Rip Van Winkle, Illustrated by Eric Pape

October 07, 2023  •  Leave a Comment

Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

 

He Taught Them to Fly KitesHe Taught Them to Fly KitesRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

He Taught Them to Fly Kites.

 

A Long Ramble on a Fine Autumnal DayA Long Ramble on a Fine Autumnal DayRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

A long ramble on a fine autumnal day.

 

He Bore on His Shoulders a Stout KegHe Bore on His Shoulders a Stout KegRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.

He bore on his shoulders a stout keg.

 

This illustrated edition of the Rip Van Winkle story was positively reviewed by the Evening Star, of Washington D. C. upon its release in 1925. “On our own ground here with an author who pays to be remembered. We can visit Sleepy Hollow. We can see the places that Irving has made so mellow and soft and whimsically dear to us, a place to which Joseph Jefferson has added much to the original charm set by the author himself, a place also which the pictures of this edition, by Eric Pape, bring out to a new effect of reality mingled with the fancy that Irving himself used to happily in the stories and legends of the Catskills.” (“Selecting Books for the Young.” Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). November 8, 1925.)

 

Illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle portion of the book include:

 

  • Cover design: Chanticleer calling, “Rip Van Winkle! Rip Van Winkle!” (cover)
  • End paper: “At the foot of these mountains the voyager may have descried the light smoke curling up from a village”
  • Washington Irving as he appeared in 1820 (page i)
  • Rip Van Winkle (frontispiece)
  • Sundial (page iii)
  • Diedrich Knickerbocker’s small hair-covered chest, bound with iron, in which letters, valuable papers and deeds were kept; date about 1775 (page v)
  • D. K. – the keys to his papers (page xi)
  • Old night watchman, returning in the early morning after an all night vigil (page xii)
  • Wrought iron door hinge, date about 1750 (page xiii)
  • The tale was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker (page xix)
  • The famous biscuit, with the likeness of Diedrich Knickerbocker (page 1)
  • The Waterloo Medal. Obverse, head of his Grace the Duke of Wellington. Reverse, date; joined hands; emblems of the co-operation of the allied generals (page 2)
  • The Queen Anne farthing. Obverse, head of “Anna Regina.” Reverse, figure of “Britannia” and date (page 3)
  • “I have seen a certificate, taken before a country justice and signed with a cross in the justice’s own handwriting. – D. K.” Stand with Betty lamp, flint, steel and striker, and pocket tinder box. (page 5)
  • “He taught them to fly kites.” (facing page 6)
  • “Morning, noon and night, her tongue was incessantly going.” (page 8)
  • “He would fish all day” (page 11)
  • “He would never refuse to assist a neighbor, even in the roughest toil” (page 15)
  • Utensils commonly used at an inn; wooden sconce with removable irons for holding candles, curly maple trenchers and wooden mug, mortar and pestle, candle molds, and a ball of wick floss (page 17)
  • The tavern sign: “A rubicund portrait of his majesty George the Third” (page 19)
  • “How solemnly they would listen” (page 21)
  • Nicholas Vedder, the landlord of the inn (page 23)
  • Nicholas Vedder’s pipe-rack and portable sconce, candle hook-holder, snuffers and toddy irons. Also smoker’s small tongs, tobacco pouch and pocket fire outfit (page 24)
  • Wrought iron door latch, tulip design, date about 1760 (page 26)
  • “Wolf would look wistfully in his master’s face” (page 27)
  • “A crow wining its solitary flight across the mountain (page 29)
  • “A long ramble on a fine autumnal day” (page 31)
  • The solitary crow (page 33)
  • “He bore on his shoulders a stout keg” (page 35)
  • “Hendric Hudson and his crew. (The people of the Kaatskill never heard a thunder storm without referring to him and his crew at their game of ninepins.) (facing page 38)
  • Wrought iron door latches, lily and tulip design, date about 1745 (page 41)
  • “He met a number of people, but none whom he knew” (page 43)
  • “The roof had fallen in, the windows shattered, and the doors were off their hinges” (page 47)
  • “A flag on which was a singular assemblage of stars and stripes” (page 51)
  • “A sword was held in the hand instead of a sceptre” (page 55)
  • Wrought iron chest-handle and hinges, date about 1740 (page 57)
  • “An old man replied in a thin piping voice” (page 59)
  • Wild purple raspberry (page 61)
  • “The Kaatskill Mountains has always been haunted by strange beings” (page 66)
  • Wrought iron chest-hinge, date about 1770 (page 70)
  • D. K.’s precious chest (page 71)
  • Wrought iron cupboard latch, date about 1760 (page 72)
  • “Kept a kind of vigil there every twenty years” (page 73)
  • D. K. – the key to his papers (page 75)
  • Morning glories or hedge weed (page 77)
  • “Gay castles in the clouds that pass” (page 78)

 

 

Hendrick Hudson and His CrewHendrick Hudson and His CrewRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.
Hendrick Hudson and His Crew.

 

Singular Assemblage of Stars and StripesSingular Assemblage of Stars and StripesRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.
A flag on which was a singular assemblage of stars and stripes.

 

Rip Van WinkleRip Van WinkleRip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, as illustrated by Eric Pape, was published in 1925 by The Macmillan Company of New York. The book contains 46 illustrations for the Rip Van Winkle story, and another 37 illustrations for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow story. The book originally sold for $1.75.
Rip Van Winkle.

 

Frederic L. M. Pape (1870-1938), more commonly known as Eric Pape, was a highly regarded painter, engraver and illustrator. Pape was born and raised in San Francisco, California. He studied art in San Francisco the School of Design and later in Paris under noted artists such as Boulanger, Lefebvre, Constant, Doucet, Blanc and Delance. He then furthered his studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts under famous instructors such as Gerome, Delauney and Jean Paul Laurens. Pape was well traveled, having lived in England, France, Germany, Mexico and Europe. After five years abroad from around 1888 to 1893 Pape returned to the United States in 1894. He taught during 1897 in Boston at the Cowles Art School, which was established by painter Frank Cowles (1839-1928) and operated from 1883 to around 1900.

 

The next year, in 1898, Pape established his own school, the Eric Pape School of Art at Boston, Massachusetts. The school offered “drawing and painting “from life,” separate classes for men and women. Portraiture, still life, water-color, paste, pyrogravure, wood-carving, composition. Illustration, with costume models, pen, wash, gouache, poster and book-cover designing, decorative illustration for books.” The school, soon after its founding, “has been signally successful and quickly recognized as one of the foremost schools of its kind in this country.” (“Representative Young Illustrators: Eric Pape, Illustrator and Painter.” The Art Interchange. Vol. 44, no. 5. May, 1900.) Among the students at his school was N. C. Wyeth, who later published his own highly regarded illustrated version of the Rip Van Winkle story in 1921. The school operated until 1913.

 

Pape’s fine art work had been exhibited at the Paris Salon and at expositions in Munich (1897) Chicago (1893), Cincinnati, Detroit, Omaha (1899), Paris (1900), Buffalo (1901) and St. Louis (1904). Some of his noted paintings include The Spinner of Zeven (1889); The Great Sphinx by Moonlight (1891); The Two Great Eras (1892); The Angel with the Book of Life (1897); Approaching Storm, The Great Dane and Early Morning (1900); and Foam Surges (1902). His illustrative work can be found in many special edition books and illustrated magazine articles of the time.

 

Pape also worked as a stage designer for theater productions, including a showing of Rip Van Winkle in 1925 at the Repertory Theatre in Boston. This version of the timeless classic featured noted American actor Francis Wilson (1854-1935) portraying Rip Van Winkle in an “effective revival of stage classic.” Wilson was an ardent admirer of Joseph Jefferson, who played the role of Rip Van Winkle on stage for over 40 years. Wilson, who at the age of 12 first saw Jefferson in 1870, also authored a biography on Jefferson. In a review of the show, it was noted that “Eric Pape, noted illustrator and scenic artist, has designed and painted special settings of extraordinary beauty for this production.” (“Rip Van Winkle at the Repertory.” The Boston Globe. November 24, 1925.)


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