith in 1856.Gould, Jay. Map of Delaware Co., New York. Philadelphia: Published by Collins G. Keeney, 1856. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2012593655/>. Map of the Miles Hine, father of Burton Hine, homestead at Meredith in 1856.

Gould, Jay. Map of Delaware Co., New York. Philadelphia: Published by Collins G. Keeney, 1856. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2012593655/>.

 

As for the family farm of Burton’s youth, the 1856 map of Delaware County by Jay Gould (1836-1892) provides some valuable insight as to the top agricultural products of the region and the era. Some leading agricultural products included butter, 4,025,575 lbs.; maple sugar, 313,302 pounds; apples, 239,210 bushels; oats, 416,659 bushels; hay, 103,895 tons; and wool, 136,659 pounds. There were many other products being produced as well including corn, potatoes, buckwheat, barley, turnips, cider, wine, cheese, hemp, hops and honey.

 

Residence of Miles Hine, Town of Meredith, Delaware Co., N. Y.Residence of Miles Hine, Town of Meredith, Delaware Co., N. Y.History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 249. "Residence of Miles Hine, Town of Meredith, Delaware Co., N. Y."

History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 249.

 

For their early education Burton and his siblings would have likely attended the Meredith District School No. 5, which had been founded in 1816. According to an 1855 report on the condition of the district schools, No. 5 was rated as “bad.” District trustees in 1855 included Miles Hine, Elias Warner and David Kemp, all of whom owned nearby farms. The Hine family farm and district school no. 5 were located near present day Route 14 near the intersection with Sunderland Road.

On the 1860 New York State census, Burton, age 17, was living at Meredith. He was listed with an occupation of Farm Laborer while living in the household of the Lewis and Burroughs (Burrows) families. As was customary for the time, with most schooling completed by 16 and sometimes earlier, the census reported that Burton had not attended school in the prior year.

Burton was a distinguished veteran of the Civil War having served for over three years with the famed 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at the age of 18 for three years in Company I on September 16, 1861 at Delhi, New York and mustered into service as a Private on October 21, 1861. Company I, known as the “Delaware Rifles,” was recruited primarily from the towns of Sidney, Kortright, Davenport, Meredith and Delhi in Delaware County, New York. Captain Theophilus L. England commanded Company I, while Colonel Harrison S. Fairchild commanded the 89th Regiment, New York (Foot) Volunteers.

 

Advertisement for the Delaware Riflemen, 89th Regiment, New York InfantryDelaware Riflemen!Captain England, Burton Hine’s company commander, was well respected for his leadership and bravery throughout his service. Theophilus was born on October 2, 1834, the son of Henry England (1807-1902), a dry goods store owner at Delhi. After the Civil War began, in 1861 “Theophilus became inspired by a patriotic zeal and loyalty. He began recruiting volunteers and soon a company of nearly one hundred men was raised.” (Raitt, John E. “Bi-Centennial Corner. In Memory of a Gallant Soldier.” Delaware Republican Express. February 12, 1976.) On February 17, 1863 Theophilus was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.

England died on June 18, 1864 while leading “a gallant charge of the Regiment” at the Battle of Petersburg in Virginia. Colonel Fairchild, Regimental Commander, wrote to LTC England’s father upon his death, stating “I much regret his loss, as he has always sustained me in the command of the Regiment, and was a brave and gallant officer.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England’s body was returned to Delhi, New York to a hero’s welcome, complete with a full honor guard. The funeral ceremony was held at Courthouse Square in the heart of Delhi village, “as none of the churches could have begun to hold the large concourse of people who had assembled to do honor to the gallant dead.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England is buried at Woodland Cemetery at Delhi, New York. When the Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) chapter was established at Delhi on March 11, 1884, it was named in his honor, being known as the England Post, No. 142, G. A. R.

Delaware Gazette, October 30, 1861.
Delaware Riflemen! Advertisement by Captain T. L. England to recruit Delaware County men into the 89th Regiment. Delaware Gazette, October 30, 1861.

 

Captain England, Burton’s company commander, was well respected for his leadership and bravery throughout his service. Theophilus was born on October 2, 1834, the son of Henry England (1807-1902), a dry goods store owner at Delhi. After the Civil War began, in 1861 “Theophilus became inspired by a patriotic zeal and loyalty. He began recruiting volunteers and soon a company of nearly one hundred men was raised.” (Raitt, John E. “Bi-Centennial Corner. In Memory of a Gallant Soldier.” Delaware Republican Express. February 12, 1976.) On February 17, 1863 Theophilus was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.

England died on June 18, 1864 while leading “a gallant charge of the Regiment” at the Battle of Petersburg in Virginia. Colonel Fairchild, Regimental Commander, wrote to LTC England’s father upon his death, stating “I much regret his loss, as he has always sustained me in the command of the Regiment, and was a brave and gallant officer.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England’s body was returned to Delhi, New York to a hero’s welcome, complete with a full honor guard. The funeral ceremony was held at Courthouse Square in the heart of Delhi village, “as none of the churches could have begun to hold the large concourse of people who had assembled to do honor to the gallant dead.” (“Funeral of Lieut. Col. England.” Delaware and Visitor. July 2, 1864.) England is buried at Woodland Cemetery at Delhi, New York. When the Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) chapter was established at Delhi on March 11, 1884, it was named in his honor, being known as the England Post, No. 142, G. A. R.

Colonel Harrison Stiles Fairchild (1820-1901), Burton’s regimental commander, mustered into service as commander of the 89th Regiment on December 4, 1861. He brought significant prior military experience to his unit having previously served as Captain in the Rochester Light Guard for ten years from 1844 to 1854, as Colonel of the 54th Regiment of New York Militia from 1854 until the start of the Civil War and was a member of the Board of Military Examiners of the state of New York. For his leadership and bravery Fairchild was promoted to brevet Brigadier General on March 13, 1865. He was present at the surrender of General Lee in northern Virginia. He mustered out of the unit on August 3, 1865 at Richmond, Virginia. After the war he worked in Rochester, New York as a stockbroker, realtor and pension claims agent. Over the years he attended a number of the reunions of the 89th Regiment, where he was always well received. “He was considered a brave and gallant soldier. Although a severe disciplinarian, he was beloved by his men . . . He was described by his friends as dignified and courteous in manner, refined in his feelings and tastes, friendly and kind in disposition, and a staunch Republican.” (Brown. Richard G. “A Civil War Remembrance of Breveted Brigadier General Harrison Stiles Fairchild.” The Friends of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Volume 12, No. 4. Fall 1992.) Fairchild passed away on January 25, 1901 and is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester.

Local newspapers of the time often published the personal letters written by soldiers in the field and sent to their home families and friends. Around June 15, 1864 Burton wrote home to his brother about his experiences, a letter which was published in the Republican & Visitor of Delhi, N.Y. in their July 2, 1864 issue. Two of Burton’s brothers, 19-year-old James W. Hine and Miles jr. Hine, would enlist in August 1864, only two months after this letter.

 

“BEFORE PETERSBURG, June 15, 1864.

Dear Brother:– Having a few leisure moments at present, I will improve them by writing you a few lines, as I presume you are anxious to hear the news. Sunday night of the 19th inst., we left the army of the Potomac and marched to the White House, which our corps took transports and sailed to City Point, then up the Appomattox and landed at Point of Rocks. Early yesterday morning, having drawn our rations, we started towards Petersburg – our regiment taking the advance, and skirmishing all the way – driving the rebels slowly until nearly noon when we came in sight of Petersburg and the fortifications around it. Slowly and cautiously we crept toward them until nearly sundown, when our artillery opened on one of their main forts, and the 3d brigade of Burnham’s division, charged and took the fort, several prisoners and all its guns. This ended yesterday’s fighting with us. The loss on our side was not heavy. Our regiment lost in killed and wounded, two captains and about privates; the majority being wounded. Our company was fortunate and did not lose a man. I, however, was suddenly notified of the arrival of an unwelcome messenger – a musket ball striking the barrel of my gun with a few inches of the lock. No more to-day.

 

Saturday June 18th:– You will see by this date that I have passed over the two preceding days. I will merely state that on Thursday the 16th, our regiment was relieved from the front and sent to the rear for rest; the General acknowledging that the 89th had a hard day yesterday (15th). On the same day we were reinforced by the 2d and 9th army corps. At about midnight we were ordered out on picket again. Loss of the regiment – one killed, five wounded.

 

On the 17th we were relieved from picket by the 5th Ohio Colored Regiment, and marched back to where our division lay. Firing heavy at night. To-day I have sad news to communicate. Our division started on in the advance, early – driving the enemy slowly all the forenoon; our regiment supporting a battalion of heavy artillery. At about 4 o’clock P. M. we charged the rebels, and drove them, but with heavy loss. Our Lieutenant Colonel fell, at the head of his regiment, shot through the head. In losing him we have lost one whose bravery none can dispute. I was within six feet of him, and as he fell, I asked him if he was shot, but no answer – he was dead. We cared for him as well as we could until night, when four others with myself, carried him a mile, to the rear. Of our company, four were wounded, viz: Orderly Dixon, Sergeant Fiebig, John Thompson and William Stott.– How seriously wounded, do not as yet know. We are nearly worn out – having had nothing to eat during the whole day.

 

Truly your brother,

BURTON HINE

Co. I, 89th N. Y. V.”

 

Burton was promoted to Corporal on February 25, 1863. He valiantly fought in many fierce battles including South Mountain (September 14, 1862), Antietam (September 17, 1862), Fredericksburg (December 11-15, 1862), Suffolk (April 11 to May 4, 1863), siege of Charleston (July 18, 1863 to September 7, 1863) and Cold Harbor (May 31 to June 12, 1864). Burton Hine was honorably discharged on October 20, 1864 after having served for 3 years, 1 month and 4 days.

All three of Burton’s brothers also honorably served during the Civil War, including Franklin Tracy Hine, James W. Hine and Miles Hine, Jr. While Burton had served in the 89th Regiment, his three brothers all served in the 144th Regiment.

Franklin Tracy Hine, Burton’s older brother, was born at Meredith on July 27, 1830. He was married to Betsey Ann Maxfield, with whom he had two children, Willis Tracy (b. 1854) and Albert Fulford Hine (b. 1857). He was working as a wagon maker in 1855 and then as a farmer in 1860.

At the age of 32 Franklin enlisted for three years in Company C, 144th Regiment on August 13, 1862 at Meredith and mustered into service on September 27, 1862. The company was led by Captain James Lewis, and the 144th Regiment was led by Colonel Robert S. Hughston. Enlisting as a Sergeant, he was promoted to 1st Sergeant on March 23, 1863, to 2nd Lieutenant on August 30, 1863 and to 1st Lieutenant on November 25, 1864. Franklin was mortally wounded at the Battle of Honey Hill in today’s Beaufort County, South Carolina. The Battle of Honey Hill took place on November 30, 1864 and was the third battle during Sherman’s famous March to the Sea. “This was when we were advancing to the battle of Honey Hill. Soon after we became engaged, 1st Lieut. Frank T. Hine, commanding Co. I, color company, was severely wounded in the knee joint by a musket ball, (afterward died of wound.)” (McKee, James Harvey. Back “In War Times.” History of The 144th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry.” Lieut. Horace E. Bailey, 1903. p. 262.) First Lieutenant Franklin’s leg was amputated and he died of his wounds on December 20, 1864 at the hospital in Beaufort, South Carolina. The Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) post at Franklin, New York (post No. 132) was named in his honor. Franklin Tracy Hine is buried at the Croton Union Cemetery at Treadwell, New York.

James W. Hine, Burton’s younger brother, was born on April 23, 1845. He married Emma E. Barnum in 1869, with whom he had four children, including James Edward (b. 1870), Ruby Elizabeth (b. 1873), Katherine Genevieve (b. 1878) and a daughter with name unknown (b. 1889). At the tender age of 19 he enlisted as a Private in Company C, 144th New York Infantry on August 11, 1864 at Norwich, New York. The unit mustered into service on August 11, 1864. During his service “he was appointed Corresponding Clerk at the headquarters of the Southern Department under Gens. Foster and Gilmore, a position he held until he mustered out in June, 1865.” He was discharged on June 25, 1865 at Hilton Head, South Carolina upon the expiration of his service commitment.

After the war, in 1867 James Hine moved west to Kent County, Michigan. He first worked as a druggist for three years, and then became the owner of the Lowell Journal, a local newspaper. He was a frequent newspaper contributor “under the peculiarly comical title of Jimcrax.” He also served as the Lowell postmaster for about seven years and held several positions in state politics, including being elected representative to the Michigan state senate. He later worked as an editorial writer for the Detroit Journal; and then owned and edited the Tecumseh News for three years.

 

James W. HineJames W. Hine, brother of photographer Burton Hine.James W. Hine was born on April 23, 1845. He married Emma E. Barnum in 1869, with whom he had four children, including James Edward (b. 1870), Ruby Elizabeth (b. 1873), Katherine Genevieve (b. 1878) and a daughter with name unknown (b. 1889). At the tender age of 19 he enlisted as a Private in Company C, 144th New York Infantry on August 11, 1864 at Norwich, New York. The unit mustered into service on August 11, 1864. During his service “he was appointed Corresponding Clerk at the headquarters of the Southern Department under Gens. Foster and Gilmore, a position he held until he mustered out in June, 1865.” He was discharged on June 25, 1865 at Hilton Head, South Carolina upon the expiration of his service commitment.

After the war, in 1867 James Hine moved west to Kent County, Michigan. He first worked as a druggist for three years, and then became the owner of the Lowell Journal, a local newspaper. He was a frequent newspaper contributor “under the peculiarly comical title of Jimcrax.” He also served as the Lowell postmaster for about seven years and held several positions in state politics, including being elected representative to the Michigan state senate. He later worked as an editorial writer for the Detroit Journal; and then owned and edited the Tecumseh News for three years.

In the 1881 publication History of Kent County, Michigan, James W. Hine was positively profiled. “In this brief review, just sufficient notice has been given to convey an idea of what may be accomplished by a man still young. Here we learn how, as a youth, he served in the war for the Union, a little later entered commercial life in a Western village, and more recently conducted a political journal with so much decent ability as to win for himself a substantial recognition at the hands of the political party to which his political faith attaches itself. His continued observance of refined and liberal social principles, and a high standard of journalistic ability, will still bring him great honors in his private and public life.” (History of Kent County, Michigan. Chicago: Chas. C. Chapman & Co., 1881. p. 434-435.)

James W. Hine passed away after a second attack of paralysis on April 4, 1903 at Detroit, Michigan. He left behind his widow and three daughters: Ruby Hine Booth, of Spearfish, South Dakota; Katherine, a teacher of mathematics at Western Reserve college in Ohio; and Helen R., “now at school and living with her sister at Spearfish, South Dakota.” (“Col. Hine Died at Harper.” Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1903.)
Portrait of James W. Hine, brother of photographer Burton Hine. Detroit Free Press, April 5, 1903.

 

In the 1881 publication History of Kent County, Michigan, James W. Hine was positively profiled. “In this brief review, just sufficient notice has been given to convey an idea of what may be accomplished by a man still young. Here we learn how, as a youth, he served in the war for the Union, a little later entered commercial life in a Western village, and more recently conducted a political journal with so much decent ability as to win for himself a substantial recognition at the hands of the political party to which his political faith attaches itself. His continued observance of refined and liberal social principles, and a high standard of journalistic ability, will still bring him great honors in his private and public life.” (History of Kent County, Michigan. Chicago: Chas. C. Chapman & Co., 1881. p. 434-435.)

James W. Hine passed away after a second attack of paralysis on April 4, 1903 at Detroit, Michigan. He left behind his widow and three daughters: Ruby Hine Booth, of Spearfish, South Dakota; Katherine, a teacher of mathematics at Western Reserve college in Ohio; and Helen R., “now at school and living with her sister at Spearfish, South Dakota.” (“Col. Hine Died at Harper.” Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1903.)

Miles Hine, Jr. (1836-1899), Burton’s older brother, was born in Meredith on April 13, 1836. His occupation prior to the war was as a peddler and later manufactured whips. At age 28, Miles Jr., enlisted in Company U, 144th New York Infantry on August 27, 1864 at Meredith and mustered into service on September 3, 1864. Miles was later transferred to Company A, 1st Battalion, 1st New York Engineers on October 6, 1864. Miles mustered out of service on June 25, 1865 at Hilton Head, South Carolina.

Prior to the war Miles married Mary Ellen Stilson on November 17, 1857. They had one child, Julia Alida, who was born in 1859 but passed away at the three years of age on February 10, 1863. Miles was “a prominent citizen of Treadwell . . . Mr. Hine was a veteran of the war for the Union and was held in very high respect. He was successful in business having accumulated a good property as a dealer in whips and used it generously in advancing the interests of his town and of the Baptist church of which he was a devoted member.” (Delaware Gazette. August 30, 1899.) Miles died at the age of 63 on August 25, 1899 at the hamlet of Croton (now Treadwell) in the town of Franklin, Delaware County, New York. He is buried at the Croton Union Cemetery at Treadwell, New York.

Henrietta Rich (Hine) Bush, Burton’s sister, was born in the town of Meredith on April 8, 1828. She married Abram Bush (1823-1902) at age 20 on October 4, 1848. Abram worked as a merchant and tailor. They first lived at Croton, New York but moved to the village of Franklin in 1858. Henrietta passed away at 68 years of age on February 21, 1897. She was a prominent member of the Methodist church. She is buried at Ouleout Cemetery in Franklin, New York.

On the 1865 New York State census Burton, age 22, was residing at Meredith in the household of Isaac and Jenett Brownwell. He was listed an occupation of “Hired Man.”

Within a couple of years after the end of the war, in 1867, Burton opened his own photography gallery at the village of Franklin. “The new photograph rooms of Burton Hine are fitted up neatly, in good style, and have an air of thrift and enterprise about them that means business and success.” (Oneonta Herald. May 29, 1867.) The Delaware Republican wrote that “A new Photograph Gallery has just been opened by Mr. Burton Hine, and judging from his specimens, he is a capital artist.” (Delaware Republican. June 8, 1867.)

The Oneonta Herald wrote on August 21, 1867 that at the village of Franklin “Burton Hine is selling some fine photographs of Rev. Dr. Kerr at 25 cts each. He will send them by mail-prepaid to any address on receipt of price.”

Rev. Dr. George Kerr was the long time and much esteemed principal of the Delaware Literary Institute, a popular secondary school at Franklin that operated from 1835 to 1902. The Institute, located in the heart of the village of Franklin, was for many years considered “one of the most prominent educational institutions of New York State, sending graduates to Harvard, Yale, Mr. Holyoke and Smith.” Dr. Kerr ably led the Institute from 1846 to 1860. In addition to being the principal Kerr was also the instructor for Greek Language and Metaphysics. Newspaper articles with praise for the teaching and leadership of Dr. Kerr were frequent. After leaving the Delaware Literary Institute Dr. Kerr later served as Chair of Philosophy, Mathematics and Astronomy at the State Agricultural College at Ovid in Seneca County and then as principal of the Cooperstown Seminary. When Dr. Kerr decided to leave the Institute after his long service there were several public pronouncements of his impact on the school and the broader community.

 

“Dr. Kerr has been for fifteen years the distinguished and successful Principal of the Delaware Literary Institute at Franklin, and the news of his resignation of that position will be received by the thousands that love him, and have known him as we have, with unmingled regret. No educator in the State has done a nobler work and none will leave more ineffaceable marks of his labors to perpetuate his name. Combining great industry with a dauntless will, and the enthusiasm of the scholar with the very highest conceptions of Learning as a power in the world, he has toiled on there through the years, in that dear sweet village of Franklin, until legions of pupils start with joy at the very sound of his name. His influence for good upon that army of students, human estimates will never measure. It is felt and seen in the high purposes and noble lives of those students as wave after wave has carried them out upon the stormy ocean of real life, and as they do their work in every State of the Union – in the new Territories and on the far-off islands of the sea.” (The Ovid Bee. November 14, 1860.)

 

Delaware Literary Institute in 1869.Delaware Literary Institute in 1869.The Delaware Literary Institute was a popular secondary school at Franklin that operated from 1835 to 1902. The Institute, located in the heart of the village of Franklin, was for many years considered “one of the most prominent educational institutions of New York State, sending graduates to Harvard, Yale, Mr. Holyoke and Smith.”

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York : from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34

Delaware Literary Institute in 1869.

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York : from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34.

 

In 1868 Hine advertised his gallery in the April 29, 1868 issue of the Oneonta Herald. “Just Look at This! I HAVE purchased the entire large stock of negatives taken by N. A. Beers, and am prepared to furnish copies from the same at $2.00 PER DOZEN. All orders by mail or otherwise will receive prompt attention. BURTON HINE. Photographer, Franklin, N.Y. Feb. 9th 1868.”

 

Burton Hine, Photograph Gallery, Franklin, NYBurton Hine, Photograph Gallery, Franklin, NYBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

Oneonta Herald, April 29, 1868.
Just Look at This! Burton Hine advertisement. Oneonta Herald, April 29, 1868.

 

N. A. Beers, an “accomplished photograph artist,” operated his Franklin gallery as the “Beers’ Gallery of Art” since at least 1864, working out of the village post office building. Beers advertised that he had “been connected with some of the best rooms in New York City, and in the country” and that his services included photographs, ambrotypes, ferotypes and “all other sun pictures.”

 

N. A. Beers, photographer advertisementN. A. Beers, photographer advertisementN. A. Beers, an “accomplished photograph artist,” operated his Franklin gallery as the “Beers’ Gallery of Art” since at least 1864, working out of the village post office building. Beers advertised that he had “been connected with some of the best rooms in New York City, and in the country” and that his services included photographs, ambrotypes, ferotypes and “all other sun pictures.”

Bloomville Mirror, December 27, 1864.
N. A. Beers advertisement, “New Photograph Institute!” Bloomville Mirror, December 27, 1864.

 

Interestingly, J. W. Hine, Burton’s brother, was also likely a photographer, perhaps for a relatively brief time, and was possibly was a partner of N. A. Beers. The following advertisement was placed in the Oneonta Herald in their July 3, 1867 issue, which was only three months before J. W. (James) would leave New York for his new home in Michigan.

 

“AVERY’S PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS OF FRANKLIN! LARGE (11 by 14) Views of the Village of Franklin; also Stereoscopic and Card or Album Size of the Episcopal Church, Boarding Hall Institute, Chapel and Presbyterian Church, made to order and sent by mail on receipt of price.

Large View . . . $1.00 each.

Stereoscopic Views . . . 40c each.

Card Views . . . 25c each.

Address N. A. Beers, J. W. Hine, Franklin; A. S. Avery, Morris, N.Y.”

 

Avery's Photographic ViewsAvery's Photographic ViewsBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

J. W. Hine, as included in the advertisement, was the brother of photographer Burton Hine.

Oneonta Herald, July 3, 1867.
Avery’s Photographer Views. Oneonta Herald, July 3, 1867.

 

A devastating fire in the village of Franklin destroyed an entire block of buildings and offices in February 1869. The fire originated from the stove pipe on the upper floor of the Bush Bros’ clothing store located in the center of the block and quickly spread. Photographer Burton Hine lost $600 worth of equipment during the fire, but was fortunately insured for $500. Temporarily after the fire Burton operated in the Kneeland Bros. building.

 

Map of the Franklin business district in 1869.Map of the Franklin business district in 1869.Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34 Map of the Franklin business district in 1869.

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34

 

Burton, of Franklin, married Harriet Adelia Strong, of Meredith, on September 14, 1869 in a ceremony performed by Rev. J. J. Hough. The ceremony took place at Meredith. The officiant, Reverend Joel Jackson Hough (1835-1897), an 1859 graduate of Yale University, served at the First Congregational Church at Franklin from 1867 to 1873. After leaving Franklin Hough served at churches in Danbury, Connecticut; Antwerp, New York; and Berkshire, New York. He received a Doctor of Divinity honorary degree from Whitman College in 1897. Reverend Hough passed away at 62 years of age from diabetes in Berkshire, New York on September 24, 1897.

Burton’s wife Harriet, born July 24, 1846, was the daughter of Lemuel and Harriet M. Strong. The History of Delaware County, N.Y., published in 1880, contained a brief summary about Lemuel Strong, Harriet’s father. “Lemuel Strong, a native of Meredith Square, removed in infancy to the farm where his life was passed, and where his death occurred October 1st, 1879. He held several public offices, but of late years declined every offer of political preferment, choosing rather the round of domestic pleasures and duties, which the care of his large farm brought to him. He married January 6th, 1841, Harriet, daughter of Pearse Mitchell. They have had six children:- Homer, who died in 1850, aged eight years; Hattie B., Sarah A. and Lemuel, jr., who died of diphtheria in 1863, within a few days of each other, aged six, fourteen and eleven years; Chauncey, born April 4th, 1844, and Adelia, born July 24th, 1846, married to Burton Hine, of Walton. Mrs. Strong survives her husband, and resides with her son on the old homestead.” (History of Delaware County, N.Y. New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 1880. p. 255.)

Harriet’s mother and Burton’s mother-in-law, Harriet M. Strong, passed away in 1911. “Mrs. Harriet M. Strong died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Burton Hine, in Walton, Dec. 3, aged 94 years. She was the daughter of Pearce [Pierce, 1781-1854] and [Abigail] Nabby Mitchell [1789-1888], who were early settlers on Elk Creek. Her husband, Lemuel Strong of Meredith, died about 20 years ago. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Hine of Walton and one son, Chauncey Strong of Oneonta. Two brothers, Hudson Mitchell of California, and Marshall Mitchell of Delhi and a sister, Mrs. Sarah M. Griswold also of Delhi survive her. Mrs. Strong was in many ways a most remarkable woman and most highly respected. The funeral was held in Walton Wednesday and burial Thursday at Meredith Square.” (Delaware Gazette. December 13, 1911.)

Burton and Harriet Hine had one son Lemuel Strong Hine and one daughter, Hattie Julia (Hine) Lewis. Lemuel Strong Hine was born on December 28, 1874. Lemuel enlisted in the military during the Spanish-American War. He served from May 1, 1898 to February 25, 1899 as a Corporal with Company F, 1st NY Infantry. He was first stationed at the Presidio in California and then in Honolulu, Hawaii. For his civilian career Lemuel worked as a successful plumber. According to his World War I draft card, Lemuel was of medium height, medium build and had light brown hair. In 1901 Lemuel married Lillian Gilbert (1879-1964), daughter of William and Catherine White Gilbert. Lemuel passed away from a heart attack at 65 years of age on January 14, 1940 and is buried at Walton Cemetery.

Hattie Julia (Hine) Lewis was born in 1870. She married Harry Knowles Lewis (1872-1925). Harry worked as a farmer, as superintendent with the Borden Milk Company and as an instructor at the State School of Agriculture at Delhi. He was well liked at the school, “where his faithful and efficient services were highly prized.” (Stamford Mirror-Recorder. July 29, 1925.) Harry passed away in 1925 following a nervous breakdown and an attempted suicide by slashing his throat. In 1928, three years after his passing, at the graduation ceremony for the state school at Delhi, alumni presented a bronze tablet to his memory. Hattie Lewis passed away in 1948 is buried at Walton Cemetery.

In 1870 Burton worked together with several other photographers to advertise their copying and retouching services. The following advertisement was featured in an 1870 issue of the Bloomville Mirror. “FOR THE HOLIDAYS. IF You want the finest retouched photograph of yourself, or one copied from the smallest or poorest picture possible, into a splendid portrait of any size, in oil or water colors, or India Ink, don’t ask [sp?], but inquire particulars of B. Fitch & Co. Delhi; S. B. Champion, Bloomville; E. Gage, Photographer, Walton; E. O. Covill, Stamford; W. S. Foote, Hobart, B. Hine, Franklin; O Friot [sp?], Oneonta; Wheeler, Unadilla; C. C. Williams, Margaretville. They will take orders and give all information required, or you can send orders direct by mail or express to Geo. H. Johnson, 1288 Broadway, New York. The beautiful porcelain pictures of all styles, frames and fittings furnished at New York prices.”

In addition to his photography business in 1870 Burton became the sole agent for the sale of the Weed Sewing Machine at the village of Franklin. Other local agents included McMurdy & Bro. at Hobart, N. O. Flint at Delhi, Dr. Geo. Parsons at Walton and J. I. Strong at Meredith. The machine was marketed in Delaware County as a “F. F., or Family Favorite!” Local advertisements highlighted the many prizes won by the Weed sewing machine, which was first patented by Theodore E. Weed in 1854. The Weed Sewing Machine Company operated from 1863 to 1891.

On the 1870 United States census Burton, age 27, was residing in the town of Franklin with his wife Harriet, age 23. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Photographer.” Their personal estate was valued at $1,500.

 

Burton Hine, 1870 United States CensusBurton Hine, Photographer, 1870 United States CensusBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer. Burton Hine, 1870 United States Census.

 

Burton and Harriet moved from Franklin to Walton several years after their marriage in 1871.

The 31st Annual Fair of the Delaware County Agricultural Society took place at Walton on September 26-28, 1871. In Class No. 20, Burton Hine was awarded a premium for “best exhibition photographs.”

 

Map of the Walton business district in 1869.Map of the Walton business district in 1869.Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34 Map of the Walton business district in 1869.

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. "Atlas of Delaware co., New York: from actual surveys by and under the direction of F. W. Beers assisted by A. B. Prindle & others" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1869. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/63eb0760-c5f7-012f-9bb5-58d385a7bc34

 

Burton placed the following advertisement in the Delaware Republican, a local newspaper, in 1872. “Hine’s Photograph Gallery! Walton, N.Y., IS turning out Pictures equal to any Gallery in the State – All of the Latest New York styles of pictures at the Lowest Prices. He has also a large Stock of Oval, Black Walnut Rosewood and Rustic Frames, Stereoscopes, Picture Cord and Picture Nails. Pictures of all kinds framed to order from a well-selected stock of Black Walnut, Rosewood, Gilt and Rustic Mouldings. At Prices which Defy Competition. Walton, August 19, 1872. 640m3 BURTON HINE.”

 

Hine's Photograph Gallery, Walton, NYHine's Photograph Gallery, Walton, NYBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

Delaware Republican, 1872.
“Hine's Photograph Gallery!” advertisement. Delaware Republican, 1872.

 

Hine was widely known for publishing his popular series of stereoviews titled “Views in and about Walton.” A number of these stereoviews are viewable as part of the digital collections of the New York Public Library.

 

Delaware Street, looking west."Delaware Street, looking west." Burton Hine, Photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "Delaware Street, looking west" is from his "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Delaware Street, looking west." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc0-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Delaware Street, looking west."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Delaware Street, looking west." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc0-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

"East Brook and Pine Hill." Burton Hine, photographer"East Brook and Pine Hill." Burton Hine, photographerThis Burton Hine stereoview titled "East Brook and Pine Hill" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "East Brook and Pine Hill." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"East Brook and Pine Hill."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "East Brook and Pine Hill." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

"Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." Burton Hine, photographer."Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." Burton Hine, photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "Group portrait of women sitting on grass in front of a house" was from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddb8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Group portrait of women sitting on the grass in front of a house." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddb8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

North Street, looking south from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographer.North Street, looking south from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "“North Street, looking south from Fitch Street" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking south from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbe-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
“North Street, looking south from Fitch Street.”

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking south from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbe-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

On the 1875 New York State census Burton, age 33, was residing at the village of Walton. The household included his wife Addie, age 27, their daughter Hattie, age 3 1/2 and their son Lemuel S., age 5 months. Burton’s occupation was listed as “Photographer.”

 

Burton Hine, 1875 New York State CensusBurton Hine, Photographer, 1875 New York State CensusBurton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer. Burton Hine, 1875 New York State Census.

 

Sometime between 1875, at the time of the New York census, and circa 1877 Burton gave up his photography business. In 1877-79 Burton Hine was serving as a constable and deputy sheriff for Delaware County. In executing his official enforcement responsibilities, Hine faced numerous challenges, as seen in the following newspaper articles.

 

“Deputy Sheriff Hine commenced selling at auction the goods in the Empire Store, lately occupied by Simpson and Russell, last Thursday. The goods sold low, as a general thing less than the appraisal, but the sales last week amounted to more than $3,000. No sale Monday and Tuesday, but it began again Wednesday forenoon.– Walton Chronicle.” (Delaware Gazette. May 23, 1877.)

 

“On Monday, Deputy-Sheriff Hine attempted to levy on the goods and chattels of J. Wilbur, at the steam mill. Wilbur objected, claiming the property belonged to his wife, and held on to a belt which Hine had hold of. Hine struck Wilbur with the belt. Wilbur swore out a warrant against the sheriff, and had him arrested from assault and battery. Hine waived an examination, and gave bail to appear before the Grand Jury. G. O. Mead and N. G. Eells, were his bondsmen.-Walton Chronicle Jan. 2” (“Delaware County.” Stamford Mirror. January 7, 1879.)

 

In 1879 Burton again changed careers, this time becoming a farmer. “Burton Hine has bought the Duffie farm, late Wm. Weissmer’s; possession to be had Dec. 15th. This farm lies on the river, about three miles below this village, and contains thirty acres of land with good buildings. Consideration $2,250 for the farm, and $350 for personal property on the farm. Mr. Duffie moves into the house which Mr. Hine leaves in this village.” (The Herald. Hancock, NY. December 11, 1879.)

On the 1880 United States census Burton, age 37, was residing in the town of Walton. The household included his wife H. Adelia, age 34; their daughter Hattie J., age 10; and their son Lemuel S., age 5. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

In addition to his business impact on the Walton village Burton Hine was also a prominent and influential civic-minded member of the community. After the Civil War a society of veterans was established with the organization of The Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.). In Delaware County the group operated as the England Post, No. 142, G. A. R. The veterans group conducted a number of reunions around Delaware County beginning in 1880 and taking place annually over the succeeding years. In 1881 Burton was chosen Chairman “for the purpose of initiating a general reunion of Delaware County soldiers during the coming summer.” (Delaware Gazette. March 30, 1881.) The 1883 reunion was held at Windsor, Broome County; the 1884 reunion was held at Unadilla, Otsego County; the 1885 reunion was held at Delhi, Delaware County; and the 1886 reunion was held at Guilford, Chenango County. In 1888 Burton was appointed as Aid-de-camp on the staff of General N. M. Curtiss, Department Commander of the G. A. R.

In 1882 Burton, along with Lewis Marvin, both of Walton, were delegates to the Republican County convention held at Kiff’s Hotel on September 12. They met “for the purpose of electing State and Congressional delegations.” (The Delaware Republican. 1882.) In 1883 Burton served as an Inspector of Election for the town of Walton. As a Walton farmer Burton was active in the Delaware County Milk Producers’ Association, and had served as Secretary. He was elected vice-president of the Walton Farmers’ and Dairymen’s Association at the time of the group’s founding.

In 1883 Burton expanded his land holdings with the purchase of another farm. “Burton Hine has bought of Mrs. John Andrews, her farm of forty-two acres, on Bob’s Brook, town of Walton, for $550. Immediate possession given of the farm, but Mrs. Andrews retains possession of the house and garden until fall.” (Stamford Mirror. May 1, 1883.) Bob’s Brook Road is located off of Route 10, southwest from the village of Walton.

 

"Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street.""Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street." Burton Hine, Photographer.This Burton Hine stereoview titled "Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mead? Street, Walton, looking west from North Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Mead Street, Walton, looking west from North Street."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Mead? Street, Walton, looking west from North Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddc2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

North Street, looking north from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographerNorth Street, looking north from Fitch Street. Burton Hine, photographerThis Burton Hine stereoview titled "North Street, looking north from Fitch Street" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking north from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbc-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"North Street, looking north from Fitch Street."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "North Street, looking north from Fitch Street." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddbc-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

"Townsend Street, looking north." Burton Hine, photographer"Townsend Street, looking north." Burton Hine, photographerThis Burton Hine stereoview titled "Townsend Street, looking north" is from his popular "Views In and About Walton" series.

Burton Hine (1842-1905) was a popular photographer during the late 1860s and 1870s in Delaware County, New York. He served honorably during the Civil War with the 89th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. After leaving the photography business Burton became a sheriff and farmer.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Townsend Street, looking north." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddba-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Townsend Street, looking north."

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. "Townsend Street, looking north." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 - 1930. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ddba-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

On the 1892 New York State census Burton, age 50, was residing in the town of Walton. The household included his wife Adelia H, their daughter Hattie, age 22, and their son Lemuel, age 18. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

On the 1900 United States census Burton, age 58, was residing in the won of Walton. The household included his wife H. Adelia, age 54. The census shows that Burton was born in October 1842 and that Harriet was born in July 1846. The census also shows that H. Adelia had two children, both then living. Burton was listed with an occupation of “Farmer.”

Burton Hine passed away at the age of 62 on April 13, 1905. He had been in poor health for several months before his passing. He was the last of his family of four brothers and one sister to pass away. Upon his passing he left behind his wife Harriet and two children, Lemuel S. Hine of Hamden, New York and Mrs. Harry K. Lewis of Hamden, New York. Harriet Adelia Hine passed away on October 16, 1928. Both Burton and Harriet are buried at Walton Cemetery.

 

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If you should have any additional information, comments or corrections about the photographer Burton Hine please add a comment to this page, or send me an email using the contact page. Where possible, please include any available references. Thank you. 

 


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