Patriotism

January 27, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery in Kingston, New York, the 16-foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their military service during the Civil War. The 120th New York Infantry unit was led by General George H. Sharpe (1828-1900), a prominent member of the Old Dutch Church parish, and contained many men from the church. The distinguished unit fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Appomattox Court House, which are but a few of their many battles.

 

Following the Civil War, General Sharpe erected the statue in honor of the men of his command. The statue depicts “the figure of a young and beautiful woman who stands in a graceful attitude on top of the pedestal holding aloft a flag. The pedestal is of red granite from Stony Creek, Conn., and is made of the same kind of stone as that used in the construction of the statue of the Goddess of Liberty, in New York Harbor." (Kingston Daily Freeman, October 17, 1896) The statue was dedicated on October 17, 1896. The statue was created by sculptor Byron M. Pickett (1834-1907) and cast at the foundry of M. J. Power of New York City. The statue was restored in 1996 by Coryat Casting Company.

 

One plaque on the base of the statue contains an approximation of the Great Seal of the United States, which includes the United States motto of “E Pluribus Unum.” Translated from Latin, the motto means “Out of many, one.”

 

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their militaPatriotismStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their military service during the Civil War. The 120th New York Infantry unit was led by General George H. Sharpe (1828-1900), a prominent member of the Old Dutch Church parish, and contained many men from the church. The distinguished unit fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Appomattox Court House, which are but a few of their many battles.

Following the Civil War, General Sharpe erected the statue in honor of the men of his command. The statue depicts “the figure of a young and beautiful woman who stands in a graceful attitude on top of the pedestal holding aloft a flag. The pedestal is of red granite from Stony Creek, Conn., and is made of the same kind of stone as that used in the construction of the statue of the Goddess of Liberty, in New York Harbor." (Kingston Daily Freeman, October 17, 1896) The statue was dedicated on October 17, 1896. The statue was created by sculptor Byron M. Pickett (1834-1907) and cast at the foundry of M. J. Power of New York City. The statue was restored in 1996 by Coryat Casting Company.

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their militaE pluribus unumStockade District, Kingston, Ulster County

Standing in the southeast corner of the Old Dutch Church cemetery, the 16 foot bronze war monument entitled “Patriotism” commemorates the soldiers of the 120th New York State Infantry and their military service during the Civil War. The 120th New York Infantry unit was led by General George H. Sharpe (1828-1900), a prominent member of the Old Dutch Church parish, and contained many men from the church. The distinguished unit fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Appomattox Court House, which are but a few of their many battles.

Following the Civil War, General Sharpe erected the statue in honor of the men of his command. The statue depicts “the figure of a young and beautiful woman who stands in a graceful attitude on top of the pedestal holding aloft a flag. The pedestal is of red granite from Stony Creek, Conn., and is made of the same kind of stone as that used in the construction of the statue of the Goddess of Liberty, in New York Harbor." (Kingston Daily Freeman, October 17, 1896) The statue was dedicated on October 17, 1896. The statue was created by sculptor Byron M. Pickett (1834-1907) and cast at the foundry of M. J. Power of New York City. The statue was restored in 1996 by Coryat Casting Company.

The plaque contains an approximation of the Great Seal of the United States, which includes the Unites States motto of “E Pluribus Unum.” Translated from Latin, the motto means “Out of many, one.”

 


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