Edward Lewis – Saugerties, Kingston and Ellenville, NY Photographer (Part 1)

August 26, 2023  •  Leave a Comment

Introduction

 

Edward Lewis operated a popular photography gallery at the village of Saugerties, New York during the late 1860s and at the city of Kingston in Ulster County, New York from the late 1860s to 1883. In addition to his portrait work Lewis issued a wide range of scenic stereoscopic views from throughout the Catskills. From 1883 to 1886 Lewis operated a gallery at the village of Ellenville. After leaving the Catskills region Lewis later established galleries at Nyack, New York and Norwalk, Connecticut.

 

Pulpit Rock, near the House (Overlook Mountain House)Pulpit Rock, near the House (Overlook Mountain House) Pulpit Rock, near the house (Overlook Mountain House).

 

Biography

 

Edward Lewis was born in August 1829 in Chenango County, New York. Chenango County, formed in 1798, is located in the central part of New York State.

 

An advertisement placed by Lewis in 1868 noted that he “had seventeen years experience in Photography, in England and America.” This would mean that Lewis began his photography career around 1851, at 21 years of age. Little more is known at this point about this time period in Lewis’ life.

 

In the late 1860s Lewis was operating as a photographer at the village of Saugerties along the Hudson River. His business was located on Partition Street, next to Van Buskirk’s drug store. In February 1868 Lewis placed the following advertisement in The Saugerties Telegraph.

 

“Photographer.– Notice to the Public. Mr. Lewis respectfully requests his patrons (all who can do so) to call in the early part of the day, as it is impossible for him to wait on all who require his services in the afternoon, consequently many go away without securing the shadow. Morning is decidedly the best time for children, as we are more at leisure and can give them more of our time and attention. Persons wishing large pictures taken should call at about eleven, if possible.”

 

In March 1868 Lewis placed the following advertisement in the local newspaper.

 

“A Treat for the Million. Good Photographs for Everybody. Mr. E. Lewis takes great pleasure in announcing to the people of Saugerties and vicinity that he has taken the Photographic Rooms adjoining Mr. Van Buskirk’s drug store, Partition street, refitted the same, and is now ready for the reception of visitors. Mr. L. having had seventeen years experience in Photography, in England and America, places him in the front ranks of his profession; and he assures the public that no pains or expense will be spared, on his part, to secure fine pictures and give satisfaction to his patrons. All kinds of pictures produced on the shortest notice, from miniature to life size, plain or finished in Oil, Water color or India Ink.

 

Prices from 25 Cts. To $50. Particular attention paid to copying, old pictures enlarged or diminished, and finished as above if required. Give him a call, examine specimens and try his skill. Saugerties, Dec. 16th 1867.”[1]

 

Edward, Lewis, Saugerties, NYEdward, Lewis, Saugerties, NYPhotographer: Edward Lewis
Location: Saugerties, Ulster County, New York
Year: 1867-1868


"A Treat for the Million. Good Photographs for Everybody.

Mr. E. Lewis takes great pleasure in announcing to the people of Saugerties and vicinity, that he has taken the Photographic Rooms adjoining Mr. Van Ruskirk's drug store, Partition street, refitted the same, and is now ready for the reception of visitors. Mr. L. having had seventeen years experience in Photography, in England and America, places him in the front ranks of his profession; and he assures the public that no pains or expense will be spared, on his part, to secure fine pictures and give satisfaction to his patrons. All kinds of pictures produced on the shortest notice, from miniature to life size, plain or finished in Oil, Water color or India Ink.

Prices from 25 Cts to $50.

Particular attention paid to copying, old pictures enlarged or deminished, and finished as above if required. Give him a call, examine specimens and try his skill.

Saugerties, Dec. 16th, 1867."

 

In May of 1868 Lewis placed another advertisement in the local newspaper, thanking the people for Saugerties for their business and announcing some of the new services that he offered.

 

“Photography. Mr. Edw. Lewis begs to return thanks to the inhabitants of Saugerties and vicinity for their very liberal patronage during his stay among them, and hopes by attention to their interests, to merit a continuance of their favors. He would also say that he is now prepared to execute views of private residences, landscapes and all other outdoor photography, both large and stereoscopic, in the best manner, (having recently purchased instruments expressly for that purpose.) Orders from the country solicited and promptly attended to. Specimens at the Gallery. He wishes to call special attention to his India Ink & Water Color Work.

 

Old pictures enlarged in the above styles. Always on hand the largest stock of oval and square frames in town. Plain and fine cases of every variety for small work. Photographs of the different Churches for sale.”[2]

 

In May of 1868 Lewis moved from the village of Saugerties to Kingston, where he leased the photographic rooms that had been recently occupied by George A. Vallet. The people of Saugerties lost a respected member of their community. “In the removal of Mr. Lewis to Kingston, our place loses not only the best artist it ever had, one who was always prompt in his business and courteous to visitors, but also a kind and an agreeable citizen. We feel confident that the people of Kingston will appreciate his skill in the Photographic art and extend him a liberal patronage.”[3]

 

In November 1868 the partnership between Lewis and Edward Jernegan (1841-1922), which operated under the name of “The Kingston Photographic Company,” was dissolved “by mutual consent.” It was agreed that Jernegan would continue the photography business at Saugerties while Lewis would remain in Kingston. Edward Jernegan would go on to prominence in the Saugerties newspaper industry, founding the Saugerties Daily Post in 1877 and the Saugerties Daily Telegraph in 1897.

 

In 1871 Lewis issued a series of 16 stereoscopic views of the newly constructed Overlook Mountain House. Located north of Woodstock near the summit of Overlook Mountain, the Overlook Mountain House first opened its doors to guests in 1871, was destroyed by fire in 1875, was rebuilt and reopened in 1878, only to be destroyed by fire again in 1923. There was an attempted 3rd rebuilding that was never completed, the remains of which are still visible on a hike to the summit of Overlook Mountain.

 

At its height the Overlook Mountain House provided accommodations for approximately 300 guests and offered visitors the latest in modern conveniences and experiences. One of the early advertisements for the Overlook Mountain House, published in 1871, beautifully described its superior accommodations and the mountain setting.

 

“Overlook Mountain House, Catskill Range. J. E. Lasher, Proprietor. This elegant House will be opened to the public early in the season, and will afford a rare treat for the lovers of the Beautiful, the Grand, and the Sublime, who can enjoy the loveliest of scenery in a first-class hotel.

 

The house cost $50,000, and is complete throughout, furnishing accommodations that will please the most fastidious and satisfy the most exacting tastes.

 

The view is unsurpassed not only on the Catskills, but in the country, and combines a grand combination of mountain, valley, river, forest, and cultivated fields. No one who has seen it has failed to speak of it with admiration.

 

It will be found a delightful spot for excursion and picnic parties, for whom special accommodations will be provided.

 

A Stage Line from West Hurley on the R. & O. R. R. will be run by the Proprietor of the Overlook, and will connect with the trains. Guests can also obtain the best of livery establishments at Rondout and Kingston.

 

John E. Lasher, Proprietor. Overlook Mountain House, Woodstock, March 24, 1871.”

 

John E. Lasher (1827-1899), the first proprietor of the Overlook Mountain House, had previously operated the Mansion House at Kingston, New York from after the Civil War until his taking control of the Overlook.

 

In order to promote his new hotel, Lasher invited Lewis to photograph the establishment prior to its official opening on June 15, 1871. “Mr. John Lasher, the lessee of the new hotel on the Overlook, has had Mr. E. Lewis, of Kingston, up there taking views of the house and grounds about it during the past week. The views are to be engraven from the photographs, and used in advertising this beautiful new summer resort. Mr. Lewis has the name of being the best artist in Ulster County.”[4]

 

The imprint on the back of each stereoview included a brief description of the hotel, travel directions and a listing of the 16 different views that were available for purchase.

 

“New Summer Resort in the Catskill Mountains. The OVERLOOK MOUNTAIN HOUSE, 3,800 feet above tide water, on the highest point of the Catskill range, was opened June 15th, 1871. All modern conveniences, including Gas and Telegraph facilities. Reached by Boat or Rail to Rondout; Rondout and Oswego Railroad to West Hurley (9 miles); thence by the Hotel Stages in 3 hours. Overlook Mountain House, Woodstock, Ulster Co., N.Y. John E. Lasher, Proprietor.

 

No. 1. Catskill Mountains from ascent to the Overlook.

No. 2. Overlook Mountain House, Rocks in foreground.

No. 3. Overlook Mountain House, distant view.

No. 4. Overlook Mountain House, near view.

No. 5. South Piazza, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 6. West Piazza, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 7. Parlor, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 8. Dining Room, Overlook Mountain House.

No. 9. View from the ledge in front of the House.

No. 10. Pulpit Rock, near the House.

No. 11. Devil’s Kitchen, near the House.

No. 12. Cleft in Rocks, near the House.

No. 13. Rocky declivity, near the House.

No. 14. Path to the Overlook.

No. 15. Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking east.

No. 16. Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west.

 

The subject published on this card is indicated by a mark under the number and name.

 

ED. LEWIS, Photographer, Kingston, N.Y.”

 

South Piazza, Overlook Mountain HouseSouth Piazza, Overlook Mountain House

South Piazza, Overlook Mountain House.

 

Overlook Mountain House, New Summer Resort in the Catskill MountainsOverlook Mountain House, New Summer Resort in the Catskill Mountains Overlook Mountain House, New Summer Resort in the Catskill Mountains.

 

Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west (Overlook Mountain House)Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west (Overlook Mountain House) Top of the Overlook Cliff, looking west (Overlook Mountain House).

 

The demand for the stereoscopic views of the Overlook Mountain House taken by Lewis, and fellow photographer D. J. Auchmoody, was very strong. One year after the opening of the Overlook Mountain House the Kingston Daily Freeman wrote of the demand and the scenic views available throughout the region.

 

“Stereoscopic views. Our photographic artists are turning the natural beauties of this section to good advantage and are making some fine views of the scenery hereabouts. The Overlook furnishes many good views, which find a ready sale at the Mountain House, Mr. Auchmoody and Mr. Lewis being kept pretty busy just now supplying the demand. Of course few visitors wish to leave the spot without some memento of their visit, and a faithful representation of the scenes they have gazed upon in the shape of a stereoscopic view is as pleasing a reminder as they can have. The landscapes about our own city, sketches of scenery along the Wallkill, Rondout and Esopus creeks also are visited by these artists and their beauties transferred to the negative. The wild scenes of Olive and Shandaken and among the Shawangunk Mountains also often form the subject of the picture, and in fact so numerous are the scenes of interest hereabouts that a person can gather a very extensive collection of stereoscopic views comprising only scenes in our own immediate neighborhood.”[5]

 

March 24, 1871, Saugerties Telegraph

 

“Lewis’ National Photograph Gallery, Cor. Wall and John Streets, Kingston, N.Y. Photographs in every desirable Style of the art. Rembrandt Effects or Shadow Pictures a Specialty. Old pictures copied and enlarged to any size and, if desired, Finished in Oil, India Ink, or Water Colors, by a first-class Artist on the premises.

 

Specimens of Finished Work on Exhibition at the Gallery. I shall the coming season give my personal attention to Out-Door Work, On plates from Stereoscopic size to 14x17 inches (10x12 inch plate is largest size used by me heretofore.)

 

Views of Residences, Public Buildings, Churches, Mills, Factories, Blocks of Buildings, Streets, Quarries, Groups, Horses, Cattle, & c., &c.

 

All orders for the above will receive prompt attention and be filled in turn at moderate prices.

 

EDW. LEWIS, P. O. Box 181, Kingston, N.Y.”

 

April 14, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

“E. Lewis, photographer, takes splendid pictures. He is going to Big Indian in a few days, to take views of that delicious country and also of the locomotive John C. Brodhead.”

 

May 6, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

“Lewis, the photographer, has a gallery of fine views, taken from home scenes. The best, probably, is the residence of W. B. Crane at Ponckhockie.”

 

May 12, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

“At the Stereoscopic exhibition of last week many home views, principally taken by Lewis, were shown upon the canvas. This exhibition was quite a success, and not at all marred because the scenes were generally shown wrong side up, as they were always presented anew in their proper position. Besides, this gave the audiences a better chance to view them in a manner they probably could never do by visiting the localities represented, unless indeed they, looked at them clown-fashion by standing on their heads.”       

 

June 9, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

“Lewis’s Gallery contains a fine photograph of the steamer “Thomas Cornell.” This picture is almost perfection, even the shadows made by the wires that brace the smoke stacks, being plainly visible.”

 

July 21, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

“In Lewis’s gallery there are some fine views of the Overlook Mountain House. The piazza of the hotel is crowded with the party from this place and Rondout, who were on the mountain last week Wednesday. Their faces can be readily recognized, and altogether the picture is a good one.”

 

July 28, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

“Lewis says he might have taken a much better picture of the Overlook House had not the visitors felt so funny. It seemed very hard for them to keep their heads still.”

 

September 22, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

At the Ulster County Fair: “Mr. Lewis had some very fine photographs, one of his wife being a brilliant specimen of art, and Dr. Loughran’s a speaking likeness and a splendid triumph of the artist.”

 

October 20, 1871, The Rondout Freeman

 

                “A large new gallery of pictures is displayed by Lewis at his gallery on John street.”

 

May 27, 1872 advertisement, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Photographic Card. As making pictures of young children has become a very important branch of the business, a few hints on the subject will not be amiss as a guide to those interested.

 

Mothers who wish to have babies appear in white should dress them in light blue, pink or solferino, nicely trimmed or embroidered. All blue, or colors mixed with blue, are photographically speaking white, accordingly as the blue more or less predominates.

 

As children are often troublesome and restless and hard to get a picture of, and as I do not wish to let your work leave my Gallery, or be bothered with impossibilities ever which I have no control, I kindly request mothers to bear in mind that babies should be brought to the Gallery between ten and two o’clock, the earlier the better. The reasons for this are obvious, to wit:

 

First:– The child is not so restless, the mother is in better humor in the forenoon, the artist is pretty likely to have had his breakfast (we seldom even get dinner) and is not so impatient, hence baby is more likely to get a good picture.

 

Second:– A photographer wishes to make money, or at least a living, as well as other people, and don’t like to bother with babies if the gallery is full of ladies and gentlemen, who are waiting for sittings, and see no end to the baby-rattle and cry.

 

Third:– The light is not so powerful in the afternoon as in the morning. The acting power of the sun’s rays are stronger and more active from sunrise to noon, than from noon to sundown. It would be well for adults to bear this in mind who want sittings for themselves.

 

We call special attention to our Shadow Pictures, Berlin Heads, Porcelain Pictures, Victoria Cards, New Size. Old Pictures copied and painted in Oil, Water Colors, India Ink and Crayon.

 

Stereoscopic views of Places of Interest and Scenery of Ulster County, Views of Public Buildings and streets in Kingston. A Series of views of the Rondout Creek, Esopus Creek, Wallkill Creek with its Falls, the Esopus at Glenerie, Overlook Mountain, Shandaken Mountain Scenery, Interiors of Cement Quarries, & c. Also a full line of foreign & Miscellaneous Views.

 

A Large Variety of Oval and Square Frames, Velvet Cases, Passapartouts, Stereoscopes, & c.

 

E. LEWIS, Cor. Wall & John sts., Over Tappen, Burhans & Webster’s Store, Kingston.”

 

September 23, 1872, The Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis has again been out in the country, and has returned home with many fine views of Rosendale and High Falls. His views of the high bridge at Rosendale and the aqueduct at High Falls are especially fine. Lewis is improving in stereoscopic views; the aqueduct is one of the best pictures of lights and shadows we have ever seen.”

 

September 26, 1872, The Daily Freeman

 

“Miss Sahler’s Wax Work. Miss Sahler’s Wax Work which took the first premiums at the Horticultural Fair, will be for sale at Lewis’ Photograph Gallery, Kingston, for two weeks. She will also keep on hand stereoscopic views of the same. September 24th, 1872.”

 

September 16, 1873, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis, the photographer, has finished a splendid full length picture of Rev. Father Dougherty in his priestly robes, which is not only a perfect likeness but a fine work of the photographic art. The picture is to be disposed of by chances, $300 worth of tickets being sold, the money thus raised to be used in purchasing books for St. Joseph’s Sunday School.”

 

August 13, 1873, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“E. Lewis, photographer on Wall street, with his wife and daughter, have been rusticating for some time at Stamford. Mr. Lewis went fishing in Odell Lake and caught half a bushel of pickerel. He also took a trip up the Neversink; walked fourteen miles up the stream and back. The trout fishing was very good.”

 

October 24, 1873, The Daily Freeman

 

“A young lady from Shokan came to Lewis’ photograph gallery the other day. She had to leave home in a hurry, she said, because she wanted to catch the train and had to go away ‘round on account of the bridge being down. Consequently her toilet wasn’t arranged in the most complete and satisfactory manner. When she arrived at Lewis’, where she was to sit for a picture, she furnished lots of amusement for the customers waiting in the reception by undoing a vast number of packages and proceeding to get herself up in wonderful style. Of course the young ladies who were waiting for an opportunity to sit blessed her for taking up a couple of hours rigging herself.”

 

January 14, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis, the photographer uptown, has a new lot of handsome faces finished according to his patent and hanging in a case on John street. It’s strange how often the girls whose pictures are in that case walk down that street, and what a wonder of excuses they do make to stop and look ‘just once.’”

 

May 30, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis, the Photographer of Kingston, has secured the services of Walter C. North for this week only at his gallery, and will be pleased to see his Rondout friends and all others wishing the benefit of his extensive experience. Call and see his new styles.”

 

June 1, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“E. Lewis has taken some fine pictures called the “Rustics.” One of a youth mounted on a velocipede is natural as life.”

 

June 29, 1874, The Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis has a new outdoor gallery of pictures. They are called rustic pictures and represent views of the sea-side, hunting and fishing scenes, with now and then a very handsome little boy or girl thrown in.”

 

December 18, 1874, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis, the uptown Photographer, requests his patrons, all who conveniently can, to call for sittings early in the day, as it is impossible to accommodate all applicants these short days. Old Sol refuses to give light enough for negative making shortly after 3 o’clock p.m.”

 

The 1875 New York state census listed 43-year-old Edward Lewis living in the First Ward of the city of Kingston in Ulster County New York. Also living in the household was his 29-year-old wife Mary A. Lewis, his 4-year-old daughter Nina A. Lewis and a 22-year-old servant by the name of Bridget Mahar. Edward was listed as having been born in Chenango County, New York. He was listed with an occupation of photographer.

 

Corner of Wall and North Front Sts. [View of a Tailor Shop.]Corner of Wall and North Front Sts. [View of a Tailor Shop.] Corner of Wall and North Front Sts. [View of a Tailor Shop].

 

View of a Church in Kingston, N.Y.View of a Church in Kingston, N.Y. View of a Church in Kingston, N.Y.

 

May 14, 1875, The Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis, the photographer, went trout fishing in Little Shandaken Thursday, and caught about sixty.”

 

December 24, 1875, The Daily Freeman

 

“Just The Thing For The Holidays. Colored Enamel Photographs. These beautiful pictures represent the natural colors with a depth and richness equal to the finest colored porcelain, and at a comparatively small price. Come and see them, and those who wish sittings come early as there is no light for negative making after 3 o’clock these short days. Lewis’ Gallery, Cor. Wall & John Sts., Kingston, N.Y.”

 

December 28, 1875, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“While Lewis the photographer on Wall street was driving his fast bay towards Flatbush Sunday afternoon, the animal in a playful mood made a spring and put one of its hind feet over the cross-bar of the wagon. Not being able to get it back the equine started to run and broke one of the shafts. Lewis reined the steed to the side of the road and the wagon overturned, which threw the occupants, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis and their little daughter, to the ground, and the horse went on, bringing up under a shed. No one was injured to any great extent.”

 

February 22, 1876, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“E. Lewis, photographer, has taken twenty-eight negatives of the most prominent actors in the uptown Esther performance. They are fine pictures.”

 

October 21, 1876 advertisement, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“A Card to my Patrons. Until further notice I will make card photographs in our best style for $2.00 Per Dozen, Cabinet Size $5.00. Former Price $3.00 and $6.00.

 

The public has had an opportunity for the last eight years to compare our photographs with the work of other photographers of this city; also New York and other cities. We abide their decision.

 

In reducing prices I would have my patrons bear in mind that the quality of work will remain the same as heretofore STRICTLY FIRST CLASS.

 

I call attention to our beautiful style of picture, the plain and colored enamel which of late we have greatly improved.

 

Persons wishing large, colored pictures of themselves or friends would do well to examine our work and prices and not be taken in by traveling humbugs, we Warrant All Work To Give Satisfaction.

 

A good stock of Picture Frames Always On Hand, and we will not be undersold.

 

Respectfully yours, ED. LEWIS, Kingston, N.Y., Cor. Wall & John Streets, over Dimmic & Webster’s.”

 

October 30, 1876, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Lewis, the uptown photographer, is making a specialty of plain and colored enamels, which are really the finest pictures a person can have taken. They are perfect and life like, and will last forever. Several military gentlemen have had pictures finished in this style by Lewis, which are truly magnificent specimens of art. A more appropriate present cannot be found, and the recipient cannot fail to prize it as something invaluable.”

 

November 20, 1876, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“A Fine Piece of Work. We were shown some resolutions the other day on the death of John Vanderlyn, that were printed in ink by our young Kingston artist Mr. E. Youngs. We have seldom seen anything of the kind that has surpassed it in the beauty of design and originality. In the center of the resolutions was a beautiful and life-like photograph of the artist Vanderlyn, which reflects great credit on the photographer, Mr. E. Lewis of Kingston.”

 

December 4, 1876, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“E. Lewis, photographer, has finished the pictures of the Supplies house that was blown up by gunpowder, and they are fine pictures, giving a perfect view of the premises, which will be of great benefit to the jury when the case is tried.”

 

March 7, 1878, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“The attractive advertisement of Lewis, the photographer, elsewhere speaks for itself, and The Freeman cordially commends it to the attention of its readers. Mr. Lewis’ artistic skill needs no praises, and should receive the patronage it deserves.”

 

March 8, 1878, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“For a Short Time Only. In making this great reduction in our prices we hesitate, not because we are unwilling to bear our share of the burden of business depression, but fear that some may think there will be a corresponding reduction in quality. Be assured, however, that we shall give you the best work that we can produce.

 

                “Card Photographs. One Dollar Per Dozen. Cabinet Size $3 Per Dozen.

 

Lewis’ Photograph Gallery, Cor. Wall & John Sts., City of Kingston, N.Y.”

 

June 12, 1878, The Daily Freeman

 

“There is a very nice crayon portrait of a child, by Lewis, the uptown photographer, on exhibition in A. A. Crosby & Company’s show window on the corner of Union avenue and The Strand.”

 

July 1, 1878, Daily Post (Saugerties)

 

“Mr. Edward Lewis, the celebrated photographer of Kingston, was in town yesterday. Mr. Lewis informs us that he is turning out finer work than ever at his gallery, and is much pleased at the many calls he receives from his Saugerties customers.”

 

July 1, 1878, Daily Post (Saugerties)

 

“Lewis in Kingston is making photographs for $1 per dozen at his gallery. He don’t slight the work on account of the price either.”

 

July 16, 1878, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Photographs $1 per Dozen. Finely retouched heads $1.50 per dozen. Crayon, Water Color and India Ink Pictures by the best artists at bottom prices. Ed. Lewis, Kingston, N.Y.”

 

July 17, 1878, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Mr. Lewis, the photographer uptown, has several pictures lately taken that are as fine as can be seen anywhere along the river. One of these is a water color portrait of Mrs. William Hermance, the likeness of which is excellent, while the coloring shows the touch of an artist. There are also large pictures in crayon of Mr. and Mrs. S. Bernstein, which were given as presents to their newly married son. One great excellence of the pictures of Mr. Lewis is the graceful positions in which he places the person whose likeness is being taken.”

 

November 11, 1878, The Daily Freeman

 

“Photographs.–Twelve for $1.00. Finely retouched heads $1.50 per dozen. A fine new stock of velvet and other frames at Bottom Prices, at Lewis’ (up-town) – Kingston.”

 

June 23, 1879, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“E. Lewis, the photographer of Wall street, has made from a small photograph enlarged a very fine life-size picture in water colors of Miss Kittie Sahler, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Artemass Sahler, who died so suddenly a few months since.”

 

June 23, 1879, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Rev. John Johns has had a fine photograph taken of the Clinton Avenue Methodist Episcopal church and parsonage, and also a photograph of every pastor who has been associated with the church from the time of its formation in 1855, they being Revs. R. H. Chalker, F. L. Prentice, W. H. Evans, W. C. Smith, W. G. Browning, L. W. Peck, T. W. Chadwick, D. Buck, S. W. Knapp, W. H. Mickle, J. E. Gorse, A. K. Sandford and John Johns. The pictures were taken by E. Lewis of the upper part of the city, and they are framed, the church and parsonage in the center, and the photographs of the dominies in a circle around them.”

 

June 30, 1879, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“Mr. Lewis, the photographer, has taken some very handsome pictures of the audience room of the Second Reformed church. Since the improvements, this room is one of the finest in the city.”

 

July 9, 1879, Kingston Daily Freeman

 

“A number of the graduating class of the Kingston Academy, have had their pictures taken by Lewis. The ladies being dressed in white, the photographs are a little out of the ordinary style and certainly are very fine, and the objects handsome accordingly.”

 

In July of 1879, B Company, 20th Battalion went to the hamlet of Phoenicia for “the purpose of camping out four days.” “While in camp Mr. E. Lewis, the Wall street photographer, will go up at the request of the company and take a number of views of the camp, of the men on parade, and also of the Tremper House, and as much of the surrounding scenery as he can. Mr. Lewis will not take a poor picture, and so if he takes any at all, it can be depended upon that it will be well worth purchasing.”[6]

 

To be continued next week . . .

 


[1] Saugerties Telegraph (Saugerties, New York). March 6, 1868.

[2] Saugerties Telegraph (Saugerties, New York). May 8, 1868.

[3] Saugerties Telegraph (Saugerties, New York). May 22, 1868.

[4] Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York). March 24, 1871.

[5] Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York). August 27, 1872.

[6] Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York). July 10, 1879.

 


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